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Bend/Central-Eastern Oregon News Releases for Tue. Oct. 16 - 8:20 am
Tue. 10/16/18
Holiday Wishes come true for Lebanon Lottery winner (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 10/16/18 8:13 AM
Yolanda Reyes, Lebanon, 100,000 Scratch-it winner
Yolanda Reyes, Lebanon, 100,000 Scratch-it winner
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/4939/118804/thumb_Yolanda_R._Lebanon_100k_Scratch.JPG

October 16, 2018 – Salem, Ore. – Holiday wishes came true for Yolanda Reyes of Lebanon, when she won $100,000 playing one of the new Holiday Wishes Scratch-it from the Oregon Lottery.
“I was at Bingo and scratching the ticket and thought I won $10,” she said. “When I asked a friend, we realized I won $100,000!”
Reyes won playing the $10 Holiday Wishes Scratch-it, which is part of the new featured holiday tickets offered by the Oregon Lottery this winter that also includes the $1 Stocking Stuffer, $2 Snow Globe Cash and the $5 Holiday Cheer. The tickets went on sale earlier this month and will run through the end of the year to celebrate the season. The Holiday Wishes Scratch-it still has one $100,000 jackpot prize left.
Reyes, who recently retired from the Oregon Department of Human Services after a 20-year career, said the money was going toward her retirement.
“It comes at a great time for me,” she said. “I just retired and this will be a nice cushion.”
In addition to her retirement nest egg, she said she will probably purchase a small pickup with the money.
Reyes purchased the ticket at B&G Bingo in Salem. 
During the 2015-17 biennium in Linn County, where Reyes lives, more than $42.1 million in Oregon Lottery proceeds were directed to economic development, parks, education, and watershed enhancement.
Lottery officials recommend that you always sign the back of your tickets with each Oregon Lottery game you play, to ensure you can claim any prize you may win. In the event of winning a jackpot, players should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 should contact the Lottery office to schedule an appointment to claim their prize.
Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned more than $11 billion for economic development, public education, state parks, and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org
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Attached Media Files: Yolanda Reyes, Lebanon, 100,000 Scratch-it winner

Mon. 10/15/18
Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services Advisory Committee meets Oct. 19
Oregon Department of Human Services - 10/15/18 4:40 PM

(Salem, Ore.) – The Advisory Committee for the Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services will meet from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 19, in Room 166 of the Barbara Roberts Human Services Building, 500 Summer St. N.E., Salem, Oregon, 97301.

The meeting is open to the public.

Agenda items include will include public comment, advisory committee planning, old business, discussion and new business, subcommittee reports, roundtable and future agenda items.

Sign language interpreters and live captioning will be provided. Those who are unable to attend in person, may join by calling toll-free phone number, (503) 934-1400, and using Conference ID # 360372. 

The meeting location is accessible to people with disabilities. For questions about accessibility or to request an accommodation, please contact Request.ODHHSP@state.or.us. Requests should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting.

For questions about this meeting, please contact: Max Brown at 503-945-6993 or ODHHS.Info@state.or.us

About the Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services Advisory Committee

The committee assists the Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Service Program (ODHHSP) by providing information and expertise on issues affecting individuals who are deaf, deaf-blind, hard of hearing and those with additional disability.

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Work on Bend Hydro dam planned for early November
Pacific Power - 10/15/18 3:25 PM

Contact: Media Hotline                                          800-570-5838                                                                                                          October 15, 2018

Work on Bend Hydro dam planned for early November

Planned reinforcements include steel facing across entire dam

 

Bend, Ore. —Pacific Power is preparing to make reinforcements to its dam in downtown Bend to address a small leak that developed in one of the structure’s wooden panels. The work is expected to begin in early November.

 

On October 10, a plant operator discovered more water than normal passing through an outlet that was once used to regulate river flow. The source of the leak is a wooden panel that was installed about 25 years ago to seal the outlet, which is no longer used. The leak is affecting the company’s ability to maintain normal water levels for Mirror Pond, but poses no safety risk and does not impact the structural integrity of the dam.

 

The work will include driving long pieces of interlocking steel sheets, known as sheet pile, into the river bed to create steel facing on the upstream side of the leaking panel and remaining sections of the 100-year-old wooden structure that have not already been reinforced. The method was successfully used in 2008, 2009, and 2014 after similar leaks were discovered. The entire face of the dam will be reinforced with this next round of sheet pile installation.

 

“These reinforcements will allow us to continue to operate the hydro project and maintain Mirror Pond levels for the community for the foreseeable future,” said Mark Sturtevant, managing director of Renewable Resources, who oversees hydro operations for PacifiCorp.

 

The dam is located near the Newport Avenue bridge. In addition to diverting water for the company’s hydroelectric project, the dam creates Mirror Pond by impounding the section of the Deschutes River immediately upstream.

 

The work will begin as soon as a large construction crane can be brought into the area and all needed permits are in hand. The company currently expects the work to start around November 5 and last for about four weeks.

 

Mirror Pond levels are currently about two feet below normal for this time of year and are expected to remain two to four feet below normal until the reinforcements are complete.

 

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Accelerate Your Leadership Journey at Leadercast Women 2018 (Photo)
Klamath Co. Chamber of Commerce - 10/15/18 2:31 PM
2018-10/1602/118783/molly_fletcher.PNG
2018-10/1602/118783/molly_fletcher.PNG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/1602/118783/thumb_molly_fletcher.PNG

To be a good leader, you must first learn how to lead yourself. This idea is the theme of this year’s Leadercast Women conference led by nine academically and critically acclaimed speakers held at Klamath Community College November 8th in Klamath Falls.  

During the conference, CEO and Keynote speaker Molly Fletcher will help attendees understand how to lead oneself to success before leading others to maximum effectiveness. She, among other speakers, will guide attendees on how to implement this, how to see it through and how it will change your life, and the lives of others.

Molly Fletcher is a true trailblazer in every sense of the word. As CEO of The Molly Fletcher Company, she shares her unconventional and unique techniques that made her one of the first female sports agents in the high stakes, big ego world of professional sports to teach others the art of negotiation. Molly was dubbed the “female Jerry Maguire” by CNN when she served as president of client representation for sports and entertainment agency CSE.    

As one of the world’s only female sports agents, Molly recruited and represented some of sport’s biggest names: Hall of Fame pitcher John Smoltz, PGA Tour golfer Matt Kuchar, broadcaster Erin Andrews, and basketball championship coaches Tom Izzo and Doc Rivers. Molly has authored Fearless At Work, A Winner’s Guide to Negotiating, The Business of Being the Best and The 5 Best Tools to Find Your Dream Career.

To learn more and to register for the Leadercast Women conference 2018, visit www.klamath.org or call the Klamath County Chamber at (541) 884-5193.




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/1602/118783/molly_fletcher.PNG

Best-selling Author Marilyn Tam to Speak at Leadercast Women Conference (Photo)
Klamath Co. Chamber of Commerce - 10/15/18 2:31 PM
2018-10/1602/118782/Marilyn_Tam.PNG
2018-10/1602/118782/Marilyn_Tam.PNG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/1602/118782/thumb_Marilyn_Tam.PNG

The future of business is dependent on having great leaders. This idea is the core of Leadercast Women and all its speakers, including best-selling author Marilyn Tam. Livestreaming at Klamath Community College on November 8th, Leadercast Women is a must-attend for any aspiring entrepreneur or leader.

Marilyn grew up as an abused and neglected child in Hong Kong, and left home as a teen to come to America alone. Following her life mission, she achieved international business and humanitarian success. She now helps people and organizations find and fulfill their life’s purpose, and provides them with the principles and actionable steps to help them reach their goals.

Marilyn is a speaker, best-selling author, consultant, board-certified executive and corporate coach, CEO of Marilyn Tam & Co., and founder and executive director of Us Foundation. Marilyn also formerly served as CEO of Aveda Corp., president of Reebok Apparel and Retail Group, and vice president of Nike Inc. She also authored How to Use What You’ve Got to Get What You Want and Living the Life of Your Dreams.

To learn more and to register for the Leadercast Women conference 2018, visit www.klamath.org or call the Klamath County Chamber at (541) 884-5193.




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/1602/118782/Marilyn_Tam.PNG

Grants available for EV charging innovation
Pacific Power - 10/15/18 1:06 PM

Media contact:                                                          
Tom Gauntt, Pacific Power, 503-813-7291

Grants available for EV charging innovation

Pacific Power opens grant applications Oct 15 to help provide wide range of charging options for customers

 

PORTLAND, Ore. —Oct. 15, 2018-- Have a great idea of how to provide charging options for the growing number of electric vehicles in Oregon? Pacific Power wants to hear from you.

Applications for electric vehicle charging station grants are now open. Up to $300,000 is available in this funding cycle for projects that help communities and businesses develop creative electric transportation infrastructure projects. A total of $1.5 million will be awarded to customer projects through the end of 2019.

“We see collaboration and partnership with community groups, employers and local governments as an important jumpstart in bringing charging technology forward,” said Cory Scott, director of customer solutions.

To apply, entities need to complete and submit an application along with supporting materials by 5 p.m. Nov. 15, 2018.

All non-residential Pacific Power customers in Oregon are eligible to apply with preference given to community-focused organizations, such as 501(c)(3) and city, county and regional governments.

 

Funding awards will cover up to 100 percent of eligible costs to purchase and install electric vehicle charging stations.

 

Some examples of projects eligible for grants include, but are not limited to:   

  • Businesses of all sizes installing chargers as an amenity for customers and employees.
  • Multi-unit housing owners installing chargers for tenants, either in support of tenant-owned electric cars or in conjunction with offering electric cars for tenant use.
  • Chargers for community car sharing programs to improve access and charging to electric cars in underserved communities.

For detailed eligibility requirements, project qualifications and application forms, please go to pacificpower.net/ev-grants.

 

Materials may be submitted to plugin@pacificpower.net.

 

Grants will be awarded in quarterly cycles through 2019. The next grant cycle will open on Jan. 15, 2019.
 

To learn more about the benefits of electric vehicles, visit pacificpower.net/ev

 

About Pacific Power
Pacific Power provides electric service to more than 740,000 customers in Oregon, Washington and California. The company works to meet growing energy demand while protecting and enhancing the environment. Pacific Power is part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity producers in the United States, with almost 1.8 million customers in six western states Information about Pacific Power is available on the company's website, Twitter, Facebook and YouTube pages.

 


Oregon State Police requesting public's assistance in waste of Deer #2 - Union County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 10/15/18 12:58 PM
2018-10/1002/118774/Woodland-buck.jpg
2018-10/1002/118774/Woodland-buck.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/1002/118774/thumb_Woodland-buck.jpg

The Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division is asking for the public’s help in locating the individual(s) responsible for shooting and wasting a mule deer buck near the Woodland snow park off of Hwy 204.  Woodland snow park is 16 miles west of the City of Elgin in the Umatilla National Forest.

