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Bend/Central-Eastern Oregon News Releases for Sat. Sep. 26 - 9:59 pm
Sat. 09/26/20
Aircraft assisting in wildfire recovery (Photo)
Oregon Civil Air Patrol - 09/26/20 7:40 PM
Cadet 1st Lt. Joshua Vanrenterghem, part of a ground team taking photographs not easily captured by aircrews, keeps a detailed log of his three-member team’s mission.
Cadet 1st Lt. Joshua Vanrenterghem, part of a ground team taking photographs not easily captured by aircrews, keeps a detailed log of his three-member team’s mission.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1184/138516/thumb_CLt_Vanrenterghem_keeping_a_detailed_log_of_the_sorties_(2).jpg

SALEM, Ore. (Sept. 26, 2020) – Aircraft are crisscrossing Oregon to help in wildfire recovery, thanks to highly trained volunteers from Civil Air Patrol.

As wildfires are being contained around Oregon, state and federal emergency leaders are seeking information on damage caused by fires that have scorched almost 1 million acres this year. Aircrews and teams on the ground are photographing key infrastructure in the fire zones, using high-resolution cameras that can produce detailed photographs.

Today – the 10th day of CAP’s wildfire response - pilots will fly over the Riverside, Beachie Creek, Archie Creek and Holiday Farm fires. Airborne photographers will submit their images to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and Oregon Emergency Management (OEM) staff for evaluation.

Another four teams responded in vehicles from McMinnville, Wilsonville, Eugene and Medford, deployed to assess damage and take ground-level photos of facilities accessible by road.

The Oregon Wing has helped federal, state and local officials with aerial photography on many occasions. One such project was flooding in Salem, where CAP images helped city leaders determine the extent of flooding and what facilities needed repair. Oregon’s CAP volunteers also monitored highway and airport traffic during the total eclipse Aug. 21, 2017, relaying information to the state departments of transportation and aviation.

The Oregon Wing’s 290 adult volunteers vigorously train to FEMA standards each year to be ready to help in emergencies. They help in searches for missing aircraft and missing hikers as well as during natural disasters. The wing also has 247 youth members, who train in leadership, character development, physical fitness and citizenship. Many also train in emergency services to assist with ground search and rescue and detection of emergency signals emitted by aircraft in distress.

About Civil Air Patrol
Established in 1941, Civil Air Patrol is the official auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force and as such is a member of its Total Force. In its auxiliary role, CAP operates a fleet of 560 single-engine Cessna aircraft and 1,944 small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS) and performs about 90% of continental U.S. inland search and rescue missions as tasked by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center.

As a nonprofit organization, CAP plays a leading role in aerospace education using national academic standards-based STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education. Members also serve as mentors to nearly 25,000 young people participating in CAP’s Cadet Programs. One of the premier public service organizations in America, CAP benefits the nation with an estimated economic impact of $209 million annually.

Often using innovative cellphone forensics and radar analysis software, CAP was credited by the AFRCC with saving 129 lives so far in fiscal 2020. CAP’s 60,000 members also perform homeland security, disaster relief and drug interdiction missions at the request of federal, state and local agencies.

Visit www.orwg.cap.gov, www.CAP.News or www.GoCivilAirPatrol.com for more information.




Attached Media Files: Cadet 1st Lt. Joshua Vanrenterghem, part of a ground team taking photographs not easily captured by aircrews, keeps a detailed log of his three-member team’s mission. , First Lt. Jonathan Ritchie, an Oregon Wing pilot, had conducted several flights in the last 10 days to help provide aerial photography of wildfire damage. , (Counter-clockwise from left) First Lts. Nani Blyleven of Eugene and Jonathan Ritchie of Hillsboro and Col. William Ray of Banks are ready for takeoff.

Shooting in East Redmond, Person of Interest Sought (Photo)
Redmond Police Dept. - 09/26/20 7:14 PM
Carlos Lopez
Carlos Lopez
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/6157/138515/thumb_CARLOS_LOPEZ.JPG

On Saturday September 26, 2020, at approximately 10:00 am, the Redmond Police Department, Oregon State Police, Bend Police Department, Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, Crook County Sheriff’s Office responded to a report of a male who had been shot with a firearm on undeveloped land owned by Deschutes County within the Redmond city limits.  The location was in the vicinity of Highway 126 East and SE Sherman Road, an area commonly occupied by homeless encampments.  The victim, 31-year-old male with no address, was transported by a friend to Redmond St. Charles Medical Center.  He was later airlifted with serious, but non-life-threatening injuries, to St. Charles Bend. 

During the investigation 55-year-old Carlos Lopez, with no address, was identified as a person of interest.  Mr. Lopez is described as being approximately 5’10”, 157-pound Hispanic male with short hair and a mustache.  He was last seen wearing blue jeans and a black shirt.  The Redmond Police Department is asking for the public’s assistance in locating Carlos Lopez. 

If you have information on his whereabouts please call 911.  Mr. Lopez should be considered armed and dangerous.  We are also asking for anybody with information regarding this incident to call us through dispatch, 541-693-6911.

The Redmond Police Department would like to thank the Oregon State Police, Bend Police Department, Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, Crook County Sheriff’s Office, Central Oregon Emergency Response Team and Dispatch 911 for their assistance in this investigation.  Please follow us on Facebook for investigation updates. 




Attached Media Files: Carlos Lopez

2020 Oregon Wildfire Response and Recovery Update - Sept. 26 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 09/26/20 2:37 PM
2020-09/3986/138512/Holiday_Farm_Fire_21_Sept_04.jpg
2020-09/3986/138512/Holiday_Farm_Fire_21_Sept_04.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/3986/138512/thumb_Holiday_Farm_Fire_21_Sept_04.jpg

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfires 2020 daily release to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. See today's Wildfire Response and Recovery update here.

Please direct any media inquiries to the Joint Information Center at 503-373-7872 or e.info@state.or.us">fire.info@state.or.us.

 

PHOTO CAPTIONS:

Oregon Department of Forestry Press Information Officer Marcus Kauffman clears a downed tree at the Holiday Farm Fire. (Photo by Dan Morrison)




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/3986/138512/Holiday_Farm_Fire_21_Sept_04.jpg

Oregon reports 277 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 4 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 09/26/20 12:00 PM

September 26, 2020

Oregon reports 277 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 4 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed four more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 546, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 277 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 32,581.

The new cases are in the following counties: Baker (2), Benton (1), Clackamas (24), Columbia (3), Coos (4), Crook (1), Deschutes (16), Douglas (4), Hood River (3), Jackson (16), Jefferson (5), Josephine (1), Lane (44), Lincoln (3), Linn (12), Malheur (8), Marion (31), Multnomah (33), Polk (7), Umatilla (14), Union (3), Wallowa (2), Wasco (7), Washington (31), and Yamhill (2).

Oregon’s 543rd COVID-19 death is a 77-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Aug. 15 and died on Sept. 23, at Portland Adventist Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 544th COVID-19 death is a 44-year-old woman in Malheur County who tested positive on Sept. 21 and died on Sept. 25. Place of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 545th COVID-19 death is an 84-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Sept. 22 and died on Sept. 24, in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 546th COVID-19 death is a 75-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Aug.16 and died on Sept. 24, at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

 

See table below for total cases, deaths, and negative tests by county.

County

Cases1

Total deaths2

Negative tests3

Baker

94

2

1752

Benton

310

6

13175

Clackamas

2398

61

60789

Clatsop

204

0

5515

Columbia

165

1

6942

Coos

156

0

6804

Crook

62

1

2554

Curry

31

0

1789

Deschutes

825

12

29466

Douglas

227

4

12695

Gilliam

8

0

276

Grant

9

0

890

Harney

12

0

808

Hood River

251

0

4971

Jackson

1139

5

33152

Jefferson

529

8

4690

Josephine

198

2

11792

Klamath

280

2

10116

Lake

32

0

877

Lane

1185

17

63598

Lincoln

481

13

8649

Linn

519

13

16370

Malheur

1617

23

5197

Marion

4658

94

47452

Morrow

498

6

1738

Multnomah

7113

137

141020

Polk

529

15

8876

Sherman

18

0

355

Tillamook

52

0

3040

Umatilla

2962

41

13033

Union

446

2

3592

Wallowa

30

1

980

Wasco

289

3

5013

Washington

4497

60

90985

Wheeler

0

0

163

Yamhill

757

13

16996

Total

32,581

546

636,090

1This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases.

3This includes cases who test negative and are not epi-linked to a confirmed case.


Fri. 09/25/20
Fatal Crash on Hwy 26 - Wasco County
Oregon State Police - 09/25/20 5:51 PM

On Friday, September 25, 2020 at approximately 12:21 A.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 26 near milepost 75.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Subaru Impreza, operated by Michael Wynne (28) of Fallbrook, CA. was westbound when it left the roadway and struck several trees.

Wynne sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

OSP was assisted by Warm Springs Police Department, Warm Springs Fire Department, and ODOT.


United States Attorney Statement Regarding Ongoing Violence In Portland
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 09/25/20 5:18 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.— Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon, provides the below statement on ongoing violence in Portland:

“This nation’s most successful movement for racial equality and justice was led by a man dedicated to non-violent principles. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. believed in nonviolence, winning his opponents’ friendship and understanding without humiliation, and he held a deep faith in the future. His aspirations for racial justice unquestionably remain unfinished, but his philosophy on how to achieve it remains just as relevant today.

George Floyd’s death has forced law enforcement and the justice system to closely examine our work and has led our society to ask critical questions. For more than 100 consecutive nights, Portland has been the center of large demonstrations and protests. Peaceful protests, public dialogue, and ongoing legislative and policy reviews at every level are essential to identifying solutions and bringing about meaningful and positive changes. Civility and respect are key elements to this process.

By contrast, there has been nothing civil, respectful, or positive about the nightly violent and destructive protests in Portland, Oregon. On many nights, after peaceful demonstrations end, violent agitators have physically attacked police officers and firefighters, damaged buildings, and repeatedly attempted to set public buildings on fire. These agitators include not just local residents but people who have travelled from out of state. 

On several occasions in August, demonstrations were held during the day where groups with opposing ideologies clashed and engaged in physical violence against one another. Following one of these political rallies, a man was shot and killed. Most recently, acts of violence towards law enforcement and first responders include a Portland firefighter being shot in the chest with a steel ball bearing launched from an arm-mounted slingshot, a man dousing several police officers with high-powered bear deterrent spray, a man punching a female police officer in the face, and a woman striking a police officer in the head from behind with a wooden shield.

This violent and senseless criminal conduct does nothing to promote meaningful or positive change. It forces the focus away from racial justice, instills fear in our community, and deters visitors. It is destroying the fabric of a city and a state that we love.

As a direct consequence of this criminal behavior and the media attention it generates, this community must now deal with the threat of even more outsiders traveling to Portland to participate in what they’ve been watching on social media and television for weeks. This too is not a new phenomenon for Portlanders. In August 2019, after a summer of violent clashes between opposing protest groups, several groups put out national calls for supporters to travel to Portland to join in a citywide melee.

Fortunately, despite hundreds of people answering this call and traveling to Portland, the outstanding work of the Portland Police Bureau and other local law enforcement agencies kept opposing groups mostly separated and violence to a minimum. The city now faces a similar scenario for Saturday, September 26th where numerous groups with opposing ideologies are gathering in the Portland area

This comes at a time when our community and state continue to grapple with the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, a major uptick in gun violence, and, now, massive wildfires burning across the state. Already limited public safety resources are fatigued and stretched thin. Our community deserves an end to the violence. Together, we need to call out violent agitators on the right and the left and stand up for civility.

Local residents and anyone traveling to Portland with the intent to commit violence are on notice. There will be consequences for acts of violence. The U.S. Attorney’s Office is committed to prosecuting people who impede or assault law enforcement officers, damage federal property, and set fire to buildings. Make no mistake: those who commit violence in the name of protest, will be investigated, arrested, prosecuted, and face prison time. Already more than 100 people have been arrested and more than 80 people are facing federal charges related to protest violence.

Our office will work closely with our law enforcement partners, including the FBI, to monitor criminal activity, and will bring federal charges where appropriate. We are committed to supporting our community and will help our law enforcement partners perform their essential public safety duties.”

# # #




Attached Media Files: Oregon US Attorney Statement Regarding Ongoing Portland Violence

Heceta Beach health advisory lifted September 25
Oregon Health Authority - 09/25/20 5:00 PM

Sept. 25, 2020

Heceta Beach health advisory lifted September 25

Portland, Ore. -- The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) today lifted a public health advisory for contact with marine water at Heceta Beach, located in Lane County. The health authority issued the advisory Sept. 22 after water samples showed higher than normal levels of fecal bacteria in ocean waters.

Results from later samples taken by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) showed lower bacteria levels. Contact with the water no longer poses a higher-than-normal risk. However, officials recommend staying out of large pools on the beach that are frequented by birds, and runoff from those pools, because the water may contain increased bacteria from fecal matter.

State officials continue to encourage other recreational activities at all Oregon beaches, suggesting only that water contact be avoided when advisories are in effect.

Since 2003 state officials have used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state agencies participating in this program are OHA, DEQ and the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

For more information, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0440, or call the OHA toll-free information line at 877-290-6767.

# # #


Snake River Correctional Institution reports in-custody death
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 09/25/20 4:30 PM

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody (AIC) died on September 25, 2020. He was incarcerated at the Snake River Correctional Institution and passed away at a local hospital. He tested positive for COVID-19. He was between 65 and 75 years old. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified, and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death. This is the eighth AIC to die who tested positive for COVID-19.

For more information on COVID-19 cases inside Oregon’s prisons, please visit DOC’s COVID-19 website. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,000 adults in custody who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state.

Institutions continue to clean and disinfect numerous times a day. DOC asks AICs to report symptoms of COVID to medical staff. Posters are in all DOC institutions encouraging individuals to maintain proper hygiene and to uphold appropriate social distancing to the extent possible. Health screening processes are in place before staff are allowed to enter facilities. Visiting remains closed until further notice.

DOC requires employees and AICs to wear masks if they cannot maintain six feet of social distancing. Wearing masks is mandatory at all times in health services areas, some work areas, and in food services areas. Cloth masks have been provided to AICs and staff. If an AIC becomes ill and exhibits flu like symptoms, then CDC and OHA guidance for supportive care are followed.

Prior to the COVID-19 crisis, DOC issued a press release when an AIC passed away. This notification would include the person’s name, county of conviction, sentence length, and date of death. However, no cause of death would be listed because the Medical Examiner makes that determination. In order to balance the desire for transparency with our legal obligation to protect personal health information, we have changed the AIC death notification process when someone dies who has tested positive for COVID-19. DOC is working with the Oregon Health Authority to publish COVID-19 related data and information on the OHA website.

####


Vermont Man Accused Of Repeatedly Assaulting Police Officers During Civil Disorder In Portland
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 09/25/20 3:45 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams announced today that a White River Junction, Vermont man has been charged with repeatedly charging at police officers while holding a shield as officers were engaged in lawful crowd dispersal during a civil disorder event.

 

            A federal grand jury in Portland, Oregon has returned a one-count indictment charging Charles Randolph Comfort, 24 with Civil Disorder.

 

According to court documents, during the late evening of June 25, 2020, a group of individuals blocked traffic on NE Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard and NE Emerson near Portland Police Bureau’s (PPB) North Precinct. Dumpsters were taken by members of the crowd from nearby businesses and rolled into the streets and fireworks were thrown over the barricade on NE Emerson Street at the officers stationed there. An unlawful assembly was declared in the early morning hours of June 26, 2020 and PPB made repeated public address announcements telling the group to leave the area.

 

 A PPB Rapid Response Team officer was assisting with moving the crowd that was in the middle of NE MLK Blvd and observed Charles Randolph Comfort carrying a black shield which he repeatedly used as he charged at officers as they were attempting to disperse the crowd.  Upon refusing to leave the area, Comfort was placed under arrest where he actively attempted to pull away and kicked a PPB officer multiple times.

 

            Charles Randolph Comfort made his initial appearance in federal court today before U.S. Magistrate Judge Youlee Yim You. He was arraigned, pleaded not guilty, and ordered released pending a jury trial.

 

            The FBI and PPB investigated this case. It is being prosecuted by an Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon. An indictment is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

# # #




Attached Media Files: Comfort Indictment Final

Civil Air Patrol Resumes Oregon Fire Flights (Photo)
Oregon Civil Air Patrol - 09/25/20 3:45 PM
Lt Col David Rudawitz is here at the Oregon Emergency Management facility in Salem helping to coordinate CAP's activities with FEMA and OEM staff.
Lt Col David Rudawitz is here at the Oregon Emergency Management facility in Salem helping to coordinate CAP's activities with FEMA and OEM staff.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1184/138492/thumb_LT_Col_David_Rudawitz_in_the_Oregon_ECC.jpg

SALEM, Ore. (Sep. 24, 2020) – Five Civil Air Patrol aircraft flew into some of Oregon’s most fire-ravaged areas again today as part of a continuing mission to assess damage and aid fire response.

Highly trained at taking high-resolution aerial and surface photos, CAP aircrews deliver much-needed information for the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and Oregon Emergency Management (OEM) to aid in their response to Oregon’s most destructive fire season in decades.

“Our hearts go out to the people of Oregon affected by the fires,” said Brig. Gen. William Betts, vice commander, First Air Force, Air Forces Northern. “It is an honor to serve these communities through CAP’s contribution to the state and federal response.”

Acting as a Total Force partner and the U.S. Air Force auxiliary, CAP is aligned with First Air Force to rapidly respond to nonmilitary threats domestically when tasked in a Defense Support of Civil Authorities capacity to save lives, relieve suffering, prevent property damage and provide humanitarian assistance

Low-visibility and high-wind conditions had limited opportunities for CAP to operate Tuesday and Wednesday—crews need relatively clear conditions to produce quality images—but as the sky cleared today, CAP planes were back taking more aerial photos and bringing emergency managers the up-to-date intelligence they need. The aircraft launched from bases in Salem, Eugene, Redmond and Medford, Oregon, and Kelso, Washington.

Another four teams responded in vehicles from McMinnville, Wilsonville, Eugene and Medford, deployed to assess damage and take ground-level photos of facilities accessible by road.

Today’s operations included areas of the Beachie Creek, Riverside, Lions Head, South Obenchain and Brattain fires.

This is the eighth day CAP has responded to the Oregon fires. More than 75 CAP volunteers from Oregon, Washington, California and Nevada have taken part. CAP aircraft have made 35 flights, and ground teams have completed six missions.

 

At last count, the Oregon Wing has 290 adult volunteers who train vigorously to FEMA standards each year to be ready to help in emergencies like the unprecedented onslaught of wildfires that have burned more than 1 million acres this year and thousands of structures and displaced huge numbers of Oregonians. The wing also has 247 youth members, who train in 

leadership, character development, physical fitness and citizenship. Many also train in emergency services to ground search and rescue and detecting emergency signals emitted by aircraft in distress.

