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Bend/Central-Eastern Oregon News Releases for Sat. Dec. 4 - 9:36 pm
Fri. 12/03/21
Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Launches Operation Guardian Angel (Photo)
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 12/03/21 4:08 PM
oga logo
oga logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-12/5227/150597/thumb_thumbnail_Standard_Yellow.png

Released by: Sgt. Jayson Janes

Date: December 3, 2021

 

Kick-off event will be held at the Ideal Option clinic on December 10, 11 a.m. – 3 p.m. 

 

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is partnering with Ideal Option, a national leader in outpatient medication-assisted treatment for addiction, to roll out their new program: Operation Guardian Angel. The program is aimed at diverting more people who possess illicit substances for personal use into recovery.

In November 2020, Oregon voted in favor of Measure 110, the Drug Addiction Treatment & Recovery Act. While the full effect of Measure 110 has yet to be realized, the data so far is underwhelming. A five-month study by the Oregon Department of Justice showed that out of 1,085 citations issued for drug possession since the Measure was enacted into law last February, only three assessment/screening verifications were received and 400 people failed to appear for their court date.

Operation Guardian Angel, modeled after successful programs in other states, is designed to empower those in the community who are struggling with the disease of addiction to come forward without fear of legal repercussions and begin their recovery with medication-assisted treatment. 

The kick-off event will take place on Friday, Dec. 10, 11:00 a.m. – 3 p.m. at the Ideal Option clinic located at 404 NE Penn Ave. in Bend. Individuals are invited to voluntarily surrender their illicit substances and paraphernalia for safe disposal and transfer immediately to Ideal Option to be enrolled in their evidence-based outpatient treatment program. Most people will be able to see a provider that same day or make an appointment for the next business day. For nearly all patients, costs are covered by Medicaid or private insurance. 

All members of the community and representatives of the media are welcome to attend the event to learn more and pick up educational materials for themselves or loved ones. 

After the kick-off event, individuals interested in the program are encouraged to contact the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office or contact Ideal Option directly to start treatment. 

The Ideal Option clinic in Bend is open Monday through Thursday, 7:30 a.m. – 6 p.m. and is located at 404 NE Penn Ave., Bend, OR 97701.

Ideal Option has helped nearly 50,000 people with medication-assisted treatment for addiction to fentanyl, methamphetamine, alcohol and other substances since 2012 and has 70 clinics nationwide, including locations in Bend, Salem, Eugene, Corvallis and Hillsboro. 

 

About Ideal Option 

Headquartered in Kennewick, Washington, Ideal Option was founded in 2012 and has since helped nearly 50,000 patients through a network of over 70 office-based medication-assisted treatment (MAT) clinics across 10 states. With a mission to serve under-served communities, Ideal Option accepts all forms of insurance including Medicaid and Medicare. Financial assistance and payment plans are also available. 
 
Ideal Option's team of medical providers carry certifications in Addiction and Emergency Medicine, Internal, OB/GYN, and Family Medicine, among other specialties. The company also employs social workers, caseworkers, counselors, and mental health practitioners. This holistic approach helps drive positive outcomes, including family stability, stable housing, improved overall health, and reduced rates of recidivism. 
 
In all the communities it serves, Ideal Option collaborates with existing stakeholders and providers to improve the continuum of care. This approach includes partnerships with emergency rooms and county jail systems, where individuals with substance use disorder often appear, as well as collaborating with numerous support agencies and municipal programs addressing social needs such as housing, mental health, and nutrition support. 

For questions about Ideal Option contact: 

Contact: Olivia Easly

Phone: (919) 946-6644

Email: oliviaeasly@idealoption.net

 

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is a full-service agency that oversees the adult jail, provides patrol, criminal investigations, civil process and search and rescue operations. Special units include SWAT, Marine Patrol, ATV Patrol, Forest Patrol, along with five K9 teams. Founded in 1916 and today led by your duly elected Sheriff L. Shane Nelson, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office serves over 200,000 residents in Deschutes County. The agency has 259 authorized and funded personnel, which includes 191 sworn employees who provide services to the 3,055 square miles of Deschutes County.




Attached Media Files: oga logo , ideal option , dcso badge

Oregon reports 1,352 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 16 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 12/03/21 4:04 PM

December 3, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 1,352 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 16 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 16 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 5,243, Oregon Health Authority (OHA) reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

OHA reported 1,352 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 394,569.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 397, which is 13 more than yesterday. There are 94 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is four more than yesterday.

There are 55 available adult ICU beds out of 692 total (8% availability) and 327 available adult non-ICU beds out of 4,094 (8% availability). 

12/3/2021 Available Beds (and Percentage of Staffed Beds Available)

 

Statewide

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

Region 5

Region 6

Region 7

Region 9

Adult ICU beds available

55

(8%)

31

(8%)

3

(3%)

7

(8%)

3

(5%)

1

(10%)

3

(6%)

7

(27%)

Adult non-ICU beds available

327

(8%)

61

(3%)

10

(2%)

86

(15%)

34

(8%)

7

(14%)

66

(17%)

63

(53%)

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

Note: Please do not visit an emergency department for COVID-19 testing, unless you require emergency care for your symptoms.

Emergency departments in Oregon are under significant strain. You can find a test here. If you have a medical condition that doesn’t require emergency care, contact your provider. An urgent care center may also help you get the care you need and will save emergency departments from added strain.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 29,675 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry on Dec. 2. Of that total, 1,956 were initial doses, 3,545 were second doses and 9,898 were third doses and booster doses. The remaining 14,182 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Dec. 2.

The seven-day running average is now 11,710 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 3,541,522 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, 81,874 doses of Pfizer pediatric, 2,285,262 doses of Moderna and 244,984 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 2,958,346 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,673,871 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 data dashboards and have been updated today.

Cases and COVID-19 deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (3), Benton (21), Clackamas (95), Clatsop (7), Columbia (21), Coos (40), Crook (45), Curry (8), Deschutes (74), Douglas (45), Grant (6), Harney (8), Hood River (14), Jackson (63), Jefferson (19), Josephine (35), Klamath (22), Lane (181), Lincoln (16), Linn (92), Malheur (2), Marion (105), Multnomah (150), Polk (55), Sherman (2), Tillamook (4), Umatilla (3), Union (12), Wallowa (1), Wasco (9), Washington (159) and Yamhill (35).

Oregon’s 5,228th COVID-19 related death is an 82-year-old woman from Multnomah County who tested positive Oct. 1 and died Oct. 10 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,229th COVID-19 related death is a 69-year-old man from Lane County who tested positive Oct. 12 and died Oct. 24 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at Riverbend. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,230th COVID-19 related death is a 45-year-old woman from Washington County who tested positive Oct. 2 and died Oct. 4 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,231st COVID-19 related death is an 88-year-old woman from Washington County who tested positive Oct. 3 and died Oct. 19 at Samaritan Lebanon Community Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,232nd COVID-19 related death is a 72-year-old woman from Josephine County who tested positive Sept. 2 and died Oct. 25 at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,233rd COVID-19 related death is a 75-year-old man from Washington County who tested positive Sept. 5 and died Oct. 26 at Portland VA Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,234th COVID-19 related death is a 61-year-old man from Multnomah County who tested positive Sept. 21 and died Oct. 15 at Legacy Good Samaritan Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,235th COVID-19 related death is an 85-year-old man from Crook County who tested positive Nov. 2 and died Oct. 27 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,236th COVID-19 related death is a 66-year-old man from Union County who tested positive Nov. 30 and died Nov. 30 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,237th COVID-19 related death is a 96-year-old woman from Umatilla County who tested positive Nov. 3 and died Nov. 21 at her residence. She had no underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,238th COVID-19 related death is a 79-year-old woman from Multnomah County who tested positive Nov. 22 and died Nov. 22 at Adventist Health Portland. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,239th COVID-19 related death is a 75-year-old woman from Linn County who tested positive Nov. 23 and died Dec. 1 at Samaritan Lebanon Community Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,240th COVID-19 related death is a 77-year-old woman from Jackson County who tested positive Nov. 22 and died Dec. 1 at Providence Medford Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,241st COVID-19 related death is a 71-year-old man from Grant County who tested positive Nov. 25 and died Nov. 28 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,242nd COVID-19 related death is a 58-year-old woman from Coos County who died Dec. 2 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Note: Lane County has informed us they are reviewing their data. We will provide any updates from Lane County if necessary.

Note: Updated information is known about Oregon’s 5,171st death, a 90-year-old man from Clackamas County. It was determined that he does not meet Oregon’s COVID-19 death definition and will not be counted as a COVID-19 death. Because of this update, we are renumbering our reports to start with 5,228 today.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our web page (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

# # #


Missing child alert -- Marley Kay Wnorowski is missing and is believed to be in danger (Photo)
Oregon Department of Human Services - 12/03/21 3:35 PM
Marley K Wnorowski
Marley K Wnorowski
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-12/973/150594/thumb_Marley_K_Wnorowski.jpg

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division, asks the public to help find Marley Kay Wnorowski, age 16, a child in foster care who went missing from Pendleton, Oregon on Oct. 30. Marley is believed to possibly be in danger.

ODHS asks the public for help in the effort to find Marley, and to contact 911 or local law enforcement if they believe they see her.

Marley is suspected to frequent Roy Raley Park in Pendleton. She may be in the company of Kyle Teeter, a 25-year-old male. 

Name: Marley Kay Wnorowski
Pronouns: She/her
Date of birth: May 4, 2005
Height: 5-foot-9
Weight: 130 pounds
Hair: Brown
Eye color: Hazel
Pendleton Police Department Case # 21-2751
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children #1435305

A small number of children in foster care may be in significant danger when they run away or have gone missing. As ODHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and ensure their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. 

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Attached Media Files: Marley K Wnorowski

Board of Forestry welcomes a new member, this final addition brings the board up to full membership
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 12/03/21 2:40 PM

SALEM, Ore. — The Oregon Board of Forestry’s chairperson will welcome its final new member at the Jan. 5, 2022, board meeting.

Liz Agpaoa is the final member to join the board. “I am thrilled to have a person with such deep experience in forestry join the board. Also thrilled to have a full board "on board," said chairperson Jim Kelly.

The public is invited to watch the meeting online starting at 9 a.m. Board materials and a link to the livestream are available at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/board/pages/bofmeetings.aspx.

Biography

All board members bios are available at https://www.oregon.gov/odf/board/pages/aboutbof.aspx.

Liz Agpaoa, of Medford, is a retired US Forest Service employee with 36 years of public service in forestry and natural resources. She retired as the Regional Forester for the national forests across the 13 southern states and commonwealth of Puerto Rico in 2014. In previous roles, she served as Chief-of-Staff for the Forest Service in Washington, D.C., oversaw forests in New Mexico, and grasslands in Texas and Oklahoma. Her first two decades of public service were in Oregon, where she serving as a Wildlife Biologist in the southern Cascades, an environmental planner in Portland, and District Ranger in the Siskiyou Mountains. She graduated from Humboldt State University with a Bachelor of Science in wildlife management. She currently serves on the board for the National Museum of Forest Service History located in Missoula, Montana.

The Oregon Board of Forestry consists of seven citizens nominated by the Governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. Responsibilities include appointing the State Forester, setting management direction for state-owned forests, adopting rules governing timber harvest and other practices on private forestland, and promoting sustainable management of Oregon’s 30-million-acre forestland base. Read more information about the board.


Bend Businesses Team Up to Launch New Beer (Photo)
StingRay Communications - 12/03/21 12:16 PM
Not Your Usual Barrel Aged Stout
Not Your Usual Barrel Aged Stout
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-12/6224/150588/thumb_Not_Your_Usual_Barrel_Aged_Stout_Label_12.3.21.jpg

Bend Brewing Company, Newport Avenue Market, and Bohemian Roastery Collaborate on Not Your Usual Barrel-Aged Stout

Bend, Ore – December 3, 2021, Iconic Bend-based businesses Bend Brewing Company and Newport Avenue Market have teamed up with Bend-based Bohemian Roastery to create an exclusive blended barrel-aged coffee stout dubbed Not Your Usual Barrel-Aged Stout. The beer will be available in 16-oz cans on Friday, December 3, exclusively at Newport Avenue Market in Bend, Oliver Lemon’s in Sisters and Terrebonne, and at BBC’s downtown Bend brewpub.

Not Your Usual Barrel-Aged Stout was conceived by BBC Lead Brewer Ryan Blasquez and Newport Avenue Market Beer and Wine Manager Robert McCarthy. The beer is a blend of Export Stout aged 15 months in Bourbon barrels from Oregon Spirit Distillers, 1-year-old Imperial Stout, and fresh Imperial Stout. The combination of these stouts was conditioned on 40-lbs. of organic Honduran Estrella Lenca coffee, wood-fire roasted by Bend-based Bohemian Roastery.

“We worked with Jeff and Shelley from Bohemian Roastery on a previous project and were blown away by the coffee flavor and aroma their wood-fire roasted coffee brought to the beer, so naturally, we thought to include them in this collaboration,” says Ryan Blasquez, BBC Lead Brewer.

Not Your Usual Barrel-Aged Stout pours inky black with strong notes of oak, baker’s chocolate, brown sugar with noticeable warmth. The tropical climate of Honduras and high-altitude soil give the Estrella Lenca coffee its distinct spicy flavors. At the same time, Bohemian Roastery’s unique wood-fire roasting produces a gentle, moist heat that develops the bean without producing additional acidity. The resulting beer can be enjoyed fresh but is a great candidate for aging.

About Bend Brewing Company

Founded in 1995 as Bend, Oregon’s second-oldest brewery, Bend Brewing Company has won numerous awards at national and international beer competitions for its Northwest-style ales and pioneering sour beers over the last 25+ years. Bend Brewing Company’s landmark downtown Bend brewpub features family-friendly casual dining with an expansive waterfront lawn known as Bend’s backyard. Learn more at www.bendbrewingco.com and follow us on Instagram @bendbrewingco


About Newport Avenue Market

Since opening in 1976, Newport Avenue Market in Bend, Oregon, has been the No. 1 choice of Foodies in Central Oregon. A 100-percent employee-owned grocer, Newport offers shoppers both mainstream and hard-to-find food items as well as kitchenware and unusual gifts. A 22-time winner of “Best Grocery Store” in Central Oregon by The Source Weekly’s annual community poll, the market supports local producers and offers an expansive selection of high-quality, in-demand food and beverage items, including 500 varieties of craft beer. For more details, go to www.newportavemarket.com.

About Bohemian Roastery

Created and operated by the Akers Family, Bohemian Roastery (BoRo) is a family-run, wood-fire coffee roasting company that began in the high desert town of Bend, Oregon, in 2017. When we found out that the majority of all coffee beans in the world were roasted using petroleum-fired heat, we decided to find a better way. This focused exploration led us to discover a far more healthful and flavorful way of roasting coffee beans. Learn more at www.bohemianroastery.com

 

 

 

 




Attached Media Files: Not Your Usual Barrel Aged Stout

UPDATE: Oregon reports 1,046 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 42 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 12/03/21 10:56 AM

This news release is an updated version to include case and death information.

December 2, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 1,046 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 42 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 42 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 5,228 the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

OHA reported 1,046 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 393,232.

OHA releases new COVID-19 vaccine breakthrough report

OHA’s most recent update on COVID-19 breakthrough cases, released today, found that 71.3% of the 4,134 reported COVID-19 cases between Nov. 21 and Nov. 27 occurred in unvaccinated people.

There were 1,186 breakthrough cases, accounting for 28.7% of all cases.

The average age of the breakthrough cases during that period was 45. Twenty-eight breakthrough cases involved residents of care facilities, senior living communities or other congregate care settings. There were 45 cases in people aged 12 to 17.

To date, there have been 45,545 COVID-19 vaccine breakthrough cases in Oregon. The average age of all cases is 47. Breakthrough cases have been reported in all 36 counties.

Cases of COVID-19 are far more common in unvaccinated people. The report shows that the rate of COVID-19 in unvaccinated people is four times higher than in vaccinated people.

To date, 4.4% of all vaccine breakthrough cases have been hospitalized and 1.2% have died. The average age of vaccinated people who died was 81.

Vaccination remains the most effective tool to reduce the spread of COVID-19.

The latest breakthrough report can be found here.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 384, which is 20 fewer than yesterday. There are 90 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is two fewer than yesterday.

There are 49 available adult ICU beds out of 691 total (7% availability) and 312 available adult non-ICU beds out of 4,078 (8% availability). 

12/2/2021 Available Beds (and Percentage of Staffed Beds Available)

 

Statewide

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

Region 5

Region 6

Region 7

Region 9

Adult ICU beds available

49

(7%)

29

(8%)

5

(6%)

6

(7%)

3

(5%)

0

(0%)

1

(2%)

5

(19%)

Adult non-ICU beds available

312

(8%)

82

(4%)

25

(4%)

69

(12%)

33

(8%)

6

(12%)

48

(13%)

49

(41%)

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

Note: Please do not visit an emergency department for COVID-19 testing, unless you require emergency care for your symptoms.

Emergency departments in Oregon are under significant strain. You can find a test here.

If you have a medical condition that doesn’t require emergency care, contact your provider. An urgent care center may also help you get the care you need and will save emergency departments from added strain.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 26,172 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry on Dec. 1. Of that total, 2,278 were initial doses, 4,024 were second doses and 10,485 were third doses and booster doses. The remaining 9,295 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Dec. 1.

The seven-day running average is now 11,810 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 3,530,606 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, 75,802 doses of Pfizer pediatric, 2,275,997 doses of Moderna and 244,417 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

Note: Today’s cumulative total doses of Pfizer Comirnaty vaccine is lower than yesterday’s total. This is due to the removal of duplicate doses found during data reconciliation.

As of today, 2,955,159 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,667,597 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 data dashboards and have been updated today.

Cases and COVID-19 deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (7), Benton (19), Clackamas (84), Clatsop (2), Columbia (26), Coos (36), Crook (22), Curry (7), Deschutes (83), Douglas (41), Harney (6), Hood River (6), Jackson (86), Jefferson (17), Josephine (43), Klamath (18), Lane (70), Lincoln (6), Linn (64), Malheur (3), Marion (62), Multnomah (157), Polk (22), Tillamook (5), Umatilla (7), Union (3), Wallowa (2), Wasco (8), Washington (117), and Yamhill (17).