On Sunday, October 7, 2018  an Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Trooper responded to a complaint of a buck deer that was shot and left to waste at the Woodland Snow Park. The dead buck was located approximately 70 yards from the parking lot on an old skid road.  The buck was visible from the parking area.  The Trooper confirmed the buck had been shot behind the front shoulder, with a rifle, and left to waste 

Anyone with information regarding this case is urged to contact OSP Trooper Davis through the Turn in Poachers (TIP) hotline at 1-800-452-7888 or OSP (677).

In addition, to either a preference point reward or cash reward offered below, the local Union/Wallowa County OHA chapter is offering an additional $500.

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators 

The TIP program offers preference point rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of big game mammals.

Preference Point Rewards:

5 Points-Mountain Sheep

5 Points-Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points-Cougar

The TIP program also offers cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of Mountain Sheep, Mountain Goat, Moose, Elk, Deer, Antelope, Bear, Cougar, Wolf, Upland Birds, Waterfowl, and Furbearers. Cash rewards can also be awarded for the unlawful take of Game Fish and Shellfish and for Habitat Destruction.

CASH REWARDS:
$1,000 Mountain Sheep, Mountain Goat and Moose 
$500 Elk, Deer and Antelope 
$300 Bear, Cougar and Wolf 
$300 Habitat Destruction 
$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl 
$100 Furbearers 

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish 

How to Report a Wildlife and/or Habitat Law Violation or Suspicious Activity: 

TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP(677)

TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/1002/118774/Woodland-buck.jpg

The Oregon Department of Corrections two reports in-custody deaths (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 10/15/18 12:35 PM
Douglas Miller
Douglas Miller
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/1070/118773/thumb_DouglasMiller.jpg

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Douglas Miller, died the morning of October 12, 2018. He was incarcerated at the Oregon State Penitentiary (OSP) and passed away at the institution’s infirmary. He was 72 years old and was incarcerated out of Multnomah County. His earliest release date was January 11, 2021.

Raymond Madrigal, died the morning of October 14, 2018. He was incarcerated at Two Rivers Correctional Institution (TRCI) and passed away in the hospital. Madrigal entered DOC custody on March 16, 2006 from Multnomah County.  His earliest release date was August 8, 2022. He was 81 years old. Next of kin have been notified for both men.

As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death. DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,700 men and women who are incarcerated in the 14 institutions across the state.

OSP is Oregon's only maximum-security prison, located in Salem, and houses over 2,000 male inmates. OSP is surrounded by a 25-foot-high wall with 10 towers. The facility has multiple special housing units including death row, disciplinary segregation, behavioral health, intermediate care housing, and an infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care. OSP participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including the furniture factory, laundry, metal shop, and contact center. It provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, work-based education, inmate work crews, and pre-release services. OSP was established in 1866 and, until 1959, was Oregon's only prison.
 

TRCI is a multi-custody facility in Umatilla that houses more than 1,800 men.  It delivers a range of correctional services and programs including education, work opportunities, and cognitive programming.  The minimum facility opened in 1998 and the medium facility opened in 2000.




Attached Media Files: Douglas Miller , Raymond Madrigal

Oregon State Police requesting public's assistance in waste of Deer - Union County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 10/15/18 12:33 PM
2018-10/1002/118772/Elgin-buck#2.jpg
2018-10/1002/118772/Elgin-buck#2.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/1002/118772/thumb_Elgin-buck#2.jpg

The Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division is asking for the public’s help in locating the individual(s) responsible for shooting and wasting a mule deer buck in the Mt. Emily Wildlife Management Unit near the City of Elgin in Union County. 

On Sunday, October 7, 2018 the Union County Sheriff’s Office received a report of a dead buck deer on South 11th Street near Birch Street in the City of Elgin.  The Deputy along with a Fish and Wildlife Trooper responded and located the buck dead and the meat spoiled. The buck was found to have been shot in the hindquarters with an arrow. The buck had been observed alive the day prior and a photo of him was taken by a resident.  

Anyone with information regarding this case is urged to contact OSP Trooper Davis through the Turn in Poachers (TIP) hotline at 1-800-452-7888 or OSP (677).

In addition, to either a preference point reward or cash reward offered below, the local Union/Wallowa County OHA chapter is offering an additional $500.

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators 

The TIP program offers preference point rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of big game mammals.

Preference Point Rewards:

5 Points-Mountain Sheep

5 Points-Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points-Cougar

The TIP program also offers cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of Mountain Sheep, Mountain Goat, Moose, Elk, Deer, Antelope, Bear, Cougar, Wolf, Upland Birds, Waterfowl, and Furbearers. Cash rewards can also be awarded for the unlawful take of Game Fish and Shellfish and for Habitat Destruction.

CASH REWARDS:
$1,000 Mountain Sheep, Mountain Goat and Moose 
$500 Elk, Deer and Antelope 
$300 Bear, Cougar and Wolf 
$300 Habitat Destruction 
$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl 
$100 Furbearers 

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish 

How to Report a Wildlife and/or Habitat Law Violation or Suspicious Activity: 

TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP(677)

TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/1002/118772/Elgin-buck#2.jpg , 2018-10/1002/118772/Elgin-Buck#1.jpg

Public comment sought on contracting, Medicaid waiver amendments
Oregon Department of Human Services - 10/15/18 12:31 PM

(Salem, Ore.) – The Department of Human Services Aging and People with Disabilities (APD) is seeking public comment on amendments to the 1915(b)(4) selective contracting waiver and the 1915(c) Medicaid Long-Term Services and Supports (LTSS) waiver.

APD is amending the 1915(b)(4) selective contracting waiver and the 1915(c) Medicaid Long-Term Services and Supports waiver to allow Waivered Case Management services to be provided by Oregon Tribes. These amendments are part of an ongoing effort to work more closely with Oregon’s Nine Federally Recognized Tribes and the Urban Indian Health Program to better serve their members.

APD intends to submit the waiver amendments on Dec. 1, 2018, with a proposed effective date of April 1, 2019. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) approval of these amendments will authorize Oregon tribes to provide case management services to tribal members receiving Medicaid LTSS and receive Medicaid reimbursement for providing these services to tribal members.

APD and Oregon Tribes continue to work collaboratively to develop and operationalize the provision of case management services, including identifying tribes that choose to participate, identifying tribal members that would be served, and developing qualifications, capacity and case management rates. APD is committed to ensuring that participating tribes have access to all technology, tools and training available to LTSS case managers currently being provided by the Area Agencies on Aging and Department of Human Services local offices. These amendments affect tribes that choose to participate and provide these services. APD staff and management and tribal members have been participating in workgroups since June 2018 to develop a plan to operationalize the provision of case management services and ensure a smooth transition of these services to participating tribes.

APD invites you to review the attached documents for further information:

  • Draft of 1915(b)(4) selective contracting waiver
  • Draft of 1915(c) LTSS waiver

Comments, suggestions and questions may be submitted directly to Chris Pascual, APD policy analyst, via email at chris.pascual@state.or.us;  by phone at 503-779-6408. Interested parties may also send written comments addressed to Chris Pascual, Aging and People with Disabilities Policy Analyst, Department of Human Services, 500 Summer Street NE E-10, Salem, OR 97301. Print versions of the 1915(b)(4) selective contracting waiver and the 1915(c) Medicaid Long-Term Services and Supports waivers will be posted in APD district offices.  Print versions may also be obtained from Chris Pascual.

The deadline for comments is Nov. 15, 2018. Mail responses must be received by this date to be considered.




Attached Media Files: APD 1915 b4 Waiver Amendment 2018 Tribal Case Management , APD 1915c Waiver Amendment

Medicare annual enrollment is Oct. 15 through Dec. 7
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 10/15/18 11:48 AM

(Salem) – Annual open enrollment for Medicare starts today, and Oregon’s Senior Health Insurance Benefits Assistance (SHIBA) Program is available to help.

Medicare is health insurance for people 65 years or older or younger than 65 with Social Security Disability Income. People living in Oregon who are 65 years or older may be eligible to sign up and find health insurance that best meets their needs. Medicare covers many medical costs, including visits to the doctor, prescription medications, and preventive care, such as mammograms, colonoscopies, diabetes treatment, and blood pressure screenings.

Medicare annual enrollment runs Oct. 15 through Dec. 7, 2018. Any Medicare Advantage (MA) or prescription drug plan (Part D) changes must be made between these dates so that coverage begins without interruption on Jan. 1, 2019. Those who are late to enroll may face a lifetime of premium penalties.

“It is important to compare Medicare Advantage and prescription drug plans every year,” SHIBA Program Manager Lisa Emerson said. “Plans change year to year, as do people’s individual health care needs. People could potentially save money by shopping for a new plan.”

SHIBA provides free health insurance counseling to explain how the Medicare program works, additional insurance options that work with Medicare, and help with reducing out-of-pocket costs. SHIBA staff members, along with more than 200 certified counselors, serve many of Oregon’s more than 860,000 Medicare beneficiaries to help them understand their Medicare benefits and enrollment options. Free information and help is available by calling 1-800-722-4134 (toll-free) or visiting shiba.oregon.gov.

SHIBA counselors help beneficiaries compare plans and enroll by using the plan finder tool found online at www.medicare.gov/find-a-plan. Beneficiaries and their families can also choose to use this tool to compare plans and enroll on their own.

SHIBA also publishes an annual Medicare guide, which will be available online in early October and in print in mid-November.

Tips from SHIBA to prepare for Medicare open enrollment:

Review your plan notice. Be sure to read any notices from your Medicare plan about changes for next year, especially your Annual Notice of Change letter.

Think about what matters most to you. Medicare health and drug plans change each year and so can your health needs. Do you need a new primary care doctor? Does your network include the specialist you want for an upcoming surgery? Is your new medication covered by your current plan? Does another plan offer the same value at a lower cost? Take stock of your health status and determine if you need to make a change.

Find out if you qualify for help paying for your Medicare. SHIBA can help you learn about a state program that helps with the costs of Medicare premiums, your Medicare Part A (hospital insurance) and Medicare Part B (medical insurance) deductibles, co-insurance and co-payments, and Medicare prescription drug coverage costs.

Apply for help with drug costs. If you have limited income and assets, you may qualify for extra help with prescription drug costs. SHIBA counselors can help you apply for this benefit through Social Security.

Contact your doctor, hospital, and pharmacy before making changes. Not all health and drug plans contract or work with the same providers. If you switch plans, make sure you understand which providers you can see for the best price.

SHIBA is also advising people to protect their identity by guarding their Medicare card like they would their credit card or Social Security number. Identity theft from stolen Medicare numbers is becoming more common. To protect against identity theft, don’t share your Medicare number or other personal information with anyone who contacts you by telephone or email, or approaches you in person, unless you have given that person permission in advance. Medicare will never contact you (unless you ask them to) for your Medicare number or other personal information. Also, don’t let anyone borrow or pay to use your Medicare number. 

More information

SHIBA: To meet with a counselor, contact the toll-free SHIBA Helpline at 1-800-722-4134. You will be asked to enter your ZIP code to be connected to a program in your area. Visit https://healthcare.oregon.gov/shiba to find local help in your county, obtain a copy of the 2018 Oregon Guide to Medicare Health plans, and find Medicare education and enrollment events in your area.

Follow SHIBA on Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/OregonSHIBA.