 

About Civil Air Patrol
Established in 1941, Civil Air Patrol is the official auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force and as such is a member of its Total Force. In its auxiliary role, CAP operates a fleet of 560 single-engine Cessna aircraft and 1,944 small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS) and performs about 90% of continental U.S. inland search and rescue missions as tasked by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center.

As a nonprofit organization, CAP plays a leading role in aerospace education using national academic standards-based STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education. Members also serve as mentors to nearly 25,000 young people participating in CAP’s Cadet Programs. One of the premier public service organizations in America, CAP benefits the nation with an estimated economic impact of $209 million annually.

Often using innovative cellphone forensics and radar analysis software, CAP was credited by the AFRCC with saving 129 lives so far in fiscal 2020. CAP’s 60,000 members also perform homeland security, disaster relief and drug interdiction missions at the request of federal, state and local agencies.

Visit www.orwg.cap.gov, www.CAP.News or www.GoCivilAirPatrol.com for more information.




Attached Media Files: Lt Col David Rudawitz is here at the Oregon Emergency Management facility in Salem helping to coordinate CAP's activities with FEMA and OEM staff. , A Civil Air Patrol aircraft patiently waits on the ramp at Salem Municipal Airport for better weather.

2020 Oregon Wildfire Response and Recovery Update - Sept. 25 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 09/25/20 3:25 PM
2020-09/3986/138491/2020-21-09_OR_4562_EchoMtnFire_5842.jpg
2020-09/3986/138491/2020-21-09_OR_4562_EchoMtnFire_5842.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/3986/138491/thumb_2020-21-09_OR_4562_EchoMtnFire_5842.jpg

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfires 2020 daily release to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. Additional photos are attached. See today's Wildfire Response and Recovery update here.

Please direct any media inquiries to the Joint Information Center at 503-373-7872 or e.info@state.or.us">fire.info@state.or.us.

 

PHOTO CAPTION:

2020-21-09_OR_4562_EchoMtnFire_5842.jpg: Lincoln County, Ore. - September 21, 2020 - A toy fire truck seen at the site of a home destroyed by the Echo Mountain Complex Fire near Lincoln City, Oregon. - Jeff Markham / FEMA  

2020_09_25-11.53.28.405-CDT - Archie Creek Fire: Firefighters and partner agencies working on the Archie Creek Fire continue to mitigate hazards within the burned area. Pictured here are hazard trees that were removed alongside Highway 138E and moved to a staging area at Swiftwater Park.  




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/3986/138491/2020-21-09_OR_4562_EchoMtnFire_5842.jpg , 2020-09/3986/138491/2020_09_25-11.53.28.405-CDT.jpeg

OHA announces health equity grant awards
Oregon Health Authority - 09/25/20 2:18 PM

Sept. 25, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA announces health equity grant awards

Today, OHA announced it had selected nonprofit organizations and tribal governments from throughout the state for health equity grants to address the disproportionate impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on Oregon’s tribal communities and communities of color. The grants total $45 million, and a full list of the awardees can be found here.

OHA announced the availability of grant funding and opened for applications to not-for-profit organizations statewide and Oregon’s nine federally recognized Tribes and the Urban Indian Health Program on Aug. 18. OHA received hundreds of applications and has funded 205 organizations and tribes. Requests totaled close to $170 million, and not all applicants could be funded.

“We look forward to partnering with these remarkable organizations and communities, who do such vital work to serve their communities,” said Patrick Allen, OHA director.  “We are deeply aware how these organizations’ linkages and knowledge of their communities and the challenges they face are so important to bringing resources to help. We look forward to the collective work to continue to meaningfully address the systemic racism and structural inequities that have caused so much health disparity, especially relating to COVID-19.”

The grants focus resources on communities most disproportionately impacted by COVID-19 and programs that will address health and economic disruptions, food insecurity and housing, and safety and violence prevention, among other aspects of need.

“While OHA relationships with many of these groups have existed in the past, this grant program represents a deepening and a broadening of the partnership,” said Leann Johnson, director of OHA’s equity and inclusion division. “In some cases, the partnership is new.  But whether new or existing, the relationships with these groups, the funding of their work, and their knowledge of the needs of their specific communities are the keys to breaking the hold of structural and systemic racism and oppression. We’re grateful for the work these organizations have engaged in already and will look to learn further from their wisdom.”

To learn more about this program, please visit https://www.oregon.gov/oha/covid19/Pages/equity-grants-covid-19.aspx


Two Men Accused of Fraud Against Warm Springs Tribe
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 09/25/20 12:46 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams announced today that two men have been charged with Fraud crimes against the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs, Oregon.

            A federal grand jury in Portland has returned a 6 count indictment charging Roderick Ariwite, age 65, a resident on the Fort Hall Reservation in Idaho, and Thomas Adams, age 48, a resident on the Warm Springs Reservation, with Conspiracy and Theft/Misapplication of Funds from a Tribal Organization.  This indictment charges Ariwite and Adams with conspiring to misappropriate $93,700 of tribal funds and with five counts of substantive misappropriation of tribal funds. 

In a separate indictment, Ariwite is charged alone with Interstate Transportation of Security Taken by Fraud.  This indictment alleges interstate transportation of a $23,000 check Ariwite obtained by fraud from a board member of a tribal business entity.

            According to the indictments, Ariwite was CEO of the Warm Springs Economic Development Corporation (WSEDC) d/b/a Warm Springs Ventures (WSV).  WSV operates as the management organization for several tribal business ventures.  One of those ventures is the Warm Springs Construction Enterprise (WSCE).  WSCE bids on and executes construction projects like building roads and commercial buildings.  Thomas Adams was Manager of WSCE, under the supervision of Ariwite.

            The indictment against Ariwite and Adams alleges that beginning in October 2017, Ariwite and Adams created their own construction company called Warbonnet Construction Services.  Thereafter, and on tribal time, while drawing tribal salaries and travel reimbursements, they engaged in work projects for Warbonnett.  The indictment alleges that in one instance Ariwite and Adams used $48,900 in tribal funds to hire a subcontractor for a Warbonnet construction project. 

The indictment also alleges Ariwite and Adams hired REDD, a consulting company Ariwite operated, for two projects that gave no benefit to the Tribe.  Ariwite and Adams paid REDD $9,800 to create a Statement of Qualifications (a marketing brochure) for WSCE.  Ariwite and Adams jointly created the SOQ and they allegedly included false and fabricated information about WSCE.  For instance, most of the construction projects the SOQ said WSCE had worked on were in fact projects by a private construction company Ariwite and Adams worked with through Warbonnet.  Additionally, some of the supposed WSCE professional staff the SOQ profiled were employees of the private construction company.  Ariwite and Adams submitted the false and fabricated SOQ to WSCE and allegedly enriched themselves with $9,800 of tribal funds.

Ariwite and Adams also paid REDD $28,000 in tribal funds to create and submit to the U.S. Small Business Administration what is known as an 8(a) application.  SBA operates a business development program for small, disadvantaged businesses and an 8(a) certification gives preferences to bid on government contracts.  REDD never produced an 8(a) application.  In this way, Ariwite and Adams allegedly misapplied $28,000 in tribal funds and enriched themselves with these funds.

The separate indictment against Ariwite alleges that in May/June 2018, Ariwite defrauded a WSV board member and transported the $23,000 fraud proceeds, in the form of a check drawn on the board member’s personal bank account, from Oregon to Idaho. 

            The Federal Bureau of Investigation investigated this case with assistance from the Warm Springs Police Department.  It is being prosecuted by Seth D. Uram, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

            An indictment is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/6325/138480/ANNOUNCEMENT-ArwiteAdamsPressRelease_Final.pdf

Oregon reports 457 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 09/25/20 12:45 PM

Sept. 25, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 457 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 542, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 457 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 32,314.

This is the highest daily case count since the beginning of the pandemic in Oregon. The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (11), Clackamas (33), Clatsop (73), Columbia (7), Coos (3), Deschutes (17), Jackson (14), Jefferson (4), Josephine (2), Klamath (1), Lake (3), Lane (50), Lincoln (2), Linn (12), Malheur (20), Marion (58), Morrow (4), Multnomah (62), Polk (8), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (9), Union (4), Wasco (3), Washington (51), and Yamhill (5).

Oregon’s 540th COVID-19 death is a 76-year-old man in Lane County who died on Sept. 1. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. Place of death is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 541st COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Sept. 15 and died on Sept. 23 at Legacy Mt. Hood Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 542nd COVID-19 death is a 76-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Sept. 10 and died on Sept. 18 at Providence Medford Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.


Workplace outbreak

An outbreak of 79 cases of COVID-19 has been reported at Pacific Seafood in Clatsop County. The case count includes all persons linked to the outbreak, which may include household members and other close contacts to an employee. The outbreak investigation started on Sept. 15, but the initial case count was below the threshold for public disclosure.


Processing error causes increase in negative case counts

Due to an error with electronic laboratory reporting (ELR) processing, there is an increase in the number of negative cases in OHA’s negative case counts. The increase is more than 7,000 negative cases.

This has no bearing on the presumed and confirmed cases of COVID 19 being reported today.

OHA apologizes for this error and has updated our ELR processing protocol.


Weekly media briefing scheduled for 1 p.m. today

Media are invited to attend a media briefing at 1 p.m. today, Thursday, Sept. 25, with OHA Director Patrick Allen, Oregon State Health Officer Dean Sidelinger and Leann Johnson, OHA’s director of the equity and inclusion division. In addition to updates about the pandemic in Oregon, OHA will discuss newly released health equity grants to address the disproportionate impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on Oregon’s tribal communities and communities of color. Media should call 877-226-8164. The access code is 9785572.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


ODF fire report and fire map for Friday, Sept. 25, 2020 (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/25/20 10:41 AM
A deer that survived the South Obenchain fire in Jackson County wanders through some of the more than 32,000 acres burned by that fire.
A deer that survived the South Obenchain fire in Jackson County wanders through some of the more than 32,000 acres burned by that fire.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1072/138471/thumb_Deer_in_burned_area.jpg

SALEM, Ore. - The Oregon Department of Forestry is closely monitoring 7 major fires in Oregon, down from 17 originally (see table below for details). Fires are removed from the list when they are 100% lined and fire managers are confident in their progress toward containment. The South Obenchain and Brattain wildfires have both been dropped from this report.

There have been more than 7,500 personnel assigned to these fires, not including many of the government employees, landowners, forestland operators, and members of the community who are contributing every day. There have been resources from 39 states and multiple Canadian provinces in this fight alongside Oregonians.

About 1 million acres have burned in Oregon since the start of this year, which is nearly double the 10-year average of approximately 557,811.

Fire name

Acres burned (est.)

Containment

Location

Lionshead

204,250

       28%

20 miles W of Warm Springs

Beachie Creek

192,838

       52%

15 miles N of Detroit

Holiday Farm

173,094

       35%

3 miles W of McKenzie Bridge

Riverside

138,029   

       34%

2 miles SE of Estacada

Archie Creek

131,642

       59%

20 miles E of Glide

Slater

44,205 in Oregon

       25%

6 SE of Cave Junction (also in No. California)

Thielsen

9,971

       31%

E of Diamond Lake

More information




Attached Media Files: ODF fire map for Friday, Sept. 25, 2020 , A deer that survived the South Obenchain fire in Jackson County wanders through some of the more than 32,000 acres burned by that fire.

Marijuana Enforcement Detectives Serve Search Warrant on Illegal Grow Operation (Photo)
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/25/20 10:08 AM
Joshua Mays Booking Photo
Joshua Mays Booking Photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/5227/138466/thumb_Joshua_Mays.jpg

Released by: Lt. William Bailey – Public Information Officer

Release Date: September 24, 2020

Location:  25000 block of Cultus Lane, Bend (Alfalfa)

Arrested:  Joshua Mays Age: 45          Bend, Oregon

Charges:

ORS 475B.349(3)(b)(A) Unlawful Manufacture of Marijuana Over 12 plants

ORS 475B.337(3)(c)(A) Unlawful Possession of Marijuana 16x at household

ORS 475B.346(3)(b)(A)(i) Unlawful Delivery of Marijuana 16x person allowance

ORS 475B.349(3)(c)Unlawful Manufacture of Extract

ORS 475.884 Unlawful Possession of Cocaine

ORS 166.270 Felon in Possession of a Firearm X 2

Evidence Seized:

  • 439 illegal marijuana plants seized
  • 505 pounds of illegal processed marijuana
  • 1 Butane Hash Oil (BHO) Lab
  • 19 pounds of BHO extract
  • 2 handguns
  • Over $11,000 US currency

NARRATIVE:

On the morning of September 24, 2020, Marijuana Enforcement Detectives with the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, assisted by the Central Oregon Drug Enforcement Team (CODE), DCSO Street Crimes Detectives and the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office SWAT Team, served a search warrant in the 25000 Block of Cultus Lane in relation to an ongoing criminal investigation into an illegal marijuana operation.  The investigation was initiated after detectives received anonymous complaints about the odor and validity of the grow operation.

Joshua Mays was contacted at the residence and taken into custody.  He was subsequently transported to and lodged in the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office Jail on the listed charges.

The Marijuana Enforcement Detectives (MED’s) would like to thank the legal marijuana businesses within Deschutes County for their collaborative efforts in combating illegal marijuana operations. The knowledge the MED’s received from focus groups confirms that illegal marijuana within Deschutes County is a major concern for the legal marijuana market, residents, and businesses in our community.  MED’s take illegal grow operations seriously due to the unregulated amounts of pesticides, fungicides and chemical solvents that can be used to manufacture marijuana products.  In addition, MED’s have discovered illegal marijuana grows that contained mold, spider mites and toxic/harmful chemicals that are unsafe for human consumption.

The MED’s receive funding to support their positions from taxes that are collected from the recreational marijuana market. Marijuana tax can be used for schools, drug treatment centers, public health, and law enforcement. The Deschutes County Board of Commissions approved the funding for the Marijuana Enforcement Detective positions.

Since July 2018, MED’s have been in operation and have encountered multiple unknown subjects and 46 firearms while serving marijuana search warrants. The MED’s would like to recognize the DCSO SWAT team for their specialized skills and commitment for the safety to the suspects, area residences and law enforcement officers in these operations.

This investigation is ongoing.

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is a full service agency that oversees the adult jail, provides patrol, criminal investigations, civil process and search and rescue operations. Special units include SWAT, Street Crimes, Marine Patrol, ATV Patrol, Forest Patrol, along with six K9 teams. Founded in 1916 and today led by your duly elected Sheriff L. Shane Nelson, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office serves the nearly 190,000 residents in Deschutes County. The agency has 230 authorized and funded personnel, which includes 187 sworn employees who provide services to the 3,055 square miles of Deschutes County.

## End of Release ##




Attached Media Files: Joshua Mays Booking Photo , bagged marijuana , marijuana , grow

Construction Contractors Board and Construction Industry Encourage Oregonians to "Check the License" as Wildfire Rebuild
Oregon Construction Contractors Board - 09/25/20 9:00 AM

September 25, 2020

Working with licensed contractors is one of the best ways for Oregon consumers to protect their most valuable investment and avoid common scams   

Salem, Ore. – The Construction Contractors Board (CCB) and construction industry leaders have a shared message for Oregonians who have had their home or business damaged or destroyed by wildfires: protect your investment – hire licensed contractors.

“It is unfortunately quite common after disasters for consumers to be taken advantage of by unscrupulous individuals,” said Chris Huntington, Administrator of the Construction Contractors Board. “Consumers who do their homework and hire licensed contractors have protections that all Oregon licensed contractors provide.”

Oregon licensed contractors provide financial protections to Oregon consumers. Licensed contractors carry a bond and insurance, which protect the consumer if things go wrong during construction. Working with licensed contractors also provides homeowners with access to CCB’s dispute resolution service if a conflict arises, potentially avoiding lengthy and expensive court proceedings.

“On behalf of over 2,500 home builder members,” said Mark Long, CEO of the Oregon Home Builders Association, “Oregon Home Builders Association wants to remind consumers to collect references and written contracts from the start of a repair project, and avoid contractors who ask for cash up front.”

Licensed construction firms are an important part of Oregon’s economy and our Oregon communities. Oregon has approximately 41,000 licensed construction firms that have made an investment in their industry and in their communities by playing by the rules.

“AGC applauds the CCB for taking steps to protect the interests of Oregonians recovering from these wildfires as they begin the process of rebuilding their homes, businesses, and lives. We will work with the CCB to ensure state law is fully enforced, and Oregonians understand the benefit of using licensed contractors,” stated Mike Salsgiver, Executive Director of Associated General Contractors (AGC), Oregon-Columbia Chapter.

Licensed contractors also have a license history that consumers can easily check on the CCB’s website. This allows the consumer to know how long the firm has been in business and whether there is any history of complaints. Unlicensed firms found through online listing sites may not provide consumers with any verifiable history.

In addition to checking for a valid license, consumers can avoid common construction scams by simply being aware. Consumers should be wary of demands for large up-front payments, demands for cash-only payments and contractors who use high-pressure tactics, door-to-door or over the phone.

How Do You Check a License?

To verify licenses:

  • Visit http://search.ccb.state.or.us/search/  
  • Enter the license number in the box, then hit the “search” button.
  • Select the “choose” button beside the proper license.
  • Verify that the license is “active,” and that the name and other information on the license matches the contractor you are considering.
  • Call 503-378-4621 for help searching or understanding the results.

Contractors and consumers can report unlicensed contractors and other illegal activity on the CCB’s website http://search.ccb.state.or.us/online_complaint_enf/ or by calling 503-934-2246.


Thu. 09/24/20
2020 Oregon Wildfire Response and Recovery Update - Sept. 24, 2020 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 09/24/20 4:34 PM
2020-09/3986/138454/2020-21-09_OR_4562_EchoMtnFire_5846.jpg
2020-09/3986/138454/2020-21-09_OR_4562_EchoMtnFire_5846.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/3986/138454/thumb_2020-21-09_OR_4562_EchoMtnFire_5846.jpg

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfires 2020 daily release to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. Additional photos are attached. See today's Wildfire Response and Recovery update here.

Please direct any media inquiries to the Joint Information Center at 503-373-7872 or e.info@state.or.us">fire.info@state.or.us 

 

PHOTO CAPTIONS:

2020-21-09_OR_4562_EchoMtnFire_5846.jpg 

Lincoln County, Ore. - September 21, 2020 - Rob Dahlman, Fire Chief for North Lincoln County Fire & Rescue #1, talks with FEMA staff members Paige Queen, OPS Branch Director, and Corey Royer, Division A Supervisor about the Echo Mountain Complex fire near Lincoln City Oregon. - Jeff Markham / FEMA 

2020-21-09_OR_4562_EchoMtnFire_4727.jpg

Lincoln County, Ore. - September 21, 2020 - Jenny Demaris, Lincoln County Emergency Manager, talks to FEMA staff about the Echo Mountain Complex fire near Lincoln City Oregon. - Jeff Markham / FEMA

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/3986/138454/2020-21-09_OR_4562_EchoMtnFire_5846.jpg , 2020-09/3986/138454/2020-21-09_OR_4562_EchoMtnFire_4727.jpg

Oregon PUC Approves Framework to Protect Utility Customers Impacted by COVID-19
Oregon Public Utility Commission - 09/24/20 4:20 PM

SALEM, Ore. – The Oregon Public Utility Commission (PUC) has conducted an investigation and approved a framework designed to protect residential and small commercial utility customers by ensuring continued access to essential services during COVID-19 and in the aftermath of the pandemic.