Oregon’s 5,187th COVID-19 related death is a 66-year-old man from Multnomah County who tested positive Aug. 7 and died Aug. 15 at Portland VA Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,188th COVID-19 related death is an 82-year-old woman from Tillamook County who tested positive Sept. 30 and died Sept. 29 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,189th COVID-19 related death is a 57-year-old woman from Clackamas County who tested positive Oct. 28 and died Nov. 1 at Kaiser Sunnyside Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,190th COVID-19 related death is an 83-year-old man from Multnomah County who tested positive Sept. 25 and died Oct. 4 at Adventist Health Portland. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,191st COVID-19 related death is a 59-year-old man from Marion County who tested positive Sept. 22 and died Oct. 4 at Santiam Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,192nd COVID-19 related death is an 80-year-old woman from Multnomah County who tested positive Sept. 22 and died Oct. 5 at Adventist Health Portland. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,193rd COVID-19 related death is an 82-year-old man from Deschutes County who tested positive Sept. 29 and died Oct. 5 at St. Charles Bend. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,194th COVID-19 related death is an 86-year-old man from Deschutes County who tested positive Sept. 24 and died Oct. 6 at St. Charles Bend. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,195th COVID-19 related death is a 67-year-old woman from Deschutes County who tested positive Sept. 30 and died Oct. 6 at St. Charles Bend. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,196th COVID-19 related death is a 78-year-old man from Malheur County who tested positive Sept. 23 and died Oct. 7 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,197th COVID-19 related death is an 82-year-old man from Deschutes County who tested positive Oct. 7 and died Oct. 7 at St. Charles Bend. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,198th COVID-19 related death is a 77-year-old woman from Marion County who tested positive Sept. 26 and died Oct. 7 at Samaritan Albany General Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,199th COVID-19 related death is an 85-year-old woman from Lane County who tested positive Sept. 29 and died Oct. 7 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,200th COVID-19 related death is an 85-year-old woman from Lane County who tested positive Sept. 29 and died Oct. 7 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,201st COVID-19 related death is an 82-year-old man from Malheur County who tested positive Sept. 17 and died Oct. 8 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,202nd COVID-19 related death is a 74-year-old man from Douglas County who tested positive Oct. 4 and died Oct. 8 at Bay Area Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,203rd COVID-19 related death is an 84-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive Sept. 21 and died Oct. 9 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,204th COVID-19 related death is a 69-year-old woman from Lane County who tested positive Oct. 6 and died Oct. 9 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,205th COVID-19 related death is a 74-year-old man from Lake County who tested positive Sept. 20 and died Oct. 8 at Providence Medford Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,206th COVID-19 related death is a 64-year-old woman from Clackamas County who tested positive Sept. 27 and died Oct. 8 at Providence Portland Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,207th COVID-19 related death is a 42-year-old woman from Jackson County who tested positive Sept. 5 and died Oct. 7 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,208th COVID-19 related death is a 64-year-old man from Washington County who tested positive Sept. 17 and died Oct. 5 at Kaiser Westside Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,209th COVID-19 related death is an 86-year-old woman from Coos County who tested positive Oct. 1 and died Oct. 5 at Coquille Valley Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,210th COVID-19 related death is an 82-year-old woman from Linn County who tested positive Aug. 30 and died Oct. 4 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,211th COVID-19 related death is an 84-year-old woman from Klamath County who tested positive Sept. 22 and died Sept. 26 at Sky Lakes Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,212th COVID-19 related death is a 79-year-old man from Multnomah County who tested positive Nov. 2 and died Nov. 17 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,213th COVID-19 related death is an 80-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive Oct. 20 and died Nov. 18 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,214th COVID-19 related death is a 73-year-old man from Marion County who tested positive Sept. 18 and died Oct. 1 at Samaritan Albany General Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,215th COVID-19 related death is a 64-year-old woman from Marion County who tested positive Oct. 27 and died Nov. 27 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,216th COVID-19 related death is a 58-year-old man from Marion County who tested positive Oct. 13 and died Nov. 10 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,217th COVID-19 related death is an 88-year-old man from Linn County who tested positive Nov. 22 and died Nov. 27 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,218th COVID-19 related death is a 56-year-old man from Klamath County who died Oct. 23 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,219th COVID-19 related death is an 86-year-old woman from Clackamas County who died Nov. 21 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,220th COVID-19 related death is a 37-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive Oct. 25 and died Nov. 20 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,221st COVID-19 related death is a 51-year-old woman from Multnomah County who tested positive Sept. 14 and died Oct. 17 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,222nd COVID-19 related death is a 76-year-old man from Marion County who died Aug. 30 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,223rd COVID-19 related death is a 79-year-old man from Marion County who tested positive Nov. 18 and died Nov. 30 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,224th COVID-19 related death is a 54-year-old woman from Marion County who tested positive Nov. 17 and died Nov. 28 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,225th COVID-19 related death is a 76-year-old woman from Marion County who tested positive Oct. 30 and died Nov. 23 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,226th COVID-19 related death is a 95-year-old man from Washington County who died Sept. 19 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,227th COVID-19 related death is a 76-year-old woman from Umatilla County who tested positive Nov. 23 and died Nov. 30 at Providence Sacred Heart Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,228th COVID-19 related COVID-19 related death is a 90-year-old man from Washington County who tested positive Nov. 22 and died Nov. 25 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Note: Updated information is known about Oregon’s 5,167th COVID-19 related death, a 68-year-old man from Josephine County who tested positive Nov. 30 and died Nov. 30. He had underlying conditions. He was originally reported as a 38-year-old man with unknown underlying conditions.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our web page (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

# # #


BLM Burns District opens public scoping period for Bridge Creek Area grazing plans (Photo)
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 12/03/21 10:47 AM
Bridge Creek Area Land Status Map
Bridge Creek Area Land Status Map
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-12/5514/150583/thumb_BCA_EIS_LandStatusMap.jpg

Hines, Ore. – The Bureau of Land Management Burns District is initiating an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Bridge Creek Area Allotment Management Plans (AMPs) and seeking public input on issues, actions, and alternatives that the EIS should address. The 30-day public scoping period will begin on December 3, 2021.

“There is a high level of public interest in this project and the BLM welcomes public participation to reach a sound decision,” said Andrews/Steens Field Manager Don Rotell. 

The Bridge Creek AMPs EIS will analyze several alternatives for livestock management and related actions in the 26,378-acre project area on Steens Mountain in southeast Oregon near the town of Frenchglen. The project includes four allotments: Hammond, Mud Creek, Hardie Summer, and Hammond Fenced Federal Range allotments. There is currently no grazing preference or grazing authorizations associated with the four allotments in the project area, all of which have been largely un-grazed since 2014. 

The alternatives in the EIS will consider issuance of 10-year grazing permits to up to three applicants and approval of four AMPs that outline seasonal grazing systems, grazing utilization thresholds, monitoring, and range developments. 

Additional project information is available through BLM’s ePlanning website at: https://eplanning.blm.gov/eplanning-ui/project/2013546/510 

Public comments should be submitted no later than January 3, 2022 on the ePlanning project page, by email to LM_OR_BU_BCA_AMP@blm.gov">BLM_OR_BU_BCA_AMP@blm.gov, or mail to 28910 Hwy 20 W., Hines, Oregon 97738. Please reference “BCA AMP” when submitting comments.

-BLM–

This year, we invite everyone to reimagine your public lands as we celebrate 75 years of the BLM’s stewardship and service to the American people. The BLM manages approximately 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. 




Attached Media Files: Bridge Creek Area Land Status Map

Board on Public Safety Standards & Training and Policy Committee Vacancies
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 12/03/21 9:55 AM

Board on Public Safety Standards & Training

 and Policy Committee

Open Vacancy – Recruitment

 

The Board on Public Safety Standards & Training (BPSST) and Policy Committees have open vacancies looking to be filled. The current vacancies are as follows:

BPSST: Please note that all Board position applications are due by December 10, 2021

  • Non-Management Law Enforcement
  • Non-Management Parole & Probation
  • Public Member – Member of a marginalized or historically underrepresented community
  • Public Member – Recommended to the Governor by the President of the Senate
  • Public Member – Recommended to the Governor by the Speaker of the House of Representatives

Telecommunications Policy Committee:

  • Recommended by and representing the Oregon Fire Chiefs Association

Corrections Policy Committee:

  • Oregon Sheriff’s Jail Command Council

Police Policy Committee:

  • Public Member – Member of a marginalized or historically underrepresented community
  • Non-Management Law Enforcement
  • Non-Management Law Enforcement
  • Oregon State Sheriff’s Association

Private Security/Investigator Policy Committee:

  • Hospitality Representative
  • Manufacturing Representative

Private Investigator Sub-Committee:

  • Representative of the Private Investigator Community

 

The BPSST Policy Committees are soon going to be recruiting for the upcoming 2022 vacancies. 

 

Upcoming Vacancies for 2022:

Telecommunications Policy Committee:

  • Public Member who has never been employed or utilized as a telecommunicator

Corrections Policy Committee:

  • Non-Management Corrections employed by Department of Corrections

 

To inquire about a vacancy, please visit Department of Public Safety Standards & Training : Board on Public Safety Standards & Training and Policy Committees : Boards and Committees : State of Oregon

If interested in applying for a Committee position, please complete and submit the Policy Committee Interest Form found under the ‘Board and Committee Resources’ section of the website listed above.

If interested in applying for a BPSST position, please complete the online application at View Job Posting Details - Workday (myworkday.com). (Please note that an account may need to be created if not already in Workday)

 

Thank you,

DPSST Board & Committees Staff


Fatal Crash on Hwy 22W-Polk County
Oregon State Police - 12/03/21 9:32 AM

On Thursday, December 2, 2021, at approximately 5:56 PM Oregon State Police and emergency personnel responded to a two-vehicle head-on crash on Hwy 22W near milepost 17. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Toyota Avalon, operated by James Marvin Dougherty (83) of Salem, was traveling westbound in the eastbound lanes and collided head-on with an eastbound Honda Element, operated by Samuel James Clark (50) of Salem. 

Clark and Dougherty were both transported to a local hospital with serious injuries. Dougherty was later pronounced deceased at the hospital. 

Eastbound lanes of Hwy 22W were closed for approximately 3 hours. 

OSP was assisted by Polk County Sheriff’s Office, Dallas Fire and Medics and ODOT. 


Thu. 12/02/21
Oregon State Hospital patient missing from Junction City campus
Oregon Health Authority - 12/02/21 5:43 PM

December 2, 2021

Media contact: Aria Seligmann, 503-910-9239 i.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us">ari.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us

Contact: Oregon State Police PIO, osppio@state.or.us

Oregon State Hospital patient missing from Junction City campus

A 31-year-old Oregon State Hospital psychiatric patient, Jordan James Savariego, was reported missing on Thursday, Dec. 2, 2021. Anyone seeing Savariego should call 911 or the Oregon State Police at 1-800-452-7888.

Savariego is accused of unauthorized departure. The OSP is conducting an investigation to help locate him. Savariego should not be approached.

Savariego was admitted from Lincoln County to the Junction City campus of Oregon State Hospital on Jan. 13, 2021. He was found Guilty Except for Insanity on the charges of Arson 1 and Aggravated Harassment.

He was last seen at the 5th St. Market in Eugene at approximately 2:07 p.m., Thursday, where he was on an approved outing. Oregon State Hospital staff members assigned to escort Savariego lost visual contact when he ran away from staff.

Hospital officials, who reported the missing patient to state and local law enforcement agencies, described Savariego as a Caucasian male, 5 feet 10 inches tall, 203 pounds, with black hair and brown eyes. When last seen, he was wearing blue sweatpants, a blue denim Carhart-style jacket, white t-shirt, brown hiking boots, and headphones.  He also wears eyeglasses.

Savariego

Any future news releases will be issued by the OSP.

###


Oregon Check Casher and Construction Company Operators Indicted in Payroll Tax Evasion Scheme
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 12/02/21 4:23 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A federal grand jury in Portland returned a five-count indictment today charging six individuals for their roles in a multiyear scheme to evade the payment of payroll and income taxes on the wages of construction workers.

David A. Katz, 45, of Tualatin, Oregon, the operator of Check Cash Pacific, Inc., a check cashing business with locations in the Portland area and Vancouver, Washington, is charged with conspiring with five individuals affiliated with Oregon-based construction companies to defraud the U.S. by facilitating under-the-table cash wage payments to construction workers to impede and obstruct the IRS’s ability to compute, assess, and collect payroll and income taxes due on the cash wages. 

Additionally, Katz is charged with four counts of filing false currency transaction reports with the U.S. Department of Treasury’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN).

Others charged with conspiracy to defraud the U.S. include Martin S. Elizondo, 46, also of Tualatin; Melesio Gomez-Rivera, 47, of Aloha, Oregon; Jorge Peraza, 49, and Natallie N. Graham, 46, both of Beaverton, Oregon; and Jose L. Altamirano, Sr., 60, of Bend, Oregon.

According to the indictment, from at least January 2014 and continuing through December 2017, Elizondo, Gomez-Rivera, and Peraza are alleged to have successfully evaded the employment tax obligations of their respective construction companies and assisted other construction companies do the same. To carry out the scheme, they cashed or had other individuals cash millions of dollars in payroll checks at various locations of Katz’s check cashing business, used the cash to pay construction workers under-the-table, and filed false business and payroll tax returns.

Altamirano is alleged to have used co-conspirators to cash payroll checks at Katz’s business to pay employees of his construction company under-the-table. Graham is alleged to have worked in the office of a subcontracting company used to facilitate and organize the unreported cash payments to workers.

In total, Katz and his co-conspirators cashed approximately $192 million in payroll checks, causing a combined employment and individual income tax loss of $68 million.

Katz, Elizondo, Gomez-Rivera, Peraza, and Graham will be arraigned on these charges in federal court in Portland on December 15, 2021.

Conspiracy to defraud the U.S. is punishable by up to five years in federal prison, a $250,000 fine, and three years’ supervised release. Filing false currency transaction reports is punishable by up to 10 years in federal prison, a $250,000 fine, and three years’ supervised release.

Acting U.S. Attorney Scott Erik Asphaug of the District of Oregon made the announcement.

This case was investigated by IRS-Criminal Investigation. Assistant U.S. Attorneys Seth D. Uram and Gavin W. Bruce are prosecuting the case.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime, and defendants are presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

# # #




Attached Media Files: Indictment , PDF Release

Local Man Faces Federal Charges for Hoax Bomb Threats Directed at Multiple Schools and a Hospital in Oregon
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 12/02/21 3:51 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A federal grand jury in Portland returned an indictment today charging a former resident of Newberg, Oregon with calling in hoax bomb threats to three schools and one hospital in Oregon.

Sean Case McGinley, 40, has been charged with four counts of making interstate threats involving explosives and four counts of conveying false information and hoaxes about destructive devices.

According to court documents, on October 26, 2021, McGinley began making multiple calls to the Newberg-Dundee Police Department dispatch center in which he referenced putting a pipe bomb under a vehicle in Newberg. Officers checked the area McGinley referenced, but did not locate a bomb. Meanwhile, McGinley’s calls and phone number were recorded and determined to originate from the St. Louis, Missouri area. Investigators later learned that McGinley formerly resided in Newberg and had family in and around St. Louis.

On November 9, 2021, McGinley placed another call to the Newberg-Dundee dispatch center claiming that a pipe bomb had been placed in the vehicle tailpipe of a Newberg Municipal Court judge. A Newberg-Dundee police officer returned McGinley’s call and spoke with him about the alleged tip. During this discussion, McGinley told the officer that he hoped someone would place a pipe bomb in the judge’s vehicle tailpipe and that he believed the judge was worthless.

On the morning of November 12, 2021, the principal of Newberg High School contacted Newberg-Dundee police to report a potential bomb threat. The principal gave officers a voicemail from an unknown person claiming there was a pipe bomb in the school. Officers determined that the hoax threat was placed by McGinley and that it also originated in St. Louis. Later the same morning, McGinley called a similar threat into Sherwood High School. McGinley then called a school resource officer at Sherwood High School, identified himself, and provided information about a purported pedophilia ring in Sherwood.

Between November 18 and 23, 2021, McGinley called in at least eight additional bomb threats to various public and private institutions. On November 18 and 22, 2021, McGinley called in threats to St. Paul High School and an elementary school in Tigard, Oregon. On November 23, 2021 alone, he called in four separate threats to Fowler Middle School and Twality Middle School in Tigard, the Providence Newberg Medical Center, and Providence Sherwood Medical Plaza. The threat made to the Providence Sherwood Medical Plaza prompted the facility to evacuate ambulatory patients and staff.

Amidst McGinley’s late November threat spree, authorities sought and obtained a federal criminal complaint and arrest warrant against McGinley and, on November 24, 2021, FBI agents arrested him in St. Louis. McGinley made his first appearance in federal court in the Eastern District of Missouri on November 29, 2021 and was ordered detained pending transfer to the District of Oregon. The investigation into McGinley’s threats is ongoing.

Making interstate threats involving explosives is punishable by up to 10 years in federal prison, three years’ supervised release, and a fine of $250,000. Conveying false information and hoaxes about destructive devices is punishable by up to five years in federal prison, three years’ supervised release, and a fine of $250,000.

Acting U.S. Attorney Scott Erik Asphaug of the District of Oregon made the announcement.

This case was investigated by the FBI with assistance from the Newberg-Dundee, Tigard, and Sherwood Police Departments and the Marion County Sheriff’s Office. Assistant U.S. Attorney Scott M. Kerin is prosecuting the case.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Oregon reports 1,046 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 42 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 12/02/21 3:09 PM

December 2, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 1,046 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 42 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 42 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 5,228 the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

OHA reported 1,046 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 393,232.

OHA releases new COVID-19 vaccine breakthrough report

OHA’s most recent update on COVID-19 breakthrough cases, released today, found that 71.3% of the 4,134 reported COVID-19 cases between Nov. 21 and Nov. 27 occurred in unvaccinated people.

There were 1,186 breakthrough cases, accounting for 28.7% of all cases.

The average age of the breakthrough cases during that period was 45. Twenty-eight breakthrough cases involved residents of care facilities, senior living communities or other congregate care settings. There were 45 cases in people aged 12 to 17.

To date, there have been 45,545 COVID-19 vaccine breakthrough cases in Oregon. The average age of all cases is 47. Breakthrough cases have been reported in all 36 counties.

Cases of COVID-19 are far more common in unvaccinated people. The report shows that the rate of COVID-19 in unvaccinated people is four times higher than in vaccinated people.

To date, 4.4% of all vaccine breakthrough cases have been hospitalized and 1.2% have died. The average age of vaccinated people who died was 81.

Vaccination remains the most effective tool to reduce the spread of COVID-19.

The latest breakthrough report can be found here.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 384, which is 20 fewer than yesterday. There are 90 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is two fewer than yesterday.

There are 49 available adult ICU beds out of 691 total (7% availability) and 312 available adult non-ICU beds out of 4,078 (8% availability). 

12/2/2021 Available Beds (and Percentage of Staffed Beds Available)

 

Statewide

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

Region 5

Region 6

Region 7

Region 9

Adult ICU beds available

49

(7%)

29

(8%)

5

(6%)

6

(7%)

3

(5%)

0

(0%)

1

(2%)

5

(19%)

Adult non-ICU beds available

312

(8%)

82

(4%)

25

(4%)

69

(12%)

33

(8%)

6

(12%)

48

(13%)

49

(41%)

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

Note: Please do not visit an emergency department for COVID-19 testing, unless you require emergency care for your symptoms.

Emergency departments in Oregon are under significant strain. You can find a test here.

If you have a medical condition that doesn’t require emergency care, contact your provider. An urgent care center may also help you get the care you need and will save emergency departments from added strain.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 26,172 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry on Dec. 1. Of that total, 2,278 were initial doses, 4,024 were second doses and 10,485 were third doses and booster doses. The remaining 9,295 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Dec. 1.

The seven-day running average is now 11,810 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 3,530,606 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, 75,802 doses of Pfizer pediatric, 2,275,997 doses of Moderna and 244,417 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

Note: Today’s cumulative total doses of Pfizer Comirnaty vaccine is lower than yesterday’s total. This is due to the removal of duplicate doses found during data reconciliation.

As of today, 2,955,159 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,667,597 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 data dashboards and have been updated today.

Cases and COVID-19 deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (7), Benton (19), Clackamas (84), Clatsop (2), Columbia (26), Coos (36), Crook (22), Curry (7), Deschutes (83), Douglas (41), Harney (6), Hood River (6), Jackson (86), Jefferson (17), Josephine (43), Klamath (18), Lane (70), Lincoln (6), Linn (64), Malheur (3), Marion (62), Multnomah (157), Polk (22), Tillamook (5), Umatilla (7), Union (3), Wallowa (2), Wasco (8), Washington (117), and Yamhill (17).

Note: More information about the cases and deaths will be provided in an updated news release.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our web page (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

# # #


Shop With A Cop 2021 (Photo)
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 12/02/21 2:28 PM
2021-12/5227/150567/DCSO_Badge_1.jpg
2021-12/5227/150567/DCSO_Badge_1.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-12/5227/150567/thumb_DCSO_Badge_1.jpg

Released by: Sergeant Jayson Janes

Date: December 2, 2021

 

Planning and preparations are underway for the 2021 Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Shop with a Cop program. Shop with a Cop is a joint venture between local law enforcement agencies throughout Central Oregon, local Walmart stores, and McDonalds. The primary focus is to help make the holidays a little brighter for less-fortunate families, and provide an opportunity for children to engage in positive police interaction.

This year, Shop with a Cop will be similar to 2020. Last year our volunteers shopped for 75 school-aged children and their families. Law enforcement then made deliveries to their houses dropping off the gifts and McDonalds meal vouchers. Although it is not how we envision Shop with a Cop to take place, we are grateful that we are still able to make this event happen. Gifts are often essential items such as; shoes, clothing, personal hygiene items, household items and other needed supplies. The program also assists children and families throughout the year with basic needs during emergencies.

Shop with a Cop is completely funded by donations from our community. Many businesses, organizations, and individual citizens give money to the program. No tax dollars are spent on this program. In addition to shopping for the students, Shop with a Cop also partners with Walmart to help provide a Christmas meal for some families.  We apply 100% of community donations to this local program.

Participating students are referred primarily by a community based advocacy group that works directly with school-aged children at most schools throughout Deschutes County. Additional students are referred via the Central Oregon Partnership for Youth (COPY) program, which provides positive mentoring for children of incarcerated parents..
 