SHIBA is part of the Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS), Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov. Follow DCBS on Twitter: http://twitter.com/OregonDCBS. Receive consumer help and information on topics such as insurance, mortgages, investments, and workplace safety.


Harrisburg Man Sentenced to Five Years in Federal Prison for Dealing Heroin and Illegally Possessing a Firearm
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 10/15/18 11:14 AM

EUGENE, Ore. – Shawn Sherman Wilson, Jr., 27, of Harrisburg, Oregon, was sentenced today to 60 months in federal prison and five years’ supervised release for dealing heroin and illegally possessing a firearm.

According to court documents, law enforcement began investigating Wilson in July 2017 after receiving a tip from a confidential source that he was trafficking heroin in and around Eugene. An undercover agent from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) contacted Wilson and arranged to purchase an ounce of heroin. They agreed to meet on July 24, 2017 in front of Taylor’s Bar & Grill, a popular night spot in Eugene near the University of Oregon.

At the meeting location, the ATF agent entered Wilson’s car, sitting in the front passenger seat. Wilson had a Smith & Wesson 9mm semi-automatic pistol sitting between his legs with the pistol’s handle positioned for easy access. The agent said “I see you got the heat.” Wilson replied, “yeah, while I’m running around town.” Wilson grabbed the firearm and showed it to the agent, telling the agent the firearm belonged to his girlfriend and he was interested in purchasing another.

The ATF agent subsequently completed the heroin purchase, giving Wilson $1,200 in cash. Wilson was later arrested in Douglas County on August 6, 2017. When arrested, Wilson possessed a Smith & Wesson 9mm pistol matching the description of the firearm observed by the undercover agent during the controlled buy.

Wilson previously pleaded guilty to one count each of possession with intent to distribute heroin and possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime on May 30, 2018.

This case was investigated by ATF and prosecuted by Pamela Paaso, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

The case is part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN), a program bringing together all levels of law enforcement and the communities they serve to reduce violent crime and make our neighborhoods safer for everyone. Attorney General Jeff Sessions reinvigorated PSN in 2017 as part of the Department’s renewed focus on targeting violent criminals, directing all U.S. Attorney’s Offices to work in partnership with federal, state, local, and tribal law enforcement and the local community to develop effective, locally-based strategies to reduce violent crime.

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/6325/118759/SENTENCING-Wilson-Final.pdf

Health policy board adopts policy recommendations that shape Oregon Health Plan's future
Oregon Health Authority - 10/15/18 11:11 AM

October 15, 2018

Health policy board adopts policy recommendations that shape Oregon Health Plan's future

On October 15 the Oregon Health Policy Board (OHPB) voted to approve a comprehensive set of policies that will improve the health of Oregon Health Plan (OHP) members, address health disparities, control program costs, and continue to transform health care delivery in our state. This next phase of health care transformation is known as "CCO 2.0."

"We’ve taken this opportunity to really look at what’s working with CCOs and where we need to push the system to advance health transformation in Oregon," said Zeke Smith, OHPB chair. Together, these policies have the potential to significantly change how our members experience care and how the state pays for that care."

The end of the first five-year contracts with coordinated care organizations (CCOs) marks an opportunity for OHA and OHPB to improve the services that 1 million Oregonians receive through OHP. CCOs are community-governed organizations that bring together physical health, mental health, addiction medicine, and dental health providers to coordinate care for people on the Oregon Health Plan. Since 2012 Oregon’s coordinated care model has saved taxpayers an estimated $2.2 billion, while also reducing unnecessary emergency department visits and improving preventive care for children and adults.

OHA heard directly from more than 850 Oregonians who participated in public meetings and forums held across the state in more than a dozen locations, which were led by OHA Director Patrick Allen. Additionally, multiple surveys and online outreach tools were used to gather perspectives from a diverse cross-section of Oregonians. OHP members and other stakeholders issued support for the policy direction and expressed satisfaction with Oregon’s coordinated care system.

"Our members feel good about the coverage they’re receiving from OHP, but they also let us know that we have areas where we can improve," Allen said. "It was clear that our top focus needed to be improving access to mental health and addiction services. We also heard that CCOs can play a stronger role in working with community partners to help patients with the factors that influence health outside the doctor’s office, particularly access to safe and affordable housing."

The resulting CCO 2.0 policies build on Oregon’s strong foundation of health care innovation and tackle our biggest health problems. They cover four priority areas identified by Governor Kate Brown:

1. Improve the behavioral health system and address barriers to access to and integration of care

CCOs will be accountable for developing a person-centered mental health and substance use disorder (behavioral health) system that OHP members can count on, no matter who they are or where they live. CCOs will remove barriers between behavioral, physical and dental health. The policies include:

  • Require CCOs to be fully accountable for the behavioral health benefit.
  • Address prior authorization and network adequacy issues that limit member choice and timely access to providers.
  • Use metrics to incentivize behavioral health and oral health integration.
  • Expand programs that integrate primary care into behavioral health settings.
  • Require CCOs to support electronic health record adoption and access to electronic health information exchange.
  • Develop a diverse and culturally responsive workforce.
  • Ensure children have behavioral health needs met with access to appropriate services.

2. Increase value and pay for performance

Over the next five years, CCOs will make a significant move away from fee-for-service payments toward paying providers based on value. OHA will incentivize providers and health systems for delivering patient-centered and high-quality care. CCOs will develop value-based payments (VBPs) to improve health outcomes specifically in the areas of hospital care, maternity care, behavioral health, oral health, and children’s health care. The policies include:

  • Require annual, CCO-specific value-based payment growth targets.
  • Each CCO will be achieve an annual VBP growth target and have 70 percent of their payments to providers be VBPs by the end of the five-year period.
  • CCOs will be required to make "infrastructure and operations" payments to patient-centered primary care homes.
  • OHA will work to align VBP efforts in OHP with Public Employees’ Benefit Board (PEBB), the Oregon Educators Benefit Board (OEBB), and commercial payers participating in the Primary Care Payment Reform Collaborative.
     

3. Focus on social determinants of health and health equity

Over the next five years CCOs will increase their investments in strategies to address social determinants of health and health equity. CCOs will align goals at the state and local level to improve health outcomes and advance health equity. OHA will develop measurement and evaluation strategies to increase understanding of spending in this area and track outcomes. The policies include:

  • Increase strategic spending by CCOs on social determinants of health, health equity and disparities in communities.
  • Increase CCO financial support of non-clinical and public health providers.
  • Align community health assessment and community health improvement plans to increase impact.
  • Strengthen meaningful engagement of tribes, diverse OHP members and community advisory councils (CACs).
  • Build CCOs’ organizational capacity to advance health equity.
  • Increase the integration and use of traditional health workers (THWs).

4. Maintain sustainable cost growth

To support sustainability of OHP, CCO 2.0 policies address the major cost drivers currently in the system. OHA will also identify areas where CCOs can increase efficiency, improve value and decrease administrative costs. The policies include:

  • Strengthen financial incentives and set up new tools to reward CCOs for improving health outcomes and containing costs.
  • Ensure program-wide financial stability and program integrity through improved reporting and strategies to manage a CCO in financial distress.
  • Use program purchasing power to align benefits and reduce costs, with a focus on pharmacy costs.

"In order to make these improvements a reality for our members, our team at OHA needs to hold ourselves accountable to monitor and enforce new and existing contracts with CCOs," said Jeremy Vandehey, director of OHA's Health Policy and Analytics Division. "We also need to set clear expectations and support providers and CCOs in making these changes so together we can improve health while containing costs."

The request for applications for the coordinated care contracts for 2020-2025 will be released in January, and the contracts are expected to be awarded in summer 2019.

For more information and to download the complete report, visit the CCO 2.0 webpage at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/OHPB/Pages/CCO-2-0.aspx.

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http://bit.ly/2NI1YSk


BBB Employment Scams Increase In 2018
Better Business Bureau Northwest + Pacific - 10/15/18 9:20 AM

                                                                  More Than $3 Million Lost to Schemes

Portland, Oregon Oct. 15,?2018 - Better Business Bureau’s Scam Tracker reveals employment scams are on the rise. With the busy holiday hiring season underway, job seekers should be aware of the scope of these scams. Since January, North America residents have reported more than 3,465 employment scams to BBB Scam Tracker with over $3 million reported lost. Compare this to the estimated 1,751 employments scams with over $800,000 lost from January to October of last year. Locally, Oregonians have already reported 27 employment scams with over $57,480 lost this year.  

Better Business Bureau Northwest + Pacific wants job seekers to be aware of employment scams that often trick “new employees” into giving out their personal information or their hard-earned money. With fall upon us, many job-seekers may be looking for an easy way to make some extra cash to get through the upcoming holidays. Scammers may take advantage of this opportunity to prey on job seekers with scam job postings, fake recruiter emails and work-at-home schemes.   

To avoid employment scams, job hunters should look out for these red flags:  

  • Positions that require little training.?Always be wary of?work-from-home or secret shopper positions, or any job with a generic title such as a caregiver, administrative assistant, or customer service rep.?These positions don't?usually?require special training or licensing, which makes it appealing?to a wide range of applicants. Scammers?know this and use these otherwise legitimate titles in their fake ads.  
  • Vague company descriptions.?It’s a huge red flag if you can’t identify the company’s?contact information,?owner,?headquarters?or?even product from its online ad. Pro tip: check?online at bbb.org/northwest-pacific?to see if the employer has a good rating. Also, watch for legitimate companies being impersonated. Find the real employer website to verify if a job posting is real.  
  • No interview. If you are offered a job without a formal interview or job application, it’s most likely a scam. Be wary of jobs that hire on the spot or conduct interviews via online chat or instant messaging services.  
  • Job applications that require a fee.?The federal government and the U.S. Postal Service never charge for information about jobs or applications for jobs. Be wary of any offer to give you special access or guarantee you a job for a fee —if you are paying for the promise of a job, it’s probably a scam.  
  • Recruiters who don’t disclose information. A legitimate recruiter will provide you with a complete contract for their services with cost, what you get, who pays (you or the employer), and what happens if you do not find a job.  

If you've been a victim of an employment scam, help others avoid being scammed by filing a report at BBB.org/ScamTracker.?

 

ABOUT BBB:?For more than 100 years, the Better Business Bureau has been helping people find businesses, brands,?and?charities they can trust. In 2017, people turned to BBB more than 160 million times for BBB Business Profiles on more than 5.2 million businesses and Charity Reports on 11,000 charities, all available for free at?bbb.org. There are local, independent BBBs across the United States, Canada,?and?Mexico, including BBB Northwest & Pacific, which serves more than 15 million consumers in Alaska, Washington, Idaho, Oregon, Montana, Hawaii and Western Wyoming.??

 

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Oregon Recreation Trails Advisory Council presents Doug Newman Award at Oregon Trails Summit (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 10/15/18 9:05 AM
Bruce Ronning (left) and Lauralee Svendsgaard, ORTAC chair
Bruce Ronning (left) and Lauralee Svendsgaard, ORTAC chair
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/1303/118753/thumb_Photo_credit_-__Gabriel_Amadeus_Tiller.jpg

SALEM, Ore. – The Oregon Recreation Trails Advisory Council (ORTAC) presented the annual Doug Newman Memorial Award to Bruce Ronning at the 2018 Oregon Trails Summit Oct. 5.