“During the pandemic, Oregonians have found themselves more reliant on their utility services as they now stay at home to combat the pandemic, stay home to work where possible, and even educate their children at home,” said Mark Thompson, PUC Commissioner.  “This increased reliance on utility services also comes at a time where many customers’ ability to pay for these services has diminished due to the economic impacts COVID-19 has had on so many in our communities.”

In June 2020, the PUC held a public meeting to hear from the regulated investor-owned utilities, as well as customer groups and interested stakeholders on the impacts of COVID-19 and actions taken by utilities to protect customers. Even prior to this time, investor-owned utilities proactively suspended disconnections of residential and non-residential accounts, stopped issuing late and final notices, suspended assessing late fees, and offered more flexible payment options for their customers in recognition of the hardships caused by the pandemic, and the importance of utility services.

“In addition to confirming the actions taken by the utilities, the Commission also wanted to further investigate the impacts of the pandemic on customers, and further evaluate additional and future actions to protect utility customers, especially low income and vulnerable populations, during and after the pandemic,” added Commissioner Thompson.

As part of the investigation, the PUC engaged participants in a dynamic and inclusive public process, which provided invaluable feedback, collaboration, and compromise from stakeholders representing utility and customer interests across Oregon. The results of these discussions were separate agreements, which had broad support from the participants in the investigation, for energy, telecommunications, and water utilities that would benefit utility customers through a variety of measures. These included establishing terms on service disconnections, reconnections, time payment arrangements, waiver of fees related to late payments, provisions to protect customers’ credit, self-certification of medical certificates, and work on programs that can assist people in donating funds to help neighbors unable to pay their bills, among others. The agreement for energy utilities also includes a condition concerning arrearage management plans to assist residential customers with outstanding balances.

The terms of the agreements are being finalized by PUC Staff and regulated energy, water, and telecommunications service providers, including: Portland General Electric, NW Natural Gas, Pacific Power, Avista, Idaho Power, Cascade Natural Gas, Avion Water, Oregon Water Utilities, NW Natural Water, Oregon Telecommunications Association, Lumen (formerly CenturyLink), and Ziply Fiber (formerly Frontier); as well as numerous stakeholders including Citizens’ Utility Board, Community Action Partners of Oregon, Verde, Northwest Energy Coalition, and Multnomah County Office of Sustainability, among others.  

“We value stakeholders’ active participation in this process and willingness to compromise and work together to develop agreements that benefit utility customers, especially as Oregonians are still dealing with the effects of the pandemic and now the wildfires that have impacted so many in our state,” added Commissioner Thompson. We also recognize the need to further examine systemic problems that low-income and vulnerable populations face with high energy burden on an ongoing basis, which were explored in our investigation. The Commission is committed to taking this challenge on.”

Staff Counsel will develop stipulations based on the tentative agreements. These stipulations will be brought back to the Commission for final approval at a later date.

For additional information, view the PUC’s COVID-19 Aftermath Report with details on the agreements for energy, telecommunications and water utilities.

# # #

The Oregon Public Utility Commission (PUC) regulates customer rates and services of the state’s investor-owned electric, natural gas and telephone utilities, as well as select water companies.  The PUC’s mission is to ensure Oregon utility customers have access to safe, reliable, and high quality utility services at just and reasonable rates, which is accomplished through thorough analysis and independent decision-making conducted in an open and fair process.


OHA Weekly media briefing scheduled for 1 p.m. tomorrow
Oregon Health Authority - 09/24/20 4:15 PM

Weekly media briefing scheduled for 1 p.m. tomorrow

Media are invited to attend a media briefing at 1 p.m. tomorrow, Thursday, Sept. 25, with OHA Director Patrick Allen, Oregon State Health Officer Dean Sidelinger and Leann Johnson, OHA’s director of the equity and inclusion division. In addition to updates about the pandemic in Oregon, OHA will discuss newly released health equity grants to address the disproportionate impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on Oregon’s tribal communities and communities of color. Media should call 877-226-8164. The access code is 9785572.


Oregon Board of Forestry hosts virtual public meeting and planning retreat on Oct. 6 and 7
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/24/20 2:53 PM

SALEM, Ore. — The Oregon Board of Forestry will meet virtually on Oct. 6 and 7 for a public meeting and planning retreat. Both days will be livestreamed. In compliance with Gov. Kate Brown’s directive on social distancing to slow the spread of COVID-19, both of these public meetings will be virtual.

The meeting agenda includes:

  • State Forests Habitat Conservation Plan (HCP) update, summary of feedback received from the county and stakeholder engagement process, and the board’s decision on proceeding with the HCP into the National Environmental Policy Act process
  • An update from the Forest Trust Land Advisory Committee and Council of Forest Trust Land Committee Commissioners

View the agenda for additional topics to be discussed at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/board/pages/bofmeetings.aspx.

On Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2020, the Board will have a full-day agenda, with limited time scheduled for live testimony. The meeting will be livestreamed and public comment will be accepted. The live testimony is reserved for the Board decision on the HCP. All written testimony received by 11:59 p.m. Friday, Oct. 2, 2020, will be distributed to the Board for review and consideration. Any testimony submitted after that window of time will not be entered into the record but will be sent to the Board as a general comment after the meeting concludes. Written testimony can be submitted before the meeting to oardofForestry@oregon.gov">BoardofForestry@oregon.gov. The live testimony instructions, board packet, and livestream option are available at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/board/pages/bofmeetings.aspx.

You must sign up to provide live testimony. Sign up opens on Thursday, Oct. 1, 2020, at 8 a.m. and concludes at 5 p.m. that day. To sign up, complete this form for verbal testimony. A confirmation email will be sent with a timeslot and Zoom login instructions, as long as available time slots exist.

On Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020, the planning retreat will provide the Board and Department leadership an opportunity to connect and explore policy issues in an informal setting. Therefore no public comment will be accepted by the Board.

On Tuesday, Oct. 6, 2020, the Board will hold two executive sessions. The first executive session will be for the purpose of considering information or records that are exempt from disclosure by law, pursuant to ORS 192.660(2)(f). The second executive session will be for the purpose of reviewing the State Forester’s Annual Performance, pursuant to ORS 192.660(2)(i).

The executive sessions will be conducted virtually. Members of the news media wishing to remotely attend one of these sessions can email Public Affairs Director Joy Krawczyk at awczyk@oregon.gov">joy.p.krawczyk@oregon.gov for information.

Accommodations for people with disabilities, and special materials, services, or assistance can be arranged by calling ODF’s Public Affairs Office at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting at 503-945-7200.

The Oregon Board of Forestry consists of seven citizens nominated by the Governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. Responsibilities include appointing the State Forester, setting management direction for state-owned forests, adopting rules governing timber harvest and other practices on private forestland, and promoting sustainable management of Oregon’s 30 million-acre forestland base. More information about the Board is available at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/board/pages/aboutbof.aspx.


Los trabajadores de los condados de Clackamas, Douglas, Jackson, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, y Marion podrían ser elegibles para la Asistencia de Desempleo por Desastre
Oregon Employment Department - 09/24/20 1:23 PM

El Departamento de Empleo de Oregon está anunciando la disponibilidad de la Asistencia de Desempleo por Desastre (DUA por sus siglas en inglés) para personas que han sido desempleadas, que se les hayan reducido horas de trabajo de manera significativa o son personas que trabajan por cuenta propia que se encuentran desempleadas como un resultado directo de los incendios forestales y los vientos directos que han estado ocurriendo desde el 7 de septiembre de 2020. Estas personas tampoco deben calificar para beneficios de desempleo estatal regular, de la Compensación de Desempleo de Emergencia por la Pandemia (PEUC por sus siglas en inglés), de otros programas de extensión, o dela Asistencia de Desempleo por la Pandemia (PUA por sus siglas en inglés).

La Asistencia de Desempleo por Desastre (DUA) es un programa federal que brinda beneficios de asistencia de desempleo temporal a las personas cuyo empleo o trabajo por cuenta propia se ha perdido o interrumpido o cuyas horas de trabajo se redujeron considerablemente como resultado directo de un desastre mayor. El Departamento de Empleo de Oregon administra el programa DUA para el Departamento de Trabajo, Administración de Empleo y Capacitación de los EE. UU., en nombre de la Agencia Federal para el Manejo de Emergencias (FEMA). Las personas elegibles para beneficios de desempleo regulares o la Asistencia de Desempleo por la Pandemia (PUA) no son elegibles para DUA.

El DUA está disponible para personas elegibles durante semanas de desempleo a partir del 13 de septiembre de 2020. Los beneficios para este desastre estarán disponibles hasta el 20 de marzo de 2021, siempre y cuando su desempleo continúe siendo un resultado directo del desastre mayor. Debe presentar la solicitud dentro de los 30 días posteriores a la fecha de este anuncio. La fecha límite para presentar un reclamo del DUA relacionada con estos incendios es el 23 de octubre de 2020. 

Además de las personas que perdieron sus trabajos como resultado directo del desastre mayor, DUA puede incluir personas que:

  • trabajaban por cuenta propia y tuvieron impedido realizar dichos servicios como resultado del desastre y el trabajo o el trabajo por cuenta propia eran su principal fuente de ingresos,
  • no pudieron llegar a su trabajo a causa del desastre,
  • estaban programadas y tuvieron impedido comenzar a trabajar o trabajar por cuenta propia en el área del desastre,
  • no pudieron trabajar debido a una lesión como resultado directo del desastre, o
  • se convirtieron en jefe de familia debido a un deceso causado por el desastre,
  • han solicitado y utilizado todos los beneficios de desempleo regulares de cualquier estado, o no llenan los requisitos para beneficios de desempleo regulares o programas de extensión y permanecen desempleados como resultado directo del desastre.

El desempleo es un resultado directo del desastre mayor si el desempleo se debió a:

  • el daño físico o la destrucción del lugar de trabajo;
  • la inaccesibilidad física del lugar de trabajo debido a su cierre por parte del gobierno federal, estatal o local en respuesta inmediata al desastre; o
  • falta de trabajo, o pérdida de ingresos, si, antes del desastre, el empleador o el negocio autónomo recibió al menos la mayoría de sus ingresos o ingresos de un negocio en el área de desastre mayor que fue dañado o destruido en el desastre o una entidad en el área del desastre mayor fue cerrada por el gobierno federal, estatal o local.

Para recibir los beneficios de DUA, toda la documentación requerida debe ser entregada cuando presente su solicitud o dentro de los 21 días posteriores a la fecha en que se presentó su solicitud de DUA. Deberá proporcionar documentación de respaldo, que incluye, entre otros, prueba de empleo en el momento del desastre o prueba de trabajo por cuenta propia en el momento del desastre e información de ingresos para el año fiscal 2019. Específicamente, la documentación requerida incluye un número de Seguro Social y una copia del formulario de impuestos federales sobre la renta más reciente o talones de cheques, o documentación que demuestre que trabajaba o trabajaba por cuenta propia cuando ocurrió el desastre. La documentación para los trabajadores autónomos se puede obtener de bancos o entidades gubernamentales, o declaraciones juradas de personas que tengan conocimiento de su negocio.

Se recomienda a las personas afectadas que soliciten el DUA a través del Departamento de Empleo de Oregon (OED), el cual primero verificará si los solicitantes pueden calificar para beneficios estatales de desempleo, PEUC, otros programas de extensión o beneficios del PUA.

Las solicitudes para DUA están disponibles en inglés y en español en línea en www.oregon.gov/EMPLOY/Disaster. Su solicitud puede enviarse por correo a la dirección que se indica a continuación, o puede enviarse en línea en unemployment.oregon.gov/contact-us. Los paquetes de solicitud estarán disponibles en ciertos sitios de evacuación y Centros WorkSource. Incluya las semanas que le gustaría reclamar en su solicitud inicial. Hay más información disponible en nuestro sitio web público y páginas de redes sociales. Si tiene preguntas adicionales o para pedir una solicitud inicial, llame al: 503-570-5000

Información de contacto:

 

Dirección:      Disaster Unemployment Assistance Unit

875 Union Street NE

Salem, OR 97311

 

Teléfono:      

503-570-5000

 

Información adicional:

www.oregon.gov/EMPLOY/Disaster

 

Presente su solicitud en línea:            unemployment.oregon.gov/contact-us




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/930/138439/09.23.20_DUA_Press_Release_Wildfires_2020_SPANISH_FINAL.pdf

Oregon reports 382 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 2 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 09/24/20 12:16 PM

Sept. 24, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 382 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 2 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed two more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 539, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 382 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 31,865.

The new cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (1), Benton (8), Clackamas (32), Clatsop (4), Columbia (1), Coos (2), Crook (1), Deschutes (5), Douglas (5), Grant (1), Hood River (1), Jackson (20), Jefferson (5), Josephine (1), Klamath (2), Lake (1), Lane (38), Linn (15), Malheur (15), Marion (48), Morrow (4), Multnomah (92), Polk (3), Umatilla (11), Union (4), Wasco (6), Washington (50), and Yamhill (6).

NOTE: Today’s case count is the highest since mid-July and is a reminder of the importance of staying six feet apart from each other; wearing a face covering when six feet of physical distance cannot be maintained and limiting the size of gatherings.

Oregon’s 538th COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old man in Douglas County who tested positive on Sept.13 and died on Sept. 20, at Mercy Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 539th COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old man in Malheur County who tested positive on Sept. 4 and died on Sept. 22, at St. Alphonsus Medical Center Ontario. He had underlying conditions.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


ODF fire report and fire map for Thursday, Sept. 24, 2020
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/24/20 10:41 AM

SALEM, Ore. - The Oregon Department of Forestry is closely monitoring 9 major fires in Oregon, down from 17 originally (see table below for details). Fires are removed from the list when they are 100% lined and fire managers are confident in their progress toward containment.

There have been more than 7,500 personnel assigned to these fires, not including many of the government employees, landowners, forestland operators, and members of the community who are contributing every day. There have been resources from 39 states and multiple Canadian provinces in this fight alongside Oregonians.

About 1 million acres have burned in Oregon since the start of this year, which is nearly double the 10-year average of approximately 557,811.

 

Fire name

Acres burned (est.)

Containment

Location

Lionshead

203,566

       15%

20 miles W of Warm Springs

Beachie Creek

192,838

       49%

15 miles N of Detroit

Holiday Farm

173,094

       35%

3 miles W of McKenzie Bridge

Riverside

138,029

        34%

2 miles SE of Estacada

Archie Creek

131,598

        55%

20 miles E of Glide

Brattain

50,951

        90%

8 miles S of Paisley

Slater

43,833 in Oregon

        24%

6 SE of Cave Junction (also in No. California)

S. Obenchain

32,671

        85%

5 miles E of Eagle Point

Thielsen

9,971

        30%

E of Diamond Lake

More information




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/1072/138433/Fire_map_for_Thursday_24_2020.pdf

Emergency Medical Services for Children Advisory Committee meets October 8
Oregon Health Authority - 09/24/20 9:58 AM

September 24, 2020

What: The quarterly public meeting of the Emergency Medical Services for Children Advisory Committee.

Agenda: Suicide Prevention Project; Pediatric EMS Data Report; EMSC Program; Youth Suicide Intervention and Prevention Plan; State EMS and Trauma Program; AmeriCorps VISTA member project.

When: Thursday, Oct. 8, 9 a.m. to noon. A public comment period is offered at the end of the meeting.

Where: Please join the meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone. Register for the meeting at https://www.zoomgov.com/meeting/register/vJItd-6rrTMiGyH47gE38-R0y2uUzYlK6FI.

Background: The Emergency Medical Services for Children Advisory Committee provides recommendations to the Oregon Emergency Medical Services for Children Program under ORS 431A.105(2)(d). For more information, see the Emergency Medical Services for Children Program website at http://www.oregonemsc.org/.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Rachel Ford at 971-673-0564, 711 TTY or achel.l.ford@dhsoha.state.or.us">rachel.l.ford@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Health Evidence Review Commission meets October 1
Oregon Health Authority - 09/24/20 8:00 AM

September 24, 2020

Contact: Daphne Peck, 503-373-1985, c.info@dhsoha.state.or.us">herc.info@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation).

What: A public meeting of the Health Evidence Review Commission.

When: October 1, 1:30-4:30 p.m.

Where: By Zoom or conference call.

Written public comment will be accepted until Sept. 29, at noon. Impromptu testimony will not be taken at the meeting. If you think you may want to testify, please complete the survey to sign up at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/herc-public-comment by Tuesday, Sept. 29, at noon. If you decide not to testify, you can decline later. If you need assistance in signing up for public testimony, please call Daphne Peck at 503-373-1985.

Agenda: HERC will consider the following topics: VBBS report; Multicomponent Interventions to Improve Screening for Breast, Cervical or Colorectal Cancer; government ethics; evidence-based report topic selection; draft onboarding/orientation handbook. The meeting agenda and materials will be available one week before the meeting.

Topics that remain unresolved at the conclusion of the morning's VbBS meeting will not be heard by HERC until a later date. Public notice of tabled topics will be announced 28 days before their next scheduled discussion.

For more information about the meeting, visit the committee’s website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/DSI-HERC/Pages/Meetings-Public.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

• Sign language and spoken language interpreters.

• Written materials in other languages.

• Braille.

• Large print.

• Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Daphne Peck at 503-373-1985, 711 TTY or c.info@dhsoha.state.or.us">herc.info@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the event. Written comments are also welcome at c.info@dhsoha.state.or.us">herc.info@dhsoha.state.or.us.

 


HERC Value-based Benefits Subcommittee meets October 1
Oregon Health Authority - 09/24/20 8:00 AM

September 24, 2020

Contact: Daphne Peck, 503-373-1985, c.info@dhsoha.state.or.us">herc.info@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation).

What: A public meeting of the Health Evidence Review Commission’s Value-based Benefits Subcommittee.

When: October 1, 8 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Where: By Zoom or conference call.  

Written public comment will be accepted until Sept. 29, at noon. Impromptu testimony will not be taken at the meeting. If you think you may want to testify, please complete the survey to sign up at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/herc-public-comment by Tuesday, Sept. 29, at noon. If you decide not to testify, you can decline later. If you need assistance in signing up for public testimony, please call Daphne Peck at 503-373-1985.