Shop with a Cop is overseen and coordinated by the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office, however, its continued success stems from the participation of deputies from the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office, officers and deputies from agencies throughout Central Oregon, the Oregon State Police, and law enforcement from the U.S. Forest Service, National Park Service, and the Bureau of Land Management. Shop with a Cop has also been overwhelmingly successful in past years because of the outstanding generosity, in the form of monetary support, from local citizens and businesses. Volunteer support for the program has always been a critical part of the program's success as well.

For businesses and citizens who would like to make a monetary contribution towards this year's program, donations can be dropped off Monday through Friday, 8:00am to 5:00pm, at the main Sheriff's Office in Bend, or at the Sheriff's Office's substations in La Pine and Sisters.
 
Checks, made out to "DCSO SWAC", can also be mailed to:

Deschutes County Sheriff's Office
Attn: Shop with a Cop Program
63333 West Highway 20
Bend, OR 97703

We again would like to thank the many Central Oregon businesses and community members that make Shop with a Cop possible...together, we CAN again make a big difference in the lives of many individuals and families!

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is a full service agency that oversees the adult jail, provides patrol, criminal investigations, civil process and search and rescue operations. Special units include SWAT, Marine Patrol, ATV Patrol, Forest Patrol, along with five K9 teams. Founded in 1916 and today led by your duly elected Sheriff L. Shane Nelson, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office serves over 200,000 residents in Deschutes County. The agency has 259 authorized and funded personnel, which includes 191 sworn employees who provide services to the 3,055 square miles of Deschutes County. 




Attached Media Files: 2021-12/5227/150567/DCSO_Badge_1.jpg

Commission on Statewide Law Enforcement Standards of Conduct and Discipline Position Vacancies
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 12/02/21 1:44 PM

Hello,

 

The Commission on Statewide Law Enforcement Standards of Conduct and Discipline has vacancies for two representatives from historically marginalized groups or community-based organizations that represent communities impacted by policing.

 

Link for application interest form -  Commission Application Form

 

Please forward this email and application to members of your organization or other individuals you would recommend.

 

The applications are due by December 10, 2021.

 

Applications and questions may be sent to Michael Slauson at michael.slauson@state.or.us.

 

Here is some additional information about this Commission.

 

This Commission was created by House Bill 2930, during the 2021 Regular Legislative Session.

The Commission was formed to establish uniform standards of conduct for law enforcement officers and disciplinary standards and procedures to follow to make determinations and impose disciplinary action in response to misconduct by a law enforcement officer.

The uniform standards must address standards of conduct and discipline regarding:

  • Unjustified or excessive use of physical or deadly force;
  • Sexual harassment;
  • Sexual assault;
  • Assault;
  • Conduct that is motivated by or based on a real or perceived factor of an individual’s race, ethnicity, national origin, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, religion or homelessness;
  • Moral character; and
  • The use of drugs or alcohol while on duty. 

 

There are 15 members on the Commission.

  • The Director of the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST), Co-Chair
  • The Attorney General’s Designee from the Department of Justice (DOJ), Co-Chair
  • A State Senator appointed by the President of the Senate – nonvoting member, acting in an advisory capacity only
  • A State Representative appointed by the Speaker of the House of Representatives – nonvoting member, acting in an advisory capacity only
  • Two members who are chief law enforcement officers
  • Two members who represent labor organizations who represent law enforcement officers 
  • Two members who represent historically marginalized groups or community-based organizations that represent communities impacted by policing
  • One member who represents a federally recognized Indian tribe or association of tribes within this state 
  • Two members who are representatives of local government to represent the interests of cities and counties 
  • One member who represents public defender organizations established under ORS chapter 151 or the Oregon Criminal Defense Lawyers Association
  • One member who represents the interests of prosecutors in this state

 

Members serve a two year term and meetings will begin in January 2022. A member of the commission is entitled to compensation and expenses as provided in ORS 292.495.

 

House Bill 2930 has a deadline for adopting the standards as Oregon Administrative Rules. The commission will schedule frequent meetings to comply with the October 1, 2022, deadline.

Commission business meetings will be hosted in Salem and commission members will be able to participate remotely by phone or computer. Commission public hearings may be held throughout the state.

Note: All meetings are public meetings.

 

 

This announcement was prepared by the Department of Justice and the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training on behalf of the Commission on Statewide Law Enforcement Standards of Conduct and Discipline.

We sincerely thank you for your time and assistance.


Applications being accepted for Public Health Advisory Board
Oregon Health Authority - 12/02/21 1:28 PM

December 2, 2021

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Applications being accepted for Public Health Advisory Board

PORTLAND, Ore.—The Office of Governor Kate Brown and Oregon Health Authority, Public Health Division are seeking applicants for three positions on the state Public Health Advisory Board (PHAB).

OHA invites applications from people who meet the following criteria:

  • A person who represents health care organizations that are not coordinated care organizations.
  • A person who represents individuals who provide public health services to the public.
  • A person with expertise in population health metrics.

Each position serves a term that begins on Jan. 1, 2022. The end dates for the positions listed above vary. Board members are appointed by the Governor. Individuals with lived and/or professional experience related to health and racial equity and community engagement are encouraged to apply.

Under Oregon Revised Statutes 292.495, board members may qualify to receive compensation for their service.

To apply, complete the electronic application process at https://www.oregon.gov/gov/admin/Pages/How_To_Apply.aspx by Dec. 23. These recruitments will remain open until filled. Those applying will be asked to provide the following:

  1. A resume.
  2. A short personal biography.
  3. A brief statement of interest, which should include the positions the applicant is applying for.
  4. A brief statement on opportunities the applicant sees for the board to address equity.
  5. A brief statement on the applicant’s understanding of diversity, equity and inclusion.

Those unable to complete the form electronically should contact the Executive Appointments Office at executive.appointments@oregon.gov for assistance.

Information about the Public Health Advisory Board is available on the board’s website at http://www.healthoregon.org/phab.

For more information, contact Cara Biddlecom, OHA Public Health Division, at 971-673-2284 or a.m.biddlecom@state.or.us">cara.m.biddlecom@state.or.us.

###

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Cara Biddlecom at 971-673-2284 or a.m.biddlecom@dhsoha.state.or.us">cara.m.biddlecom@dhsoha.state.or.us or 711 TTY.


Value of Heritage Resources in Disaster Resilience Report and Messaging Guide now available
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 12/02/21 12:11 PM

SALEM, Oregon –

Oregon Heritage, a division of the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department that includes the Oregon Heritage Commission and the State Historic Preservation Office, recently released the Value of Heritage Resources in Disaster Recovery Report and Messaging Guide, commissioned by the Oregon Heritage Commission. 

The Value of Heritage Resources in Disaster Resilience Report and Messaging Guide is the most recent effort in the Oregon Heritage Commission’s long-term initiative to help heritage organizations and communities prepare their heritage resources for natural and man-made disasters. The specific goal of this report and accompanying messaging guide is to help heritage groups articulate why historic places and cultural resources should be included in local emergency plans so that emergency managers and decision makers in the community include those assets in both disaster planning and community recovery. 

Kuri Gill grants and outreach coordinator for Oregon Heritage said, “Heritage resources help create a unique sense of identity for communities, support our local economies and strengthen social bonds. The loss of such resources can be devastating to a community. And if preserved, in the aftermath of a disaster, they can be an anchor for community recovery. Articulating the importance of these resources is important in gaining local support for their inclusion in local disaster planning. The report and messaging tool arm heritage groups with the language and knowledge to share this message with decision makers and their community in order to ensure the long-term preservation of Oregon’s heritage.”

The elements of the report and messaging guide are as follows:

Value of Heritage in Disaster Resilience Report:  Includes case studies in heritage and disaster, risk communication techniques, and outlines the methodology that gathered input from a team of stakeholders to survey heritage leaders statewide for the creation of the messaging guide. 

The Messaging Guide: Shares guidance on creating an opening, impact, and approach message along with samples statements to modify.

          Sample Talking Points: Provides cut and paste messages to tailor to various audiences.

  Sample Opinion: Shares a sample editorial on disaster planning.

          Tips for Communicating: Summarizes FEMA’s top 4 tips in disaster risk communication.

These tools are intended to aid groups or communities in defining why heritage resources matter to their local identity and then sharing that message with the public and decision makers to enhance disaster planning for the community’s historic buildings, landmarks, museum collections, and cemeteries. These tools can also be used in conjunction with the Community Disaster Resilience Planning for Heritage Resources Guidebook to kick-start a community-wide disaster planning effort focused on heritage resources.

This report and accompanying tools also support the Oregon Heritage Commission’s strategic priority of promoting the value of heritage. Find this and additional tools in the Sharing the Value of Heritage Toolkit on Oregon Heritage’s website, www.oregonheritage.org. 


Healthcare-Associated Infections Advisory Committee meets virtually Dec. 8
Oregon Health Authority - 12/02/21 11:26 AM

December 2, 2021

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Healthcare-Associated Infections Advisory Committee meets virtually Dec. 8

What: The Healthcare-Associated Infections Advisory Committee (HAIAC) is holding its quarterly public meeting.

Agenda: Committee Business (Logistics update; approve September 2021 minutes), OHA updates, Influenza vaccination and surveillance updates, NHSN data review, Project Firstline updates, Topics for future meetings and reports, and Public comment.

When: Wednesday, Dec. 8, 1-3 p.m.

Where: Zoom. https://www.zoomgov.com/meeting/register/vJItc--spjIoH3Zf4kk2g1vKdMMHb3lfYTQ. All attendees must use the webinar for audio functions. Please register for the webinar by following the link above. After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Background: OHA provides oversight and support for the mandatory reporting of healthcare-associated infections in Oregon via the HAI Program. The HAI Program convenes its advisory board on a quarterly basis; the purpose of the board is to make recommendations to OHA regarding infection measures reportable by health care facilities: http://www.oregon.gov/oha/ph/DiseasesConditions/CommunicableDisease/HAI/Pages/index.aspx

Program contact: Roza Tammer, 971-673-1074, oza.p.tammer@state.or.us">roza.p.tammer@state.or.us

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Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Laura LaLonde at 971-673-1120, 711 TTY or a.Lalonde2@dhsoha.state.or.us">Laura.Lalonde2@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon reports 1,111 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 25 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 12/02/21 10:44 AM

This news release is an updated version to include case and death information.

December 1, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 1,111 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 25 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 25 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 5,186, Oregon Health Authority (OHA) reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

OHA reported 1,111 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 392,197.

COVID-19 weekly cases and hospitalizations decline, deaths decline

OHA’s COVID-19 Weekly Report released today shows a decrease in daily cases and hospitalizations and deaths.

OHA reported 4,276 new cases of COVID-19 during the week of Monday, Nov. 22, through Sunday, Nov. 28. That is 25% decrease from the previous week.

There were 95,882 tests for COVID-19 for the week of Nov. 21 through Nov. 27. The percentage of positive tests declined slightly to 5.6%, from 6% the previous week.

There were 226 new COVID-19 hospitalizations, down from 268 last week — a 16% drop.

There were 125 reported COVID-19-related deaths, down from 214 reported the previous week, as epidemiologists reviewed a backlog of suspected COVID-19 related deaths by matching death certificates to previously reported cases. Note: A previous summary of this report erroneously characterized the trend for Weekly COVID-19 related deaths. It is corrected in this version.

Today’s COVID-19 Weekly Outbreak Report shows 54 active COVID-19 outbreaks in senior living communities and congregate living settings, with three or more confirmed cases and one or more COVID-19 related deaths.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 404, which represents no change from yesterday. There are 92 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is two fewer than yesterday.

There are 49 available adult ICU beds out of 691 total (7% availability) and 270 available adult non-ICU beds out of 4,108 (7% availability). 

12/1/2021 Available Beds (and Percentage of Staffed Beds Available)

 

Statewide

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

Region 5

Region 6

Region 7

Region 9

Adult ICU beds available

49

(7%)

27

(7%)

3

(3%)

8

(9%)

1

(2%)

1

(10%)

1

(2%)

8

(31%)

Adult non-ICU beds available

270

(7%)

64

(3%)

8

(1%)

56

(10%)

35

(8%)

4

(8%)

55

(13%)

48

(40%)

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

Note: Please do not visit an emergency department for COVID-19 testing, unless you require emergency care for your symptoms.

Emergency departments in Oregon are under significant strain. You can find a test here.

If you have a medical condition that doesn’t require emergency care, contact your provider. An urgent care center may also help you get the care you need and will save emergency departments from added strain.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 25,659 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry on Nov. 30. Of that total, 14,324 were initial doses, 1,947 were second doses and 10,174 were third doses and booster doses. The remaining 11,335 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Nov. 30.

The seven-day running average is now 12,208 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 3,534,286 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, 70,261 doses of Pfizer pediatric, 2,267,258 doses of Moderna and 244,207 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 2,950,723 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,662,164 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 data dashboards and have been updated today.

Cases and COVID-19 deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (10), Benton (9), Clackamas (90), Clatsop (9), Columbia (29), Coos (29), Crook (23), Curry (5), Deschutes (82), Douglas (64), Hood River (8), Jackson (75), Jefferson (6), Josephine (55), Klamath (19), Lake (2), Lane (67), Lincoln (17), Linn (72), Malheur (3), Marion (100), Morrow (3), Multnomah (141), Polk (36), Tillamook (4), Umatilla (9), Union (5), Wallowa (3), Wasco (9), Washington (102), and Yamhill (25).

Oregon’s 5,162nd COVID-19 related death is a 72-year-old man from Coos County who died Nov. 1 at Coquille Valley Hospital. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,163rd COVID-19 related death is an 86-year-old woman from Washington County who died Oct. 19 at OHSU Hillsboro Medical Center. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,164th COVID-19 related death is an 83-year-old man from Josephine County who died Sept. 25 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,165th COVID-19 related death is a 56-year-old man from Clackamas County who died Sept. 14 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,166th COVID-19 related death is a 50-year-old woman from Clackamas County who died Sept. 30 at Kaiser Sunnyside Medical Center. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,167th COVID-19 related death is a 38-year-old man from Josephine County who tested positive Nov. 30 and died Nov. 30 at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,168th COVID-19 related death is an 80-year-old woman from Jackson County who tested positive Nov. 23 and died Nov. 30 at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,169th COVID-19 related death is a 93-year-old man from Douglas County who tested positive Nov. 24 and died Nov. 25 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,170th COVID-19 related death is a 58-year-old man from Columbia County who died Sept. 14 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,171st COVID-19 related death is a 90-year-old man from Clackamas County who died Nov. 24 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,172nd COVID-19 related death is a 98-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive Nov. 27 and died Nov. 29 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,173rd COVID-19 related death is a 72-year-old man from Marion County who tested positive Nov. 14 and died Nov. 27 at Salem Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,174th COVID-19 related death is a 79-year-old woman from Malheur County who tested positive Oct. 30 and died Nov. 24 at St Alphonsus Medical Center Ontario. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,175th COVID-19 related death is a 62-year-old man from Malheur County who tested positive Oct. 30 and died Nov. 26. Location of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,176th COVID-19 related death is an 82-year-old man from Malheur County who tested positive Oct. 30 and died Nov. 23 at St Luke’s Nampa Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,177th COVID-19 related death is a 53-year-old woman from Lane County who died Nov. 13 at McKenzie Willamette Medical Center. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,178th COVID-19 related death is an 88-year-old man from Lane County who died Oct. 14 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,179th COVID-19 related death is a 90-year-old woman from Lane County who died Sept. 8 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,180th COVID-19 related death is a 60-year-old man from Klamath County who tested positive Nov. 2 and died Nov. 30 at Sky Lakes Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,181st COVID-19 related death is an 83-year-old woman from Washington County who tested positive Nov. 18 and died Nov. 27 at OHSU Hillsboro Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,182nd COVID-19 related death is a 71-year-old man from Washington County who tested positive Nov. 3 and died Nov. 17 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,183rd COVID-19 related death is a 76-year-old man from Umatilla County who died Nov. 7 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,184th COVID-19 related death is a 35-year-old woman from Umatilla County who tested positive Sept. 19 and died Nov. 19 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,185th COVID-19 related death is a 41-year-old man from Polk County who died Oct. 16 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,186th COVID-19 related death is a 51-year-old woman from Polk County who died Sept. 23 at Sacred Heart Medical Center. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

# # #


Oregon State Police seeking public assistance in the poisoning of Catherine Wolf Pack- Union County
Oregon State Police - 12/02/21 9:00 AM

The Oregon State Police is seeking public assistance in locating the person or persons responsible for the poisoning of the Catherine Wolf Pack in eastern Oregon. 

On February 9, 2021, Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division Troopers received information from the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) regarding a possibly deceased, collared wolf. Troopers responded to the area and located five deceased wolves, three males, and two females. It was later determined the wolves were from the Catherine Pack, with all known members present and deceased. The wolves were located southeast of Mount Harris, within Union County. Fish and Wildlife Troopers and ODFW personnel with the assistance of a helicopter searched the area for anything of evidentiary value. An additional deceased magpie was also found in the vicinity of the deceased wolves. 

The five wolves and magpie were collected and transported to the US Fish and Wildlife Service Forensics Lab located in Ashland, Oregon to determine the cause of death. 

On March 11, 2021, Fish and Wildlife Troopers again received information from ODFW personnel of an additional wolf collar emitting a mortality signal in the same general location. A search of the area located a deceased female wolf, a skunk, and a magpie all very close to the scene. All animals were collected and immediately submitted to the USFWS lab for testing. The female wolf was dispersing from the Keating Pack. 

Fish and Wildlife Troopers were initially hampered in investigating the scene due to snow levels and inclement weather. Troopers continued searching over the next few weeks as snow continued to melt and located evidence of suspected poisoning. The evidence was submitted for testing and analysis. 

In April 2021, the USFWS submitted their examination reports with findings consistent with poisoning as the cause of death for all six wolves, the skunk, and two magpies. Lab results also indicated the suspected evidence confirmed a poisonous substance. 

In addition, two more collared wolves were found deceased in Union County after the initial incidents. In April 2021, a deceased adult male wolf from the Five Points Pack was located west of Elgin and in July 2021, a young female wolf from the Clark Creek Pack was located northeast of La Grande. In both cases the cause of death was not readily apparent, a necropsy and testing were conducted. Toxicology reports confirmed the presence of differing types of poison in both wolves. Based upon the type of poison and locations, it was determined the death of the young female wolf may be related to the earlier six poisonings.

Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Troopers have continued in their investigation in the intervening months but have exhausted leads in the case. OSP is asking any person with information related to this investigation to contact the Oregon State Police through the OSP TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP (677) or TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us. Please reference Case #SP21-033033.

To learn about the Wolves in Oregon specifically wolf-livestock conflicts please visit https://www.dfw.state.or.us/Wolves/index.asp#livestock   

 

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators 

The Oregon Hunters Association TIP reward offers preference points or cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of Bighorn Sheep, Rocky Mountain Goat, Moose, Elk, Deer, Antelope, Bear, Cougar, Wolf, Upland Birds, Waterfowl, Furbearers, Game Fish and Shellfish. Cash rewards can also be awarded for turning in people who destroy habitat, illegally obtain licenses/tags, and for the unlawful lending/borrowing of big game tags.

Preference Point Rewards:

5 Points-Bighorn Sheep

5 Points-Rocky Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points-Cougar

 

CASH REWARDS:

$1,000 Bighorn Sheep, Rocky Mountain Goat and Moose 

  $500 Elk, Deer and Antelope 

  $300 Bear, Cougar and Wolf 

  $300 Habitat Destruction

$200 Illegally Obtaining License/Tag(s)

$200 Unlawful Lend/Borrow Big Game Tags(s) 

  $100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl 

  $100 Furbearers 

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish 

 


Wed. 12/01/21
Oregon Health Policy Board meets December 7 via Zoom
Oregon Health Authority - 12/01/21 5:11 PM

December 1, 2021

Contacts: Philip Schmidt, 503-383-6079philip.schmidt@dhsoha.state.or.us  (media inquiries)

Tara Chetock, 971-304-9917, a.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us">tara.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Oregon Health Policy Board meets December 7 via Zoom

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Policy Board.

When: December 7, 8:30 a.m. to noon.