Bruce Ronning is from Deschutes County and began his recreational career at the City of Eugene Parks Department. Bruce worked in their Outdoor Programs section, helping many Oregonians learn to ski, paddle, hike and bike.

During his career, Bruce served on several committees overseen by Oregon Parks and Recreation Department: ORTAC, the Recreational Trails Program advisory committee, the Local Government Grant Program advisory committee, and review committees for development of Oregon’s Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan (SCORP) and the Oregon Statewide Recreation Trails Plan.

Bruce retired from public service after 24 years with the Bend Park and Recreation District. During his tenure Bruce served as the Outdoor Programs Manager, Long Range Planner, and finally as the Director of Planning and Development. During that time 65 miles of the 95-mile Bend Urban Trails Plan were developed.

The Doug Newman Memorial Award recognizes an Oregonian whose efforts have inspired, benefitted and contributed to the trails and trail users of Oregon. The award pays tribute to Doug Newman, an avid outdoorsman, author and writer for the Eugene Register-Guard. He also worked extensively with the University of Oregon Outdoors Program. Diagnosed with polio as a child, Newman died in 1992.

ORTAC was established by the Legislature in 1971 to advise OPRD and its partners in the development and promotion of high quality non-motorized trail systems throughout Oregon. The Council is made up of seven volunteer members appointed by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Commission to represent the five Oregon congressional districts. The Council meets four times annually in different locations across the state.

For more information about the Doug Newman award or ORTAC, contact Jodi Bellefeuille at ellefeuille@oregon.gov">jodi.bellefeuille@oregon.gov or 503-986-0716.




Attached Media Files: Bruce Ronning (left) and Lauralee Svendsgaard, ORTAC chair

Oregon Community Bank Week recognizes a vital member of communities statewide
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 10/15/18 8:34 AM

Salem - Gov. Kate Brown has proclaimed Oct. 15-19, as Oregon Community Bank Week. The week honors local banks and their employees for their economic and civic contributions in communities across the state.

 

Oregon’s community banks, most of which are chartered by the Department of Consumer and Business Services, play an essential role in promoting the economic health and prosperity of the state. In some communities they are the sole provider of banking products and services and sometimes the largest employer.

 

Community banks provide $400 million in agriculture-related loans, $5.9 billion in small business loans, and 5,400 family wage jobs annually. 

 

“Our state banks take a relationship-based approach to doing business by providing banking services, creating jobs, and educating customers and students about a variety of financial matters,” said Cameron Smith, DCBS director. “They actively participate in every corner of the state and are a major financing source for our small businesses and farms.”

 

State chartered banks throughout Oregon are celebrating Community Bank Week in their local neighborhoods. Many of them will host consumers, students, small businesses, and local elected officials to showcase the positive effect banks have on the people they serve.

 

To learn more about the Oregon banks recognized during Community Bank Week, go to oregonbankers.com/community-bank-week.html.

 

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About DCBS: The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov. 

 

About Oregon DFR:

The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov and http://dfr.oregon.gov/Pages/index.aspx.

 


Klondike West Fire declared a conflagration
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 10/15/18 8:33 AM

Governor Kate Brown has declared the Klondike Fire, burning near Agness, a conflagration. The declaration cleared the way for the State Fire Marshal to mobilize firefighters and equipment to assist local resources battling the fire.

 

The Office of State Marshal’s Red Incident Management Team led by Chief Ian Yocum, and five structural task forces from Lane, Rogue Valley, Linn, Benton, and Marion counties will arrive early this afternoon.  Three task forces will be assigned to day shift and two will be working the night shift.

 

 A level 3 "GO" evacuation is in effect for the Oak Flats and Spud Road areas of the Agness community.

 

More information on evacuations is available at Curry County Emergency Services Facebook.

 


Sun. 10/14/18
Photos: Oregon National Guard honors military police unit in demobilization ceremony (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 10/14/18 4:05 PM
2018-10/962/118745/181014-Z-FS713-010.jpg
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PHOTO CAPTIONS:

181014-Z-FS713-007: Maj. Gen. Michael Stencel (right), Adjutant General, Oregon, and 1186th Military Police commander, Capt. Richard Smith, pause for a photo during a demobilization ceremony, Oct. 14, 2018, at the Anderson Readiness Center in Salem, Oregon. Approximately 30 Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers in the unit returned from Afghanistan where they provided Personal Security Detail (PSD), to protect individuals or groups of individuals. (Photo by Sgt. Cory Grogan, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

181014-Z-FS713-003: Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers with the 1186th Military Police Company stand in formation during a demobilization ceremony honoring their overseas deployment, Oct. 14, 2018, at the Anderson Readiness Center in Salem, Oregon. Approximately 30 Soldiers in the unit recently returned from a deployment to Afghanistan where they provided Personal Security Detail (PSD), protecting individuals or groups of individuals. (Photo by Sgt. Cory Grogan, Oregon Military Deparment Public Affairs)

181014-Z-FS713-002: Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers with the 1186th Military Police Company stand in formation during a demobilization ceremony honoring their overseas deployment, Oct. 14, 2018, at the Anderson Readiness Center in Salem, Oregon. Approximately 30 Soldiers in the unit recently returned from a deployment to Afghanistan where they provided Personal Security Detail (PSD), protecting individuals or groups of individuals. (Photo by Sgt. Cory Grogan, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

181014-Z-FS713-010: Brig. Gen. William J. Prendergast IV, Land Component Commander, shakes hands with Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers of the 1186th Military Police Company to welcome them home from their overseas deployment during a demobilization ceremony, Oct. 14, 2018, at the Anderson Readiness Center in Salem, Oregon. Approximately 30 Soldiers in the unit deployed to Afghanistan providing Personal Security Detail (PSD), to protect individuals or groups of individuals. (Photo by Sgt. Cory Grogan, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

 

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/962/118745/181014-Z-FS713-010.jpg , 2018-10/962/118745/181014-Z-FS713-002.jpg , 2018-10/962/118745/181014-Z-FS713-003.jpg , 2018-10/962/118745/181014-Z-FS713-007.jpg

Redmond DUII Driver Crashes Into Canal (Photo)
Redmond Police Dept. - 10/14/18 1:03 PM
2018-10/6157/118744/IMG_0705.JPG
2018-10/6157/118744/IMG_0705.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/6157/118744/thumb_IMG_0705.JPG

REDMOND, OR – On Saturday, October 13, 2018, at about 11:10 p.m., Redmond Police Officers observed a vehicle driving recklessly near the intersection of SW Pumice Ave and SW Canal Blvd. This section of SW Canal Blvd is closed, part of the SW Canal Blvd reconstruction project. Officers observed the vehicle strike a telephone pole and a parked water truck.  Additionally, the vehicle was operating dangerously close to a group of juvenile pedestrians that were also in the area. Officers walked into the area on foot as access to the road is heavily barricaded and attempted to contact the driver, who immediately sped off. The vehicle, a 2006 Dodge pickup truck was found a few minutes later crashed into the COID canal near the intersection of SW Reindeer Ave and SW Canal Blvd. The outside temperature at the time of the crash was below freezing, and the canal is currently filled with water.

 

Officers approached the vehicle and discovered the driver was still trying to drive despite the vehicle being partially submerged in the frigid water. Redmond Fire & Rescue personnel responded to the scene and conducted a water rescue to remove the driver safely.  The driver was identified as Anthony Castaneda, 34-years-old, and a Redmond resident.  Castaneda was evaluated by medics on scene and was then taken into custody by Redmond Officers. Castaneda was lodged at the Deschutes County Jail on charges of DUII-Alcohol, Recklessly Endangering Another Person, Reckless Driving, and Criminal Mischief.

 

It took several hours and multiple resources to safely remove the pickup from the canal.  The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality is aware of this incident and is investigating to determine how much pollutants may have entered the water.  COID staff also responded to scene to oversee removal of the vehicle from their property.

 

The Redmond Police Department would like to applaud the efforts of Redmond Fire & Rescue personnel in making sure Castaneda did not become hurt, injured, or killed given the weather conditions and danger associated with the vehicle crashing into the waterway.

 

The Redmond Police Department arrested 13 drivers for DUII in September and have arrested more than 116 drivers in 2018. The Redmond Police Department remains vigilant in DUII enforcement in efforts to make Redmond the safest community in Oregon.

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Your Redmond Police Department keeps you safe with 45 sworn officers and 11 support staff who field more than 23,000 calls for service annually.  To date in 2018, the police department has responded to over 550 reported motor vehicle crashes.




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/6157/118744/IMG_0705.JPG , 2018-10/6157/118744/IMG_0702.JPG

Sat. 10/13/18
Snake River Correctional Institution on Lockdown
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 10/13/18 5:23 PM

On October 13, 2018, at approximately 10:30 a.m., a Snake River Correctional Institution (SRCI) staff member was assaulted by an inmate. As a result of the assault, the staff member was transported to a local hospital for evaluation. Security staff responded to the assault and seven additional staff where taken to the hospital for evaluation and they have been released.

The inmate has been taken to segregation. The institution has been placed on lockdown. All activities and visiting have been canceled until further notice. The incident is currently under investigation by the Oregon State Police.

SRCI is a multi-custody prison in Ontario that houses approximately 3,000 male inmates. SRCI has multiple special housing units including disciplinary segregation, intensive management, infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care, and an administrative segregation unit. SRCI participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including a contact center, laundry, and sign shop. SRCI specializes in incentive housing, specialized housing, inmates with mental health/medical vulnerabilities, education and trades programs, cognitive and parenting programs, and institution work programs. SRCI opened in 1991 and is the largest correctional institution in the state.


Oregon National Guard to honor military police unit in demobilization ceremony
Oregon Military Department - 10/13/18 8:00 AM

SALEM, Oregon – The 1186th Military Police Company, Oregon Army National Guard, is scheduled to be recognized in a demobilization ceremony on Sunday, Oct. 14, at 2:00 p.m., at the Anderson Readiness Center, located at 3225 State Street, Salem, Oregon, 97301. 

Approximately 30 Citizen-Soldiers were mobilized in May 2017 for deployment to Afghanistan in support of Operation Freedom’s Sentinel (OFS). The Soldiers provided Personal Security Details (PSD), protecting high-profile individuals.

Scheduled to attend the ceremony and welcome the Soldiers home will be Maj. Gen. Michael Stencel, Adjutant General, Oregon; Brig. Gen. William J. Prendergast, Land Component Commander; as well as other community and military leaders.

The 1186th MP Company is based in Salem, Oregon. The unit has often partnered with local law enforcement agencies for training. The 1186th MPs partnered with district and federal agencies to provide security, crowd management and traffic control during the 58th Presidential Inauguration in Washington, D.C., in January 2017.

This unit has previously deployed overseas twice: to Afghanistan in 2011 and to Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, in 2004. The company also provided domestic operations support in Louisiana following Hurricane Katrina in 2005. 