Agenda: Items scheduled for discussion could include, but may not be limited to, the following topics: 2021 CPT, CDT, and HCPCS placement; completion and re-review of GN173 entries: straightforward clean up; low vision aids; cryosurgical ablation of the prostate; facial nerve decompression; bone marrow MRI; radiofrequency ablation for lung tumors; AFP-L3; Cystatin C; nerve allografts; combined kidney liver transplants; hysterectomy at time of salpingo-oophorectomy for BRCA1+ women; peanut allergies and allergy testing and treatment; NASH and bariatric surgery; artificial disks and spinal fusion joint procedures; magnetoencephalography; home intraocular pressure monitoring; evidence-based report: Multicomponent Interventions to Improve Screening for Breast, Cervical or Colorectal Cancer; various straightforward coding and guideline changes.

For more information about the meeting, visit the committee’s website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/DSI-HERC/Pages/Meetings-Public.aspx. The meeting agenda and materials will be available one week before the meeting.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

• Sign language and spoken language interpreters.

• Written materials in other languages.

• Braille.

• Large print.

• Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Daphne Peck at 503-373-1985, 711 TTY or c.info@dhsoha.state.or.us">herc.info@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the event. Written comments are also welcome at c.info@dhsoha.state.or.us">herc.info@dhsoha.state.or.us.


Wed. 09/23/20
Clackamas, Douglas, Jackson, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, and Marion Counties Workers May Be Eligible for Disaster Unemployment Assistance
Oregon Employment Department - 09/23/20 5:43 PM

The Oregon Employment Department is announcing the availability of Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA) for individuals who became unemployed, had their work hours substantially reduced or are unemployed self-employed individuals as a direct result of the wildfires and straight-line winds that have been taking place since September 7, 2020. They also must not qualify for regular state unemployment insurance (UI), Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC), other extension programs, or Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) benefits.

Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA) is a federal program that provides temporary unemployment assistance benefits to individuals whose employment or self-employment has been lost or interrupted or had their work hours greatly reduced as a direct result of a major disaster. The Oregon Employment Department administers the DUA program for the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration, on behalf of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Individuals eligible for regular unemployment benefits or Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) are not eligible for DUA.

DUA is available to eligible individuals for weeks of unemployment beginning September 13, 2020. Benefits for this disaster will be available until March 20, 2021, as long as your unemployment continues to be a direct result of the major disaster. You must file the application within 30 days after this announcement date. The deadline for filing a DUA claim related to these fires is October 23, 2020. 

In addition to people who lost their jobs as a direct result of the major disaster, DUA may include individuals who:

  • were self-employed and prevented from performing such services as a result of the disaster and the work or self-employment was their primary source of income,
  • were unable to reach their job because of the disaster,
  • were scheduled to and prevented from beginning work or self-employment in the disaster area,
  • were unable to work due to injury as a direct result of the disaster, or
  • became head of household due a death caused by the disaster,
  • Have applied for and used all regular unemployment benefits from any state, or do not qualify for regular unemployment benefits, or extension programs and remain unemployed as a direct result of the disaster.

Unemployment is a direct result of the major disaster if the unemployment resulted from:

  • the physical damage or destruction of the place of employment;
  • the physical inaccessibility of the place of employment due to its closure by the federal, state, or local government in immediate response to the disaster; or
  • lack of work, or loss of revenues, if, prior to the disaster, the employer or self-employed business received at least a majority of its revenue or income from an business in the major disaster area that was damaged or destroyed in the disaster or an entity in the major disaster area closed by the federal, state, or local government.

To receive DUA benefits, all required documentation must be turned in when you file or within 21 days from the day your DUA application is filed. You will need to provide supporting documentation, including but not limited to, proof of employment at the time of the disaster, or proof of self-employment at the time of the disaster, and income information for tax year 2019. Specifically, required documentation includes a Social Security number and a copy of the most recent federal income tax form or check stubs, or documentation to support that  you were working or self-employed when the disaster occurred. Documentation for the self-employed can be obtained from banks or government entities, or affidavits from individuals having knowledge of their business.

Affected individuals are encouraged to apply for DUA through the Oregon Employment Department (OED), which will first check if applicants can qualify for state unemployment benefits, PEUC, other extension programs or PUA benefits.

Applications for DUA are available in English and Spanish online at www.oregon.gov/EMPLOY/Disaster. Your application may be mailed to the address listed below, or submitted online at unemployment.oregon.gov/contact-us. Application packets will be available at certain evacuation sites and WorkSource Centers. Please include the weeks you would like to claim in your initial application. More information is available on our public website and social media pages. For additional questions or to request an initial application, please call: 503-570-5000

Contact Information:

Address:        Disaster Unemployment Assistance Unit

875 Union Street NE

Salem, OR 97311

 

Telephone:   

503-570-5000

 

Additional Information:

www.oregon.gov/EMPLOY/Disaster

 

Submit your Application Online:            unemployment.oregon.gov/contact-us




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/930/138413/09.23.20_DUA_Press_Release_Wildfires_2020_English_FINAL.pdf

Bend Police respond to reported assault at protest event.
Bend Police Dept. - 09/23/20 5:25 PM

Date: Wednesday, September 23rd, 2020

Case # 2019-00111879

Date & Time of Incident: Wednesday, September 23rd, 2020 at 1300

Type of Incident: Assault, Disorderly Conduct

Location of Incident: NW Wall Street / NW Newport Ave.

Person #1: 32 year old female Bend resident

Person #2: 39 Year old male Bend resident

 

Narrative:

On September 23rd, 2020, Bend Police Officers responded to a report that a person had been sprayed with mace at a protest event. This occurred near the intersection of NW Wall Street and NW Newport Avenue. Upon arrival, Officers interviewed witnesses on scene and obtained video footage of the incident.

Witness statements and video indicated that Person #1 (32 year old female Bend resident) and Person #2 (39 Year old male Bend resident) were arguing near the intersection. During the argument, Person #1 allegedly sprayed Person #2 with mace.

Person #1 reported no injuries and did not wish to pursue criminal charges. Person #2 was treated by Bend Fire Paramedics and also declined to pursue criminal charges.

No parties were arrested or detained. There is no threat to the public.  

The Bend Police Department is committed to the safety of citizens freely exercising their First Amendment rights and engaging in peaceful protest.  We will continue to respond to reports of criminal activities and investigate those events and refer cases to the Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office for consideration of criminal charges. 


Civil Air Patrol Aircrews Bring Home More Wildfire Photos
Oregon Civil Air Patrol - 09/23/20 4:03 PM

SALEM, Ore. (Sep. 23, 2020) – Civil Air Patrol crews gathered more than 100 photos Tuesday of key infrastructure in Oregon wildfire zones to help determine damage caused by the worst fires in the state in decades. 

This was CAP’s sixth day of missions in the wildfire zones. Some planned trips for CAP crews were canceled because other aircraft were in the areas helping fight the wildfires.  

More flights are planned for the near future as Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and Oregon Emergency Management (OEM) requests have come in for CAP’s high-resolution photography. That depends on weather, as CAP aerial photography depends on good visibility. Low clouds and smoke inhibit that. Weather forecasts also show the possibility of rain. 

CAP has flown 30 sorties so far in response to the wildfires. More than 20 CAP volunteers have worked organizing, flying and recording activities. In addition, CAP has highly trained emergency services personnel imbedded with the OEM in Salem, responding to requests for air support and advising on other interagency cooperation. 

Acting as a Total Force partner and the U.S. Air Force auxiliary, CAP is aligned with First Air Force to rapidly respond to nonmilitary threats domestically when tasked in a Defense Support of Civil Authorities capacity to save lives, relieve suffering, prevent property damage and provide humanitarian assistance. 

At last count, CAP’s Oregon Wing has 290 adult volunteers who train vigorously to FEMA standards each year to be ready to help in emergencies like the unprecedented onslaught of wildfires that have burned more than 1 million acres this year and thousands of structures and displaced huge numbers of Oregonians. The wing also has 247 young cadet members, who train in leadership, character development, physical fitness and citizenship. Many also train in emergency services to ground search and rescue and detecting emergency signals emitted by aircraft in distress.

About Civil Air Patrol
Established in 1941, Civil Air Patrol is the official auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force and as such is a member of its Total Force. In its auxiliary role, CAP operates a fleet of 560 single-engine Cessna aircraft and 1,944 small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS) and performs about 90% of continental U.S. inland search and rescue missions as tasked by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center.

As a nonprofit organization, CAP plays a leading role in aerospace education using national academic standards-based STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education. Members also serve as mentors to nearly 25,000 young people participating in CAP’s Cadet Programs. One of the premier public service organizations in America, CAP benefits the nation with an estimated economic impact of $209 million annually.

Often using innovative cellphone forensics and radar analysis software, CAP was credited by the AFRCC with saving 129 lives so far in fiscal 2020. CAP’s 60,000 members also perform homeland security, disaster relief and drug interdiction missions at the request of federal, state and local agencies.

Visit www.orwg.cap.gov, www.CAP.News or www.GoCivilAirPatrol.com for more information.


2020 Oregon Wildfire Response and Recovery Update - Sept. 23, 2020 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 09/23/20 3:52 PM
2020-09/3986/138405/2020-19-09_OR_4562_ECCatOEM_DSF5731_FEMA.jpg
2020-09/3986/138405/2020-19-09_OR_4562_ECCatOEM_DSF5731_FEMA.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/3986/138405/thumb_2020-19-09_OR_4562_ECCatOEM_DSF5731_FEMA.jpg

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfires 2020 daily release to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. Additional photos are attached. See today's Wildfire Response and Recovery update here.

Please direct any media inquiries to the Joint Information Center at 503-373-7872 or e.info@state.or.us">fire.info@state.or.us 

 

PHOTO CAPTIONS:

2020-19-09_OR_4562_ECCatOEM_DSF5714.jpg_FEMA: Salem, Ore. - September 19, 2020 - FEMA staff working on the 2020 Oregon Wildfire Response and Recovery at the State Emergency Coordination Center. - Jeff Markham / FEMA  

2020-19-09_OR_4562_ECCatOEM_DSF5731.jpg_FEMA: Salem, Ore. - September 19, 2020 - FEMA staff working on the 2020 Oregon Wildfire Response and Recovery at the State Emergency Coordination Center. - Jeff Markham / FEMA

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/3986/138405/2020-19-09_OR_4562_ECCatOEM_DSF5731_FEMA.jpg , 2020-09/3986/138405/2020-19-09_OR_4562_ECCatOEM_DSF5714_FEMA.jpg

OR 22E to remain closed indefinitely between Gates and Santiam Junction
ODOT: Valley, No. Coast - 09/23/20 2:05 PM

SALEM--OR 22E remains closed indefinitely from Gates Hill Road (milepost 33) in Gates to the OR 22/U.S. 20 intersection (Santiam Junction). Marion County still has the North Fork Road and Pioneer Road closed at OR 22E.

The wildfires damaged or destroyed tens of thousands of trees along OR 22E. These hazard trees are a threat to the road and to the travelers that use it.  Crews have been working hard to remove them so we can open up other sections of the highway.  Also, miles of guardrail and hundreds of signs have been damaged or destroyed and will eventually need to be repaired or replaced.

ODOT’s immediate goal is to get the hazard trees cleared, and then use pilot cars from the east and west to open these communities while we work on the other repairs. ODOT continues to work closely with the Oregon State Police, and the Marion and Linn County Sheriff’s departments on a daily basis and will continue to coordinate our efforts with them to open up the communities of Detroit and Idanha.

Other highways in the state are closed because of wildfire damage to the roads.  ODOT is working to open these highways as quickly and safely as possible to all access to allow for property owners and the communities that were impacted.

On those roads that are open near wildfires, travelers should make sure to drive the posted speeds, exercise caution and be aware of firefighting equipment and emergency vehicles that are still operating in the area.

https://www.tripcheck.com/

 

 


Oregonians affected by the wildfires get more time to report the loss of SNAP benefits
Oregon Department of Human Services - 09/23/20 2:01 PM

The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS) has received federal approval to extend the normal 10-day deadline for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) recipients in 20 counties to request replacement of benefits as a result of food lost due to power outages and wildfires that began on Sept. 7.

The extension gives SNAP recipients in Benton, Clackamas, Columbia, Coos, Deschutes, Douglas, Jackson, Jefferson, Josephine, Klamath, Lake, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Multnomah, Tillamook, Wasco, Washington, and Yamhill counties until Oct. 7 to apply to replace food purchased with their SNAP benefits.

“Replacing SNAP benefits will help Oregonians provide food for their families so they can focus on recovering from the wildfires,” said Dan Haun, ODHS Self-Sufficiency Programs Director. “We hope that these replacement benefits will help alleviate worries about food and feeding themselves and their families.”

SNAP recipients do not need to visit an office. They can request replacement food benefits by calling their local office and submitting the required information by email, fax or regular mail. Recipients can use either Form DHS 0349D (Affidavit for Nonreceipt or Destroyed Food Stamp Benefits) or submit a signed and dated written request that includes how the food was destroyed, the date it happened, destroyed food items and the amount paid for each item.

Administered by ODHS, SNAP is a federal program that provides food assistance to approximately 1 million eligible, low-income families and individuals in Oregon, including many older adults and people with disabilities. Oregonians in need can apply for benefits, including SNAP, child care, cash assistance and Medicaid. Learn more at https://govstatus.egov.com/or-dhs-benefits. For local resources in your area, such as food or shelter, please call 2-1-1.


PacificSource Community Solutions Central Oregon Receives $14.39 Million for Earning High State Quality Scores
PacificSource Health Plans - 09/23/20 1:57 PM

Central Oregon Coordinated Care Organization will allocate the funds back to care providers

(BEND, Ore.) September 23, 2020— PacificSource Community Solution’s Central Oregon Coordinated Care Organization (CCO) announced that it will receive $14.39 million dollars from Quality Pool payments made by the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) to the CCO for quality performance during 2019. The money earned from the Quality Pool will go back to the care providers for the Central Oregon CCO for quality initiatives throughout Central Oregon, strategically aimed at improving the health of those within the CCO.

PacificSource’s Central Oregon CCO met 15 of the 19 quality measures and excelled in assessments for children in DHS custody, colorectal cancer screening, dental sealants for children, depression screenings, effective contraceptive use, oral evaluation for adults with diabetes, and postpartum care. The CCO was also the highest-ranking CCO in the state for adolescent well-care visits. Quality measures are used by the OHA to determine how successful CCOs have been at improving care, making quality care accessible, eliminating health disparities, and curbing the rising cost of healthcare for the populations they serve. The Central Oregon CCO has been eligible for its maximum payout in nearly every year since the Quality Pool payments began in 2013. 

Together, PacificSource Community Solutions and the Central Oregon Health Council lead PacificSource’s Central Oregon CCO, which includes most healthcare providers in Crook, Deschutes, Jefferson, and Northern Klamath Counties, and serves more than 50,000 members of Oregon’s Medicaid program, known as the Oregon Health Plan (OHP). Medicaid, which is government-funded health insurance for low income individuals and families, currently covers approximately one in four residents in the four counties.

"The Central Oregon Health Council is proud to partner with PacificSource and collaborate with community providers and partners to improve the quality of healthcare services in our region,” said Donna Mills, executive director of the Central Oregon Health Council. “This work strongly supports our organization’s mission of creating a healthier Central Oregon.”

"We are grateful for our strong regional partnerships with providers who consistently deliver high-quality care year over year,” said Dan Stevens, executive vice president and Oregon regional director at PacificSource.

The OHA has published a 2019 Performance Report that includes all of Oregon’s CCOs. It can be found online at Oregon.gov/oha

About the Central Oregon Health Council

The Central Oregon Health Council (COHC) is a not-for-profit, tax-exempt public and private community governance entity. The COHC is dedicated to improving the health of the region and providing oversight of the Medicaid population and the Central Oregon CCO. The COHC was officially created by Senate Bill 204 in 2011 to promote the health of the region’s residents, and it seeks to achieve the Triple Aim of improving health outcomes, increasing satisfaction with the health system, and reducing cost. The COHC’s mission is to serve as the governing Board for the CCO and to connect the CCO, patients, providers, Central Oregon, and resources. The COHC and Central Oregon’s CCO work together to transform healthcare in the region and to use integrated and coordinated healthcare systems to improve health; increase quality, reliability, availability, and continuity of care; and reduce the cost of care.

About PacificSource Community Solutions

PacificSource Community Solutions is part of the PacificSource family of companies that provides Medicaid services to Central Oregon and the Columbia Gorge, as well as Lane, Marion, and Polk Counties. PacificSource Health Plans is an independent, not-for-profit community health plan serving the Northwest. Founded in 1933, PacificSource is based in Springfield, Oregon, with local offices throughout Oregon, Idaho, Montana and Washington. The PacificSource family of companies employs over 1,500 people and serves more than 523,700 individuals throughout the Greater Northwest. For more information, visit PacificSource.com.


Oregon reports 193 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 6 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 09/23/20 1:23 PM

Sept. 23, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 193 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 6 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed six more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 537, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 193 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 31,503.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (1), Benton (2), Clackamas (9), Clatsop (2), Columbia (2), Coos (2), Deschutes (2), Douglas (1), Hood River (2), Jackson (22), Jefferson (3), Josephine (4), Klamath (1), Lane (36), Lincoln (1), Linn (2), Malheur (22), Marion (17), Multnomah (29), Polk (2), Umatilla (12), Wasco (4), Washington (14), and Yamhill (1).

Oregon’s 532nd COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on September 11 and died on September 15 at Samaritan Albany General Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 533rd COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on September 14 and died on September 15 at Portland Adventist Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 534th COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on August 17 and died on September 19 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 535th COVID-19 death is a 75-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on September 1 and died on September 22 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 536th COVID-19 death is a 54-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on September 3 and died on September 7 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 537th COVID-19 death is a 95-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on July 17 and died on August 31 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

NOTE: Updated information is available for Oregon’s 295th COVID-19 death, a 26-year-old man in Yamhill County. The updated death certificate does not list COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or as a significant condition that contributed to his death, and he is no longer considered a COVID-19 related death or case.


OHA Releases Weekly Report

In today’s Weekly Report, OHA notes that the week of Sept. 14 through Sept. 20 reported new COVID-19 infections rose 17% from the week prior, to 1,511. The number of Oregonians newly tested rose 8%, to 18,840, and the percentage of tests that were positive rose from 5.6% to 6.2%. Eighteen Oregonians were reported to have died in association with COVID-19, compared to 29 the prior week. One hundred and sixteen Oregonians were hospitalized, up from 83 in the previous week. The age group with the highest incidence of reported infection continues to be 20–29-year-olds. People under 30 years old have accounted for 37% of reported cases.


OHA changes child care reporting guidelines

Starting today, Sept. 23, OHA is changing the process for reporting COVID-19 outbreaks in child care facilities. The change will provide a more transparent and comprehensive reporting of these cases.

Child care providers are required to report COVID-19 cases to their local health care authority. Since July, OHA has reported on outbreaks of 5 or more cases in facilities that enrolled 30 or more children in the Weekly COVID-19 Report.

Under the new reporting threshold, outbreaks of more than 2 children in facilities with a capacity of more than 16 children will now be reported, provided they are not siblings in the same household.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Shooting Investigation - Marion County
Oregon State Police - 09/23/20 1:14 PM

Oregon State Police is currently investigating a shooting incident that occurred on Interstate 5 near Brooks.