Where: Virtual meeting only. The public can join remotely via Zoom or a conference line. To join via Zoom: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1602657497?pwd=emhzUnJsK1EzWk5rV0VpYTdjU3VrQT09

To call in to the meeting on a mobile device, use the following number:

+16692545252,,1602657497#,,,,,,0#,,306554# US (San Jose)

Proposed Agenda Topics:

  1. Welcome, Roll Call, and Minutes Approval
  2. Oregon Health Authority Director’s Update
  3. Oregon Health Policy Board Committee Liaison Updates
  4. Committee Membership Workgroup Request
  5. Health Equity Committee: Proposed Membership Slate
  6. OHA 1115 Medicaid Waiver: Draft Application and Public Comment Process
  7. Public Comment

To provide public comment, please submit your request for public comment at least 48 hours prior to the meeting at: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/OHPB-Public-Comment

For more information and meeting materials, please visit the OHPB meeting webpage at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/OHPB/Pages/OHPB-Meetings.aspx

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • CART (live captions)
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Tara Chetock at 971-304-9917, 711 TTY, a.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us">tara.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Public comment period on Medicaid waiver renewal to start Dec. 7
Oregon Health Authority - 12/01/21 4:50 PM

Dec. 1, 2021

Contact: Philip Schmidt (503) 383-6079 (media), meeting info and accommodations contacts listed below.

Public comment period on Medicaid waiver renewal to start Dec. 7

What: OHA is seeking the public’s input on 1115 Medicaid Demonstration waiver renewal application. The public is invited to give input on the draft waiver application Dec. 7, 2021 through Jan. 7, 2022. Details on meetings and how to comment are below.

The draft application is available here.

For people unable to attend a meeting, or who prefer to submit comments in writing, they can be sent to .Renewal@dhsoha.state.or.us">1115Waiver.Renewal@dhsoha.state.or.us, via this form https://tinyurl.com/OHPWaiverSurvey or send them via mail to:

Health Policy and Analytics Medicaid Waiver Renewal Team

Attn: Michelle Hatfield

500 Summer St. NE, 5th Floor, E65

Salem, OR 97301

Agenda: At each meeting, OHA staff will give an overview of the waiver application followed by an opportunity for community members to give public comment.

Meeting details:

Background: Over the past year, OHA has been developing a shared vision from a diverse range of health care and community voices for changes to the Medicaid system – often referred to as the Oregon Health Plan (OHP). The vision for those proposals are outlined in a series of five policy concept papers, linked below. Based on the concept papers, OHA has developed a draft waiver application which formally proposes the concepts to the federal government. OHA is seeking public comment on the draft application during the Dec. 7, 2021 to Jan. 7, 2022 period.  

Draft Medicaid waiver application

Final concept papers:

Maximizing continuous and equitable access to coverage

Improving health outcomes by streamlining life and coverage transitions  

Moving to a value-based global budget

Incentivizing Equitable Care

Improving health through focused equity investments led by communities

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Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact the meeting information/accommodations contact listed below each meeting by phone or their email at least 48 hours before the meeting. OHA accepts all relay calls.


A punto de comenzar la pausa de nuevas solicitudes para el Programa de Asistencia de Emergencia para Alquiler de Oregón
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 12/01/21 4:24 PM

1 de diciembre, 2021 

 

Contacto para medios: Delia Hernández 

503-986-2051 

equests@oregon.gov">HCS.mediarequests@oregon.gov 

 

A punto de comenzar la pausa de nuevas solicitudes para el Programa de Asistencia de Emergencia para Alquiler de Oregón

Más de $ 157 millones en ayuda federal de emergencia pagada a más de 23,000 hogares

 

SALEM, Ore. — Oregón Housing and Community Services (OHCS, por sus siglas en inglés) y los Administradores de Programas Locales (LPAs) continúan avanzando en procesar solicitudes para el Programa de Asistencia de Alquiler de Emergencia de Oregón (OERAP). 

 

Hasta la fecha, OHCS y LPAs han pagado $ 157.5 millones en asistencia federal de alquiler de emergencia a 23,155 solicitantes. En comparación con $ 149.8 millones y 22,128 solicitantes la semana pasada. La agencia ocupa el octavo lugar en el país en el porcentaje de fondos pagados y comprometidos.

 

Pausa de solicitudes nuevas para OERAP

 

Durante la conferencia de prensa de hoy, OHCS anunció que la pausa en aceptar nuevas solicitudes para OERAP comienza hoy, 1 de diciembre, a las 11:59 p.m. Con base en la cantidad de fondos que se han solicitado a través de las solicitudes recibidas, el estado calcula que se han solicitado casi todos los $ 289 millones en asistencia federal de alquiler de emergencia que hemos recibido hasta la fecha. 

 

“Al aproximarse las vacaciones de diciembre, nuestra principal prioridad sigue siendo mantener a las familias alojadas de forma segura y asequible. Sabemos que los residentes del estado que se han atrasado en el pago de la renta están estresados y asustados ”, dijo la directora de OHCS, Margaret Salazar. “El llamado de la Gobernadora a una sesión especial de vivienda para mantener a las familias alojadas durante estos momentos difíciles es lo correcto y confiamos en que la Legislatura llegará a un consenso sobre medidas adicionales para proteger a los inquilinos. Las familias de Oregón necesitan más tiempo y el programa necesita más fondos ".

 

Hay asistencia de alquiler disponible en muchas localidades, a través de programas que operan independientemente de la OERAP. Algunas ciudades y condados recibieron fondos de asistencia para el alquiler de emergencia directamente del Tesoro de los EE. UU. Y estos programas deben tener fondos disponibles. Incluyen:

Las personas también pueden comunicarse con el 2-1-1 o las agencias de acción comunitaria en su área. 

Si una persona ha presentado previamente una solicitud o la ha iniciado, la pausa no le afectará. Aquellos que iniciaron sus solicitudes aún podrán completarlas, y las solicitudes que se enviaron anteriormente aún se procesarán. Los solicitantes pueden continuar teniendo acceso al portal OERAP para completar su solicitud o verificar el estado de su solicitud. Serán alertados por correo electrónico a medida que avance su aplicación.

Se recomienda a cualquier persona que se haya atrasado en el pago del alquiler o que pueda estar atrasado en el alquiler de diciembre que solicite asistencia de emergencia para el alquiler antes de las 11:59 p.m. el 1 de diciembre en oregonrentalassistance.org.

Progreso y números actualizados

 

A través del plan de tres puntos, OHCS y su socio de procesamiento, Public Partnerships LLC (PPL), han logrado avances significativos para procesar rápidamente solicitudes en las últimas semanas. Actualmente, 150 empleados de PPL están procesando solicitudes con enfoque en las que están fuera del período de protección de desalojo de 60/90 días. La semana pasada, PPL procesó cerca de 547 solicitudes, superando su meta de 500 solicitudes. 

 

Hasta la fecha, OHCS y LPAs han: 

  • Pagado $ 157,576,939 a propietarios e inquilinos para ayudar a 23,155 hogares de Oregon.
  • Procesado y comprometido $ 27.4 millones adicionales en fondos para 3,265 hogares.
  • Recibido más de 55,736 solicitudes completas. 

 

Visite el tablero de datos de OERAP para más datos.  

 

Aplicaciones en proceso de revisión

 

Aproximadamente 20,987 solicitudes están en proceso de revisión. La ventana de protección de 60/90 días comienza cuando un inquilino muestra prueba de que solicitó asistencia a un programa. Sin embargo, estos datos no están disponibles actualmente. Como representante, OHCS realiza un seguimiento cuando un inquilino completa una solicitud de OERAP y la cantidad de solicitantes a los que no se les ha pagado fuera del plazo de 60 días (90 días en el condado de Multnomah y áreas no incorporadas del condado de Washington). Las solicitudes fuera de la ventana de 60/90 días se trasladarán de la LPA de su condado a la PPL.

 

Este gráfico a continuación muestra las áreas geográficas con el mayor número de solicitudes fuera de los períodos de protección de 60 y 90 días a partir del 1 de diciembre. Este gráfico no incluye solicitudes fuera del período de 60/90 días de los condados que recibieron financiación para asistencia de alquiler de emergencia directamente del Departamento del Tesoro.

 

 

 

Este gráfico muestra los tiempos promedio de procesamiento de solicitudes para cada condado para el programa OERAP a partir de esta semana.

 

 

El condado de Multnomah no está incluido en esta comparación porque tiene una ventana de 90 días. Su tiempo medio de procesamiento es de 75 días. En promedio, PPL procesó las solicitudes dentro de unos 57 días desde que recibieron la solicitud. Se están realizando mejoras para realizar un seguimiento de los tiempos de procesamiento de PPL que tengan en cuenta que están aceptando aplicaciones antiguas, en lugar de aceptar aplicaciones a medida que llegan como LPAs.

### 




Attached Media Files: 2021-12/1810/150536/12-1-2021-PR-App-Pause-SPA.pdf

State to pause accepting new applications for the Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program (Photo)
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 12/01/21 3:27 PM
2021-12/1810/150534/pr-2.png
2021-12/1810/150534/pr-2.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-12/1810/150534/thumb_pr-2.png

Dec. 1, 2021 

 

Media Contact: Delia Hernández 

503-986-2051 

equests@oregon.gov">HCS.mediarequests@oregon.gov 

 

State to pause accepting new applications for the Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program

More than $157 million in federal emergency rental assistance paid to over 23,000 households

 

SALEM, Ore. — Oregon Housing and Community Services (OHCS) and Local Program Administrators (LPAs) continue to make strong progress on processing applications for the Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program (OERAP). 

 

As of today, OHCS and LPAs have paid $157.5 million in federal emergency rental assistance to 23,155 applicants, up from $149.8 million and 22,128 applicants last week. The agency is ranked 8th in the nation in the percentage of funds paid and obligated. 

 

Media briefing on new application pause for OERAP

 

During today’s media briefing, OHCS announced that the pause in accepting new applications for OERAP starts today, Dec. 1, at 11:59 p.m. Based on the amount of funding that has been requested through the applications that have been paid and are currently in the queue, the state estimates nearly all the $289 million in federal emergency rental assistance we’ve received so far has been requested by renters.  

 

“As we look to the December holidays, our top priority continues to keep families safely and affordably housed. We know Oregonians who’ve fallen behind on rent are stressed and scared,” said OHCS Director Margaret Salazar. “The governor’s call for a housing special session to keep families housed during this difficult time is the right call and we are confident the Legislature will come to consensus on additional measures to protect renters. Oregon renters need more time, and the program needs more funding.”  

 

There is rental assistance available in many localities – through programs that are operating independently from OERAP. Some cities and counties received emergency rental assistance funding directly from the U.S. Department of the Treasury, and these programs should have funds available. They include: 

 

 

People can also contact 211 or Community Action Agencies in their area. 

 

If a person has previously submitted an application or began an application, the pause will not impact them. Those who started their applications will still be able to complete them, and those applications that were previously submitted will still be processed. Applicants can continue to log on to the OERAP portal to complete their application or check the status of their finished application. They will be alerted by email as their application advances. 

 

Anyone who has fallen behind on rent or may get behind on December rent is encouraged to apply for emergency rental assistance before 11:59 p.m. Dec. 1 at oregonrentalassistance.org.

 

Progress and updated numbers  

 

Through its three-point plan, OHCS and its processing partner, Public Partnerships LLC (PPL), have made significant strides to drive rapid application processing in the past several weeks. Currently, 150 PPL staff are processing applications with a focus on applications outside the 60-/90-day safe harbor period. In the past week, PPL processed close to 547 applications, exceeding their 500-application target.

 

To date, OHCS and LPAs have: 

  • Paid $157,576,939 to landlords and tenants to help 23,155 Oregon households.
  • Processed and obligated an additional $27.4 million in funds for 3,265 households.
  • Received more than 55,736 completed applications.

 

Visit the OERAP dashboard for more data.  

 

Applications in review process  

 

About 20,987 applications are in the review process. The 60-/90-day window of protection begins when a tenant shows proof they applied for the program. However, this data is not currently available. As proxy, OHCS is tracking when a tenant completes an OERAP application and the number of applicants who have not been paid outside of the 60-day window (90 days in Multnomah County and unincorporated areas of Washington County). Applications outside the 60-/90-day window are being moved from the LPA in their county to PPL. 

 

The graph below shows an estimate of the geographic areas with the most applications outside the 60- and 90-day windows of protection as of Dec. 1. This graph does not include applications outside the 60-/90-day window from counties that received ERA funding directly from the U.S. Treasury.

 

[See attached file]

 

Below is a graphic that shows average application processing times for each county for the OERAP program as of this week. 

 

 [See attached file]

 

 

 

Multnomah County is not included in this as a comparison because they have a 90-day window. Their average processing time is 75 days. On average, PPL processed applications within an estimated 57 days from when they received the application. Improvements are underway to track PPL processing times that take into account they are taking old applications.

### 

 




Attached Media Files: 2021-12/1810/150534/12-1-2021-PR-Application-Pause.pdf , 2021-12/1810/150534/pr-2.png , 2021-12/1810/150534/Pr-1.png

Pendleton Man Sentenced to Federal Prison for Assault with a Deadly Weapon, Distribution of Methamphetamine
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 12/01/21 3:05 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A Pendleton, Oregon man was sentenced to federal prison today for shooting a family member with a semi-automatic pistol and distributing methamphetamine.

Royce Francis Speedis, 34, was sentenced to 77 months in federal prison and three years’ supervised release.

According to court documents, in early March 2019, Speedis and co-defendant Lavella Ruth Thompson, 28, also of Pendleton, arranged to purchase methamphetamine on the Umatilla Indian Reservation. On March 7, 2019, three individuals drove to the reservation to meet and sell methamphetamine to Thompson. Thompson arrived in an SUV and tried to convince the three people to follow her to a second location to complete the sale. When they declined, Thompson returned to the SUV. Three men then exited the SUV with guns and opened fire into the sellers’ car. One passenger in the sellers’ car sustained non-life-threatening injuries after being struck in the back of the head. 

The methamphetamine sellers provided conflicting accounts of Speedis’ involvement in the shooting. A ballistics analysis later linked a Ruger rifle recovered from Speedis’ family’s residence on the reservation to spent cartridge casings found at the shooting scene. However, no arrests were made following the shooting.

On April 17, 2019, Speedis and his sister engaged in an argument with their cousin on the reservation. When the cousin attempted to leave, Speedis pulled a black semi-automatic pistol from his waistband and fired a single round that traveled through his cousin’s right leg into his left leg.

On April 23, 2019, a federal grand jury in Portland returned a two-count indictment charging Speedis with assault with a deadly weapon and using a firearm in connection with a crime of violence. On August 19, 2020, Speedis was indicted a second time, along with Thompson, on one count each of conspiring with one another to distribute and possess with intent to distribute methamphetamine and interference with commerce by robbery.

One year later, on August 23, 2021, Speedis pleaded guilty to assault with a deadly weapon and conspiring to possess with intent to distribute methamphetamine.

On September 7, 2021, Thompson pleaded guilty to the conspiracy charge. She will be sentenced on December 10, 2021.

Acting U.S. Attorney Scott Erik Asphaug of the District of Oregon made the announcement.

This case was investigated by the Umatilla Tribal Police Department and the FBI. It was prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Fatal Crash on Hwy 197-Wasco County
Oregon State Police - 12/01/21 3:00 PM

On Wednesday, December 1, 2021, at approximately 8:24 AM, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Highway 197 near milepost 11.  

Preliminary investigation revealed a northbound Acura TL, operated by Garet Nunnery (25) of Madras, drifted onto the southbound shoulder and rolled multiple times.

Nunnery sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased. 

Hwy 197 was closed for approximately 3.5 hours.

OSP was assisted by Wasco County Sheriff’s office, Dufur Fire and Rescue and ODOT.


Oregon reports 1,111 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 25 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 12/01/21 2:33 PM

December 1, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 1,111 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 25 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 25 new COVID-19 related death in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 5,186, Oregon Health Authority (OHA) reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

OHA reported 1,111 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 392,197.

COVID-19 weekly cases and hospitalizations decline, deaths rise

OHA’s COVID-19 Weekly Report released today shows a decrease in daily cases and hospitalizations and an increase in deaths.

OHA reported 4,276 new cases of COVID-19 during the week of Monday, Nov. 22, through Sunday, Nov. 28. That is 25% decrease from the previous week.

There were 95,882 tests for COVID-19 for the week of Nov. 21 through Nov. 27. The percentage of positive tests declined slightly to 5.6%, from 6% the previous week.

There were 226 new COVID-19 hospitalizations, down from 268 last week — a 16% drop.

There were 125 reported COVID-19-related deaths, up from 214 reported the previous week, as epidemiologists reviewed a backlog of suspected COVID-19 related deaths by matching death certificates to previously reported cases.

Today’s COVID-19 Weekly Outbreak Report shows 54 active COVID-19 outbreaks in senior living communities and congregate living settings, with three or more confirmed cases and one or more COVID-19 related deaths.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 404, which represents no change from yesterday. There are 92 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is two fewer than yesterday.

There are 49 available adult ICU beds out of 691 total (7% availability) and 270 available adult non-ICU beds out of 4,108 (7% availability). 

12/1/2021 Available Beds (and Percentage of Staffed Beds Available)

 

Statewide

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

Region 5

Region 6

Region 7

Region 9

Adult ICU beds available

49

(7%)

27

(7%)

3

(3%)

8

(9%)

1

(2%)

1

(10%)

1

(2%)

8

(31%)

Adult non-ICU beds available

270

(7%)

64

(3%)

8

(1%)

56

(10%)

35

(8%)

4

(8%)

55

(13%)

48

(40%)

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

Note: Please do not visit an emergency department for COVID-19 testing, unless you require emergency care for your symptoms.

Emergency departments in Oregon are under significant strain. You can find a test here.

If you have a medical condition that doesn’t require emergency care, contact your provider. An urgent care center may also help you get the care you need and will save emergency departments from added strain.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 25,659 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry on Nov. 30. Of that total, 14,324 were initial doses, 1,947 were second doses and 10,174 were third doses and booster doses. The remaining 11,335 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Nov. 30.

The seven-day running average is now 12,208 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 3,534,286 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, 70,261 doses of Pfizer pediatric, 2,267,258 doses of Moderna and 244,207 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 2,950,723 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,662,164 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 data dashboards and have been updated today.

Cases and COVID-19 deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (10), Benton (9), Clackamas (90), Clatsop (9), Columbia (29), Coos (29), Crook (23), Curry (5), Deschutes (82), Douglas (64), Hood River (8), Jackson (75), Jefferson (6), Josephine (55), Klamath (19), Lake (2), Lane (67), Lincoln (17), Linn (72), Malheur (3), Marion (100), Morrow (3), Multnomah (141), Polk (36), Tillamook (4), Umatilla (9), Union (5), Wallowa (3), Wasco (9), Washington (102), and Yamhill (25).

Note: More information about the cases and deaths will be provided in an updated news release.

# # #


INSIGHT SCHOOL OF OREGON - PAINTED HILLS | BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING |December 17 @11:00am
Insight School of Ore. - Painted Hills - 12/01/21 2:01 PM

The ISOR-PH board will hold a regular board meeting on December 17 @11:00am 

Insight School of Oregon Painted Hills Board Members are hereby notified that the Meeting of the Board will be held on Friday, December 17 @11:00am.

Insight School of Oregon Painted Hills Board Members are hereby notified that the Meeting of the Board will be held at:

1.Via Teleconference - using any of the following US phone numbers

+1 253 215 8782

+1 346 248 7799

+1 669 900 9128

+1 301 715 8592

+1 312 626 6799

+1 646 558 8656

Meeting ID is: 936 9648 8538

And

2. Via Zoom Meeting Link:

https://zoom.us/s/93696488538

The Public has been invited to the Board Meeting with notices posted at the following locations:

A. FlashNet Newswire

http://flashalertbend.net/press-releases.html

B. Insight School of Oregon Painted Hills Office

603 NW 3rd Street

Prineville, OR 97754


Ho, Ho, Ho, Holiday Scams !
FBI - Oregon - 12/01/21 12:59 PM

If you’re doing online shopping this holiday season, be on the lookout for scammers trying to steal a deal, too!

During the 2020 holiday shopping season, the FBI Internet Crime Complaint Center (IC3.gov) received more than 17,000 complaints regarding the non-delivery of goods, resulting in losses of more than $53 million. The FBI anticipates this number could increase during the 2021 holiday season due to rumors of merchandise shortages and the ongoing pandemic.

“Oftentimes when we talk about cyber crimes, we are referring to massive intrusions into financial institutions or ransomware attacks against large providers. Smaller cyber scams run by individuals or groups can be just as frustrating and difficult for families this time of year when all you want to do is provide the perfect gift for your family. The best thing you can do to be a savvy shopper is to know what scams are out there and take some basic precautions,” says Kieran L. Ramsey, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon.

Here’s a look at some of the more common scams:

Online Shopping Scams:

Scammers often offer too-good-to-be-true deals via phishing e-mails, through social media posts, or through ads. Perhaps you were trying to buy tickets to the next big concert or sporting event and found just what you were looking for – at a good deal – in an online marketplace? Those tickets could end up being bogus.