The unit is comprised of Soldiers from Portland, Salem, Keizer, Beaverton, Lake Oswego, West Linn, Gresham, Monmouth, Eugene, Springfield, Veneta, Central Point, Oakland, Roseburg, Redmond, Milton-Freewater, Ontario, and Nyssa, Oregon. A few Soldiers are from Vancouver, Aberdeen, and Everett, Washington.

The event is open to the public and media is encouraged to attend.


Fri. 10/12/18
Enterprise Security Office Proactive Assessment Discovers Security Vulnerability
State of Oregon - 10/12/18 4:50 PM

During a regular cybersecurity assessment, security specialists at the Enterprise Security Office identified an information security vulnerability on an internet-connected system with the Oregon Department of State Lands.

In coordination with the Department of State Lands, the Enterprise Security Office began the assessment on October 5, 2018. The impacted system was taken offline on Monday, October 8, after a potential vulnerability was determined. The vulnerability was confirmed on Thursday, October 12, during the course of the assessment.

The system contained some personal information, including names, addresses, birthdates, and social security numbers. Through forensic investigations, security specialists have determined it is likely outside entities may have accessed some of this information.

The Department of State Lands will notify individuals whose information may have been compromised, and those individuals will be offered free credit monitoring.

At the direction of Governor Brown, the Enterprise Security Office conducts regular cybersecurity assessments of state agencies. These assessments are a proactive effort to minimize risk to the state’s electronic information systems and to best protect the information of Oregonians and businesses.

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Maternal Mortality and Morbidity Review Committee application deadline extended to October 31
Oregon Health Authority - 10/12/18 4:42 PM

October 12, 2018

Maternal Mortality and Morbidity Review Committee application deadline extended to October 31

The Oregon Health Authority Public Health Division has extended the deadline for applications for the Maternal Mortality and Morbidity Review Committee to Oct. 31 to allow time for additional applications across all the recommended areas of expertise.

OHA invites applications from people who meet the criteria outlined in HB 4133, Section (3).

Board members are appointed by the Governor. Member terms are, in general, four years each. As this is a new committee, initial terms of office will be assigned by the Governor so that terms expire at staggered intervals.

To apply, submit the following to executive.appointments@oregon.gov by Oct. 31:

  1. A completed executive appointment interest form, available on the Governor’s Office website at http://www.oregon.gov/gov/admin/Pages/How_To_Apply.aspx.
  2. A resume or brief biographical sketch.
  3. A brief statement of interest.

Information about the legislation is available on the Maternal Mortality and Morbidity Review Committee website.

For more information, contact Cate Wilcox, OHA Public Health Division, at 971-673-0299 or cate.s.wilcox@state.or.us.

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http://bit.ly/2NEJdPK


Oregon Sends Second Team to Support Hurricane Michael Response
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 10/12/18 3:59 PM

Salem, OR – October 12, 2018 – The Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal and Oregon Department of Forestry, through the Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC), is working with Oregon’s Office of Emergency Management to support a request from the Florida Division of Emergency Management for a second All-Hazards Incident Management Teams (IMTs) to support the response to Hurricane Michael.

 

The EMAC is a mutual aid agreement among states and territories of the United States. Essentially working as a mutual aid system, the agreement offers assistance during governor-declared state of emergency or disaster through a responsive, straightforward system. This system allows states to send personnel, equipment, and commodities to assist with response and recovery efforts in other states.

 

The OSFM IMT, led by Chief Ted Kunze, also includes staff from the Oregon Department of Forestry who are qualified within the Incident Command Structure.

 

“We value our working relationships and partnerships with fellow states agencies,” said Oregon Department of Forestry's Interim Operations Manager, Blake Ellis. “Florida has been there for us in our time of need, sending a full IMT to our aid during this year’s challenging fire season, and Oregon is fortunate to have the opportunity to return the favor”

 

The team heads to Florida tomorrow morning and anticipates a full deployment of 14 days.

 

We wish success to the team and will keep Florida in our thoughts as they recover from this devastating storm.


Regional Forest Practice Committees for Northwest and Southwest Oregon will meet Oct. 25 in Eugene
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 10/12/18 2:09 PM

EUGENE, Ore. — The Regional Forest Practice Committees for Northwest Oregon and Southwest Oregon will meet Thursday, Oct. 25 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The meeting will be held at the Valley River Inn, 1000 Valley River Way in Eugene. The committee will hear about the pesticide stewardship partnership between the Oregon Department of Forestry, Department of Environmental Quality and the Oregon Department of Agriculture. Committee members will also receive updates on:

  • the work of the Oregon Department of Forestry’s monitoring unit
  • tethered logging guidance
  • forest health
  • analysis of rules concerning a bird called the marbled murrelet

 

In addition, committee members will decide on which nomination to accept as operator of the year for their respective area.

 

There will be an opportunity for public comment near the beginning of the meeting. Members of the public may attend the meeting. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours prior to the meeting. Questions about accessibility or special accommodations for the meeting can be directed to ODF’s Susan Domenique at 503-945-7502.
 

Regional Forest Practice Committees are panels of citizens - mandated under Oregon law - that advise the Oregon Board of Forestry on current forestry issues and forest management approaches. Three Regional Forest Practice Committees, serving the Northwest, Southwest and Eastern Oregon regions of the state, were created by the 1971 Oregon Forest Practices Act. Under Oregon law, a majority of Regional Forest Practice Committees members must be private forest landowners and logging or forest operations companies.


Oregon’s forests are among one of the state’s most valued resources, providing a balanced mix of environmental, economic and social benefits.  Additional information about ODF’s Regional Forest Practice Committees is available on the Oregon Department of Forestry’s web site: http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/RFPC.aspx.

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Eastern Oregon Regional Forest Practice Committee will meet Oct. 18 in central Oregon
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 10/12/18 2:01 PM

SUNRIVER, Ore. — The Eastern Oregon Regional Forest Practice Committee will meet in Sunriver on Thursday, Oct. 18 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The meeting will be held in Sunriver's main lodge. The committee will hear about the pesticide stewardship partnership between the Oregon Department of Forestry, Department of Environmental Quality and the Oregon Department of Agriculture. It will also receive updates on:

  • the work of the Oregon Department of Forestry’s monitoring unit
  • tethered logging guidance
  • forest health
  • analysis of rules concerning a bird called the marbled murrelet

In addition, committee members will decide on which nomination to accept as operator of the year for Eastern Oregon.

There will be an opportunity for public comment near the beginning of the meeting. Members of the public may attend the meeting. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours prior to the meeting. Questions about accessibility or special accommodations for the meeting can be directed to ODF’s Susan Domenique at 503-945-7502.

Regional Forest Practice Committees are panels of citizens - mandated under Oregon law - that advise the Oregon Board of Forestry on current forestry issues and forest management approaches. Three Regional Forest Practice Committees, serving the Eastern, Northwest and Southwest and regions of the state, were created by the 1971 Oregon Forest Practices Act. Under Oregon law, a majority of Regional Forest Practice Committees members must be private forest landowners and logging or forest operations companies.

 
Oregon’s forests are among one of the state’s most valued resources, providing a balanced mix of environmental, economic and social benefits.  Additional information about ODF’s Regional Forest Practice Committees is available on the Oregon Department of Forestry’s web site: http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/RFPC.aspx.

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Deputy Involved Shooting Near Deschutes Junction, North of Bend (Photo)
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/12/18 12:53 PM
photo
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/5227/118722/thumb_IMG_0425_(2).jpg

Released by: Sgt. William Bailey - Public Information Officer

Release Date: October 12, 2018

NARRATIVE:

At 10:42am today, a deputy-involved shooting occurred in the area of Deschutes Junction, north of Bend, while deputies were at a private residence attempting to locate and arrest a suspect on an outstanding felony warrant.  The suspect in the case is alive and was transported to St. Charles Medical Center in Bend with non-life threatening injuries.  The deputy involved was not injured.

The Tri-County Major Incident Team is investigating, led by the Oregon State Police

We ask the public to avoid the area, as the northbound Highway 97 on-ramp is currently closed as a result of this incident and investigation.

Future details will be released by the Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office in coordination with the Oregon State Police.

## End of Release ##

 




Attached Media Files: photo

Partners united for salmon, steelhead and lamprey extend Columbia Basin Fish Accords
Bonneville Power Administration - 10/12/18 11:16 AM

Portland, Ore. – States, tribes and three federal agencies continue to work side by side for the good of endangered salmon and steelhead as they extend the historic Columbia Basin Fish Accords for up to four more years.

The original agreements, signed in 2008, provided states and tribes more than $900 million to implement projects benefiting salmon, steelhead, and other fish and wildlife, and $50 million for Pacific lamprey passage improvements at federal dams on the Columbia and Snake rivers.

The Accords partnerships over the past 10 years balanced the agencies’ needs to perform their missions of navigation, flood risk management, hydropower production, fish and wildlife mitigation, recreation, water supply and irrigation in a manner consistent with tribal trust and treaty rights.

The new Accords extensions could run through September 2022 and will set aside more than $400 million for fish and wildlife mitigation and protection.

Since 2008, Accord dollars have: protected more than 36,000 acres of riparian habitat and improved nearly 7,000 acres; protected nearly 100,000 acre-feet of water; restored nearly 600 miles of streams and tributaries; opened access to nearly 2,000 miles of blocked fish habitat; and improved Pacific lamprey passage at dams operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. The agreements also committed funding for hatcheries.

"With this renewed commitment, we look forward to building on the momentum and progress of the past 10 years," said Brig. Gen. Pete Helmlinger, commander of the Corps’ Northwestern Division.

 “These agreements continue to represent a significant, regional partnership,” says Lorri Gray, Pacific Northwest Regional Director for the Bureau of Reclamation. “The work we’ve accomplished with the Accords illustrates the progress we can make for fish when we work together. We've seen that spending dollars on improving habitat is good for the fish and good for the region.”

“These extensions ensure we will continue to benefit from years of collaboration and direct coordination with our Accords partners,” says Elliot Mainzer, administrator of the Bonneville Power Administration. “The alignment derived from these agreements ensures we will continue to get the highest value for the fish and wildlife investments we make in the region.”

Accord agreements were extended with the Shoshone Bannock Tribes, the Columbia River Inter-Tribal Fish Commission, the Confederated Tribes and Bands of the Yakama Nation, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation, the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation, the Confederated Tribes of the Warm Springs Reservation of Oregon, the states of Idaho and Montana, BPA, the Corps and Reclamation.To read the new agreements, go to  www.bpa.gov/goto/FishAccordsExtensions.