This event occurred at approximately 11:50 A.M. southbound on Interstate 5 between Woodburn and Brooks.

OSP is asking anyone with any information or that might have a witnessed a road rage type incident between a Black Honda Accord and another vehicle to call Oregon State Police Northern Command Center at 1-800-442-2068 or OSP.

One person was transported to the hospital with injuries.

 


Plan Ahead Before Going Home
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 09/23/20 12:20 PM

As evacuation levels change, people affected by the fires are eager to know when it is safe to go home. As conditions may be unknown in an area, it is important that residents follow the advice of local authorities to learn when it is safe to return. Residents should also check road closures and conditions to know the safest way to travel. Check roads by visiting Oregon Dept. of Transportation’s TripCheck.com.

Once local authorities have given the all-clear to re-enter properties, homeowners should take steps to protect themselves and others, when cleaning up after a wildfire. Many dangers may remain, such as ash and fire debris, which can be toxic. 

Staying safe around ashes:

  • If you see ash or a layer of dust, keep children away until it has been cleaned.
  • Cloth face coverings, paper masks or bandanas are not effective at filtering out fine airborne ash, dust or asbestos fibers. N95 or KN95 respirators, if properly fit, tested and worn, can offer protection from airborne particles.
  • Avoid activities that could stir up ash and make it airborne again, like using a leaf blower, dry sweeping, or vacuuming without a HEPA filter.
  • Use rubber gloves when cleaning up ash. Wash any ash off of your body or clothing right away.
  • To clean up ash outdoors: Gently dampen the ash – do not use a pressure washer, which will generate dust before it wets things down. Then use a vacuum with a high efficiency HEPA filter if you have one. If you don't have a HEPA-equipped vacuum, gently sweep or scoop up the ash.
  • To clean up ash indoors: Use a damp cloth to clean surfaces, a wet mop on floors. Do not use a vacuum to clean up ash unless it has a high efficiency HEPA filter.
  • Turn on an air purifier or ventilation system with a HEPA filter, if you have one, to help remove particles from indoor air.
  • Find more safety tips on the Oregon Dept. of Environmental Quality website.

Making your yard safe:

  • Extinguish hot embers. Check for them in yard debris, rain gutters or crawl spaces, on the roof, and under overhangs and decks.
  • Clear away debris. Move it away from the house to the edge of your home.
  • Check the electric meter. If there is visible damage, don’t turn the breaker on. Call your utility company.
  • Stay clear of electrical wires on the ground. Report them to your utility company.
  • Check the gas meter, gas lines or propane tank. If there is visible damage or if you smell gas, call your local utility or propane company.

Before entering structures: If you have safety concerns, have a qualified building inspector or structural engineer inspect your structures. Don’t enter if you smell gas. Turn off the power before you inspect your structure. Use a flashlight, but turn it on outside because the flashlight battery may produce a spark that can cause a fire.

Entering your structures safely:

  • Check for immediate dangers. This includes remaining fire and fire damage, and wild or domestic animals that may have taken refuge.
  • Check the attic. Embers may have entered through vents.
  • Keep appliances turned off until you have determined the electric meter and electrical lines are undamaged.
  • Discard food that has been exposed to heat, smoke, or soot.
  • Don’t drink or use water from the faucet until emergency officials say it’s okay. Water systems may become polluted if there is post-fire flooding.
  • Take safety precautions for utilities:
    • Electric – If you turn on the breaker and still have no power, contact your utility company.
    • Propane tank or  system – Turn off the valves and call your propane supplier to inspect the system.
    • Heating oil tank system – Call your supplier to inspect it before you use it.
    • Solar electrical system – Have it inspected by a licensed technician to verify the solar panels and wiring are safe.

Documenting Damage and contacting your insurance company: Call your insurance agent. Make a list of the damage and document it with photos and videos. Keep all receipts for repair and cleaning costs.

###

Disaster recovery assistance is available without regard to race, color, religion, nationality, sex, age, disability, English proficiency or economic status. If you or someone you know has been discriminated against, call FEMA toll-free at 800-621-FEMA (3362)  711/VRS - Video Relay Service). Multilingual operators are available. (Press 2 for Spanish). TTY call 800-462-7585.

 


9-1-1 Operators to Graduate from Oregon Public Safety Academy / DPSST
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 09/23/20 11:48 AM

The Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) is pleased to announce the graduation of its 120th Basic Telecommunications Class.

The three-week course includes emergency call handling techniques, stress management, civil liability, ethics, criminal law, overview of fire-rescue and law enforcement operations, and a number of other topics. Upon completion of the course, students will return to their employing agency to continue their training for a number of months with a field training officer.

The 9-1-1 training program began in 1993 when the Oregon Legislative Assembly enacted legislation which requires that individuals who receive emergency calls for assistance from the public, meet professional standards for training and certification. There are approximately 950 men and women across the state who work in this profession in city, county, tribal, regional, and state public safety communications centers.

Basic Telecommunications #BT120 Graduation will be held at 9:00 a.m. on Friday, October 2, 2020, at the Oregon Public Safety Academy, in Salem, Oregon. Telephone: 503-378-2100.  Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the need for social distancing, the graduation will be closed to the public.  However, we would like to publicly congratulate Basic Telecommunications Class #BT 120 for a successful completion of their Basic Training.
 
Members of Basic Telecommunications Class #120:

Dispatcher Lorin Alexander

Klamath 9-1-1 Communications District

 

Dispatcher John Bustard

Umatilla Tribal Police Department

 

Dispatcher Alexis Bynon

W.C.C.C.A.

 

Dispatcher Alexander Doby

METCOM 9-1-1

 

Dispatcher Angela Drorbaugh

Yamhill Communications

 

Dispatcher Sarah Ferris

Tillamook County 911

 

Dispatcher Carsen Funkhouser

W.C.C.C.A.

 

Dispatcher Larissa Hackett

Klamath 9-1-1 Communications District

 

Dispatcher Kaylee Hamm

Willamette Valley Communications Center

 

Dispatcher Alexis Hayes

Corvallis Police Department

 

Dispatcher Roderick Hogan

W.C.C.C.A.

 

Dispatcher Melody Holmes

Frontier Regional 9-1-1

 

Dispatcher Iliya Kuzmenko

Willamette Valley Communications Center

 

Dispatcher Jessica Lundmark

W.C.C.C.A.

 

Dispatcher Jacob Olson

Yamhill Communications

 

Dispatcher Kylee Peck

Umatilla County Sheriff's Office

 

Dispatcher Erika Powell

Willamette Valley Communications Center

 

Dispatcher Annabelle Thompson

W.C.C.C.A.

 

Dispatcher Kimberly Whanger

Columbia 9-1-1 Communications District

 

Dispatcher Jennifer Zeman

W.C.C.C.A.

 

## Background Information on the BPSST and DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement.  Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director and Darren Bucich, Chief of McKenzie Fire & Rescue serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.


ODF fire update and fire map for Wednesday, Sept. 23, 2020
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/23/20 11:08 AM

SALEM, Ore. - The Oregon Department of Forestry is closely monitoring 10 major fires in Oregon, down from 17 originally (see table below for details). Fires are removed from the list when they are 100% lined and fire managers are confident in their progress toward containment.

There have been more than 7,500 personnel assigned to these fires, not including many of the government employees, landowners, forestland operators, and members of the community who are contributing every day. There have been resources from 39 states and multiple Canadian provinces in this fight alongside Oregonians.

About 1 million acres have burned in Oregon since the start of this year, which is nearly double the 10-year average of approximately 557,811.

 

Fire name

Acres burned (est.)

Containment

Location

Lionshead

203,685

15%

20 miles W of Warm Springs

Beachie Creek

192,828

46%

15 miles N of Detroit

Holiday Farm

173,094

27%

3 miles W of McKenzie Bridge

Riverside

138,027

31%

2 miles SE of Estacada

Archie Creek

131,598

52%

20 miles E of Glide

Brattain

50,751

87%

8 miles S of Paisley

Slater

42,215 in Oregon

24%

6 SE of Cave Junction (also in No. California)

S. Obenchain

32,671

80%

5 miles E of Eagle Point

Two Four Two

14,473

95%

N/NW of Chiloquin

Thielsen

9,916

26%

E of Diamond Lake

More information




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/1072/138389/Fire_map_for_Wednesday_Sept._23_2020.pdf

621 organizations awarded $25.7 million in Coronavirus Relief Fund Cultural Support grant awards (Photo)
Oregon Cultural Trust - 09/23/20 10:45 AM
The Clackamas County Fairgrounds and Event Center on Sept. 9, when it served as an evacuation center for families and livestock fleeing the wildfires. The Fairgrounds received a $187,287 CRFCS grant award.
The Clackamas County Fairgrounds and Event Center on Sept. 9, when it served as an evacuation center for families and livestock fleeing the wildfires. The Fairgrounds received a $187,287 CRFCS grant award.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1171/138388/thumb_CCFEC_Fire_Pictures-203.jpg

Salem, Ore. – Coronavirus Relief Fund Cultural Support (CRFCS) grant awards totaling $25.7 million will be distributed to 621 cultural organizations across Oregon through a partnership between the Oregon Cultural Trust and its County and Tribal Cultural Coalitions. The funds, allocated to the Cultural Trust for Oregon cultural organizations facing losses due to the COVID-19 health crisis, were made available through a $50 million relief package for Oregon culture approved by the Emergency Board of the Oregon Legislature in July.

“Many cultural organizations and institutions have closed their doors to help keep us all safe during this pandemic. These grants will mean that more than 600 Oregon arts and culture organizations across our state’s counties and Tribes will be able to keep up their vital creative work,” said Governor Kate Brown. “Everything from museums to fairgrounds to the summer events we all know and love can continue to enrich our lives—connecting us to one another and giving us the hope and inspiration we need.”

“These funds are life blood to Oregon’s cultural community,” added Chuck Sams, chair of the Cultural Trust Board of Directors. “While they won’t replace all the losses suffered during the pandemic, they will ensure Oregon culture survives this crisis. We are deeply grateful to the Oregon Legislature for making this possible.”

The largest award is $1.4 million to the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry; the average grant award is $41,458. Just under $90 million in requests were received from 751 organizations; 130 organizations were ineligible for awards based on program guidelines.

“Due to the incredible need, we were able to fund a percentage of organizations’ eligible expenses,” said Brian Rogers, Cultural Trust executive director. “Smaller organizations received a higher percentage of their eligible expenses. The final awards represent a statewide, equitable distribution plan that was approved by our Board of Directors, the Governor’s Office, Business Oregon and our legislative sponsors.”

The organizations to receive funding include cultural institutions, county fairgrounds, cultural entities within federally recognized Indian Tribes based in Oregon, festivals and community event organizations, in addition to some for-profit organizations that have significant cultural impact in their communities. Awards will be issued directly to the organizations by their local County or Tribal Coalition.

Funding was determined based on eligible request amounts, an award allocation formula that established a base amount of funds per county or Tribe and the organization’s fiscal size. COVID-19 expenses previously reimbursed by other federal CARES Act programs were not eligible.

The intended use of the CRF Cultural Support funds is to provide financial assistance to cultural nonprofit organizations and community venues that have canceled or postponed public programming because of public health executive orders associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. Guidelines for the funding are in accordance with the U.S. Department of the Treasury.

The legislation allows Coalitions to be reimbursed for up to 5 percent of their total grant awards for documented administrative expenses. Requests from Coalitions for administrative expenses totaled $209,515.

Below is a list of funds awarded per county; the full list of grant awards (listed alphabetically by county) is posted on the Cultural Trust website.

NOTE: No applications were submitted from Gilliam County and the Tribes chose not to apply due to previously received CARES Act funding. Washington County, which serves as the fiscal agent for the Cultural Coalition of Washington County, chose not to participate in the CRFCS program; the Cultural Trust is currently working to identify potential solutions.

Baker County Cultural Coalition                                   $126,485

Benton County Cultural Coalition                                   $97,691

Clackamas County Cultural Coalition                          $620,073

Clatsop County Cultural Coalition                                $402,881

Columbia County Cultural Coalition                               $22,668

Coos County Cultural Coalition                                     $304,916

Crook County Cultural Coalition                                      $22,220

Curry County Cultural Coalition                                      $57,264

Deschutes County Cultural Coalition                           $998,668

Douglas County Cultural Coalition                               $102,606

Grant County Cultural Coalition                                        $5,924

Harney County Cultural Coalition                                   $25,075

Hood River Cultural Trust                                              $171,602

Jackson County Cultural Coalition                            $1,057,193

Jefferson County Cultural Coalition                             $271,715

Josephine County Cultural Coalition                            $241,778

Klamath County Cultural Coalition                                 $72,001

Lake County Cultural Coalition                                       $94,291

Lane County Cultural Coalition                                  $2,575,914

Lincoln County Cultural Coalition                                 $160,625

Linn County Cultural Coalition                                      $179,277

Malheur Cultural Trust                                                    $183,608

Marion County Development Corporation                   $835,398

Morrow County Cultural Coalition                                   $41,740

Multnomah County Cultural Coalition                     $13,106,828

Polk County Cultural Coalition                                      $245,072

Sherman County Cultural Coalition                                  $3,830

Tillamook County Cultural Coalition                             $213,444

Umatilla County Cultural Coalition                               $579,444

Union County Cultural Coalition                                      $54,609

Wallowa County Cultural Trust Coalition                     $151,756

Wasco County Cultural Trust Coalition                       $209,256

Cultural Coalition of Washington County                 $1,638,592

Wheeler County Cultural Heritage Coalition                 $12,241

Yamhill County Cultural Coalition                                 $858,658

_________________

About the Oregon Cultural Trust

Created in 2001 by the Oregon Legislature, the Oregon Cultural Trust is a testament to how much Oregonians value culture. No other state provides a 100 percent tax credit to inspire cultural giving. As uniquely Oregonian as public beaches and the bottle bill, the Oregon Cultural Trust was designed as an ongoing funding engine for arts and culture across the state. Oregonians fund the Cultural Trust. We, in turn, fund the artists, potters, poets, acrobats and dreamers who define our famous quality of life.

In 2019 Oregonians gave $4.5 million to the Cultural Trust. Sixty percent of that went straight back to the field. The remaining 40 percent helped grow our permanent fund. Our three grant programs fund our five Statewide Partners, 45 County and Tribal Coalitions and 1,450+ qualified cultural nonprofits through competitive Cultural Development Grants.

More information at culturaltrust.org.

 

 




Attached Media Files: The Clackamas County Fairgrounds and Event Center on Sept. 9, when it served as an evacuation center for families and livestock fleeing the wildfires. The Fairgrounds received a $187,287 CRFCS grant award. , The semi finalists from the 2020 August Wilson Monologue Competition, part of World Stage Theatre’s Black History Festival NW. The final celebration for the Festival was held virtually due to COVID-19. Photo by Shawntee Sims. World Stage Theatre received , The labyrinth at Pacifica: A Garden in the Siskiyous in Williams, Oregon. Pacifica received a $43,348 CRFCS grant award. Photo by Cate Battles/ Argosy Odyssey and Josephine County Cultural Coalition.

Newly launched resource network connects Eastern Oregonians to the resources they need
Oregon Department of Human Services - 09/23/20 9:59 AM

The newly launched Eastern Oregon Community Resource Network (EOCRN) uses technology to connect resources to people and communities in need. Multiple organizations in Baker, Union and Wallowa counties act together through this resource network.

“During times of adversity such as these, we recognized the need and also the resources in our Eastern Oregon communities. This resource network includes private and public sector non-profits, tribes, social service groups, hospitals, school districts, churches and individuals to share resources to address the needs of people and to address social service gaps in our community,” said Maria Weer, Building Healthy  Families Executive Director.

Building Healthy Families is the administering organization overseeing this network. The Oregon Department of Human Services has been a coordinating agency helping with its organization and launch. This product has been developed by Galaxux Inc. Galaxux is responsible for hosting and providing ongoing maintenance and support.

Here’s how EOCRN works: When an EOCRN member becomes aware of a need, either through a phone call or through the EOCRN website, they first check with 211 and other local resources. If that member can’t meet the need, they post it on EOCRN (https://www.eocrn.org/) to mobilize the entire community. EOCRN uses custom matching to notify members with profiles that match the need. These EOCRN members contact the member who made the request to coordinate details to fulfill the need. EOCRN values privacy of the clients and does not identify the client.

Requests could be anything from food to clothing to essential household items. Eastern Oregon has higher poverty rates than the state in general; as well as high childhood poverty rates; lack of public transportation and in many areas, there are food deserts, meaning there is a lack of affordable, heathy food nearby.

“The network also works to address the long-term solutions to needs. We want to help support a thriving community. We live here. We believe in working together to make a better world for all of us,” Weer said.

So far, there are 55 members in the network. They will meet quarterly to connect, network and act on identified social priorities.

For more information about EOCRN, or to sign up, go to www.EOCRN.org/.  


Corporate Activity Tax registrations top 15,000
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 09/23/20 9:50 AM

Salem, OR—The Department of Revenue reminds business owners and their tax preparers that once their business has earned more than $750,000 in commercial activity for the year, they are required to register for Oregon’s Corporate Activity Tax (CAT) within 30 days.

The CAT applies to all business entity types, such as C and S corporations, partnerships, sole proprietorships, and other entities. More than 15,000 businesses have registered for the CAT since registration opened for the new program in December 2019.

To register go directly to the CAT page of the Revenue website and click on the “Register for the CAT” link in the center of the page.

For those who need help, a short CAT registration training document is available on the page.

To register, individuals doing business in Oregon will need their name and their Social Security number or individual taxpayer identification number. Businesses will need their entity’s legal name and federal employer identification number.
Businesses and individuals will need:
• Their mailing address;
• The date they exceeded or expect to exceed $750,000 in Oregon commercial activity;
• A valid email address or current Revenue Online login, and;
• Their Business Activity Code (Refer to the current list of North American Industry Classification System codes found with their federal income tax return instructions.)
The 2019 Legislature created the CAT to boost funding for public schools. The CAT is imposed on businesses for the privilege of doing business in Oregon, including those located inside and outside of Oregon. It’s measured on a business’s commercial activity—the total amount a business realizes from activity in Oregon.

Registration doesn’t mean a business will owe tax. Only businesses with taxable commercial activity in excess of $1 million must pay the Corporate Activity Tax. The tax is $250 plus 0.57% of taxable commercial activity greater than $1 million after subtractions.

The CAT page of the Revenue website includes links to the administrative rules that govern the tax, a list of basic frequently asked questions (FAQ), and a Beyond the FAQ section that includes high-level summaries of the rules and other topics to help answer taxpayer questions.

Taxpayers with general questions about the CAT can email cat.help.dor@oregon.gov or call 503-945-8005.

Visit www.oregon.gov/dor to get tax forms, check the status of your refund, or make tax payments; call 800-356-4222 toll-free from an Oregon prefix (English or Spanish); 503-378-4988 in Salem and outside Oregon; or email questions.dor@oregon.gov. For TTY (hearing or speech impaired), call 800-886-7204.