Or, perhaps, you think you just scored a hard-to-find item like a new gaming system? Or a designer bag at an extremely low price? If you actually get a delivery, which is unlikely, the box may not contain the item you ordered in the condition you thought it would arrive. 

In the meantime, if you clicked on a link to access the deal, you likely gave the fraudster access to download malware onto your device, and you gave him personal financial information and debit/credit card details.

Social Media Shopping Scams:

Consumers should beware of posts on social media sites that appear to offer special deals, vouchers, or gift cards. Some may appear as holiday promotions or contests. Others may appear to be from known friends who have shared the link. Often, these scams lead consumers to participate in an online survey that is designed to steal personal information.

If you click an ad through a social media platform, do your due diligence to check the legitimacy of the website before providing credit card or personal information.

Gift Card Scams:

Gift cards are popular and a great time saver, but you need to watch for sellers who say they can get you cards below-market value. Also, be wary of buying any card in a store if it looks like the security PIN on the back has been uncovered and recovered. Your best bet is to buy digital gift cards directly from the merchant online.

Another twist on this scam involves a person who receives a request to purchase gift cards in bulk. Here’s how it works: the victim receives a spoofed e-mail, a phone call, or a text from a person who they believe is in authority (such as an executive at the company). The fraudster tells the victim to purchase multiple gift cards as gifts. The victim does so and then passes the card numbers and PINs to the “executive” who cashes out the value. 

Charity Scams:

Charity fraud rises during the holiday season when people want to make end-of-year tax deductible gifts or just wish to contribute to a good cause. These seasonal scams can be more difficult to stop because of their widespread reach, limited duration and, when done online, minimal oversight.

Bad actors target victims through cold calls, email campaigns, crowdfunding platforms, or fake social media accounts and websites. Fraudsters make it easy for victims to give money and to feel like they’re making a difference. The scammer will divert some or all the funds for personal use, and those most in need will never see the donations.

Tips to Avoid Being Victimized:

  • Pay for items using a credit card dedicated for online purchases, checking the card statement frequently, and never saving payment information in online accounts.
  • Never make purchases using public Wi-Fi.
  • Beware of vendors that require payment with a gift card, wire transfer, cash, or cryptocurrency.
  • Research the seller to ensure legitimacy. Check reviews and do online searches for the name of the vendor and the words “scam” or “fraud.”
  • Check the contact details listed on the website to ensure the vendor is real and reachable by phone or email. 
  • Confirm return and refund policies.
  • Be wary of online retailers who use a free email service instead of a company email address.
  • Don’t judge a company by its website. Flashy websites can be set up and taken down quickly.
  • Do not click on links or provide personal or financial information to an unsolicited email or social media post.
  • Secure credit card accounts, even rewards accounts, with strong passwords or passphrases. Change passwords or passphrases regularly.
  • Make charitable contributions directly, rather than through an intermediary, and pay via credit card or check. Avoid cash donations, if possible.
  • Only purchase gift cards directly from a trusted merchant.
  • Make sure anti-virus/malware software is up to date and block pop-up windows.

What to Do if You Are a Victim:

If you are a victim of an online scam, the FBI recommends taking the following actions:

  • Report the activity to the Internet Crime Complaint Center at IC3.gov, regardless of dollar loss. Provide all relevant information in the complaint.
  • Contact your financial institution immediately upon discovering any fraudulent or suspicious activity and direct them to stop or reverse the transactions.
  • Ask your financial institution to contact the corresponding financial institution where the fraudulent or suspicious transfer was sent.

For additional information and consumer alerts, and to report scams to the FBI, visit IC3.gov.

###


UPDATE - Child Identified and Arrests made- Death Investigation of remains found of female child - Lincoln County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 12/01/21 11:37 AM
2021-01/1002/140792/Lincoln_County_Child_Approximation.JPG
2021-01/1002/140792/Lincoln_County_Child_Approximation.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-01/1002/140792/thumb_Lincoln_County_Child_Approximation.JPG

On December 10, 2020, Detectives from the Oregon State Police Major Crimes section responded to the H.B. Van Duzer Scenic Corridor in Lincoln County, Oregon, for the report of human remains discovered just outside the rest area.  An individual walking in the area discovered the remains of a female child, concealed inside a duffle bag, then hidden in the forest.  Based on the level of decomposition, it appeared she had been deceased between 30-60 days before her discovery.

Investigators and experts at the Oregon State Medical Examiner’s Office, collected samples from the child’s remains for DNA testing by a specialty DNA laboratory.  Parabon Nano Labs extracted DNA from the samples submitted, and on October 4, 2021, notified OSP investigators they identified the deceased child. 

The deceased was identified as Haley Mae Coblentz.  She was nine years old at the time of her death.  Haley was born in Colorado.  She was living with her biological mother and mother’s girlfriend in multiple places in Oregon and the Pacific Northwest since 2015.  She was not reported as a missing person at the time of her death.

On November 30, 2021, with the assistance of the Detroit FBI, OSP Investigators located Haley’s mother, 29-year-old Shawna Browning, and 34-year-old Lauren Harrison in Detroit, Michigan. Investigators arrested Browning and Harrison and served a search warrant on their vehicle and hotel room. 

Browning and Harrison were arrested on a Lincoln County, Oregon warrant and charged with:

  • Aggravated Murder ORS 163.095

 

Browning and Harrison were lodged in detention facilities in Wayne County, Michigan, and are being held without bail. 

 

On December 10, 2020, the Oregon State Police recovered the remains of a female child in the forest immediately adjacent to the H.B. Van Duzer Forrest State Scenic Corridor rest area.

Her body was inside a duffle bag that had been concealed in the forest near the rest area.  Based on the condition of the remains, little was known about the deceased’s race, appearance, or other identifying characteristics.  In an attempt to identify the deceased, the Oregon State Police and Oregon State Medical Examiner’s Office used a specialty lab to extract DNA information to aid in her identification. 

With the assistance of Parabon Nanolabs, investigators now know more identifying details which will hopefully assist in her identification. The following new information is being released:

·      Age:                     7 – 9

·      Eye color:            Hazel / Brown

·      Hair color:           Brown / Black

·      Skin color:           Light Brown / Fair with no freckles

·      Race:                    She has been identified as mostly Caucasian with some Central American ancestry

·      She was wearing a pull-up diaper

 

The Oregon State Police has been working in partnership with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC) since the discovery of the child’s remains. Over the past six months, detectives have definitively ruled out more than 60 potential missing kids from information provided by NCMEC and tips from the public.

While investigators continue to work in partnership with NCMEC, there is a strong likelihood this child has not been reported missing.  Investigators would like the public to know, we are already considering all children listed on the NCMEC website and therefore, there is no need to contact the Oregon State Police to highlight those names.

This child would likely not have been seen since November 2020. If you have any information that might help investigators in identifying this child, please call 800-442-0776 or OSP (677).

 

Oregon State Police investigators have received and investigated more than 180 tips from the public, law enforcement partners and the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. 

Using available dental records, field contacts, and other investigative techniques, investigators have been able to exclude 61 individuals from being the child whose remains were recovered. 

Investigators are still actively working to identify the deceased, and reviewing information regarding missing children which changes and is updated frequently. 

Several different investigative efforts are underway, including DNA analysis.  With the assistance of the Oregon State Medical Examiner’s Office, DNA has been extracted and is awaiting analysis.  This analysis is expected to provide investigators additional information regarding the race, origin, eye color, and other genetic details that may help lead to her identity.  A sketch with the updated race and genetic details will be released upon receipt of the DNA information. 

Anthropological and forensic dental examinations of the female child recovered at in the H.B. Van Duzer State Forrest Scenic Corridor have so far determined she is between 61/2 and 10 years old.  She stood between 3’10’ and 4’6” tall.  She had long black or dark brown hair.  She died at least 30 days prior to her discovery on December 10, 2020. 

Investigators continue to ask anyone with information about the identity of the deceased or the circumstances surrounding her death to call the Oregon State Police at 800-442-0776 or OSP (677). 

As part of the ongoing investigation into the discovery of a female child’s remains at the Van Duzer Rest Area in Lincoln County, the Oregon State Police (OSP) continues to solicit the public’s assistance in identifying the child and the circumstances around her death.  To date, we have received over 150 tips from citizens in the United States and Canada.  We are deeply appreciative of the public’s input so far, and continue to accept information that may lead to the identification of the child.

The Oregon State Medical Examiner’s Office has estimated the child's age to be 6.5 to 10 years old.  She is approximately 3’10” to 4’6” tall, and has long hair that is dark brown or black.  Her race or ethnic origin has yet to be determined, but DNA analysis is not complete.  A sketch completed by the Clackamas County Sheriff’s Office at our request has also been released. 

OSP, in partnership with the Oregon State Medical Examiner’s Office, the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC), and numerous state and local agencies across the United States, are using a variety of means to include or exclude known missing persons who match the general description and/or sketch previously released.  This may include, but is not limited to, dental records, age, descriptors, and confirmed sightings via verifiable sources, and/or recent contacts with family or friends that demonstrate they were alive after the remains of the unidentified female were discovered in Lincoln County. 

OSP will not comment on the individual methods used to exclude each child.

In an effort to refocus the public’s attention and reduce duplicative tips, OSP is now prepared to publicly exclude the following reported missing children from our investigation:

  • Dulce Alavez, age 6, from Bridgeton, NJ
  • Addyson Gibson, age 12, from Portland, OR
  • Noelle Johnson, age 7, from Portland, OR
  • Niayah Bylenga (AKA Niayah Crawford), age 7, from Pendleton, OR or Ritzville, WA
  • Tarie Price, age 8, from Gretna, NE
  • Breasia Terrell, age 10, from Davenport, IA

OSP reminds the public that while these children have been excluded from our investigation, they are all still reported missing and we ask the public to continue to be vigilant for these children and all other missing persons reported across the nation. 

The Oregon State Police is releasing the attached approximation sketch of the child that was found in Lincoln County on December 10, 2020.

Sketch was provided with assistance of the Clackamas County Sheriff's Office.

If you have any information that might help investigators in identifying this child, please call 800-442-0776 or OSP (677).

Oregon State Police Detectives are seeking the public’s assistance in identifying the remains of an individual discovered in rural Lincoln County.  

On December 10, 2020, Investigators were summoned to the H.B. Van Duzer Forest State Scenic Corridor for a death investigation. At this location, investigators found the remains of a female child. 

The Oregon State Medical Examiner’s Office estimate the deceased’s age to be 6.5 to 10 years old.  She is approximately 3’10” to 4’6” tall, and had long hair that is dark brown or black.  Her race or ethnic origin has yet to be determined, but DNA analysis is not complete. 

Due to the condition of the remains she had likely been deceased at least 30 days before she was discovered. 

If you have any information that might help investigators in identifying this child, please call 800-442-0776 or OSP (677).

No information regarding the cause or manner of death is available for release at this time. 

On Thursday, December 10, 2020 Oregon State Police Major Crimes Detectives responded to the H.B. Van Duzer Forest State Scenic Corridor for a death investigation.

The area is a heavily wooded state park in Lincoln County, Oregon.

Due to the terrain OSP Detectives were assisted by Lincoln County SAR members.

At this time the deceased has yet to be positively identified. No further information regarding this individual is available for release until identity is established and next of kin can be notified.

An investigation into the circumstances of this incident is active and ongoing. No further details are available for release at this time.




Attached Media Files: 2021-01/1002/140792/Lincoln_County_Child_Approximation.JPG , Updated Child Approximation , Haley May Cobletz

Jury Convicts Gypsy Joker Outlaw Motorcycle Club Members on Racketeering Charges
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 12/01/21 10:45 AM

PORTLAND, Ore.—On November 30, 2021, a federal jury in Portland found two members of the Gypsy Joker Outlaw Motorcycle Club (GJOMC) guilty of kidnapping and murder in aid of racketeering for the 2015 kidnapping and murder of Robert Huggins, a Portland resident and former club member.

GJOMC Portland clubhouse president Mark Leroy Dencklau, 61, of Woodburn, Oregon and Portland clubhouse member Chad Leroy Erickson, 51, of Rainier, Oregon, were found guilty of murder in aid of racketeering; kidnapping in aid of racketeering, resulting in death; kidnapping resulting in death; and conspiracy to commit kidnapping, resulting in death. Additionally, Dencklau was found guilty of racketeering conspiracy.

The jury acquitted Erickson and GJOMC national president Kenneth Earl Hause, 64, of Aumsville, Oregon, of racketeering conspiracy.

“Organized crime will not be tolerated in the District of Oregon. Dencklau, Erickson and other members of the Gypsy Joker Outlaw Motorcycle Club prided themselves in using violence to intimidate others and bolster their sense of power and influence. The kidnapping, torture, and murder of Robert Huggins was a gruesome example of the lengths these men were willing to go to exert their authority over rivals and perceived enemies,” said Scott Erik Asphaug, Acting U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon. “A robust, coordinated law enforcement operation led to their arrest and prosecution. Our community is safer thanks to the dedication of all involved law enforcement agencies.”

“The heinous actions of this criminal organization clearly warranted this guilty verdict,” said Jonathan T. McPherson, Special Agent in Charge of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (ATF) Seattle Field Division. “ATF remains committed to combatting organizations like the Gypsy Jokers Outlaw Motorcycle Club that endanger our communities.”

According to court documents and trial testimony, the GJOMC is a hierarchical criminal organization wherein members and associates maintain their position and status in the organization by participating in, directly or indirectly, various acts of violent racketeering activity including murder, kidnapping, robbery, extortion, narcotics trafficking, and witness tampering. Since the 1980s, the club has been active in several states including Oregon and Washington and, until recently, operated six clubhouses in the Pacific Northwest. The club also has international chapters in Germany, Australia, and Norway.

From 2003 until his arrest, Dencklau served as the president of the club’s Portland chapter. The GJOMC also oversaw several support clubs in Oregon and Washington including the Road Brothers Northwest Motorcycle Club, Solutions Motorcycle Club, Northwest Veterans Motorcycle Club, High-Side Riders, and the Freedom Fellowship Motorcycle Club. Support club members conducted criminal activities in support of the GJOMC and served as a source of new members and revenue for the club.

On July 1, 2015, the body of Robert Huggins, an estranged member of the GJOMC Portland chapter, was found lying in a field in Clark County, Washington. Huggins’ body was badly beaten, and he appeared to have been tortured prior to his death. Huggins was previously stripped of his club membership for allegedly stealing from the club and, after breaking into Dencklau’s Woodburn residence, tying up Dencklau’s girlfriend and stealing multiple firearms. In the days and weeks following this robbery, Dencklau directed GJOMC members to find Huggins.

Several government witnesses testified at trial to Dencklau, Erickson, and their co-defendants’ roles in the revenge kidnapping, torture, and murder of Huggins. On the evening of June 30, 2015, Dencklau and others kidnapped Huggins from a residence in Portland and transported him to a rural property in Southwest Washington. Over the course of several hours, Huggins was severely beaten and tortured. He sustained numerous injuries to his head and face, including a fractured skull; lacerations to his chest and torso; and removed nipples. A local medical examiner ruled that Huggins’ death was caused by multiple blunt and sharp force injuries.

On June 28, 2018, a federal grand jury in Portland returned a four-count indictment charging Dencklau; Earl Deverle Fisher, 48, of Gresham, Oregon; and Tiler Evan Pribbernow, 40, of Portland, with murder in aid of racketeering; kidnapping in aid of racketeering, resulting in death; kidnapping resulting in death and conspiracy to commit kidnapping, resulting in death.

Later, on November 29, 2018, Dencklau; Fisher; Erickson; Hause; Ryan Anthony Negrinelli, 36, of Gresham, Oregon; and Joseph Duane Folkerts, 61, of Battleground, Washington, were charged by superseding indictment with racketeering conspiracy.

Fisher, Negrinelli, Folkerts, and Pribbernow have all previously pleaded guilty to the conspiracy charge and are awaiting sentencing.

All defendants convicted face a maximum sentence of life in federal prison. Dencklau and Erickson also face mandatory minimum sentences of life in prison.

Acting U.S. Attorney Asphaug and Special Agent in Charge McPherson made the announcement.

This case was investigated by the Portland Police Bureau and ATF, with assistance from the U.S. Marshals Service, IRS-Criminal Investigation, the Clark County Sheriff’s Office, Oregon State Police, and the Oregon and Washington State Crime Labs. Leah K. Bolstad and Steven T. Mygrant, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon, prosecuted the case with Damaré Theriot, Trial Attorney for the Criminal Division’s Organized Crime and Gang Section.

This case was brought as part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN). In keeping with the Attorney General’s mission to reduce violent crime, the District of Oregon’s PSN program focuses on prosecuting those individuals who most significantly drive violence in our communities, and supports and fosters partnerships between law enforcement, community organizations, and local community leaders to prevent and deter future criminal conduct.

This prosecution is the result of an Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force (OCDETF) investigation. OCDETF identifies, disrupts, and dismantles the highest-level drug traffickers, money launderers, gangs, and transnational criminal organizations that threaten the U.S. by using a prosecutor-led, intelligence-driven, multi-agency approach that leverages the strengths of federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies against criminal networks.

# # #




Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Increased emergency SNAP benefits continue in December
Oregon Department of Human Services - 12/01/21 10:23 AM

Need to know

  • Most Oregonians who receive SNAP benefits will continue to receive increased emergency food benefits in December
  • Approximately 391,000 SNAP households will receive approximately $62 million in extra food benefits in addition to their regular SNAP benefits
  • Find resources to meet your basic needs: Dial 2-1-1, or text your zip code to 898-211, www.211info.org 
  • Oregon Department of Human Services COVID-19 help center 

(Salem) – Most Oregonians who receive Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits will receive emergency allotments in December. 

The federal government has approved emergency allotments every month since March 2020. This gives SNAP recipients additional support during the COVID-19 pandemic. 

In December, approximately 391,000 SNAP households will receive approximately $62 million in extra food benefits in addition to their regular SNAP benefits.

“We are grateful to have the opportunity to provide emergency benefits to most SNAP households in Oregon,” said Dan Haun, director of the Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Self-Sufficiency Program. “We also know that many Oregonians are still struggling to meet their basic needs due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and we encourage them to contact our partners at 211 and the Oregon Food Bank for support during this difficult time.”

Emergency allotments will be available on Dec. 11 for current SNAP households. New SNAP households will receive the emergency allotments Dec. 30 or Jan. 4.

SNAP recipients do not have to take any action to receive these supplemental benefits as they will be issued directly on their EBT cards. 

More information about emergency allotments is available at https://www.oregon.gov/dhs/ASSISTANCE/FOOD-BENEFITS/Pages/About-SNAP.aspx.

Questions about your SNAP benefits should be directed to the ONE Customer Service Center at 1-800-699-9075.

If you are a SNAP household and your income or the number of people in your household has changed, it could impact your benefits. It is important to make sure ODHS has the most up-to-date information. 

You can report any changes to your income or household in many ways: 

  • Online at: ONE.Oregon.gov
  • By mail at: ONE Customer Service Center, PO Box 14015, Salem, OR 97309
  • By fax at: 503-378-5628
  • By phone at: 1-800-699-9075 or TTY 711

Resources to help meet basic needs

Administered by ODHS, SNAP is a federal program that provides food assistance to approximately 1 million eligible, low-income families and individuals in Oregon, including many older adults and people with disabilities. Oregonians in need can apply for benefits, including SNAP, child care, cash assistance and Medicaid. Learn more at https://govstatus.egov.com/or-dhs-benefits. For local resources in your area, such as food or shelter, please call 2-1-1 or reach out to the state’s Aging and Disability Resource Connection (ADRC) at 1-855-ORE-ADRC or 1-855-673-2372.

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Attached Media Files: 2021-12/973/150517/Dan_Haun_Dir_of_SSP_on_Emergency_Allotments_for_December.m4a

Fatal Crash on Interstate 84-Wasco County
Oregon State Police - 12/01/21 10:04 AM

On Tuesday, November 30, 2021, at approximately 5:24 PM, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a head-on collision in the eastbound lanes of Interstate 84 near milepost 89, approximately two miles east of The Dalles. 

Preliminary investigation revealed a westbound (wrong way) Subaru Forester, operated by Colin Leas (32) of McMinnville, crashed head-on into an eastbound Kia Sorrento, operated by Jessica Treadwell (35) of Condon.  Both vehicles became fully engulfed in flames immediately after impact.