Keno prize at the end of the rainbow (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 10/12/18 9:31 AM
Keno stock art
Keno stock art
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October 11, 2018 – Salem, Ore. – Sitting at home checking his numbers on his iPad, it didn’t sink in when Larry Bowser of Eugene realized he had won the Keno 8-Spot bonus.
Bowser, purchased his tickets while at the Fred Meyer on 11th Avenue in Eugene, and at the time didn’t think much of playing a $3 wager with Special Keno and Bulls-Eye. As luck would have it, Bowser not only matched all 8-numbers, but also hit the Bulls-Eye number, and with his $3 wager, multiplied his prize by 3.
In the end, his $3 wager led to a $247,914 prize, the third-highest Keno 8-spot winner since 2000. His win also makes him one of the biggest Bulls-Eye winners since the introduction of the Bulls-Eye Keno feature. The Bulls-Eye option is $1 extra and after the 20 winning numbers are revealed, the Bulls-Eye arrow randomly lands on one of those numbers. Then the Bulls-Eye prize is added to whatever you already won. Bowser hit the Bulls-Eye number which was worth $40,000, but since he had three tickets, it meant he’d won $120,000.
“I dropped the kids off this morning and was headed to Salem on Highway 126 and as I turned on the road, a rainbow came out,” he said. “That was amazing. That’s when I realized I won.”
Bowser said he was going to use his prize for his kids and they are planning a vacation.
During the 2015-17 biennium in Lane County, where Bowser lives and played Keno, more than $50.8 million in Oregon Lottery proceeds were directed to economic development, parks, education, and watershed enhancement.
Lottery officials recommend that you always sign the back of your tickets with each Oregon Lottery game you play, to ensure you can claim any prize you may win. In the event of winning a jackpot, players should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 should contact the Lottery office to schedule an appointment to claim their prize.
Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned more than $11 billion for economic development, public education, state parks, and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org
###




Attached Media Files: Keno stock art , Rainbow

GeerCrest Orchard to be Dedicated as Oregon Heritage Trees (Photo)
Oregon Travel Experience - 10/12/18 8:27 AM
Historic American Pippin
Historic American Pippin
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/4010/118713/thumb_Amer._Pippin_Tree_2.JPG

News Release from Oregon Travel Information Council
 

On Friday, October 19, at 11:00a.m., the Oregon Heritage Tree Program will dedicate the GeerCrest Orchard as new Oregon Heritage Trees in Salem. The dedication event is free and open to the public. It will be held at GeerCrest Farm and Historical Society.

 

The year 1837 saw the beginnings of mass immigration to the Willamette Valley from the Eastern United States. The Willamette Valley, described to Americans in the East as an “Eden of the West,” had been shaped by millennia of active land management by a diverse native population including the Kalapuyan, Molallan and Chinookan. The area – still within sovereign Native nations – proved enticing to immigrants hoping to settle on land in a conducive climate. These immigrants were mainly retired fur trappers and traders and farmers, but were soon followed by tradesmen, merchants, and professionals.

A nurseryman from Illinois named Ralph Geer traveled the Oregon Trail in 1847. He brought with him a bushel of apple seeds and half-bushel of pear seeds. He met and befriended Henderson Luelling, who carried two wagon loads of growing fruit trees from Indiana. Geer praised Luelling for his “Traveling Nursery.” Geer said, “That load [brought by Luelling] of living trees and shrubs brought more wealth to Oregon than any ship ever entered the Columbia river.”

With their combined seeds, trees, and techniques, the two men founded the non-native nursery and fruit industry in Oregon. Luelling planted his trees on his donation land claim just south of Portland in Milwaukie and traded with Geer for rootstocks, enabling success through their cooperation. By 1852, Geer advertised 66 varieties of apple trees, 15 varieties of pear trees and assorted peach, cherry, plum, nectarine and almond trees for sale in the Oregon Statesman newspaper.  The economic boom resulting from the California Gold Rush created a rich market for both trees and fruit.

Today, the Geer farm east of Salem still has trees growing from the original plantings. GeerCrest Farm is now managed by the nonprofit GeerCrest Farm & Historical Society, Inc. Their mission is both preservation of history and farm-life education for children. The farm has two buildings on the National Register: the 1880 stone fruit cellar and the 1851 farmhouse, which is the oldest residence in Oregon that remains in the original family.  Standing near the farmhouse is a grove of fruit and nut trees that date back to the beginning of the Geer homestead. In recognition of the early non-Native Oregon nurserymen and fruit growers, the Oregon Heritage Tree Program welcomes these venerable trees into the 2018 class of Oregon Heritage Trees.


The Oregon Heritage Tree Program is administered by the Oregon Travel Information Council. For more information on the GeerCrest Orchard or the Oregon Heritage Tree Program, please visit the website at ortravelexperience.com




Attached Media Files: Historic American Pippin , GeerCrest photo 1870 , Hawthorne Apple

Insight School of Oregon - Painted Hills | Board of Directors Meeting
Insight School of Ore. - Painted Hills - 10/12/18 7:34 AM

The ISOR-PH board will hold a regular board meeting on Thursday, October 18 at 4:00pm.
Insight School of Oregon Painted Hills Board Members are hereby notified that the Meeting of the Board will be held on: Thursday, October 18 at 4:00pm..


1.Via Teleconference:
Conference Call Number: 1-888-824-5783
Conference Code Number: 54433245#

And

2. Via Web Conference
http://tinyurl.com/ISORPH-SchoolBoardMeeting

The Public has been invited to the Board Meeting with notices posted at the following locations:

A. FlashNet Newswire
http://flashalertbend.net/press-releases.html

B. Insight School of Oregon Painted Hills Office
603 NW 3rd Street
Prineville, OR 97754


Thu. 10/11/18
Oregon Military Department scheduled to sell National Guard armory in Burns (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 10/11/18 2:43 PM
2018-10/962/118697/Front_view_Armory_.jpg
2018-10/962/118697/Front_view_Armory_.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/962/118697/thumb_Front_view_Armory_.jpg

SALEM, Oregon – The Oregon Military Department is scheduled to sell the Oregon Army National Guard armory in Burns, Oregon, for a fair market price of $250,000. The property is located at 619 S. Fairview Ave.

The Burns Paiute Tribal Council will purchase the property once terms of the Land Sale Agreement are completed.  The terms of the Land Sale Agreement are $225,000 down and $5,000 each year for the next five years. The tribal council approved the purchase last week.

“We are so grateful for the opportunity to purchase the armory and turn it into a wellness center for our community,” said Eric Hawley, Tribal Counsel Chief.

The Burns Armory has been vacant since 2013. At that time, there were only eight Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers living in Burns assigned to a 21-person engineer unit. The remainder of Soldiers in that unit lived in the greater Bend, Oregon, area. In 2012, the unit began conducting drill training at the Bend Armory and was officially re-stationed there in 2013.

Legislative approval to sell the armory was achieved in 2017 as part of Senate Bill 5506 and the sale was listed under terms defined by The Department of Administrative Services.




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/962/118697/Front_view_Armory_.jpg

Arrests made in Redmond burglary
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/11/18 10:51 AM

Released by:  Lt. Chad Davis

Release Date:  10/10/18

 

Arrestee: Winningham, Nathan    Age: 32

                  Terrebonne, Oregon

 

Charges:   Burglary I

                   Theft I

                   Identity Theft

                   Fraudulent use of a credit card

                   Probation Violation

                   (Additional charges to follow)

 

Arrestee: Winningham, Melvin      Age:   55

                  Terrebonne, Oregon

 

Charges:   Felon in possession of a firearm (6 counts)

                   Theft I

                   Unlawful possession of Methamphetamine     

 

Search warrant location: 8603 NW 5th

                     

 

NARRATIVE:

 

On 9/25/18, Deputies with the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office investigated a burglary that occurred in the 2500 block of NW Coyner Avenue in Redmond.  Firearms, ammunition, tools, and credit cards were stolen in the burglary.  No suspects were known when the burglary was initially reported to Deputies.  The victim of the burglary was later contacted by his bank and notified that one of his credit cards had been used at a business in Redmond totaling over $4000.00 in fraudulent charges.  Video surveillance from the business captured a male and a female suspect using the stolen credit card. 

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office Street Crimes Unit (SCU) began assisting in the investigation and identified the male suspect as Nathan Winningham of Terrebonne.  SCU Detectives began conducting surveillance of Winningham’s residence in Terrebonne and developed enough information to obtain a search warrant for his residence in Terrebonne.  SCU Detectives and Deputies served the search warrant and located several stolen firearms, ammunition and paperwork from the burglarized residence and also Methamphetamine. 

On 10/8/18, SCU Detectives arrested Nathan Winningham’s father, Melvin Winningham, who also lives at the same residence in Terrebonne.  Melvin Winningham was arrested for six counts of felon in possession of a firearm, Theft I and Unlawful possession of Methamphetamine and lodged at the Deschutes County Adult Jail.  

On 10/9/18, SCU Detectives learned Nathan Winningham was frequenting a residence in the 1400 block of NE 7th St. in the city of Redmond.  Detectives began conducting surveillance on the residence.    Winningham was located hiding in the bathroom of the residence and he was eventually taken into custody with the assistance of DCSO K-9 Ezel.  Winningham was not injured in the incident and later lodged at the Deschutes County Adult Jail on the listed charges.  The investigation is on-going and additional arrests are likely to occur.

 

The Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Street Crimes Unit focuses enforcement on street level drug cases and quality of life issues connected to property crimes throughout Deschutes County.

 

 

## End of Release ##


Oregon State Police investigating rollover truck crash on Hwy 99W south of Dundee Bypass - Yamhill County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 10/11/18 10:48 AM
2018-10/1002/118694/Coke_2.jpg
2018-10/1002/118694/Coke_2.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/1002/118694/thumb_Coke_2.jpg

Oregon State Police and emergency personnel are currently on scene of a roll over truck crash on Hwy 99W near mile post 26.

This is a single vehicle crash with minor injuries to the operator.

Expect delays in the area for the next couple of hours.




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/1002/118694/Coke_2.jpg , 2018-10/1002/118694/Coke_1.jpg

Legacy Emanuel's Mobile ECMO Team is equipped for the flu season; unveils a dedicated oversized ambulance for transporting severely-ill flu patients (Photo)
Legacy Health - 10/11/18 10:15 AM
Legacy Emanuel unveils new ambulance dedicated to the mobile ECMO team in preparation for the flu season
Legacy Emanuel unveils new ambulance dedicated to the mobile ECMO team in preparation for the flu season
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/419/118690/thumb_ambulance.jpg

Media Opportunity October 12: Legacy Emanuel Medical Center

Legacy Emanuel’s Mobile ECMO Team is equipped for the flu season; unveils a dedicated oversized ambulance for transporting severely-ill flu patients

Media Opportunity:

11 a.m. Friday, October 12, 2018, At Legacy Emanuel near the Emergency Room entrance (N. Kerby Ave.). Legacy Emanuel’s dedicated Mobile ECMO Team AMR ambulance, physicians, former flu patient.

Interviews:

  • Portland police officer, a married father of four, a former ECMO patient who just recovered from near-fatal flu complications. He didn’t get a flu shot.
  • Dr. Joseph Deng, M.D., director of Legacy Emanuel ECMO Services and head of the Legacy Health Mobile ECMO Team.
  • Eric Dodge, AMR Ambulance

Visuals:

  • Ambulance (external/internal)
  • Portable ECMO equipment

(Portland, OR) The important message is to get a flu shot. According to recently released data by the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, last year’s flu season was the worst in decades. A flu shot can prevent infections and reduce the severity of flu complications or even death.