State issues insurance emergency order for wildfire victims
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 09/23/20 9:25 AM

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services’ Division of Financial Regulation has issued an insurance emergency order for people affected by the state’s wildfires. 

Insurance companies must immediately take steps to do the following until the order is no longer in effect: 

  • Extend all deadlines for policyholders to report claims or submit other communications related to claims
  • Take all practicable steps to provide opportunities for policyholders to report claims
  • Establish a grace period for premium payments for all insurance policies issued, delivered, or covering a risk in the affected areas
  • Suspend cancellations and nonrenewals

The order applies to several ZIP codes across the state. The division’s bulletin No. DFR 2020-16 provides a list of ZIP codes that are subject to the order. 

“We issued this order to make sure evacuees and other Oregonians affected by these wildfires are able to access the insurance resources they need, especially while they are displaced,” said DCBS Director and Insurance Commissioner Andrew Stolfi. “We appreciate all the work our state’s insurance representatives are doing to help their customers right now, and we encourage everyone to be patient and work together throughout the recovery process.”

If your home or property was damaged by the wildfires, contact your insurance company as soon as possible to discuss your situation and learn next steps. If you still have concerns, the division’s consumer advocates are here to help. Call 888-877-4894 (toll-free) or email .insurancehelp@oregon.gov">dfr.insurancehelp@oregon.gov.

Visit the division's wildfire insurance resource page to view the order, bulletin, and more insurance information.

###

About DCBS: The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov. 

About Oregon DFR: The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov and http://dfr.oregon.gov/Pages/index.aspx.


CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Group meets September 24
Oregon Health Authority - 09/23/20 9:16 AM

September 23, 2020

Contact: Brian Toups, 503-385-6542, rian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us">brian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s CCO Metrics Technical Advisory Group.

When: September 24,1-3 p.m.

Where: By call-in or webinar only. The public may join remotely through a webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/5590554135910010380 and listen-only conference line conference line at 888-398-2342, participant code 5731389.

Agenda: Welcome and introductions; updates; 2021 Benchmarks; preventive dental; meaningful language access – technical aspects of reporting; EHR-based measures – changing national landscape; adjourn. The agenda is available on the group's webpage.

For more information, please visit the committee's website.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written material in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Brian Toups at 503-385-6542, 711 TTY, rian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us">brian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Fatal Crash on Hwy 199 - Josephine County
Oregon State Police - 09/23/20 8:53 AM

On Wednesday, September 23, 2020 at approximately 12:18 A.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 199 near milepost 16.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Chevrolet Malibu, operated by Rianna McGonagle (18) of Sisters, was southbound when it veered off the road and struck a tree. 

McGonagle sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

OSP was assisted by Rural Metro Fire and the Josephine County Sheriff's Office.


Tue. 09/22/20
Redmond Police Department Statement Regarding Cory Buckley (Photo)
Redmond Police Dept. - 09/22/20 4:49 PM
Cory Buckley DCSO Inmate Pic
Cory Buckley DCSO Inmate Pic
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/6157/138361/thumb_Cory_Buckley_DCSO_Inmate_Pic.jpg

Cory Buckley served as a Redmond Police Officer from 2014 until January 23, 2020, when he resigned in lieu of termination while under an Internal Affairs Investigation unrelated to the case he just plead guilty to.  The purpose of the Internal Affairs investigation in 2020 that resulted in Mr. Buckley’s resignation was related to his improper contact with a community member via a department issued cell phone that began in April of 2019 and continued through October of 2019.   

Details of this investigation were forwarded to the Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office and Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) for review.   

Today, September 22, 2020,  Cory Buckley was sentenced for Official Misconduct regarding an offense which took place while he was a Central Oregon Drug Enforcement (CODE) Detective with the Redmond Police Department.  The victim in this case reported the incident to local law enforcement after Mr. Buckley had resigned from RPD and it was investigated by the Bend Police Department.   

The Redmond Police Department is grateful to the Bend Police Department for conducting a complete and thorough investigation in order to ensure justice was served for the victim.  Mr. Buckley’s actions directly violated department policies, core values, the law enforcement code of ethics and the public’s trust.  We want to assure our community that the Redmond PD takes allegations of unprofessional police conduct seriously and will always respond to such conduct in a manner that reflects the trust our residents have placed in us.




Attached Media Files: Cory Buckley DCSO Inmate Pic

Nurse Staffing Advisory Board's Process Improvement Committee meets October 7
Oregon Health Authority - 09/22/20 4:32 PM

September 22, 2020

What: The Nurse Staffing Advisory Board's Process Improvement Committee is holding its third meeting. This meeting was rescheduled twice (Sept. 9 and Sept. 23) due to various emergencies.

Agenda:

  • Review the committee agenda and summary from previous meeting.
  • Finalize recommendation on survey process priorities and Nurse Staffing Report format.
  • Review components of the nurse staffing complaint investigation process.
  • Discuss nurses’ concerns with the current complaint investigation process and role of NSAB and OHA in addressing these concerns.
  • Discuss communication to share with nurses regarding complaint investigation process.
  • Summarize action items and next steps.

The agenda will be available on the Nurse Staffing Advisory Board's webpage at www.healthoregon.org/nursestaffing.

When: Oct. 7, 1:30-4 p.m.

Where: Via Zoom: dial 669-254-5252, meeting ID 160 454 8059, passcode 900107.

The Nurse Staffing Advisory Board advises Oregon Health Authority on the administration of Oregon’s nurse staffing laws; identifies trends, opportunities and concerns related to nurse staffing; makes recommendations to OHA based on those trends, opportunities and concerns; and reviews the enforcement powers and processes under Oregon’s nurse staffing laws.

Program contact: Kimberly Voelker, 971-673-0389, erly.n.voelker@dhsoha.state.or.us">kimberly.n.voelker@dhsoha.state.or.us.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written material in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Kimberly Voelker at 971-673-0389, 711 TTY or erly.n.voelker@dhsoha.state.or.us">kimberly.n.voelker@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon SNAP recipients who lost food due to wildfires may be eligible for replacement benefits
Oregon Department of Human Services - 09/22/20 3:23 PM

The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS) is currently processing replacement benefit requests for individuals who receive Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and who suffered loss of food due to the wildfires.

SNAP recipients who lost or disposed of food that was unsafe to eat, can request SNAP replacement benefits. Current SNAP recipients should contact their local ODHS office as soon as possible to find out if they are eligible.

Replacement benefits are available to existing SNAP recipients who:

  • Lost food due to a power outage
  • Lost food due to home damage
  • Request replacement benefits within 10 calendar days of experiencing food loss

Replacement benefits are not automatic. The amount of replacement benefits each SNAP recipient will receive is based on their monthly issuance.

Learn more at https://www.oregon.gov/dhs/assistance/food-benefits/pages/replacement%20-benefits.aspx.

SNAP customers can contact their local ODHS SSP, APD or AAA office for more information. Find a local office at: oregon.gov/DHS/Offices/Pages/index.aspx.

For other ways to connect with DHS, contact 211info:

  • By calling 2-1-1 from any phone
  • Text your zip code to 898211
  • By email at help@211info.org
  • 211info.org

###




Attached Media Files: REplacement Benefits Flyer

2020 Oregon Wildfire Response and Recovery Update - Sept. 22, 2020 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 09/22/20 2:58 PM
2020-09/3986/138353/ODOT_9.20.20_67.jpg
2020-09/3986/138353/ODOT_9.20.20_67.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/thumb_2020-09/3986/138353/ODOT_9.20.20_67.jpg

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfires 2020 daily release to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. Additional photos are attached. See today's Wildfire Response and Recovery update here.

Please direct any media inquiries to the Joint Information Center at 503-373-7872 or e.info@state.or.us">fire.info@state.or.us 

 

PHOTO CAPTIONS:

ODOT_9.20.20: Removing hazard trees on OR 126. 

Emotional Support: Help is available for FREE at the Oregon Behavioral Health Support Line, call 1-800-923-HELP.




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/3986/138353/ODOT_9.20.20_67.jpg , 2020-09/3986/138353/Emotional_Support.jpg

Bureau of Land Management Western Oregon Resource Advisory Council to meet virtually October 26 and 30 (Photo)
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 09/22/20 2:41 PM
Western Oregon RAC
Western Oregon RAC
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/5514/138350/thumb_Western_OregonRAC1.jpg

Medford, Ore.  – The Bureau of Land Management’s Western Oregon Resource Advisory Council will meet virtually Monday, October 26 and Friday, October 30.

This will be the first meeting of the Western Oregon RAC. Planned agenda items at the meeting include member introductions and overview of roles and responsibilities of the RAC, including processes to review and recommend projects for funding under Title II of the Secure Rural Schools and Community Self-Determination Act.

“The Western Oregon RAC is made up of valuable partners who represent the diverse perspectives of Western Oregon communities,” said Medford District Manager Elizabeth Burghard. “Their work on Secure Rural Schools Funding is critical for our local communities and the BLM is looking forward to having an excellent dialogue with them,” continued Burghard.

The meeting runs from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. each day.  The meetings are open to the public, with a public comment period scheduled for 2:30 p.m. on October 26.  Individuals who want to make a statement during the public comment period are encouraged to also submit a written copy of their statement at the meeting for the administrative record.

To participate in the meeting, please contact Kyle Sullivan, RAC Coordinator, ksullivan@blm.gov or (541) 618-2340 for registration information.

The Western Oregon RAC will meet multiple times a year. It is one of several citizen advisory councils to BLM Oregon/Washington. Its 15 members are appointed by the Secretary of the Interior and represent a broad range of public land interests, including environmental, local government, recreation, timber, and commercial activity. The Western Oregon RAC advises the BLM in Western Oregon, including the Coos Bay, Medford, Northwest Districts, and parts of the Lakeview District.

For more information about the Western Oregon RAC, visit: https://www.blm.gov/get-involved/resource-advisory-council/near-you/oregon-washington.

###

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in the 11 Western states and Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. In fiscal year 2018, the diverse activities authorized on BLM-managed lands generated $105 billion in economic output across the country. This economic activity supported 471,000 jobs and contributed substantial revenue to the U.S. Treasury and state governments, mostly through royalties on minerals.




Attached Media Files: Western Oregon RAC

Heceta Beach health advisory issued September 22
Oregon Health Authority - 09/22/20 2:36 PM

September 22, 2020

PORTLAND, Ore. -- The Oregon Health Authority issued a public health advisory today for higher than normal levels of bacteria in ocean waters at Heceta Beach in Lane County.

People should avoid direct contact with the water in this area until the advisory is lifted. Higher than normal levels of fecal bacteria can cause diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections and other illnesses. This applies especially to children and the elderly, who may be more vulnerable to illness from waterborne bacteria.

Increased pathogen and fecal bacteria levels in ocean waters can come from both shore and inland sources such as stormwater runoff, sewer overflows, failing septic systems, and animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.

While this advisory is in effect at Heceta Beach, visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach, or in discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Even if there is no advisory in effect, officials recommend avoiding swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm.

Although state officials advise against water contact, they continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on this beach because they pose no health risk even during an advisory.

The status of water contact advisories at beaches is subject to change. For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0482, or 877-290-6767 (toll free).

Video and audio resources for media here.

 

 


Oregon State Penitentiary reports in-custody death (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 09/22/20 1:38 PM
Jeffrey R. Williams
Jeffrey R. Williams
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1070/138338/thumb_Williams_J.jpg

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Jeffrey R. Williams, died the evening of September 21, 2020. Williams was incarcerated at Oregon State Penitentiary and passed away in the infirmary while on end of life care. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified.

Williams entered DOC custody on May 4, 1989, from Coos County and was sentenced to death. Williams was 59 years old. Next of kin has been notified.

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,000 individuals who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state. While crime information is public record, DOC elects to disclose only upon request out of respect for any family or victims.

OSP is a multi-custody prison located in Salem that houses over 2,000 adults in custody. OSP is surrounded by a 25-foot-high wall with 10 towers. The facility has multiple special housing units including disciplinary segregation, behavioral health, intermediate care housing, and an infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care. OSP participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including the furniture factory, laundry, metal shop, and contact center. It provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, work-based education, work crews, and pre-release services. OSP was established in 1866 and, until 1959, was Oregon’s only prison.

####

 




Attached Media Files: Jeffrey R. Williams

Oregon reports 328 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 09/22/20 1:33 PM

Sept. 22, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 328 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 532, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 328 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 31,313.

The new cases are in the following counties: Benton (6), Clackamas (31), Clatsop (2), Columbia (3), Coos (3), Crook (1), Curry (1), Deschutes (11), Douglas (10), Hood River (1), Jackson (12), Jefferson (1), Josephine (4), Klamath (2), Lane (32), Lincoln (1), Linn (10), Malheur (14), Marion (38), Multnomah (60), Polk (9), Umatilla (3), Wasco (25), Washington (42), and Yamhill (6).

Oregon’s 530th COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Sept.10 and died on Sept. 20, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 531st COVID-19 death is a 41-year-old man in Malheur County who tested positive on Sept. 15 and died on Sept. 20. Place of death is being confirmed. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 532nd COVID-19 death is a 64-year-old woman in Malheur County who tested positive on Sept. 1 and died on Sept. 20, at St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Boise, Idaho. She did not have underlying conditions.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Pursuit NW of Redmond; K9 Track Captures Two That Fled From Vehicle (Photo)
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/22/20 1:13 PM
Bourland
Bourland
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/5227/138342/thumb_Bourland.jpg

Released by: Lt. William Bailey - Public Information Officer

Release Date: September 22, 2020

Location: Northwest Way near NW Upas Avenue, Redmond

Arrested: Bourland, Nicholas B. Age 38 Bend, Oregon

Charges:
Attempt to Elude Felony and Misdemeanor
Reckless Driving
Reckless Endangering
Criminal Trespass

Arrested: Donohoe, Natalie J. Age 33 Bend, Oregon

Charges:
Unlawful Possession of Methamphetamine
Probation Violation

NARRATIVE:

On September 21, 2020, at approximately 0023 hours, a deputy with the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office attempted to stop a black 2012 BMW 535 for an observed traffic violation on Northwest Way near Upas Avenue, in Redmond. The vehicle immediately accelerated away from the deputy in an attempt to elude, reaching speeds of approximately 100 miles per hour. This vehicle pursuit lasted approximately 8 miles before the deputy lost sight of the vehicle on Highway 126 near Cline Falls Road. Other deputies responding to assist began to establish a perimeter around the area.

Within minutes of losing sight of the vehicle, the originating deputy located the vehicle unoccupied on NW 95th Street. Deputy Michael Mangin and his K9 partner “Ares” began a person track from the vehicle with the assistance of DCSO deputies and detectives, City of Bend Police K9 Lil Kim and Officer Kevin Uballez and a City of Redmond Police Officer with a thermal drone.

The extended track continued for several miles until a female was located nearly 30 feet up in a tree. This female was identified as Natalie J. Donohoe of Bend. She was determined to be a passenger in the vehicle during the pursuit and was in possession of several grams of suspected methamphetamine.

The search continued as deputies, officers and their K9’s tracked the driver of the vehicle to another tree nearly 200 yards away from the female. The male driver was identified as Nicholas B. Bourland of Bend. Both were arrested and transported to the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office Jail, where they were lodged on the listed charges.

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office was assisted by several property owners in the area providing information on animal activity and agitation believed to be associated with the fleeing subjects. These tips helped law enforcement narrow their search area and capture both individuals. The Oregon State Police also assisted in the search.

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is a full service agency that oversees the adult jail, provides patrol, criminal investigations, civil process and search and rescue operations. Special units include SWAT, Street Crimes, Marine Patrol, ATV Patrol, Forest Patrol, along with six K9 teams. Founded in 1916 and today led by your duly elected Sheriff L. Shane Nelson, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office serves the nearly 190,000 residents in Deschutes County. The agency has 230 authorized and funded personnel, which includes 187 sworn employees who provide services to the 3,055 square miles of Deschutes County.

## End of Release ##




Attached Media Files: Bourland , Donohoe

ODF fire report for Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2020
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/22/20 10:46 AM

SALEM, Ore. - The Oregon Department of Forestry is closely monitoring 10 major fires in Oregon, down from 17 originally (see table below for details). Fires are removed from the list when they are 100% lined and fire managers are confident in their progress toward containment.

There have been more than 7,500 personnel assigned to these fires, not including many of the government employees, landowners, forestland operators, and members of the community who are contributing every day. There have been resources from 39 states and multiple Canadian provinces in this fight alongside Oregonians.

About 1 million acres have burned in Oregon since the start of this year, which is nearly double the 10-year average of approximately 557,811.

Fire name

Acres burned (est.)

Containment

Location

Lionshead

198,916

       13%

20 miles W of Warm Springs

Beachie Creek

192,775

       38%

15 miles N of Detroit

Holiday Farm

173,094

       22%

3 miles W of McKenzie Bridge

Riverside

138,020

       26%

2 miles SE of Estacada

Archie Creek

131,598

       44%

20 miles E of Glide

Brattain

50,510

       55%

8 miles S of Paisley

Slater

42,215 in Oregon

       22%

6 SE of Cave Junction (also in No. California)

S. Obenchain

32,671

       70%

5 miles E of Eagle Point

Two Four Two

14,473

       89%

W/NW of Chiloquin

Thielsen

9,916

       26%

E of Diamond Lake




Attached Media Files: ODF fire map for Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2020.

Snake River Correctional Institution reports in-custody death
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 09/22/20 10:35 AM

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody (AIC) died on September 21, 2020. He was incarcerated at the Snake River Correctional Institution and passed away at a local hospital. He tested positive for COVID-19. He was between 80 and 85 years old. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death. This is the seventh AIC to die who tested positive for COVID-19.

For more information on COVID-19 cases inside Oregon’s prisons, please visit DOC’s COVID-19 website. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,000 adults in custody who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state.

Institutions continue to clean and disinfect numerous times a day. DOC asks AICs to report symptoms of COVID to medical staff. Posters are in all DOC institutions encouraging individuals to maintain proper hygiene and to uphold appropriate social distancing to the extent possible. Health screening processes are in place before staff are allowed to enter facilities. Visiting remains closed until further notice.

DOC requires employees and AICs to wear masks if they cannot maintain six feet of social distancing. Wearing masks is mandatory at all times in health services areas, some work areas, and in food services areas. Cloth masks have been provided to AICs and staff. If an AIC becomes ill and exhibits flu like symptoms, then CDC and OHA guidance for supportive care are followed.

Prior to the COVID-19 crisis, DOC issued a press release when an AIC passed away. This notification would include the person’s name, county of conviction, sentence length, and date of death. However, no cause of death would be listed because the Medical Examiner makes that determination. In order to balance the desire for transparency with our legal obligation to protect personal health information, we have changed the AIC death notification process when someone dies who has tested positive for COVID-19. DOC is working with the Oregon Health Authority to publish COVID-19 related data and information on the OHA website.