Leas, Treadwell and a passenger in the Kia Sorrento, Lorena Sparkman (56) of Condon, sustained fatal injuries and were pronounced deceased. 

The eastbound lanes of I-84 were closed for approximately 2.5 hours. 

OSP was assisted by The Dalles Police Department, Wasco County Sheriff’s Office, Mid-Columbia Fire and Rescue and ODOT. 


Be prepared: Despite mild late fall temperatures, getting ready for winter storms is still key
Pacific Power - 12/01/21 9:56 AM

Contact:  Pacific Power media hotline                       

            503-813-6018                                                  

 

Be prepared: Despite mild late fall temperatures, getting ready for winter storms is still key

Check your Emergency Outage Kit, keep mobile devices charged, revisit family storm plans

 

PORTLAND, Ore. –Dec. 1 , 2021— So far most of  the Northwest has dodged the kind of storms that cause large power outages, but experience tells us that it is wise to be prepared even if the weather is mild at the moment. Pacific Power reminds its customers and the public in Oregon, Washington and northern California to take precautions to stay safe and comfortable should outages occur.

 

“Windstorms and winter blasts can be unpredictable and cause issues that lead to power outages,” said Allen Berreth, vice president, operations. “We are always prepared to respond with crews at the ready, to repair damage as fast as possible and reduce the amount of time any customer is without service.”

 

            To ensure that you are prepared for outages, we ask that every home maintain an Emergency Outage Kit that includes the following:
 

  • Flashlight
  • Battery-operated radio and clock
  • Extra batteries
  • Non-perishable foods
  • Manual can opener
  • Bottled water
  • Blankets

 

If a power outage occurs, Pacific Power encourages customers to first check their fuses and circuit breakers. If the power failure is not caused inside the home or business, customers should report the outage to Pacific Power at 1-877-508-5088.

 

Get the App. The Pacific Power App for mobile devices can become invaluable during an outage. You can report and track an outage affecting you from your mobile device. The app is free and can be downloaded on the App Store or Google Play. For more information, visit www.pacificpower.net/app.

 

 

Pacific Power suggests these safety precautions once a storm has hit:

 

  • Stay away from all downed power lines and utility lines. Even if the lines are not sparking, they could be energized and extremely dangerous. Call 911 and report the outage to Pacific Power at 1-877-508-5088
  • Extensive rain may cause flooding or landslides. Be especially careful of any standing water or even soggy ground. A live down wire may seem to be a safe distance away, but it is still extremely dangerous due to wet conditions.
  • Don’t drive over downed power lines

 

 

 

-30-


Agricultural Organizations Respond to Ag Overtime Lawsuit
Oregon Farm Bureau - 12/01/21 8:17 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 1, 2021

Agricultural Organizations Respond to Ag Overtime Lawsuit

The agricultural community is disappointed with the lawsuit filed yesterday by the Oregon Law Center regarding agricultural overtime. The lawsuit is an appalling attempt to circumvent the legislative process by seeking to expand a 2017 manufacturing overtime bill well beyond what was intended by the legislature. 

We have been participating in a legislative workgroup in good faith to discuss the nuances of proposals to extend overtime to agriculture. The impacts of this proposal are complex due to the nature of Oregon’s agricultural economy, the needs of employees, and the seasonal nature of agricultural work. These considerations are presently being discussed by legislators and the workgroup, and this lawsuit undermines those good faith discussions. 

Oregon’s family farms are suffering under the cumulative weight of the COVID-19 pandemic, market and shipping disruptions, and the growing cost of doing business in Oregon. We care deeply about the health and welfare of our employees and pay among the highest wages for agricultural production in the world. However, our farms compete in a global marketplace and are price takers, meaning that they are unable to pass along any price increases in their operations to consumers. These factors make agricultural overtime discussions complex, as well-intentioned policies could have significant impacts on farm viability and availability of agricultural work. 

The 2017 manufacturing overtime bill was never intended to expand overtime pay to agriculture, and we are confident that the Court will uphold the intent of the legislature. We will be seeking to engage in the lawsuit to protect the integrity of the legislative process. 

Oregon Farm Bureau Federation
Oregon Association of Nurseries 
Columbia Gorge Fruit Growers
Oregon Wine Council
Oregon Winegrowers Association 
Associated Oregon Hazelnut Industries
Oregon Seed Council
Oregon Dairy Farmers Association 
Oregon Cattlemen’s Association 
Oregon Sheep Growers Association

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Committee meets virtually Dec. 14 to review grant applications for recreation projects
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 12/01/21 8:00 AM

The County Opportunity Grant Program Advisory Committee will hold a public meeting to review grant applications from 1-4 p.m. Dec. 14 via Zoom. 

Applicants to the County Opportunity Grant Program (COGP) will present their proposed projects for acquiring, planning, developing and rehabilitating county-run camping facilities. The committee will evaluate and score all applications and create a priority ranking list of projects to be funded. The list will be forwarded to the Oregon Parks and Recreation Commission for final review and approval. 

A schedule listing applicants and their specific presentation times is posted on the County Opportunity Grant Program web page at oregon.gov/oprd/GRA/pages/GRA-cogp.aspx. A link to view the Zoom meeting will also be posted at the site.

The COGP Advisory Committee consists of seven members who represent counties, recreational vehicle owners, people with disabilities and the general public. They also represent various geographic areas of the state. 

The COGP was established in 1983 to direct a portion of revenue from recreational vehicle registration fees to counties for park and recreation sites and programs. All Oregon counties are eligible to apply. The program is administered by Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD). 

For more information about the COGP, visit oprdgrants.org


Tue. 11/30/21
Oregon reports 1,054 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 19 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 11/30/21 4:34 PM

November 30, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 1,054 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 19 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 19 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 5,161, Oregon Health Authority (OHA) reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

OHA reported 1,054 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 391,099.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 404, which is eight more than yesterday. There are 94 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is three more than yesterday.

There are 52 available adult ICU beds out of 687 total (8% availability) and 317 available adult non-ICU beds out of 4,118 (8% availability). 

11/30/2021 Available Beds (and Percentage of Staffed Beds Available)

 

Statewide

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

Region 5

Region 6

Region 7

Region 9

Adult ICU beds available

52

(8%)

28

(8%)

4

(5%)

7

(8%)

2

(3%)

1

(10%)

1

(2%)

9

(35%)

Adult non-ICU beds available

317

(8%)

67

(3%)

10

(2%)

53

(9%)

41

(10%)

5

(10%)

90

(21%)

51

(43%)

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

Note: Please do not visit an emergency department for COVID-19 testing, unless you require emergency care for your symptoms.

Emergency departments in Oregon are under significant strain. You can find a test here.

If you have a medical condition that doesn’t require emergency care, contact your provider. An urgent care center may also help you get the care you need and will save emergency departments from added strain.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Oregon reaches another milestone administering COVID-19 vaccines

With the expansion of pediatric COVID-19 to children ages 5 to 11 and the approval of booster doses to anyone 18 and older, Oregon recorded more than 6 million COVID-19 doses administered to people eligible for vaccination last week.

On Nov. 23, the ALERT IIS registry that tracks immunizations tallied 6,007,214 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, Moderna and Johnson & Johnson doses to all age groups. The count includes all shots in a primary vaccine series, including pediatric doses, third doses and boosters.

“We want to thank Oregonians of all ages who continue to take the most effective measure available to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and keep themselves and others safe by getting vaccinated and following recommendations provided for COVID-19 vaccination, including boosters and third doses,” said Dr. Dean E. Sidelinger, state health officer and state epidemiologist.

“This also represents a major public health milestone involving all our health systems, providers, pharmacies, Tribal clinics and public health partners who achieved this goal in less than a year since the first doses were administered last December.”

OHA continues to work on its goal of closing gaps in vaccination coverage by setting a target of vaccinating 80% of those in Tribal communities and communities of color and working with vaccine partners to ensure access to pediatric vaccine for families in these groups.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 17,408 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry on Nov. 29. Of that total, 1,757 were initial doses, 1,366 were second doses and 7,691 were third doses and booster doses. The remaining 6,535 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Nov. 29.

The seven-day running average is now 13,576 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 3,510,467 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, 66,421 doses of Pfizer pediatric, 2,254,066 doses of Moderna and 243,152 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 2,946,263 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,658,165 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 data dashboards and have been updated today.

Cases and COVID-19 deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (7), Benton (13), Clackamas (55), Clatsop (6), Columbia (12), Coos (64), Crook (19), Curry (9), Deschutes (97), Douglas (52), Harney (5), Hood River (18), Jackson (73), Jefferson (10), Josephine (14), Klamath (50), Lake (12), Lane (79), Lincoln (14), Linn (30), Malheur (4), Marion (65), Morrow (4), Multnomah (121), Polk (50), Sherman (1), Tillamook (3), Umatilla (28), Union (2), Wallowa (3), Wasco (12), Washington (77) and Yamhill (45).

Oregon’s 5,143rd COVID-19 related death is a 70-year-old woman from Josephine County who tested positive Aug. 11 and died Oct. 14 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,144th COVID-19 related death is a 60-year-old woman from Klamath County who tested positive Nov. 13 and died Nov. 26 at Sky Lakes Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,145th COVID-19 related death is a 90-year-old man from Josephine County who tested positive Nov. 18 and died Nov. 28 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,146th COVID-19 related death is a 72-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive Nov. 18 and died Nov. 27 at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,147th COVID-19 related death is a 68-year-old woman from Jackson County who tested positive Nov. 8 and died Nov. 27 at Providence Medford Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,148th COVID-19 related death is a 60-year-old woman from Jackson County who tested positive Nov. 4 and died Nov. 27 at Providence Medford Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,149th COVID-19 related death is a 70-year-old woman from Harney County who tested positive November 9 and died November 24 at Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,150th COVID-19 related death is a 41-year-old man from Douglas County who first became symptomatic Nov. 22 and died Nov. 25 at Mercy Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,151st COVID-19 related death is an 89-year-old woman from Douglas County who tested positive Nov. 15 and died Nov. 29 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,152nd COVID-19 related death is a 46-year-old man from Douglas County who tested positive Nov. 15 and died Nov. 27 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,153rd COVID-19 related death is a 69-year-old man from Douglas County who tested positive Nov. 14 and died Nov. 26 at Mercy Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,154th COVID-19 related death is an 84-year-old man from Clackamas County who tested positive Nov. 18 and died Nov. 24 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,155th COVID-19 related death is a 69-year-old woman from Yamhill County who tested positive Sept. 23 and died Nov. 16 at her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,156th COVID-19 related death is a 70-year-old woman from Union County who tested positive Nov. 20 and died Nov. 29 at Grande Ronde Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,157th COVID-19 related death is an 87-year-old woman from Multnomah County who tested positive Nov. 17 and died Nov. 27 at Legacy Mount Hood Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,158th COVID-19 related death is a 60-year-old man from Multnomah County who tested positive Nov. 15 and died Nov. 28 at Legacy Mount Hood Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,159th COVID-19 related death is a 62-year-old woman from Multnomah County who tested positive Nov. 11 and died Nov. 23 at Legacy Mount Hood Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,160th COVID-19 related death is a 78-year-old man from Malheur County who tested positive Nov. 3 and died Nov. 27 at Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,161st COVID-19 related death is a 95-year-old woman from Lane County who died Sept. 23 at McKenzie-Willamette Medical Center. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Note: Updated information is known about Oregon’s 4,349th death, a 43-year-old woman from Umatilla County who first became symptomatic Sept. 24 and died Oct. 22 at CHI St. Anthony Hospital. She had underlying conditions. She was originally reported as a male and unknown location of death. This person was originally reported as having died Sept. 4.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our web page (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.


Oregon Alliance of Independent Colleges & Universities' Members See Enrollment Growth in 2021-22
Oregon Alliance of Independent Colleges & Universities - 11/30/21 4:30 PM

TUALATIN, OR – The headcount enrollment of the Oregon Alliance of Independent Colleges & Universities’ (The Alliance) thirteen member institutions increased by 1% from fall 2020 to fall 2021. Comparably, the most recent data from the Higher Education Coordinating Commission reported a 0.4% drop in community college headcount enrollment and a 0.5% drop in public university headcount enrollment during the same time period.

“It is clear that students continue to view Alliance member colleges and universities as a tremendous value and pathway to securing a brighter future. In a constantly changing world, our member institutions are preparing the next generation of leaders to recognize and solve problems, to communicate ideas and solutions persuasively, and learn new skills and adapt to change quickly throughout their lifetime,” said Brent Wilder, President of The Alliance. “Our members work diligently to help students minimize debt, graduate on time and prepared for a life of meaningful contributions while at the same time having a significant impact on Oregon’s economy, which was $1.58 billion in 2018-19.”

Additionally, we're pleased with our high levels of vaccination, the willingness among students to engage in COVID-19 safety measures, and the low rate of cases across our 13 member colleges and universities. Our members have implemented a variety of systems and plans to manage potential roadblocks or virus resurgence, including requiring masks/face coverings in all indoor spaces, cleaning protocols developed from CDC guidance, sanitizing stations throughout campus, COVID-19 surveillance testing, and proof of vaccination for sporting events. 

Further 2021-22 Highlights:

  • Total enrollment at Alliance institutions is 26,331 students.
  • 16.7% of students are first-generation.
  • 49% of transfer students have previously attended an Oregon community college.
  • Alliance institutions enroll a higher number of diverse students compared to Oregon’s population data from the 2020 census.
    • 10.4% of The Alliance’s aggregate student population are Asian American, compared to the 4.6% of Oregon’s population.
    • 3.7% of The Alliance’s student body population are African American, compared to 2.0% of Oregon’s overall population.
    • 14% of The Alliance’s student body population are Hispanic/Latinx, compared to 13.9% of Oregon’s overall population.
  • The percentage of undergraduate first-time, full-time, degree seeking, and Pell eligible students is 25.4%.
  • Oregon students constitute 45% of enrolled learners, an increase of 1.1% over the last year.
  • Alliance institutions have a split of 66% undergraduate and 34% graduate.

The Oregon Alliance of Independent Colleges and Universities (“The Alliance”) is comprised of 13 private, nonprofit, independent colleges and universities in the state of Oregon. These institutions deliver high-quality experiential learning with high-impact teaching strategies. The Alliance is the collective voice of Oregon’s independent, nonprofit higher education sector. For more information, visit www.oaicu.org.


Oregon Employment Department to Hold Media Availability
Oregon Employment Department - 11/30/21 3:01 PM

WHO:                   David Gerstenfeld, Acting Director, Oregon Employment Department and  
Gail Krumenauer, State Employment Economist 

 

WHEN:                Wednesday, 1 p.m. PST, Dec. 1, 2021 

 

WHAT:               The Oregon Employment Department is hosting a video conference media availability and will share updates on economic and workforce-related trends,  PFMLI program, employment services, unemployment claims processing, and more.  

 

WHERE:             Via Zoom video conference: Members of the media must RSVP by emailing  OED_Communications@employ.oregon.gov by 12 p.m. PST on Wed., Dec. 1. Video conference information will be provided to all reporters who RSVP. RSVPs must indicate if the reporter wants to ask a question of the presenters. 

 

OTHER:              The Oregon Employment Department has revised its claims processing dashboard and updates it weekly. Visit this link for updates. After the briefing concludes, a recording of the video conference will be emailed to reporters who RSVP’d.  

 

### 

 

Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 953-2366. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services. 

 




Attached Media Files: 2021-11/930/150501/12.1.21_Media_availability.pdf

OSP Fish & Wildlife is seeking public assistance identifying a suspect in a deer poaching -Clackamas County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 11/30/21 1:56 PM
2021-11/1002/150496/Suspects.JPG
2021-11/1002/150496/Suspects.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-11/1002/150496/thumb_Suspects.JPG

The Oregon State Police Fish & Wildlife Division and Metro Park Rangers are working together to investigate unlawful hunting activity that occurred on public property along SW Grahams Ferry Rd outside Wilsonville in Clackamas County between October 25, 2021, and November 14, 2021. Several deer carcasses were found on the property and Troopers currently have probable cause for multiple hunting-related crimes. 

One suspect has been identified but the second suspect is still outstanding. OSP Troopers are trying to identify the person in these photos, who is believed to be connected with this case.

The Oregon State Police is requesting public assistance with information about the identity of this person or this case. Any person with information related to this incident is encouraged to call the OSP TIP (Turn-In-Poachers) Reward line at 1-800-452-7888 or by cell at OSP (677) or send an email tip to TIP@osp.oregon.gov. Please reference case # SP21320391.

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators

TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP (677)

TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us

The Oregon Hunters Association TIP reward offers preference points or cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of Bighorn Sheep, Rocky Mountain Goat, Moose, Elk, Deer, Antelope, Bear, Cougar, Wolf, Upland Birds, Waterfowl, Furbearers, Game Fish and Shellfish. Cash rewards can also be awarded for turning in people who destroy habitat, illegally obtain licenses/tags, and for the unlawful lending/borrowing of big game tags.

PREFERENCE POINT REWARDS:

5 Points-Mountain Sheep

5 Points-Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points-Cougar

 CASH REWARDS:

$1,000 Mountain Sheep, Mountain Goat and Moose

$500 Elk, Deer, and Antelope

$300 Bear, Cougar, and Wolf

$300 Habitat Destruction

$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl

$100 Furbearers

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish




Attached Media Files: 2021-11/1002/150496/Suspects.JPG , 2021-11/1002/150496/Suspect_-_side_view.JPG , 2021-11/1002/150496/Suspect_1_(002).JPG

OHCS to hold media briefing to update status of Oregon's emergency rental assistance program
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 11/30/21 12:20 PM

Nov. 30, 2021

 

Contact: Delia Hernández

503-986-2051

equests@oregon.gov">HCS.MediaRequests@hcs.oregon.gov

 

OHCS to hold media briefing to update status of Oregon’s emergency rental assistance program

 

Salem, Ore. - Oregon Housing and Community Services (OHCS) will hold a media briefing at 11 a.m. Wednesday, Dec. 1, to discuss the pause in accepting new applications for the Oregon Emergency Rental Assistance Program (OERAP) and updates on the status of applications and funding. OHCS Executive Director Margaret Salazar will be available to speak to the media. Interested media can participate via this Zoom link.

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Attached Media Files: 2021-11/1810/150491/11-30-2021-Media-Advisory.pdf

"Freeze the Day" and Plan a Visit to the Oregon Historical Society's Newest Exhibition on Oregon's Winter Sports History
Oregon Historical Society - 11/30/21 11:30 AM

MEDIA TOURS: Schedule an exhibit tour with OHS Executive Director Kerry Tymchuk and Olympic luger Jack Elder by contacting achel.randles@ohs.org">rachel.randles@ohs.org.

PRESS KIT (WITH IMAGES): https://bit.ly/ohsfreezetheday

 

Portland, OR — November 30, 2021 — Oregon’s unique topography and climate have created an environment of endless possibility for outdoor recreation. Whether engaging in leisure activities on the weekends or competing in professional athletic events, Oregonians have long enjoyed experiences shaped by snow and ice. As the chill of winter enters the air, the Oregon Historical Society (OHS) invites visitors to discover the magic, awe, thrill, and camaraderie Oregonians have enjoyed for generations in its newest original exhibition, Freeze the Day! A History of Winter Sports in Oregon.

Countless individuals have shaped the history of winter sports in Oregon, including Native people who developed and adapted technology and cultural practices to survive and thrive with the snow and ice of winter months. Euro-American emigrants who arrived in the nineteenth century began to explore ways to recreate in the mountains, lakes, and rivers. In the beginning of the twentieth century, Oregonians started building alpine resorts, sporting clubs, and recreational facilities across the state.

This work set the stage for championship athletes to grow and blossom. Freeze the Day profiles 13 such athletes, including Olympic snowboarders Ben Ferguson and Chris Klug, luger Jack Elder, figure skater Tonya Harding, and Special Olympics Oregon snowboarder Henry Meece. Innovators also flourished, such as Hjalmar Hvam, who developed the world’s first workable safety ski binding, and Oregon Adaptive Sports, which provides snow opportunities to community members with disabilities. Visitors will also discover many of the ice sports that people enjoy throughout the state as well as beloved teams past and present, from the Portland Rosebuds to the Portland Winterhawks.

“With the Winter Olympics coming up, a visit to Freeze the Day is the perfect way to brush up on your Oregon sports history as we anticipate cheering on Team USA next February,” said OHS Executive Director Kerry Tymchuk. 