In preparation for the flu season, Legacy Emanuel Medical Center unveiled a dedicated AMR ambulance for the state’s only Mobile ECMO team. ECMO, or Extra Corporeal Membrane Oxygenation, is a sophisticated life-saving procedure which takes over the oxygenation and heart function in patients with severe lung disease, cardiac disease or trauma. Legacy Emanuel is one of two hospitals in Oregon that has the ECMO service but the only one with a mobile team to pick up and transport patients. When a physician from another hospital calls for the Mobile ECMO Team, a patient is on the verge of dying.

The oversized AMR ambulance can hold nine medical personnel, specialized equipment and a portable ECMO machine to stabilize the patient. The Mobile ECMO Team, staffed with critical care physicians, nurses and other medical professionals, is available 24/7 to pick up severely ill patients suffering from flu complications whose only hope may be the life-saving ECMO procedure. Patients are transported back to Legacy Emanuel for inpatient ECMO treatment in the Neuro-Trauma Intensive Care Unit.

Last flu season, the Mobile ECMO Team picked up 22 patients with an 80% survival rate, 21% above the international average. They also travel by air and last year, flew 12 hours to Palmer, AK, to pick up a flu patient.

 

 

 

 

Legacy Health is Oregon’s only locally-owned nonprofit health-care organization with nearly 13,000 employees serving you where you work, live, and play. An integrated network of care providers from over 100 Legacy Medical Group primary care, urgent care and specialty care clinics, to seven community-based and nationally recognized hospitals including Legacy Emanuel Medical Center, Randall Children’s Hospital at Legacy Emanuel, Legacy Good Samaritan Medical Center, Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center, Legacy Mount Hood Medical Center, Legacy Salmon Creek Medical Center, and Legacy Silverton Medical Center. Legacy provides a vigorous research program at its state-of-the-art Legacy Research Institute and extensive medical testing at Legacy Laboratory Services

 




Attached Media Files: Legacy Emanuel unveils new ambulance dedicated to the mobile ECMO team in preparation for the flu season

Find pumpkin patches with Oregon's Bounty (Photo)
Oregon Farm Bureau - 10/11/18 10:00 AM
Pumpkin patch at Farm Bureau member Smith Rock Ranch in Terrebonne.
Pumpkin patch at Farm Bureau member Smith Rock Ranch in Terrebonne.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/5507/118688/thumb_smithrockranch.jpg

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Use a smartphone to easily find pumpkin patches, u-pick orchards, farm stands, and harvest festivals with Oregon’s Bounty at www.OregonFB.org.

Pumpkins, apples, pears, and squash are just a few examples of autumn’s agricultural bounty. But if you want to venture out into the countryside to buy seasonal food directly from a farmer or rancher, where do you go?

“Everyone knows where their local farmers market is, but not everyone knows where to find roadside farm stands, pumpkin patches, u-pick orchards, and harvest events. That’s where Oregon’s Bounty comes in,” said Anne Marie Moss, Oregon Farm Bureau communications director.

Oregon’s Bounty at www.OregonFB.org is a searchable directory of nearly 300 family farms and ranches that sell food and foliage directly to the public.

Smartphone-friendly, the Oregon’s Bounty website allows visitors to search for a specific agriculture product — like pumpkins or apples — and/or search for farms within a specific region of the state, such as Portland Metro, the Gorge, or the Willamette Valley. Visitors can also do a search for “u-pick” or “events” to locate those activities.

“Oregonians love farm-fresh food. Thanks to the diversity of Oregon agriculture, we can buy an enormous variety of fruits, vegetables, meat, dairy products, nuts, and flowers directly from the families who grew it,” said Moss.

“Each of the farms listed in Oregon’s Bounty are owned and operated by Farm Bureau members, who are proud of what they’ve raised and are happy to answer questions about what they do,” said Moss. “Fall is an ideal time to take a trip into the scenic countryside, meet a few of these family farmers, and experience Oregon agriculture firsthand.”

###

Note to Editors: “Farm Bureau” is a registered trademark; please capitalize in all cases.

The state’s largest general agriculture organization, Oregon Farm Bureau is a grassroots, nonpartisan, nonprofit organization representing farm and ranch families in the public and policymaking arenas. First established in Oregon at the county level in 1919 and the state level in 1932, Farm Bureau is organized in all 36 counties and has nearly 7,000 member families professionally engaged in agriculture.




Attached Media Files: Pumpkin patch at Farm Bureau member Smith Rock Ranch in Terrebonne. , 2018-10/5507/118688/OregonsBountyFall.png

Redmond Police Announce DUII Enforcement Results for September (Photo)
Redmond Police Dept. - 10/11/18 8:01 AM
NHTSA image
NHTSA image
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/6157/118683/thumb_Driver_Sober_or_Get_Pulled_Over.png

REDMOND, OR -- In September, the Redmond Police Department conducted a DUII High Visibility Enforcement effort. During this time Redmond police placed three additional officers on our roadways funded by DUII grant funds. A total of twelve hours were worked on grant time, resulting in several traffic citations issued, but no DUII arrests. Redmond patrol officers working their normal shifts during September arrested thirteen (13) DUII drivers.  In 2017, RPD Officers arrested 125 drivers for DUII.  To date in 2018, RPD has arrested 116 drivers.

 

The end of September represents the end of the grant year for the grant-funded DUII patrols. RPD Officers working their normal shifts will continue to patrol Redmond looking to remove impaired drivers from our streets.  Redmond PD has applied for additional grant funding, and the application process is ongoing. The primary intent of these heighten patrols is to prevent deaths, injuries and property damage caused by DUII drivers by removing them from the road. Redmond Police Department officers are trained to look for signs of impairment beyond just alcohol, as many other substances, legal or illegal, can impair a person's ability to operate a vehicle.

 

The Officers of your Redmond Police Department are committed to making Redmond the safest community in Oregon. Preventing, locating and arresting DUII drivers is one of many ways they are working to accomplish this vision.  Funding to support these enhanced DUII patrols is provided by a DUII High Visibility Enforcement Grant, awarded to the Redmond Police Department from the Oregon Department of Transportation. Please report suspected DUII drivers by calling 541-693-6911 in Deschutes County or anywhere in Oregon by calling 800-24-DRUNK (800-243-7865).

                                                                                        # # #

The City of Redmond Police Department is a 24-hour a day professional law enforcement agency serving a population of approximately 30,000 people with 45 sworn officers, and 11 support staff.  Each year, the department responds to over 23,000 calls for service, with approximately 20% of those being emergency 911 calls.  The Redmond Police Department utilizes exceptional customer service and community-partnered law enforcement techniques to accomplish our vision of making Redmond the safest community in Oregon. 




Attached Media Files: NHTSA image

Pursuit in Bend by DCSO
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/11/18 5:23 AM

 

MEDIA RELEASE

Pursuit in Bend    

Released by:          Sgt. Kevin Dizney

 

Occurred:               October 11, 2018 at 0235 AM

 

Location:                Knott Road near Woodside Court

 

 

Driver:                      Alvino, Jesus  Age:  23

Redmond, Oregon

 

Charges:                 Felony Attempt to Elude

Reckless Driving

Reckless Endangering

Warrant for Parole Violation on a weapons offense  

 

 

Passenger:             Escobedo, Bryan Jayson   Age:  29 

                                  Redmond, Oregon

 

Charges:                 Warrant:  Probation Violation for drug possession

 

 

 

NARRATIVE:         

 

On Thursday, 10/11/18, at approximately 0235 hours, a Deschutes County Sheriff’s Deputy began to assist Bend Police Officers on a traffic stop of a

2000 Volkswagon Jetta, relating to traffic violations observed in the City of Bend.  When the Bend officers attempted a traffic stop, the suspect vehicle eluded by failing to yield and speeding away.  The officers did not initiate pursuit until the Deschutes County deputy was able to get in position behind the vehicle.  The deputy observed additional traffic violations including speed in excess of 90mph while westbound on Knott Road heading toward Deschutes River Woods. 

 

The deputy continued pursuit into Deschutes River Woods at speeds between 25-65 mph.  The deputy chased the suspect on Baker Road to the end of Riverwoods Drive, where the road ends, turned around, and chased the vehicle back out to the highway on the same route.  The suspect then turned southbound on Highway 97 after a failed attempt to spike strip the vehicle was attempted near the Deschutes Riverwoods Store. 

 

Deputies continued chase on Highway 97 at speeds in excess of 105 mph to just south of the Cottonwood Road exit when additional deputies, assisted by Sunriver Police Department, were able to successfully spikestrip the vehicle causing the tires to gradually deflate bringing the car to a stop. 

 

Deputies were able to take both suspects into custody without further incident.  During the investigation, it was determined both suspects had warrants for their arrest. 

End of Release


Pursuit in Bend by DCSO
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/11/18 5:22 AM

 

MEDIA RELEASE

Pursuit in Bend    

Released by:          Sgt. Kevin Dizney

 

Occurred:               October 11, 2018 at 0235 AM

 

Location:                Knott Road near Woodside Court

 

 

Driver:                      Alvino, Jesus  Age:  23

Redmond, Oregon

 

Charges:                 Felony Attempt to Elude

Reckless Driving

Reckless Endangering

Warrant for Parole Violation on a weapons offense  

 

 

Passenger:             Escobedo, Bryan Jayson   Age:  29 

                                  Redmond, Oregon

 

Charges:                 Warrant:  Probation Violation for drug possession

 

 

 

NARRATIVE:         

 

On Thursday, 10/11/18, at approximately 0235 hours, a Deschutes County Sheriff’s Deputy began to assist Bend Police Officers on a traffic stop of a

2000 Volkswagon Jetta, relating to traffic violations observed in the City of Bend.  When the Bend officers attempted a traffic stop, the suspect vehicle eluded by failing to yield and speeding away.  The officers did not initiate pursuit until the Deschutes County deputy was able to get in position behind the vehicle.  The deputy observed additional traffic violations including speed in excess of 90mph while westbound on Knott Road heading toward Deschutes River Woods. 

 

The deputy continued pursuit into Deschutes River Woods at speeds between 25-65 mph.  The deputy chased the suspect on Baker Road to the end of Riverwoods Drive, where the road ends, turned around, and chased the vehicle back out to the highway on the same route.  The suspect then turned southbound on Highway 97 after a failed attempt to spike strip the vehicle was attempted near the Deschutes Riverwoods Store. 

 

Deputies continued chase on Highway 97 at speeds in excess of 105 mph to just south of the Cottonwood Road exit when additional deputies, assisted by Sunriver Police Department, were able to successfully spikestrip the vehicle causing the tires to gradually deflate bringing the car to a stop. 

 

Deputies were able to take both suspects into custody without further incident.  During the investigation, it was determined both suspects had warrants for their arrest. 

End of Release


Wed. 10/10/18
Commercial Burglary Arrests
Bend Police Dept. - 10/10/18 7:36 PM

Arrested:  16 year-old male, Bend Resident, 17 year-old male, Bend Resident

On 10-05-18 at 11:30 PM, Bend Police Officers responded to a reported burglary at US Market, 2625 NE Butler Market Road.  Surveillance video showed two male suspects who had broken a window, entered the business and stole merchandise.  The suspects fled the area prior to police arrival.  