####


UPDATE -- Isaiah Moore found
Oregon Department of Human Services - 09/22/20 10:20 AM

(Salem, Ore.) – Isaiah Moore, an infant born on July 25, 2020, who went missing after his birth has been found. Isaiah was found Monday, Sept. 21, 2020. The Oregon Department of Human Services is thankful for the community support to find him.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. You can also report child abuse by calling a local police department, county sheriff, county juvenile department, or Oregon State Police.

###


Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Gaming System Sales Frauds (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 09/22/20 9:00 AM
TT - Gaming System Sales - GRAPHIC - September 22, 2020
TT - Gaming System Sales - GRAPHIC - September 22, 2020
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/3585/138312/thumb_TT_-_Gaming_Shopping_Scams_-_September_22_2020.png

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week: building a digital defense against online shopping frauds. 

We are six months in to the pandemic now, and one thing is clear: life has changed dramatically. Many kids are going to school in their kitchens, we know we must wear a mask to walk into a grocery store, and finding toilet paper is still something to be celebrated. 

One thing that hasn't changed: fraudsters will take advantage of any situation to empty your wallet. One particular crime that we are seeing on the rise in Oregon involves scams related to the purchase of gaming systems. 

Whether you are trying to find one for you kids or yourself, it is obvious that people are desperate to escape the real world with a journey into the virtual world.? Since the pandemic hit, though, finding a Switch or a PlayStation or any other popular gaming system has been difficult.? 

That has people looking online for any deal they can find. Unfortunately, buying a gaming system through an online platform can leave you empty handed. 

In just a couple weeks, we've had more than 20 Oregonians tell us they ordered and paid for a system only to find out they had been scammed. In at least one case, the buyer eventually ended up receiving a box ... but there was no system inside. When he complained to the online platform, the buyer tried to make him pay to send the bogus item back to China. 

Here's how to protect yourself: 

  • Do your research on the seller. Avoid any seller with bad reviews or no reviews. You can also do an online search for the seller's name with the words "scam" or "fraud". 

  • Stick to reputable online platforms with protection policies in place. Know your rights if something goes wrong.? 

  • Make your payment through the online platform's secure service. Do not take the transaction outside that system. 

  • If the price is low, the risk is high. You often get what you pay for. 

If you have been victimized by a charity fraud scam or any other online scam, be sure to file a report at the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your FBI local office. 

### 

 




Attached Media Files: TT - Gaming System Sales - AUDIO - September 22, 2020 , TT - Gaming System Sales - GRAPHIC - September 22, 2020

First quarter Hospital Financial Reports show drop in revenue due to COVID-19
Oregon Health Authority - 09/22/20 8:36 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

September 22, 2020

Today the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) provided the agency’s first look at how COVID-19 has impacted hospital revenue during this public health crisis. Hospital revenue and operating margins suffered steep drops at the end of March, likely due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

For the first time OHA is releasing its quarterly hospital financial reports as an interactive online dashboard. The dashboard allows users to interact with hospital financial data from 2007 to 2020, displayed monthly or quarterly.

"The broad health and economic impacts of COVID-19 highlight why we need a sustainable health care system that ensures everyone has access to quality, affordable care when they need it," said Jeremy Vandehey, OHA’s director of health policy and analytics.

Hospitals ended 2019 in a strong financial position, with revenue outpacing expenses. Net patient revenue increased 7.3% compared with the fourth quarter of 2018, while operating expenses increased only 1.2%. Uncompensated care remained essentially flat during that period. Hospitals closed out 2019 with a robust median operating margin of 4.2%.

However, the strong fourth quarter of 2019 stands in stark contrast to the first quarter of 2020. Oregon’s first COVID-19 case was identified on February 28, 2020. To conserve hospital capacity and preserve personal protective equipment (PPE) for the COVID-19 emergency, on March 19, 2020, Governor Kate Brown issued executive order 20-10, prohibiting elective and non-urgent medical procedures.

Decreases in hospital utilization in March led to a drop in patient revenue. At the same time, hospital expenses continued to increase, leading to large drops in operating margins in the first quarter of 2020. A drop in hospital stocks exacerbated the losses.

Key findings from the report include:

  • Statewide total margin fell from 9.3% in the first quarter of 2019 to -8.8% in the first quarter of 2020, a decrease of 19.4 percentage points.
  • Median statewide total margin fell 11.3 percentage points, from 6.7% to -4.6% in the same time period.
  • Statewide net patient revenue was down slightly, $22.7 million or -0.6%, when compared with the first quarter of 2019.
  • Total operating expenses remained on trend, increasing $215 million, 6.3%, when compared with the first quarter of 2019.

The first quarter financial reports don’t reflect financial assistance that was provided to the health system in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The second quarter hospital financial reports, released later this fall, will reflect federal and state grants or other assistance that was provided to hospitals to stabilize and support the health system.

"We have been working closely with our partners across the health system to contain the rising costs of health care," said Vandehey. "These data demonstrate the risks health systems face when their revenue depends on the numbers of patients they treat and procedures they perform. We see that paying for volume instead of value can contribute to financial uncertainty during a crisis, just when we need hospitals the most."

Quarterly reporting on Oregon's acute care hospitals assists policymakers and the public in monitoring the impact of state and federal health reforms on hospital care and financial stability. These reports track key measures of hospital finances and utilization including profitability, charity care, bad debt, and inpatient, outpatient, and emergency department visits.

For more information about OHA’s hospital reporting program, go to the Health Policy and Analytics website.

# # #


Umpqua Bank Announces Wildfire Relief for Impacted Communities, Customers and Associates (Photo)
Umpqua Bank - 09/22/20 8:26 AM
Wildfires destroyed Umpqua's store in Phoenix, Oregon.
Wildfires destroyed Umpqua's store in Phoenix, Oregon.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/6798/138314/thumb_Phoenix_Store.jpg

PORTLAND, Ore. – September 22, 2020 – Umpqua Bank, a subsidiary of Umpqua Holdings Corporation (NASDAQ: UMPQ), today announced a package of relief and support for communities, customers and associates impacted by the devastating wildfires raging across the West Coast.

“The personal loss experienced by so many people from these historic wildfires is truly incalculable. As a bank, we’ve experienced the devastation firsthand, including the complete loss of one of our stores in Phoenix, Oregon,” said Umpqua Bank CEO Cort O’Haver. “The road to recovery will take time, but Umpqua is committed to doing all we can to help our communities rebuild what’s been lost.”

Today’s announcement comes as wildfires in Oregon, Washington and California have already consumed more than five million acres and resulted in at least 36 deaths. In response to the devastation, Umpqua has activated relief programs for community, customers and associates to support both immediate needs and longer-term recovery efforts.

Community Relief
Umpqua has committed $750,000 in relief funding for impacted communities. This includes $100,000 for both response and recovery efforts in the coming weeks. An additional $650,000 is allocated for community organizations helping small businesses and local economies recover. The bank has also activated a 3:1 corporate match for associates donating to nonprofits supporting those impacted by the wildfires, as well as expanded its Virtual Volunteer program to support the many Umpqua associates currently volunteering time and resources to recovery efforts.

Customer Relief
The bank has activated its Disaster Relief Loan Program to provide impacted customers quick access to cash as needed, as well as to help them recover financially. Mortgage relief options for homeowners impacted by natural disasters are also being actively made available, and the bank will work with all impacted customers to defer or waive any costs associated with their Umpqua accounts incurred as a direct result of the wildfires.

Associate Relief
For the many Umpqua associates directly impacted by the wildfires, the bank has initiated an emergency assistance fund. In addition to providing direct financial support to these associates, the  bank is also providing impacted associates access to a wide variety of services to meet their immediate and long-term needs.

“Especially in moments like this, we want our communities and people to know they’re not alone,” said O’Haver. “In addition to this initial relief, Umpqua will continue partnering closely with local leaders and organizations to help those we serve recover and move forward.”

About Umpqua Bank
Umpqua Bank, headquartered in Roseburg, Ore., is a subsidiary of Umpqua Holdings Corporation, and has locations across Idaho, Washington, Oregon, California and Nevada. Umpqua Bank has been recognized for its innovative customer experience and banking strategy by national publications including The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, BusinessWeek, Fast Company and CNBC. The company has been recognized for eight years in a row on FORTUNE magazine's list of the country's "100 Best Companies to Work For," and was recently named by The Portland Business Journal the Most Admired Financial Services Company in Oregon for the fifteenth consecutive year. In addition to its retail banking presence, Umpqua Bank also owns Financial Pacific Leasing, Inc., a nationally recognized commercial finance company that provides equipment leases to businesses. A subsidiary of Umpqua Holdings Corporation, Umpqua Investments, Inc., provides retail brokerage and investment advisory services in offices throughout Washington, Oregon, and California. 

 


 




Attached Media Files: Wildfires destroyed Umpqua's store in Phoenix, Oregon.

Mon. 09/21/20
2020 Oregon Wildfire Response and Recovery Update - Sept. 21, 2020 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 09/21/20 3:00 PM
2020-09/3986/138305/red_cross_photo___fema.JPG
2020-09/3986/138305/red_cross_photo___fema.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/3986/138305/thumb_red_cross_photo___fema.JPG

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfires 2020 daily release to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. Additional photos are attached. See today's Wildfire Response and Recovery update here.

Please direct any media inquiries to the Joint Information Center at 503-373-7872 or e.info@state.or.us">fire.info@state.or.us 

 

PHOTO CAPTIONS:

Photo: 09_OR_4562_Stayton_We_Will_Rebuild__DSF5762.jpg

Stayton, Ore. - September 20, 2020 - "We Will Rebuild" sign on Highway 22 overpass just outside Stayton, Ore. - Justin Marquis / FEMA  

Red Cross Photo

Portland, Ore. - September 14, 2020 - Red Cross volunteers working in a shelter at the Oregon Convention Center. - Dominick Del Vecchio / FEMA  




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/3986/138305/red_cross_photo___fema.JPG , 2020-09/3986/138305/2020-20-09_OR_4562_Stayton_We_Will_Rebuild__DSF5762.jpg

Civil Air Patrol Continues Flights in Oregon Wildfire Efforts (Photo)
Oregon Civil Air Patrol - 09/21/20 2:41 PM
2020-09/1184/138303/Randy_and_airplane.jpg
2020-09/1184/138303/Randy_and_airplane.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1184/138303/thumb_Randy_and_airplane.jpg

SALEM, Ore. (Sept. 20, 2020) – As smoke clears from western Oregon, Civil Air Patrol is sending pilots and specially trained aircrews to assist in efforts to recover from devastating wildfires again today.

Two aircraft from CAP’s Oregon Wing and one from the Washington Wing joined the effort in cooperation with Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and Oregon Emergency Management (OEM), marking the fifth day of CAP participation.

CAP is tasked with photographing key infrastructure from the air to help assess fire damage. Aircrews have a mission pilot, an observer and an airborne photographer and are taking on assignments over the Archie, Beavercreek and Echo Mountain wildfires.  

“Our hearts go out to all of those affected by the fires,” said Brig. Gen. William D. Betts, vice commander, 1st Air Force, Air Forces Northern, Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida. “We are confident in the skills of these selfless, dedicated CAP volunteers who contribute so much to both the local community response and the wider federal effort.”

Acting as a Total Force partner and the U.S. Air Force auxiliary, CAP is aligned with 1st Air Force to rapidly respond to nonmilitary threats domestically when tasked in a Defense Support of Civil Authorities capacity to save lives, relieve suffering, prevent property damage and provide humanitarian assistance.

Using high-resolution digital cameras, the CAP aircrews produced more than 900 images Sept. 19 for emergency operations supervisors. Eight sorties were flown Friday and five Saturday as smoke cleared and showers dissipated. CAP pilots still face tricky conditions in some areas with smoke, low clouds and aircraft not involved of the organized efforts.

CAP members train to FEMA standards so they can operate jointly with other emergency agencies. 

CAP planes based in Hillsboro, Redmond and Salem, Oregon, and Vancouver, Washington, participated Sept. 19. More than 36 CAP volunteers have worked organizing, flying and recording activities.

In addition, CAP has highly trained emergency services personnel imbedded with the OEM in Salem, responding to requests for air support and advising on other interagency cooperation.

At last count, the Oregon Wing has 290 adult volunteers who train vigorously each year to be ready to help in emergencies like the unprecedented onslaught of wildfires that have burned more than 1 million acres this year and thousands of structures and displaced huge numbers of Oregonians. The wing also has 247 young cadet members, who train in leadership, character development, physical fitness and citizenship. Many cadets train in emergency services as well and participate in ground search and rescue and detecting emergency signals emitted by aircraft in distress.
Squadron locations and contact information can be found at https://orwg.cap.gov.

About Civil Air Patrol
Established in 1941, Civil Air Patrol is the official auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force and as such is a member of its Total Force. In its auxiliary role, CAP operates a fleet of 560 single-engine Cessna aircraft and 1,944 small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS) and performs about 90% of continental U.S. inland search and rescue missions as tasked by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center.

As a nonprofit organization, CAP plays a leading role in aerospace education using national academic standards-based STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education. Members also serve as mentors to nearly 25,000 young people participating in CAP’s Cadet Programs. One of the premier public service organizations in America, CAP benefits the nation with an estimated economic impact of $209 million annually.

Often using innovative cellphone forensics and radar analysis software, CAP was credited by the AFRCC with saving 129 lives so far in fiscal 2020. CAP’s 60,000 members also perform homeland security, disaster relief and drug interdiction missions at the request of federal, state and local agencies.

Visit www.orwg.cap.gov, www.CAP.News or www.GoCivilAirPatrol.com for more information.




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/1184/138303/Randy_and_airplane.jpg , This is a CAP Cessna 182 in flight.

Oregon reports 201 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 09/21/20 12:04 PM

Sept. 21, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 201 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 529, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 201 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 30,995.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (16), Clatsop (2), Columbia (2), Coos (4), Curry (3), Deschutes (8), Douglas (2), Hood River (1), Jackson (18), Josephine (3), Klamath (2), Lane (28), Lincoln (1), Linn (1), Malheur (12), Marion (18), Morrow (2), Multnomah (35), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (4), Wasco (10), Washington (25), and Yamhill (1).

Oregon’s 527th COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Aug. 21 and died on Sept. 6, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 528th COVID-19 death is a 54-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Sept. 16 and died on Sept. 20, at Legacy Mt. Hood Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 529th COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Sept. 18 and died on Sept. 19, at OHSU. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.


OHA features new COVID 19 dashboard

Today, Monday, Sept. 21, OHA is unveiling a new version of the dashboard Oregon COVID-19 Case Demographics and Disease Severity Statewide to provide more information on the demographics of COVID-19 cases in Oregon.

The new dashboard will present case rates per 100,000 people, which more clearly shows disparities in the burden of COVID-19 between demographic groups. In addition to case counts and rates, users will be able to view the percent of cases in each age group, sex, race, and ethnicity that have ever been hospitalized for their illness or have died with COVID-19.


OHA Ends Publication of Weekly Testing Summary, Data Published Daily

OHA will no longer issue the Weekly Testing Summary because the data is currently available on a more timely basis on the OHA website. The location of the information is linked below:

  1. Testing totals for the prior week(s)
  2. Test positivity statewide (cumulative)
  3. Test positivity statewide for the prior week (same location as #1)

Other testing-related announcements or issues, such as changes in the national testing supply chain, will be noted in daily press releases on an as-needed basis. OHA’s most recent testing guidance for healthcare providers can be found here.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


ODF fire report and fire map for Monday, Sept. 21, 2020
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 09/21/20 11:18 AM

SALEM, Ore. - The Oregon Department of Forestry is closely monitoring 10 major fires in Oregon, down from 17 originally (see table below for details). Fires are removed from the list when they are 100% lined and fire managers are confident in their progress toward containment.

There have been more than 7,500 personnel assigned to these fires, not including many of the government employees, landowners, forestland operators, and members of the community who are contributing every day. There have been resources from 39 states and multiple Canadian provinces in this fight alongside Oregonians.

About 1 million acres have burned in Oregon since the start of this year, which is nearly double the 10-year average of approximately 557,811.

Fire name

Acres burned (est.)

Containment

Location

Lionshead

198,647

       13%

20 miles W of Warm Springs

Beachie Creek

192,764

       38%

15 miles N of Detroit

Holiday Farm

170,637

       17%

3 miles W of McKenzie Bridge

Riverside

137,880

       25%

2 miles SE of Estacada

Archie Creek

131,598

       41%

20 miles E of Glide

Brattain

50,447

       52%

8 miles S of Paisley

Slater

42,214 in Oregon

       18%

SE of Cave Junction (also in No. California)

S. Obenchain

32,671

       65%

5 miles E of Eagle Point

Two Four Two

14,473

       77%

W/NW of Chiloquin

Thielsen

9,689

       22%

E of Diamond Lake

More information




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/1072/138293/Fire_map_for_Monday_Sept._21_2020.pdf

Deceased Located within Holiday Farm Fire Perimeter Identified
Lane Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/21/20 9:46 AM

On September 11, 2020, fire personnel working the Holiday Farm Fire located a deceased male in a residence off Goodpasture Road in Vida.  The Lane County Sheriff’s Office responded and investigated the death with the Lane County Medical Examiner’s Office. 

The deceased has been identified as 59 year old David Perry of Vida.  Perry's next of kin have been notified.  Our thoughts go out to Perry's family and friends as they grieve.  

News Release from 9/11/2020:

We are saddened to report that on 9/11/2020, fire personnel were in the area of Goodpasture Road in Vida when they located a deceased person in a residence within the perimeter of the Holiday Farm Fire. First responders are working with the Medical Examiner’s Office to identify the deceased, which may take some time.  After the person has been identified, we will notify next of kin and afford them the opportunity to notify additional family and friends prior to releasing the person’s name. 

The Lane County Sheriff’s Office is investigating the death along with the Lane County Medical Examiner’s Office, who will determine cause and manner of death.


Some Oregonians still eligible for Economic Impact Payment
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 09/21/20 8:46 AM

Salem, OR—More than 130,000 Oregonians will receive a special mailing this month from the IRS encouraging them to see if they’re eligible to claim an Economic Impact Payment.

The IRS will mail the letters to people who typically aren’t required to file federal income tax returns but may qualify for an Economic Impact Payment. The letter urges recipients to visit the special Non-Filers: Enter Payment Info tool on IRS.gov before the Oct. 15 deadline to register for an Economic Impact Payment. 

More than 7 million people nationwide have already used the Non-Filers tool to register for a payment.

This month’s letters, delivered from an IRS address, are being sent to people who haven’t filed a return for either 2018 or 2019. Based on an internal analysis, these are people who don’t typically have a tax return filing requirement because they appear to have income below the filing threshold based on Forms W-2 and 1099 and other third-party statements available to the IRS.

The letter urges the recipient to register at IRS.gov by Oct. 15 in order to receive a payment by the end of the year. Individuals can receive up to $1,200, and married couples can receive up to $2,400. People with qualifying children under age 17 at the end of 2019 can get up to an additional $500 for each qualifying child.