While snow may not be falling in the gallery, visitors can “catch a snowflake” within the exhibit, and rather than melt, watch the snowflake come to life in their hand. Visitors can also look for friends and family in a community scrapbook and share their love of Oregon’s wintry weather online using the hashtag #OHSFreezeTheDay. 

“Whether or not you are a winter sports afficionado, or simply an admirer of Oregon’s natural wonders, this fun and immersive exhibition has something for visitors of all ages,” said Tymchuk.

Discover how winter sports continue to shape Oregon’s cultural fabric with a visit to Freeze the Day! A History of Winter Sports in Oregon, on exhibit December 3, 2021, through July 17, 2022. The Oregon Historical Society’s museum is open seven days a week, Monday – Saturday from 10am – 5pm and Sunday from 12pm – 5pm. Admission is $10, with discounts for students, seniors, teachers, and youth. Admission is free every day for OHS members and Multnomah County residents.


About the Oregon Historical Society

For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state’s collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon’s history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon’s cannot be contained within a single story or point of view. 


Oregon Faith Leaders Come Together for Abortion Justice
Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon - 11/30/21 10:31 AM

As the U.S. Supreme Court hears a pivotal case that could overturn Roe vs. Wade, leaders and members of Oregon’s faith community — voices often overlooked in the fight to defend reproductive freedom — are gathering in of support for abortion access, honoring the dignity and worth of every person who seeks care, and calling upon the Supreme Court to uphold this fundamental right.

The press event sponsored by Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon, the ACLU of Oregon, Pro-Choice Oregon and Family Forward will be held at 10am Wednesday, December 1st in Portland. For the location, RSVP to PPAO Communications Director Jimmy Radosta at 503.232.9632 or jimmy.radosta@PPAOregon.org. For those unable to attend in person, the event will be livestreamed at facebook.com/PPAOregon and instagram.com/PPAOregon.

Speakers will include Rabbi Rachel Joseph of Congregation Beth Israel, a Board Member of Planned Parenthood of Oregon; State Senator Kayse Jama; the Rev. Bill Sinkford of First Unitarian Portland; the Rev. Dr. Deb Patterson, a State Senator who serves as a minister at United Church of Christ in the Mid-Willamette Valley; the Rev. Dr. Chuck Currie of United Church of Christ; and the Rev. Eilidh Lowry, Portland Public School Board Chair and pastor at United Methodist Church’s Southeast Portland Parish. Other attendees will come from across the state, including Bend and Eugene. 

In 2021, a record-breaking number of anti-abortion and anti-transgender bills have been introduced and enacted in state legislatures across the nation. 

Texas is already providing a glimpse of what a post-Roe world could look like. Politicians there passed a heinous law banning abortion at six weeks, decimating access to abortion in the state. Due to structural racism and inequities, abortion restrictions disproportionately harm Black, Brown and Indigenous people; LGBTQ+ people; young people; immigrants; people with low incomes; and those living in rural areas.

This week the court will hear oral arguments in a case that challenges Mississippi’s cruel 15-week abortion ban and that could upend nearly 50 years of precedent. If Roe is overturned, abortion access will be jeopardized for nearly half of the people who can become pregnant in the United States. 

“The sacred right to bodily autonomy and the human right to health care are under attack like never before. We are in the fight of our lives,” says An Do, Executive Director of Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon. “In this moment of crisis, we are so grateful for faith leaders who proudly affirm and fight for the moral agency of people seeking abortions, their bodily autonomy and their moral authority to make reproductive decisions. Because justice can’t be achieved until every person can make their own decisions about their bodies, their lives and their futures.”

If states like Idaho are allowed to ban abortion, studies show that Oregon health centers would see a 234% increase in out-of-state patients forced to travel long distances for care. And even though abortion is protected in Oregon statute, Eastern Oregonians could see up to a 35% decrease in abortion access because of the longer travel burden.


Marine Board Recognizes Life Saving Efforts by Marine Law Enforcement Partners (Photo)
Oregon Marine Board - 11/30/21 10:00 AM
Marine law enforcement boat operating at
Marine law enforcement boat operating at
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-11/4139/150477/thumb_LEBoatOnPlane.png

The Oregon State Marine Board recognized heroic life-saving efforts by Sheriff’s Office deputies, marine safety officers and private citizens, in five separate counties this season, during the agency’s virtual post-season conference held on November 18.

The Life Saving Award recognizes individuals who have exhibited heroism, going above and beyond the call of duty, by directly attempting to rescue one or more persons involved in a water-related incident.

Newberg-Dundee Police Work with Boaters on Rescue 

On the afternoon of November 21, 2020, Yamhill County Sheriff’s Office and Newberg-Dundee Police Department were notified of a call involving two paddleboarders on the Willamette River near Rogers Landing. The caller reported that they had picked up a stranded paddleboarder on the edge of Newberg. Two paddleboarders had been on the river and were separated for about an hour. The air temperature was in the low 40’s and the river level very high with little daylight left.

Yamhill County Sheriff’s Office and Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue sent boats to Rogers Landing to aid in the call. Prior to either agency getting a boat on the water, Sgt. Cooke responded to Rogers Landing. He located the vehicle associated with the paddleboarders in the parking lot. He contacted two private citizens in a boat at the ramp, identified as Pete and Wendy Brentano. Pete is a volunteer firefighter with St. Paul Fire District. The Brentano’s took Sgt. Cooke onboard and began their search downstream from Rogers Landing looking for the missing woman.

They located what they believed to be the missing person’s paddleboard on a private dock three miles downstream of Rogers Landing. Sgt. Cooke went onshore and followed tracks up through a field toward NE Parrish Road. He eventually located the person and was able to direct medical staff to their location. The other paddleboarder was transported via ambulance with hypothermia.

Sgt. Cooke’s swift actions, with the assistance of the Brentano’s in their personal vessel, helped ensure the missing woman was located and received medical care. 

Multnomah County Marine Officers Credited with Save 

On the afternoon of December 15, 2020, the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office received a call of a boat on fire in Multnomah Channel. It was reported that four people were on board: two adults, two children, and two dogs.

The Multnomah County Sheriff’s River Patrol Unit responded from Columbia River station, while patrol deputies on land searched for access points to the river in this rural section of Sauvie Island to help direct rescue boats. Portland Fire & Rescue, Scappoose Fire, Columbia County Sheriff’s Office, and the U.S. Coast Guard also responded. As emergency crews were en route, it was reported that the family had jumped into the river and were attempting to swim to shore. Responders knew that time was of the essence. The river temperature in Multnomah Channel was around 43 degrees, and the air temperature was approximately 50 degrees. 

Marine deputies arrived and located the family and their two dogs huddling in shallow water. Sgt. Steve Dangler jumped in the water to assist the man who had become immobile from hypothermia. Family members were loaded onto the patrol boat as Dep. Scott McDowell kept the vessel steady. Sgt. Dangler kept the man and a dog warm for a prolonged period. The family and their pets were eventually transported by the sheriff’s boat to a nearby dock for transportation to a local hospital for hypothermia. 

Jefferson County Marine Officers Recognized for Life-Saving Efforts 

On June 26, 2021, Jefferson County Sheriff deputies noticed a group of young men running into the water near the Crooked River boat launch at Lake Billy Chinook. The young men were swimming to an offshore floating dock. Initially, deputies thought they were racing each other until they heard a person yell that someone was drowning. 

Deputy Marty Kaczmarek turned around and saw that there were two people struggling to stay afloat. One person was submerged with just the top of his head visible. Dep. Kaczmarek removed his vest and gun and immediately jumped in the water with two other bystanders.

Dep. Kaczmarek and the two bystanders swam out to the floating dock where the two swimmers were struggling. Dep. Kaczmarek, with the help of a bystander, grabbed one victim and swam him back to Sr. Dep. Melody Zistel, who was now standing in the water up to her neck. Sr. Dep. Zistel helped pull the victim to shore with the two men. 

The first victim was breathing but couldn’t talk and was out of breath. Three more men swam out and pulled the second victim from the water as Dep. Kaczmarek and Sr. Dep. Zistel was tending to the first victim.  Sr. Dep. Zistel coordinated the medical response and both men were taken to the hospital.

The deputies’ quick actions, along with other civilian bystanders, directly led to two lives being saved. 

Yamhill County Marine Officers Recognized for Life-Saving Efforts

In the early evening on June 26, 2021, Deputy Rob VandeBergh and Marine Safety Officer Jose Dominguez were patrolling the Willamette River via boat on the way back to Rogers Landing. While en route, they slowed to investigate a bonfire on the shoreline. They heard a person calling for help as they motored toward shore. They then located an unoccupied boat anchored in the river and, after a brief visual search, located struggling in the water downstream of the boat. They quickly maneuvered the patrol boat to the person, threw her a personal floatation device, and pull her to safety.

Dep. VandeBergh and MSO Dominguez transported the victim to Rogers Landing where she was assessed by medics, who found her suffering from physical exhaustion. Based on the victims’ statements, and the assessments of the medics, without the intervention and quick deployment of the flotation device and the successful water rescue, this individual would likely have drowned. Dep. VandeBergh and MSO Dominguez actions directly led to a life saved. 

Linn County Marine Officers Recognized for Life Saving Efforts

On August 4th, 2021, two boaters were surprised by a surge in water volume and were able to contact Linn County Sheriff’s Department for assistance.

A boat operator and his girlfriend were taking a new boat on its maiden voyage from Sunnyside Park on Foster Reservoir. The two traveled up the Middle Fork Santiam River toward the base of Green Peter Reservoir dam where the operator had previously visited. The operator did not see a sign, which was obscured by brush, warning of intermittent releases of water from the upstream dam. 

The two boaters beached the boat to swim to shore. About the time they decided to leave, the water began quickly rising. They were separated by the rushing water and the female became trapped on the rocks. The male had tied the boat to a tree and the boat was now stuck in an eddy with water rushing past at a high volume.

The male called for help and a short time later, Sr. Deputy Stuart Spangler and Marine Safety Officer Lexi Heyerly arrived. Sr. Dep. Spangler and MSO Heyerly deftly maneuvered the patrol boat in the swift water and were able to rescue the female. At this time, Dep. Dan Graybill arrived in a separate boat crewed by Sgt. Chris Houdek. Dep. Graybill maneuvered the patrol boat into the rapids and Sgt. Houdek threw the male a rescue line and was able to pull the male to the Sheriff’s boat and bring him aboard. 

The actions and teamwork of the Linn County Sheriff’s Office staff likely saved a life and led to a positive outcome. 

The Marine Board is incredibly grateful to these individuals for helping keep Oregon boaters safer. Oregon’s waterways are enticing exhilarating -and inherently dangerous. Everyone can do their part when recreating by planning ahead, having the right gear, and being aware of changing conditions.  

For more information about the Marine Board, visit https://boat.oregon.gov

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Attached Media Files: Marine law enforcement boat operating at

Local Non-Profits Receive a $2.2 Million Boost From OnPoint Community Credit Union in 2021 (Photo)
OnPoint Community Credit Union - 11/30/21 9:30 AM
2021-11/963/150483/Rose_Haven_Family_Back_to_School_Drive.jpg
2021-11/963/150483/Rose_Haven_Family_Back_to_School_Drive.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-11/963/150483/thumb_Rose_Haven_Family_Back_to_School_Drive.jpg

Rose Haven, Meals on Wheels and Oregon Food Bank are the latest recipients during a record year of giving for Oregon's largest credit union

PORTLAND, Ore. November 30, 2021—OnPoint Community Credit Union announced today on Giving Tuesday it has made $2.2 million in donations this year to over 277 non-profits that address the most critical needs of Oregon and Southwest Washington communities. A new record for the credit union's annual giving program, OnPoint's 2021 donations focused on diversity, equity and inclusion, education, and services for vulnerable young people, individuals and families. 

Supporting food and shelter organizations in time for the holidays

Included in OnPoint’s record contribution total is today’s $75,000 donation made in observance of the holiday season to three non-profits dedicated to feeding and sheltering underserved community members: Rose HavenOregon Food Bank and Meals on Wheels. Each of these $25,000 donations will support the organizations' efforts to provide food security, day shelter and valuable resources to those in need across the Portland Metro Area. OnPoint will donate an additional $15,000 to organizations in other regions it serves, including the Redmond Food Project, Eugene's Hope & Safety Alliance and Salem's Shangri-La.

"Supporting the well-being of our communities is at the core of who we are, and we strive to make a bigger impact every year in every way that we can – whether we are donating critically needed funds or volunteering our time and financial expertise," said Rob Stuart, OnPoint President and Chief Executive Officer. "These non-profits work tirelessly to build a safer, more equitable future for our community, and we're grateful to our members and employees for the opportunity to support their work."

Rose Haven, one of the recipients of OnPoint's $25,000 holiday donations, is Multnomah County’s only day shelter and community center open to women, children and marginalized genders. The Northwest Portland non-profit will use OnPoint's donation to provide guests with meals, personal care supplies, bus tickets and financial assistance for rent, utilities and medical emergencies. A portion of the funds will also be used to support Rose Haven's move from its current 3,700-square-foot space in the basement of the First Immanuel Lutheran Church to a new 12,000-square-foot, custom-built, trauma-informed space. Visit OnPoint's blog to learn more about Rose Haven's critical role in the community and how OnPoint is supporting its mission.

"Oregon currently has the second highest rate of people experiencing homelessness in the country," said Liz Starke, Development Director, Rose Haven. "Our housing crisis is a complex issue that cannot be solved alone. We are fortunate to partner with organizations like OnPoint that are helping us make our vision of a community where everyone has safety, stability, love, health and home, a reality." 

Giving continues with OnPoint's annual holiday social giving campaign 

In addition to the donations announced today, OnPoint is also kicking off its holiday social giving campaign on FacebookTwitter, Instagram and LinkedIn. From November 30 to December 10, OnPoint followers can select six organizations to receive donations from the credit union by following/liking OnPoint channels and sharing the non-profit they support. Participants can vote through the credit union's social media channels by tagging OnPoint and using the #OnPointGiving hashtag or commenting on one of its social media posts. 

Donation to fight climate change exceeds expectations

OnPoint's 2021 giving also included a $226,750 donation to The Nature Conservancy in Oregon (TNC), an environmental organization committed to protecting and restoring the lands and waters that are vital to survival. OnPoint's donation supports a range of TNC's most critical projects, including increasing the pace and scale of forest restoration, employing adaptation strategies to ensure vibrant and resilient coastal communities and sustainable fisheries, and protecting existing soil and underground carbon in Eastern Oregon. This gift was made possible through OnPoint's 2021 giving campaign related to its Green Auto Discount and Green Horizons initiative, which supports members and employees in building a more environmentally and financially sustainable future.

Growing our commitment to build more equitable communities 

Over the past three years, OnPoint has more than doubled its annual giving in direct response to the growing needs of the communities it serves. OnPoint donated more than $1 million to local and regional non-profits in 2019 and more than $1.65 million in 2020. With this year's $2.2 million in donations, of which more than $500,000 went to DEI-focused organizations, the credit union remains committed to expanding its charitable giving efforts even further. Below are a few of the non-profits to which OnPoint made donations this year:

  • $47,650 to Girls, Inc. of the Pacific Northwest
  • $43,750 to Native American Youth & Family Center
  • $35,000 to Cascade AIDS Project
  • $27,700 to Hacienda CDC
  • $25,000 to Black United Fund of Oregon
  • $25,000 to Coalition of Communities of Color
  • $25,000 to Portland NAACP
  • $25,000 to Self Enhancement, Inc.
  • $25,000 to Urban League of Portland
  • $20,000 to Immigrant and Refugee Community Organization
  • $10,000 to APANO Communities United Fund
  • $10,000 to College Possible
  • $10,000 to Community Action
  • $10,000 to Girls Build
  • $10,000 to KairosPDX
  • $10,000 to Meals On Wheels People
  • $10,000 to Portland Housing Center
  • $10,000 to Proud Ground
  • $10,000 to Serendipity Center, Inc.
  • $5,000 to Adelante Mujeres
  • $5,000 to Harper's Playground
  • $5,000 to Impact NW dba Squires
  • $5,000 to POIC
  • $5,000 to Q Center
  • $5,000 to Small Business Legal Clinic, Lewis & Clark College

As OnPoint grows its footprint in Oregon and Southwest Washington, it will continue to invest in our communities by donating to organizations in need, creating jobs, providing more member services and fostering relationships with community partners. If you're an organization seeking financial assistance, visit OnPoint's Giving page to submit a donation request.

ABOUT ONPOINT COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION

OnPoint Community Credit Union is the largest credit union in Oregon, serving 458,000 members and with assets of $9 billion. Founded in 1932, OnPoint Community Credit Union's membership is available to anyone who lives or works in one of 28 Oregon counties (Benton, Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Coos, Crook, Curry, Deschutes, Douglas, Gilliam, Hood River, Jackson, Jefferson, Josephine, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Morrow, Multnomah, Polk, Sherman, Tillamook, Wasco, Washington, Wheeler and Yamhill) and two Washington counties (Skamania and Clark) and their immediate family members. More information is available at www.onpointcu.com or 503-228-7077 or 800-527-3932.

 

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Attached Media Files: 2021-11/963/150483/Rose_Haven_Family_Back_to_School_Drive.jpg

Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Medicare Fraud (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 11/30/21 9:00 AM
TT - Medicare - GRAPHIC - November 30, 2021
TT - Medicare - GRAPHIC - November 30, 2021
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-11/3585/150469/thumb_TT_-_Medicare_Scams_-_GRAPHIC_-_November_30_2021.jpg

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. Today: Building a digital defense against Medicare Fraud.

December 7th is the end of the open enrollment period for Medicare recipients. It’s a chance to change your health and prescription drug options, if you wish. It’s also a prime time for scammers to target seniors with fraud.

Here’s some helpful information from our partners at Medicare and the Federal Trade Commission (FTC):

In addition to regular mail notifications that you may receive from Medicare or Social Security, seniors may be receiving information and solicitations from insurance companies that offer Medicare health and prescription drug plans. If you live in Oregon and need help navigating the Medicare system, you can contact the Senior Health Insurance Benefits Assistance agency (SHIBA).

Bad actors often try to take advantage of seniors by getting between them and official sources of information. They may show up at your home or contact you by phone, email, text message, or social media post. Here are some important things to keep in mind:

  • Medicare will never contact you for your Medicare number or other personal information unless you’ve given it permission in advance.
  • Medicare will never call you to sell you anything.
  • You may get calls from people promising you things if you give them a Medicare number. Don’t do it. 
  • Medicare will never visit you at your home.
  • Medicare can’t enroll you over the phone unless you call first.
  • If someone calls claiming to be from Medicare, asking for your Social Security number or bank information to get your new card or new benefits, that’s a scam.
  • Don’t give personal information to a caller claiming to be from Medicare. You can’t trust caller ID. These calls can be spoofed so they look like they’re coming from Medicare even when they’re not. 

Before you give any personal information, initiate your own call to Medicare at 1-800-MEDICARE. You should also call this number if you feel as though you have been scammed.

Also, if you are the victim of this or any other online scam, you should report the incident to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your FBI local office.  

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Attached Media Files: TT - Medicare Scams - AUDIO - November 30, 2021 , TT - Medicare - GRAPHIC - November 30, 2021

Mon. 11/29/21
Oregon reports 2,598 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 27 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 11/29/21 4:48 PM

November 29, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 2,598 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 27 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 27 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 5,142, Oregon Health Authority (OHA) reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

OHA reported 2,598 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 390,066.

The 27 new deaths and 2,598 new cases reported today include data recorded by counties for the period between Nov. 24 and Nov. 28.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 396, which is 21 more than yesterday. There are 91 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, with no change from yesterday.

There are 68 available adult ICU beds out of 679 total (10% availability) and 368 available adult non-ICU beds out of 4,092 (9% availability).

11/29/2021 Available Beds (and Percentage of Staffed Beds Available)

 

Statewide

Region 1

Region 2

Region 3

Region 5

Region 6

Region 7

Region 9

Adult ICU beds available

68

(10%)

28

(8%)

6

(7%)

12

(13%)

7

(12%)

3

(30%)

5

(11%)

7

(27%)

Adult non-ICU beds available

368

(9%)

95

(5%)

16

(3%)

68

(12%)

38

(9%)

6

(13%)

96

(23%)

49

(41%)

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

Note: Please do not visit an emergency department for COVID-19 testing, unless you require emergency care for your symptoms.

Emergency departments in Oregon are under significant strain responding to the current surge in COVID-19. You can find a test here.