The IRS cautions that receiving a letter is not a guarantee of eligibility. An individual is likely eligible for an Economic Impact Payment if they:

  • Are a U.S. citizen or resident alien.
  • Have a work-eligible Social Security number.
  • Can’t be claimed as a dependent on someone else’s federal income tax return.

For more information on eligibility requirements, see the Economic Impact Payment eligibility FAQ on IRS.gov.

People who are eligible should not wait to receive a letter and should register now. Alternatively, people can wait until next year and claim the recovery rebate credit on their 2020 federal income tax return by filing in 2021.

Those unable to access the Non-Filers tool may submit a simplified paper return following the procedures described in the Economic Impact Payment FAQ on IRS.gov.

Anyone using the Non-Filers tool can speed up the arrival of their payment by choosing to receive it by direct deposit. Those not choosing this option will get a check.

Beginning two weeks after they register, people can track the status of their payment using the Get My Payment tool, available only on IRS.gov.

For Oregon tax issues, visit www.oregon.gov/dor to get tax forms, check the status of your refund, or make tax payments; call 800-356-4222 toll-free from an Oregon prefix (English or Spanish); 503-378-4988 in Salem and outside Oregon; or email questions.dor@oregon.gov. For TTY (hearing or speech impaired), call 800-886-7204.


Oregon State Police Fish & Wildlife Division is Requesting Public's Assistance to Identify the Person(s) Responsible for the Unlawful Take of a Bull Elk - Yamhill County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 09/21/20 8:18 AM
2020-09/1002/138286/Elk_Pic.jpg
2020-09/1002/138286/Elk_Pic.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1002/138286/thumb_Elk_Pic.jpg

On September 13, 2020 Oregon State Police Troopers received information that fresh skeletal remains of a bull elk had been discovered on private property between Mt. Richmond Road and Williams Canyon Road.

Evidence at the scene is consistent with a bull elk harvested in the first two weeks of the general archery season.

The person(s) responsible did not have permission to hunt on the property.

The Oregon Hunters Association of Yamhill County has agreed to match the Turn In Poachers (TIP) program reward of $500 for a total reward of $1,000.

The Oregon State Police is requesting that any person with information about this incident contact Oregon State Police Northern Command Center at 1-800-442-0776 or OSP and leave information for Trooper Tayler Jerome if you are wishing to remain anonymous you may also contact the OSP through the Turn in Poachers line at TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)

The TIP program offers preference point rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of big game mammals.

PREFERENCE POINT REWARDS:

5 Points-Mountain Sheep

5 Points-Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points-Cougar

The TIP program also offers cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of Mountain Sheep, Mountain Goat, Moose, Elk, Deer, Antelope, Bear, Cougar, Wolf, Upland Birds, Waterfowl, and Furbearers. Cash rewards can also be awarded for the unlawful take of Game Fish and Shellfish and for Habitat Destruction.

CASH REWARDS:

$1,000 Mountain Sheep, Mountain Goat and Moose

$500 Elk, Deer and Antelope

$300 Bear, Cougar and Wolf

$300 Habitat Destruction

$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl

$100 Furbearers

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish

How to Report a Wildlife and/or Habitat Law Violation or Suspicious Activity:

TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP(677)

TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/1002/138286/Elk_Pic.jpg

Fatal Crash Hwy 20 - Linn County
Oregon State Police - 09/21/20 8:07 AM

On Sunday, September 20, 2020, at approximately 7:10 A.M.,Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 20 near milepost 67.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Nissan Altima, operated by Robert Snyder (60) of Portland, was westbound on Hwy 20 when it went off the road and struck a tree.

Synder sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

OSP was assisted by Sweet Home Fire Department and ODOT.


The Oregon Air National Guard's 142nd Wing conducts F-15 Night Flying (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 09/21/20 8:01 AM
2020-09/962/138284/051120-Z-CH590-161.jpg
2020-09/962/138284/051120-Z-CH590-161.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/962/138284/thumb_051120-Z-CH590-161.jpg

PORTLAND, Ore. - The Oregon Air National Guard’s 142nd Wing will conduct routine F-15 Eagle night training missions on September 21-24, 2020.

Night training allows the Citizen-Airmen pilots based at the Portland Air National Guard Base to stay current with mandatory Air Force requirements. Night flying is conducted as an essential training requirement for nighttime maneuvers to support mission and contingency response. Training flights will be completed each evening before 10:00 p.m.

For more information contact TSgt. Steph Sawyer, 503-335-4351

-30-

FILE PHOTO: 051120-Z-CH590-161: An Oregon Air National Guard F-15C Eagle, assigned to the 142nd Wing takes off from Portland Air National Guard Base at dusk. (National Guard photo by Master Sgt. John Hughel, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

About the 142nd Wing:

The Portland Air National Guard Base employs around 1,500 Airmen who provide an economic impact of nearly $500 million to the region. The 142nd Wing defends our homeland with F-15 Eagle fighter jets, guarding the Pacific Northwest skies from Northern California to the Canadian border, as part of Air Combat Command and the North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD). Their mission is to provide unequalled, mission-ready units to sustain combat aerospace superiority and peacetime tasking any time, any place in service to our nation, state and community.




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/962/138284/051120-Z-CH590-161.jpg

Sun. 09/20/20
Oregon Wildfire Response & Recovery Update - Sept. 20, 2020 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 09/20/20 1:53 PM
Mayor of Detroit, Jim Trett , Federal Coordinating Officer, Dolph Diemont and Rep. SchraderSeptember
Mayor of Detroit, Jim Trett , Federal Coordinating Officer, Dolph Diemont and Rep. SchraderSeptember
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/3986/138276/thumb_2020-19-09_OR_4562_Detroit_Mt_Hagen_DeMob_01.jpg

The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfires 2020 daily release to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. Additional photos are attached. See today Wildfire Response and Recovery update here.

 




Attached Media Files: Mayor of Detroit, Jim Trett , Federal Coordinating Officer, Dolph Diemont and Rep. SchraderSeptember , Mayor of Detroit, Jim Trett , Federal Coordinating Officer, Dolph Diemont and Rep. Schrader. September 19, 2020

DCSO Searching For Lost Motorcycle Rider (Photo)
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/20/20 12:58 PM
2020-09/5227/138266/Chris_Faith.png
2020-09/5227/138266/Chris_Faith.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/5227/138266/thumb_Chris_Faith.png

Updated Media Release

Date:  09/20/20

DCSO Deputies had been attempting contact throughout the night with the subject who had loaned his cell phone to Faith to call his friends.  On 09/20/20, at about 8:30am, Deputies were finally able to speak with him on the phone and confirm the location where he had contact with Faith the day before.  That location was more accurately described as the USFS 370 Rd, about one mile north of Todd Lake, which was a significant distance away from the originally described area.  The subject told deputies he had offered to Faith for him to follow him and his group down to the main road, but Faith said he was fine and continued to push his motorcycle up (north) USFS 370.

With this new information, DCSO SAR Volunteers were provided with new search assignments reflecting Faith's last known point.  On 09/20/20, at about 9:14am, 9-1-1 Dispatch received a call from a mountain bike rider on the Mrazek Trail, who had come across Faith.  Faith had walked away from his motorcycle at some point during the early morning hours and was tired and cold.  Nearby DCSO SAR search teams responded to Faith's location, began warming efforts and transported him in a DCSO SAR vehicle to the Tumalo Falls/4601 parking area, where Bend Fire Department personnel were dispatched to meet them.

After evaluation by Bend Fire Department, a Sheriff's Office Deputy assisted in reuniting Faith with his family.  Faith did not require any further assistance.  

End of update

   

 

Date:  09/20/20

By:  Lt. Bryan Husband

Location:  Triangle Hill Area, near USFS Rd 4601/4602 (West of Bend)

Lost Subject:  Christopher Faith, 29 year old male, Gilchrist, OR

 

On 09/19/20, at about 11:11pm, Deschutes County 9-1-1 received a report of a lost dual sport motorcycle rider in the Triangle Hill area, near the USFS Rd 4601/4602 juncture.  Friends of Chris Faith reported they had been riding together in that area earlier in the day and had gotten separated.  They reported receiving a call from Faith at about 6:13pm, who told them his motorcycle wouldn't start and he was stranded.  Faith reported he had left his cell phone in their truck, had been walking and pushing his motorcycle for 1-2 miles, when he came across another motorcycle rider who let him borrow his cell phone to call his friends.  Faith described his current location to his friends as being near the USFS 4601/4602 juncture.  Faith did not report any medical problems or other issues other than being stranded.  

Faith's friends told him to continue walking downhill on the road and they would meet him at the truck.  Faith never arrived at the truck.  His friends (three other dual sport riders) rode to his described area, but could not locate Faith or his motorcycle.  Faith's friends continued to search the surrounding area until 11:11pm, at which time they reported him as lost to 9-1-1 Dispatch.  Deputies responded to the area and searched throughout the night without success.

On 09/20/20, at about 6:30am, patrol deputies were joined by over 20 Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Search and Rescue Volunteers, searching both by vehicles and ATV's.  The search continues at this time.  Chris Faith is described as a 29 year old white male, approximately 5, 7" tall, 180 lbs, with short brown hair and beard and brown eyes.  He was last seen wearing a "Thor" brand motorcycle riding shirt/pants combo, green in color with purple and blue accents.  He was wearing a "Fly" brand helmet, neon yellow in color.  Faith's motorcylcle was descriged as a YZF 450 dual sport, yellow and black in color.

Faith has been entered as a missing person and anyone with information as to his whereabouts is encouraged to call Deschutes County Dispatch at:  541-693-6911.

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is a full service agency that oversees the adult jail, provides patrol, criminal investigations, civil process and search and rescue operations. Special units include SWAT, Street Crimes, Marine Patrol, ATV Patrol, Forest Patrol, along with six K9 teams. Founded in 1916 and today led by your duly elected Sheriff L. Shane Nelson, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office serves the nearly 190,000 residents in Deschutes County. The agency has 230 authorized and funded personnel, which includes 187 sworn employees who provide services to the 3,055 square miles of Deschutes County.




Attached Media Files: 2020-09/5227/138266/Chris_Faith.png

Oregon reports 208 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 1 new death
Oregon Health Authority - 09/20/20 12:04 PM

Sept. 20, 2020

Oregon reports 208 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 1 new death

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 526, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 208 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 30,801.

The new cases are in the following counties: Benton (7), Clackamas (18), Clatsop (4), Columbia (3), Coos (2), Deschutes (9), Douglas (2), Gilliam (1), Hood River (4), Jackson (5), Jefferson (2), Klamath (1), Lane (23), Linn (7), Malheur (15), Marion (21), Morrow (3), Multnomah (41), Polk (1), Umatilla (8), Washington (28), and Yamhill (3).

Oregon’s 526th COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Sept. 1 and died on Sept.18, at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

See table below for total cases, deaths, and negative tests by county.

County

Cases1

Total deaths2

Negative tests3

Baker

90

2

1,533

Benton

285

6

12,143

Clackamas

2,256

61

56,853

Clatsop

117

0

5,304

Columbia

154

1

6,608

Coos

138

0

6,445

Crook

60

1

2,470

Curry

27

0

1,705

Deschutes

769

12

28,147

Douglas

209

3

12,176

Gilliam

8

0

265

Grant

8

0

862

Harney

12

0

764

Hood River

245

0

4,772

Jackson

1,039

4

31,732

Jefferson

513

8

4,499

Josephine

183

2

11,311

Klamath

273

2

9,844

Lake

28

0

853

Lane

964

15

60,349

Lincoln

472

13

8,406

Linn

466

13

15,580

Malheur

1,527

23

4,819

Marion

4,447

90

45,305

Morrow

488

6

1,682

Multnomah

6,818

130

133,456

Polk

502

15

8,442

Sherman

18

0

327

Tillamook

48

0

2,915

Umatilla

2,913

41

12,629

Union

435

2

3,409

Wallowa

28

1

930

Wasco

234

3

4,709

Washington

4,289

58

87,468

Wheeler

0

0

159

Yamhill

738

14

16,397

Total

30,801

526

605,268

1This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases.

3This includes cases who test negative and are not epi-linked to a confirmed case.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Fatal Crash Hwy 42 - Douglas County
Oregon State Police - 09/20/20 8:42 AM

On Saturday, September 19, 2020 at approximately 9:15 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 42 near milepost 74.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Dodge Ram pickup, operated by Dustin Robinson (36) from Sutherlin, was westbound when it went off the road.  He struck a Pontiac Grand AM, operated by William McCullough IV (20) from Roseburg,  that was at the intersection of Jackie Avenue and Hwy 42.  

McCullough IV and his passenger, Mark Ritter (20) from Roseburg, sustained fatal injuries and were pronounced deceased. 

Robinson sustained minor injuries from the crash.  

OSP was assisted by Douglas County Sheriff's Office, Winston Police Department, Douglas County Fire District 2, ODOT and the Douglas County District Attorney's Office. 

Driving Under the Influence of Intoxicants (Robinson) is being investigated as a possible factor in the crash.  Any further information will be released by or with approval from the Douglas County District Attorney's Office.


Sat. 09/19/20
Dispute with a Firearm
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 09/19/20 11:35 PM

Dispute with a Firearm

Date:  09/19/20

By:  Sergeant Troy Gotchy

On 09/19/20 at approximately 1838 hours, Deputies with the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office were dispatched to a dispute involving a firearm on 85th Place on the north end of Bend.  The reporting person advised a male subject had pointed an AK-47 at him during the dispute.  Multiple 911 calls were received from the location of the dispute and the surrounding residences reporting lots of screaming.  It was also reported that another male subject was armed with a knife.

The first two Deputies on scene contacted a male subject walking down 85h place with a large knife in a sheath on his side.  That male was detained without incident after dropping the knife, and placed in a patrol car.

Several more Deputies arrived on scene and began loud hailing the involved residence.  Four people came out of the property, and complied with orders from the Deputies.  They were all detained during the ongoing investigation.  While speaking with the individuals on scene, it was learned the rifle was still on the property, and there may still be two subjects at the back of the property that may have access to firearms.

Members from the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office SWAT Team along with a Deschutes County Sheriff’s office K9 deputy and his K9 partner Ares responded to assist with the call. Several Officers from the Central Oregon Emergency Response Team who were already out on another mission with their armored vehicle responded to the scene to assist.  Once they arrived, the armored vehicle was driven closer to the house, and several more loud hails were put out asking anyone else on the property to come out.  After getting no response the property was cleared, and it was determined the other two subjects were not on scene.

Members from the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office Detective Division also responded to the scene to assist with the investigation. The investigation revealed there was a large knife and a SKS rifle involved in the dispute. No arrests have been made at this time. The investigation is ongoing.  The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office was assisted on this call by the Bend Police Department, the Redmond Police Department, and the Bend Fire Department.

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is a full service agency that oversees the adult jail, provides patrol, criminal investigations, civil process and search and rescue operations. Special units include SWAT, Marine Patrol, ATV Patrol, Forest Patrol, along with four K9 teams. Founded in 1916 and today lead by your duly elected Sheriff L. Shane Nelson, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office serves the nearly 190,000 residents in Deschutes County. The agency has 230 authorized and funded personnel, which includes 187 sworn employees who provide services to the 3,055 square miles of Deschutes County.

### End of Release###


Oregon Civil Air Patrol joins wild fire efforts (Photo)
Oregon Civil Air Patrol - 09/19/20 8:50 PM
Some people were hit with one building destroyed and the others still standing.
Some people were hit with one building destroyed and the others still standing.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-09/1184/138263/thumb_DSC_1609_sm.jpg

SALEM, Ore. (Sept. 19, 2020) – Flying is tricky due to smoke, temporary flight restrictions over wild fires and on-and-off rain showers, but four Oregon and one Washington Civil Air Patrol aircraft joined the effort to recover from devastating wild fires today.

Working with Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and Oregon Emergency Management (OEM), CAP is tasked with photographing key infrastructure from the air to help assess damage caused by fires that have ravaged almost 1 million acres in the state this year. Air crews composed of a mission pilot, an observer, and an airborne photographer are taking on assignments all over Oregon.

Using high resolution digital cameras, the highly trained CAP aircrews returned more than 151 images to emergency operations supervisors yesterday.  Eight sorties were flown yesterday as the smoke started clearing and thundershowers dissipated.

“Conditions were challenging,” said 1st Lt Jonathan Ritchie, a pilot on Friday and Saturday sorties. “Low cloud layers interfered with access to target areas. Some crews could get to their target areas. It was a little bit challenging working around the TFRs (temporary flight restrictions). ATC (air traffic control) was very helpful in keeping us where we needed to be.”

“It is quite satisfying to be a pilot on these missions,” he said. “We do a lot of training to prepare for these kind of things. We have a great staff running the mission base to plan our sorties and keep us safe.”

Oregon CAP aircraft based in Hillsboro, Medford, Redmond, Salem and Vancouver, Wash., participated Friday. They flew assignments for the Beachie Creek Fire, the Riverside Fire, the Brittain Fire, the S. Oberchain Fire, and the Archie Creek Fire.

This is the fourth day of CAP participation. More than 33 CAP volunteers have worked on organizing, flying, and recording activities.  In addition, CAP has a couple of highly trained emergency services personnel that are imbedded with the OEM in Salem. They are responding to requests for air support and advising on other inter-agency cooperation.

Flying in the time of Coronavirus adds complications, as members of the aircrew need to follow special procedures to keep each other safe and protect the equipment.  You cannot use normal sanitizing wipes on aircraft instruments and surfaces, for instance.

CAP in Oregon has 290 adult volunteers who train vigorously each year to be ready to help in situations like Oregon’s unprecedented onslaught of wild fires that have burned thousands of structures and displaced more Oregonians that any emergency in years.  CAP trains to FEMA standards so they can operate jointly with other emergency agencies.  CAP also has 247 cadet members, who train in leadership, character development, physical fitness and citizenship.  Many of them train in emergency services as well, and participate in ground search and rescue and detecting emergency signals emitted by aircraft in distress.

About Civil Air Patrol
Established in 1941, Civil Air Patrol is the official auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force and as such is a member of its Total Force. In its auxiliary role, CAP operates a fleet of 560 single-engine Cessna aircraft and 1,944 small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (sUAS) and performs about 90% of continental U.S. inland search and rescue missions as tasked by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center.

Often using innovative cellphone forensics and radar analysis software, CAP was credited by the AFRCC with saving 129 lives so far in fiscal 2020. CAP’s 60,000 members also perform homeland security, disaster relief and drug interdiction missions at the request of federal, state and local agencies.

As a nonprofit organization, CAP plays a leading role in aerospace education using national academic standards-based STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) education. Members also serve as mentors to nearly 25,000 young people participating in CAP’s Cadet Programs. One of the premier public service organizations in America, CAP benefits the nation with an estimated economic impact of $209 million annually.




Attached Media Files: Some people were hit with one building destroyed and the others still standing. , 2020-09/1184/138263/DSC_8882_sml.jpg