If you have a medical condition that doesn’t require emergency care, contact your provider. An urgent care center may also help you get the care you need and will save emergency departments from added strain.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 7,772 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry on Nov. 28. Of that total, 385 were initial doses, 861 were second doses and 1,722 were third doses and booster doses. The remaining 4,790 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Nov. 28.

The seven-day running average is now 15,401 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered 3,568,720 doses of Pfizer Comirnaty, 64,464 doses of Pfizer pediatric, 2,245,750 doses of Moderna and 286,453 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

As of today, 2,942,427 people have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine and 2,655,974 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.

Updated vaccination data are provided on Oregon’s COVID-19 data dashboards and have been updated today.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (17), Benton (32), Clackamas (300), Clatsop (29), Columbia (54), Coos (27), Crook (22), Curry (9), Deschutes (282), Douglas (87), Gilliam (1), Grant (2), Harney (2), Hood River (6), Jackson (136), Jefferson (25), Josephine (77), Klamath (23), Lake (1), Lane (177), Lincoln (35), Linn (123), Malheur (6), Marion (230), Morrow (1), Multnomah (417), Polk (28), Tillamook (20),Umatilla (11), Union (18), Wallowa (7), Wasco (1), Washington (340) and Yamhill (52).

Oregon reports 861 confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases on Nov. 24, 306 confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases on Nov. 25, 467 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases on Nov. 26, 519 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases on Nov. 27 and 445 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases on Nov. 28.

Note: Oregon’s 5,108th and 3,621st COVID-19 related deaths, reported on Nov. 23 and Sept. 21 respectively, were identified to be the same person. Because of this update, we are renumbering our reports to start with 5,116 today.

Oregon’s 5,116th COVID-19 related death is a 91-year-old man from Jackson County who died Oct. 19 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,117th COVID-19 related death is a 74-year-old man from Jackson County who died Sept. 10 at Sky Lakes Medical Center. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,118th COVID-19 related death is a 69-year-old woman from Curry County who died Sept. 7 at Providence Medford Medical Center. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,119th COVID-19 related death is a 78-year-old woman from Curry County who died Sept. 7 at Providence Medford Medical Center. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,120th COVID-19 related death is an 80-year-old woman from Curry County who died Aug. 30 at her residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,121st COVID-19 related death is a 70-year-old woman from Polk County who tested positive Aug. 15 and died Aug. 27 at Salem Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,122nd COVID-19 related death is an 85-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive Nov. 6 and died Nov. 21 at Providence Medford Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,123rd COVID-19 related death is an 81-year-old woman from Jackson County who tested positive Oct. 11 and died Nov. 19 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,124th COVID-19 related death is a 72-year-old woman from Grant County who died Sept. 4 at St. Charles Bend. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,125th COVID-19 related death is an 83-year-old woman from Douglas County who tested positive Nov. 2 and died Nov. 20 at David Grant Medical Center in Fairfield, Calif. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,126th COVID-19 related death is a 75-year-old woman from Clackamas County who tested positive Nov. 8 and died Nov. 24 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,127th COVID-19 related death is an 81-year-old woman from Baker County who tested positive Nov. 19 and died Nov. 26 at St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Boise, Idaho. She had no underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,128th COVID-19 related death is a 67-year-old woman from Baker County who tested positive Nov. 2 and died Nov. 27 at St. Alphonsus Regional Medical Center in Boise, Idaho. She had no underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,129th COVID-19 related death is an 85-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive Nov. 21 and died Nov. 23 at Asante Rogue Regional Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,130th COVID-19 related death is a 75-year-old woman from Jackson County who tested positive Nov. 15 and died Nov. 21 at Providence Medford Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,131st COVID-19 related death is a 72-year-old woman from Jackson County who tested positive Nov. 9 and died Nov. 24 at Providence Medford Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,132nd COVID-19 related death is an 87-year-old man from Washington County who tested positive Nov. 12 and died Nov. 20 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,133rd COVID-19 related death is a 58-year-old man from Washington County who tested positive Nov. 4 and died Nov. 19 at OHSU Hillsboro Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,134th COVID-19 related death is a 64-year-old man from Polk County who tested positive Nov. 5 and died Nov. 23 at Salem Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,135th COVID-19 related death is a 62-year-old woman from Marion County who tested positive Nov. 4 and died Nov. 26 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,136th COVID-19 related death is a 60-year-old woman from Marion County who tested positive Nov. 2 and died Nov. 26 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,137th COVID-19 related death is a 76-year-old man from Linn County who tested positive Nov. 9 and died Nov. 23 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,138th COVID-19 related death is a 72-year-old man from Linn County who tested positive Oct. 31 and died Nov. 20 at Salem Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,139th COVID-19 related death is a 70-year-old woman from Jefferson County who died Sept. 29 at St. Charles Bend. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 5,140th COVID-19 related death is a 78-year-old man from Benton County who tested positive Nov. 9 and died Nov. 23 at Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,141st COVID-19 related death is a 65-year-old man from Josephine County who died Aug. 19 at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 5,142nd COVID-19 related death is a 57-year-old man from Josephine County who tested positive Nov. 1 and died Nov. 23 at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. He had no underlying conditions.

Updated information is known about Oregon’s 4,990th COVID-19 related death, a 42-year-old-man from Josephine County who tested positive Sept. 4 and died Sept. 3. He was originally reported as having died Sept. 4.

Updated information is known about Oregon’s 4,957th COVID-19 related death, an 84-year-old woman from Josephine County who tested positive Sept. 1 and died Sept. 12. She was originally reported as being an 83-year-old woman.

Updated information is known about Oregon’s 4,764th COVID-19 related death, a 59-year-old man from Josephine County who tested positive Aug. 23 and died Sept. 6 at Oregon Health & Science University Hospital. He had underlying conditions. He was previously reported as a 58-year-old man from Josephine County who died at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center with no underlying conditions.

A date was incorrectly reported on Nov. 24. Oregon’s 5,095th COVID-19-related death is a 65-year-old man from Clackamas County who died Nov. 24, 2020, at his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Learn more about COVID-19 vaccinations  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccine situation in Oregon, visit our web page (English or Spanish), which has a breakdown of distribution and other information.

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OHA expresses concern about Omicron, recommends vaccination
Oregon Health Authority - 11/29/21 4:37 PM

November 29, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA expresses concern about Omicron, recommends vaccination

PORTLAND, Ore. — Oregon Health Authority is issuing a statement on the new COVID-19 variant known as Omicron, which the World Health Organization has classified as a variant of concern. The following is from Dean E. Sidelinger, M.D., M.S.Ed., health officer and state epidemiologist:

We know the emergence of the new variant of COVID-19, called the Omicron variant, is concerning for many Oregonians. We share that concern, and Oregon Health Authority epidemiologists are closely monitoring its transmission in other parts of the world.

What we do know is that the basic prevention steps we have long talked about remain the best ways to protect yourself against Omicron, Delta or any variant of COVID-19 that is circulating. Vaccination remains the best protection against COVID-19 infection and transmission, including most circulating variants.

Omicron has not yet been detected in the United States, but we expect it will be in the coming days due to its reported high transmissibility. Oregon has one of the most robust variant surveillance systems in the United States, and so far, no cases of Omicron have been detected in Oregon.

Omicron is reported to be more transmissible than the Delta variant as it’s quickly outcompeted Delta in South Africa, but we do not yet know how much more transmissible it is. We also don’t know how Omicron affects vaccine effectiveness against severe infection (hospitalization and death). The vaccines have remained highly effective against other variants, and we expect the same to be true with Omicron. We should have early answers in the coming weeks.

The best way to protect yourself against Omicron, or any variant of COVID-19 that is circulating, is to be vaccinated. Vaccination remains the best protection against COVID-19. Those who are not yet vaccinated should get their first COVID-19 vaccine as soon as possible. Those due for a booster – all adults either two months after a Johnson & Johnson vaccination or six months after a Moderna or Pfizer vaccination – should get it as soon as possible. Wearing a mask when inside public places as well as social distancing and handwashing remain incredibly important in the face of an emerging variant and high levels of community transmission.

We know that news of Omicron’s emergence will cause many people to experience some anxiety about the unknown. We also know there is a great deal of “pandemic fatigue” as cases, hospitalizations and deaths are reported daily. COVID-19 continues to disrupt our lives. I share these anxieties as we continue to face COVID-19.

I want to thank all of my public health colleagues and health care partners who continue to help protect us from COVID-19 and provide us all with quality care. Some communities – our communities of color and our Native American neighbors – have been especially impacted by COVID-19. But no Oregonian has been spared, so I want to thank all Oregonians for the steps they continue to take to protect themselves, loved ones and communities from this pandemic.

View a video statement by Dr. Sidelinger at https://youtu.be/3LqIt3v7qJw.


Fatal Crash on Hwy 197-Wasco County
Oregon State Police - 11/29/21 3:43 PM

On Monday, November 29, 2021, at approximately 8:36AM, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two-vehicle crash on Hwy 197 near milepost 12. 

Preliminary investigation revealed a southbound Ford Windstar van, operated by Barbara Dillon (77) of Klamath Falls, drifted into the oncoming lane of travel and collided with a northbound Ford F-350, operated by Stephen Hart (66) of Tygh Valley. 

Dillon sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased. Hart was transported to the Mid-Columbia Medical Center with injuries. 

Hwy 197 was closed for approximately 3.5 hours. 

OSP was assisted by the Wasco County Sheriff’s office, ODOT and Dufur Fire and Rescue.


System of Care Advisory Council meets remotely Tuesday, December 7, 2021
Oregon Health Authority - 11/29/21 1:33 PM

November 29, 2021

Media contact: Aria Seligmann, 503-910-9239, i.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us">ari.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us

Program contact: Hilary Harrison, 503-209-1949, y.harrison@dhsoha.state.or.us">hilary.harrison@dhsoha.state.or.us  

System of Care Advisory Council meets remotely Tuesday, December 7, 2021

What: A regular public meeting of the System of Care Advisory Council

When: Tuesday December 7, 12:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Where: By webinar at ZoomGov

Meeting ID: 160 347 3675, Passcode: 123456

Dial by your location +1 669 254 5252 US (San Jose)

Agenda: The full agenda can be found at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HSD/BH-Child-Family/Pages/SOCAC.aspx. The meeting will include time for public comment.

Details: Senate Bill 1 (2019) established a Governor-appointed System of Care Advisory Council to improve the efficacy and effectiveness of the state and local continuum of care that provides services to youth and young adults.

The council will be discussing its System of Care Plan for Oregon for 2022-2023 to the Governor and legislature, the appointment of an Executive Director and the issue brief received from the Children’s System Advisory Council.

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Hilary Harrison at 503-209-1949, 711 TTY, or y.harrison@dhsoha.state.or.us">hilary.harrison@dhsoha.state.or.us at least two business days before the meeting.


Public Health Advisory Board meets Dec. 6, Dec. 9 for member trainings
Oregon Health Authority - 11/29/21 12:51 PM

November 29, 2021

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Public Health Advisory Board meets Dec. 6, Dec. 9 for member trainings

What: The Public Health Advisory Board is holding trainings for board members.

Agenda: Training sessions will focus on health equity education.

When: Monday, Dec. 6, 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m., and Thursday, Dec. 9, 2-4:30 p.m. The meetings are open to the public. No public comment will be offered at these meetings, which will be focused on board training. Members of the public can submit comments via email to lichealth.policy@dhsoha.state.or.us">publichealth.policy@dhsoha.state.or.us, or join the public comment period offered at the regular Public Health Advisory Board meeting on Dec. 16 from 2-5 p.m.

Where: Zoom conference call.

  • 6: (669) 254-5252, participant code 1606015481#.
  • 9: (669) 254-5252, participant code 1619638665#.

Background: Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Cara Biddlecom: at 971-673-2284, 711 TTY, or a.m.biddlecom@state.or.us">cara.m.biddlecom@state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


DOGAMI names finalists for position of State Geologist and Executive Director
Oregon Dept. of Geology and Mineral Industries - 11/29/21 11:00 AM

After initial interviews earlier this month, the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) has named two finalists for the State Geologist and Executive Director of DOGAMI. They are: 

• Ruarri Day-Stirrat, Senior Specialist Research Geoscientist with Shell International Exploration & Production, Inc. 

• Michael Kortenhof, Land Quality Manager with the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality 

Final interviews will take place on December 8 and 10, 2021. Candidates will meet with members of the community, employees of DOGAMI and will interview during the board meeting scheduled for December 10, 2021. The Board will meet in executive session prior to the closing of the board meeting to consider employment of the director. The agenda for the Governing Board meeting is available at

https://www.oregongeology.org/about/govboard/Board_agenda_12_10_2021.pdf 

The governing Board consists of five members, confirmed by the Senate and appointed by the Governor. The Board works at the pleasure of the Governor. The Governing Board sets agency policy and oversees general operations. The Board adopts a strategic plan every six years. This guides DOGAMI's mission and objectives. They meet at least quarterly at sites around the state. The Governing board provides an important connection between the agency and Oregon communities. 

 

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Two Rivers Correctional Institution reports in-custody death (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 11/29/21 10:18 AM
Loren E. Sicks
Loren E. Sicks
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-11/1070/150455/thumb_Sicks_L.jpg

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Loren Eugene Sicks, died the morning of November 28, 2021. Sicks was incarcerated at Two Rivers Correctional Institution (TRCI) in Umatilla and passed away in the infirmary while on hospice care. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified.

Sicks entered DOC custody on December 7, 1999, from Lane County with an earliest release date of March 3, 2023. Sicks was 81 years old. Next of kin has been notified.

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 12,000 individuals who are incarcerated in 13 institutions across the state. While crime information is public record, DOC elects to disclose only upon request out of respect for any family or victims.

TRCI is a multi-custody prison in Umatilla that houses approximately 1,800 adults in custody. TRCI participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including institution and industrial laundry, mattress manufacturing, and sewing. Other institution work programs include reparation and cleaning of irrigation ditches, maintenance of local baseball fields, and work with local cities and the Hermiston School District. The facility provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, religious services, and behavioral health services. TRCI opened in 2000.

 

 

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Attached Media Files: Loren E. Sicks

UPDDATE--Fatal Crash on Hwy 30-Multnomah County
Oregon State Police - 11/29/21 9:36 AM

UPDATE: The female pedestrian has been identified as Amy Bybee (41) of Portland. 

On Thursday, November 25, 2021, at about 7:07 PM, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a pedestrian hit by a vehicle on Hwy 30 near milepost 16.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Ford Escape, operated by Brandon Pollard (28) of Warren, was travelling eastbound on Hwy 30 and struck an unidentified female who was on foot within the eastbound “A” Lane. 

The unidentified female suffered fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased. Pollard and his passenger, Mallory Dunn (26) of Kennewick, Washington, were not injured. Pollard remained at the scene and cooperated with law enforcement.

Multnomah County Medical Examiner responded and is actively working on identifying the female pedestrian. 

Hwy 30 was closed for 2.5 hours following the crash. 

OSP was assisted by the Scappoose Fire Dept., Scappoose Police Dept., Columbia County Sheriff’s Office, ODOT, and the Medical Examiner. This is an ongoing investigation and more information will be released when available.


Fatal Crash on Hwy 97-Deschutes County
Oregon State Police - 11/29/21 9:31 AM

On Saturday, November 27, 2021 at approximately 10:00 PM, Oregon State Police and emergency personnel responded to a vehicle versus pedestrian crash on Highway 97 near milepost 124. 

Preliminary investigation revealed a pedestrian, Kara Shepherd (44) of Redmond, was attempting to cross four lanes of travel and was struck by a northbound Lexus RX330, operated by Erin Behzadian (37) of Redmond. 

Shepherd sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased. Behzadian was not injured and remained on scene and cooperated with the investigation.

OSP was assisted by Redmond Police Department and ODOT. 


Sun. 11/28/21
DOGAMI Governing Board to meet December 10
Oregon Dept. of Geology and Mineral Industries - 11/28/21 7:25 PM

PORTLAND, Ore. - The Governing Board of the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI) will meet on Friday, December 10 at 8:30 a.m. to 3:20 p.m. To adhere to the state’s social distancing requirements and to slow the spread of COVID-19, this public meeting will be conducted as a virtual meeting. This meeting includes an executive session of the Governing Board to conduct interviews of the two finalists for the State Geologist and Executive Director of DOGAMI. The meeting agenda is available at

https://www.oregongeology.org/about/govboard/Board_agenda_12_10_2021.pdf 

The DOGAMI Governing Board sets policy and oversees general operations, and adopts a strategic plan every six years. The Board meets at least quarterly. As active members of their communities, Board members provide an important connection between Oregonians and DOGAMI's mission of providing earth science information and regulation to make Oregon safe and prosperous.


Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Search and Rescue assist injured climber at Smith Rocks
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 11/28/21 5:13 PM

Released by: Deputy Donny Patterson - Assistant Search and Rescue Coordinator

Date/time: 11/28/ 21 at 1110 AM

Location: Dihedrals climbing area at Smith Rock State Park

Injured:  42 year old female – Redmond, OR

 

On 11/18/21, at about 11:10 AM, a Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Special Services Deputy was advised of an injury at Smith Rock State Park requiring Search and Rescue assistance.  A DCSO SAR volunteer climbing in the area had come upon an injured climber requiring assistance down the trail.  It was reported that one of the members in the injured climbers party slid down a climbing rope and impacted her head as she was climbing up. The accident occurred on a climbing route known as “Darkness at Noon”, which is located in the area of the Dihedrals at Smith Rock State Park.  

The Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Search and Rescue member who was climbing in the area, remained on scene to provide assistance until further help could arrive.  Due to the location of the climber, a wheeled litter rescue was required.  A DCSO Special Services Deputy responded to the park, as additional Search and Rescue volunteers were called out to assist.  Ten DCSO Search and Rescue volunteers responded to assist.  

When Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Search and Rescue teams arrived on scene, the medical team members began providing patient care and preparing the injured climber for transport by wheeled litter. Once the patient was ready, Search and Rescue members along with a State Park employee, began moving the climber down through some tough terrain, eventually reaching the canyon floor and footbridge.  The climber was then transported out of the canyon to an awaiting Redmond Fire / Paramedic ambulance. 

This was a team effort and the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office would like to thank Redmond Fire and the Oregon State Parks for their assistance in this rescue.    

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is a full service agency that oversees the adult jail, provides patrol, criminal investigations, civil process and search and rescue operations. Special units include SWAT, Marine Patrol, ATV Patrol, Forest Patrol, along with five K9 teams. Founded in 1916 and today led by your duly elected Sheriff L. Shane Nelson, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office serves over 200,000 residents in Deschutes County. The agency has 259 authorized and funded personnel, which includes 191 sworn employees who provide services to the 3,055 square miles of Deschutes County.  

 

 

 


Fatal Structure Fire (Photo)
Crook Co. Fire and Rescue - 11/28/21 2:38 PM
2021-11/6932/150445/IMG_1237.JPG
2021-11/6932/150445/IMG_1237.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-11/6932/150445/thumb_IMG_1237.JPG

Media Information Release

 

Type of incident: Structure Fire

Location of incident:  SE Wintoon Road (Juniper Canyon), Prineville, Oregon

Incident date:  11/27/2021                  Alarm Time:  21:42

Description of occupancy:  Double wide mobile home

Owner, occupant:  The home was occupied by one female at the time of the fire.  Two other males lived on the property and were on the property at the time of the fire.

Circumstances found on arrival; actions taken:  CCFR was dispatched to a structure fire with the report of a female occupant still in the home. Upon arrival crews discovered two males living on the property had extinguished the majority of the fire with garden hoses.  Upon entry to the home, crews discovered heavy fire damage to the contents in the front half of the home, and significant heat and smoke damage throughout the rest of the home. Crews accessed the heavily damaged living room where the female was reported to have been sleeping and confirmed the female occupant was deceased. 

Injuries, rescues, other information of interest:  One fatality

Responding Apparatus:  One Command Vehicle, two Engines, one Medic, and one Tender

Responding Personnel:  Nine

Mutual Aid assistance by:  Crook County Sheriff’s office assisted on scene. Redmond Fire provided an ambulance for station coverage while crews were operating at the fire.  The Office of the State Fire Marshal and Oregon State Police assisted with the fire investigation.

Probable fire cause:  Cause of the fire was determined to be accidental.  Through the investigation it was determined the occupant had a history of smoking in bed and was on supplemental oxygen.  Evidence at the scene indicated that careless smoking was the most probable cause of the fire.

Contact:  Division Chief Russell Deboodt

Office: 541-447-5011        Cell:




Attached Media Files: 2021-11/6932/150445/IMG_1237.JPG