Since the incident, Bend Police Officers have been pursuing leads in the case.  After the burglary occured, a citizen viewed the video surveillance and recognized one of the males committing the burglary.  This information was relayed to Officers and on 10-10-18, the male was contacted and arrested.  This lead to a search warrant being executed at a Bend residence, a second suspect being identified and arrested and the recovery of stolen property from the burglary.

Due to the suspects being juveniles, their names are not being released at this time and the case has been referred to the District Attorney's Office.  


VOLCANOES: THE FIRES OF CREATION to Open at OMSI
OMSI - 10/10/18 2:32 PM

PORTLAND, Ore. (Oct. 10, 2018) – Join intrepid explorer Carsten Peter as he travels the globe to study one of nature’s most breathtaking spectacles in the new giant screen film Volcanoes: The Fires of Creation. Opening Saturday, Oct. 13 at OMSI’s Empirical Theater, Volcanoes takes viewers on an incredible journey across the planet to witness the beauty of volcanic forces from a boiling lava lake in Vanuatu to acid ponds, geysers and mineral deposit fields in Ethiopia.  

“We are thrilled to present this electrifying and educational story of Volcanoes,” said Wendy MacKeigan, CEO of SK Films. “Audiences will see volcanoes up close and personal, like never before on the Giant Screen and take them to places they would normally not be able to go.”

On a journey that spans the globe, audiences will explore the archeological ghost town of Pompeii, see hydrothermal vents at the bottom of the ocean and witness the devastating effects of the 2018 Kilauea eruption in Hawaii.  

“We often think of volcanoes as being destructive, but they also build and play a beneficial role on the planet. There are dozens of volcanoes erupting each day from the bottom of the ocean to mountain peaks. To witness one in action is both beautiful and awe-inspiring,” said Michael Dalton-Smith, director and producer of Volcanoes. “Most importantly, I hope that the audience will come away with a better understanding of the forces that shaped the world we know today.”

Tickets to the film are $8.50 for adults, $6.50 for youth (ages 3-13), and $7 for seniors (ages 63+). Guests can purchase tickets online, via phone at 503.797.4000 or in person at the museum. For more information, visit www.omsi.edu.

SK Films
SK Films is an award-winning content provider and a global leader in the IMAX®/Giant Screen industry. SK works across various genres and platforms, including theatrical, television and digital media, with a special emphasis on creating high impact natural history and science related content. SK has a reputation as one of the most accomplished and respected producers and distributors supplying 3D, 2D and Dome product to IMAX and other Giant Screen theatres worldwide, with a mission to entertain and inspire audiences and immerse them in the awe and wonder of the world we live in. For more information, please visit www.SKFilms.ca 

Digital Crossing Films
Digital Crossing Films is a natural history documentary film company that specializes in IMAX®/Giant Screen productions as well as 8k TV productions. For the past fifteen years Digital Crossing Productions has been creating exciting natural history programs for international markets, which air on Smithsonian Channel, National Geographic and Discovery Channel. Two of these natural history programs – Volcanic Odyssseys and Kenya Wildlife Diaries received multiple nominations for the 2017 Canadian Screen Awards. http://digitalcrossing.ca/ 

About OMSI
Founded in 1944, the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI) is one of the nation’s leading science museums, a world-class tourist attraction, and an award-winning educational resource for the kid in each of us. OMSI operates the largest museum-based outdoor science education program in the country and provides traveling and community outreach programs that bring science learning opportunities to schools and community organizations in nearly every county in Oregon. OMSI is located at 1945 SE Water Avenue, Portland, OR 97214. For general information, call 503.797.4000 or visit omsi.edu. 


Earthquake Preparedness is as Easy as "Drop. Cover. Hold On." (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 10/10/18 2:29 PM
Oregon Governor Kate Brown signed a proclamation declaring October 18, 2018 "Great Oregon ShakeOut Day."
Oregon Governor Kate Brown signed a proclamation declaring October 18, 2018 "Great Oregon ShakeOut Day."
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/3986/118668/thumb_ShakeOut_Proclamation_2018.jpg

All are invited to participate in Great ShakeOut, an annual earthquake preparedness drill, at 10:18 on October 18.

Salem, OR – October 10, 2018 – Crustal earthquakes are regular occurrences in Oregon. They are generally small and low-impact and can cause significant localized damage while the threat of a Cascadia Subduction Zone quake is a geologic hazard that will affect the entire state. On average, Cascadia quakes occur every 300 years and are caused by the shifting of geologic plates in the Cascadia subduction zone.  Emergency management agencies and other organizations across the state have worked with communities to share information and promote preparedness. The best protective action anyone can do during any type of earthquake is to “Drop. Cover. Hold on.” Most injuries are caused by falling debris or being thrown to the ground.

On Thursday, October 18, people worldwide will practice how to “Drop, Cover and Hold On” as part of the Great ShakeOut annual earthquake drill. It’s your chance to be one in a million - or one of a half million! Currently more than 520,000 Oregonians have pledged to participate in the Great Oregon ShakeOut. Join us at 10:18 a.m. on Thursday, October 18, as we "Drop, Cover and Hold On." Register today and check out some great earthquake preparedness resources.

“Earthquakes are just one of the natural hazards we face in Oregon,” says Althea Rizzo, geologic hazards awareness program coordinator at Oregon’s Office of Emergency Management. “We also experience winter storms, wildfires and flooding. Experience has shown that in the aftermath of large disasters - consider the recent earthquake and tsunami in Indonesia or Hurricanes Maria and Florence – personal preparedness is critically important. The Great ShakeOut is a safe and fun way to practice what to do when seismic activity occurs.”

Oregon Governor Kate Brown has declared October 18, 2018, “Great Oregon Shakeout Day.” The proclamation encourages participation in the ShakeOut and urges Oregonians to be
2 Weeks Ready.

 “We know that a Cascadia Subduction Zone quake and tsunami could leave large areas of our state without resources for days and weeks,” says Rizzo. “Having 2 weeks of food, water and other emergency supplies is critical for individuals and families who may need to take care of themselves until formal response resources can reach them.”

# # #

 

 




Attached Media Files: Oregon Governor Kate Brown signed a proclamation declaring October 18, 2018 "Great Oregon ShakeOut Day." , The Great ShakeOut, the nation's largest earthquake preparedness drill, takes place at 10:18 a.m. on Thursday, Oct. 18.

Single vehicle fatal crash on Lone Rock Rd. in Gilliam County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 10/10/18 1:40 PM
2018-10/1002/118666/Lone_Rock_Road_RD-1.jpeg
2018-10/1002/118666/Lone_Rock_Road_RD-1.jpeg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/1002/118666/thumb_Lone_Rock_Road_RD-1.jpeg

On Tuesday, October 9, 2018, at approximately 8:07 AM, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a single vehicle crash on Lone Rock Road near mile post 13 in Gilliam County.

Preliminary investigation revealed a 2002 Chevrolet Tahoe, operated by Karen Buell (62) of Condon, was traveling eastbound on Lone Rock Road when, for unknown reasons, left the roadway and rolled down a steep embankment. 

Buell sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene.

OSP was assisted by the Gilliam County Sheriff's Office, South Gilliam County Fire, and Gilliam County Road Department.




Attached Media Files: 2018-10/1002/118666/Lone_Rock_Road_RD-1.jpeg

Oregon State Police requesting public's assistance in waste of fork-horn buck in Douglas County
Oregon State Police - 10/10/18 1:12 PM

OSP Fish and Wildlife Troopers are asking for the public’s assistance in locating the person(s) responsible for shooting and leaving (to waste) a fork-horn buck the night of October 5, 2018.

Preliminary investigation revealed that the deer was shot once from Panther Creek Road (a spur road off 12-mile road about 3.5 miles from West Fork Cow Creek Road).

Those with information are asked to contact Sr. Trooper Baimbridge directly at (541) 817-4473 or OSP dispatch at (541) 440-3333. Those with information can remain anonymous and a TIP reward will be offered for information leading to a citation or arrest in the case.

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators 

The TIP program offers preference point rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of big game mammals.

Preference Point Rewards:

5 Points-Mountain Sheep

5 Points-Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points-Cougar

The TIP program also offers cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of Mountain Sheep, Mountain Goat, Moose, Elk, Deer, Antelope, Bear, Cougar, Wolf, Upland Birds, Waterfowl, and Furbearers. Cash rewards can also be awarded for the unlawful take of Game Fish and Shellfish and for Habitat Destruction.

CASH REWARDS:
$1,000 Mountain Sheep, Mountain Goat and Moose 
$500 Elk, Deer and Antelope 
$300 Bear, Cougar and Wolf 
$300 Habitat Destruction 
$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl 
$100 Furbearers 

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish 

How to Report a Wildlife and/or Habitat Law Violation or Suspicious Activity: 

TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP(677)

TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)


OHA: Federal immigration rule proposal could impact health access, outcomes
Oregon Health Authority - 10/10/18 11:36 AM

October 10, 2018

OHA: Federal immigration rule proposal could impact health access, outcomes

Salem, Ore. -- Oregon Health Authority Director Patrick Allen released the following statement in response to Department of Homeland Security’s proposed public charge rule change, which was published in the Federal Register today:

OHA is closely monitoring the proposed change to the Department of Homeland Security’s federal public charge rule that could impact access to essential services like health care for some Oregon immigrant communities. It is important to know that the rule has not yet changed, and eligibility criteria for our programs have not changed.

However, we are aware that families are concerned, fearful, and faced with difficult choices. We will continue our work with local health care providers, advocates, attorneys, and community leaders to address the fears and respond to the changing immigration landscape while maintaining our focus on improving the health of Oregonians.

We know that health coverage contributes to healthier pregnancy, birth, and childhood outcomes, better education, and reduced emergency department visits and hospitalizations. OHA will continue to focus on transforming health care for all Oregonians.

Public charge is a term used in immigration law to describe an individual who is likely to become dependent on the government in the future. Being considered a public charge can result in the denial of a green card (permanent residency) application. Currently, the only public assistance that can be considered when determining a person will become a public charge is cash assistance (e.g. Temporary Assistance for Needy Families and Social Security Income) and assisted long-term care at the government’s expense.

The proposed changes would expand the list of programs that could impact public charge determinations to include non-emergency Medicaid (full Oregon Health Plan), Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (food stamps) and housing assistance. Homeland Security is also considering including the Children’s Health Insurance Program on the list and has requested public comment on that aspect.

OHA, led by Governor Kate Brown’s Office and together with Oregon Department of Human Services and Oregon Housing and Community Services, will closely monitor this proposed rule, study its impacts and work with community partners to support affected Oregonians.

One in 10 Oregon residents is an immigrant, while about one in eight U.S. born children has at least one immigrant parent, according to the American Immigration Council.

The public may submit comments to the Federal Register on the proposed rule change for 60 days, until December 10, 2018. You can comment by visiting the Federal Register website at https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2018/10/10/2018-21106/inadmissibility-on-public-charge-grounds.

 

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Resources:
Proposed Rule: Inadmissibility on Public Charge Grounds: https://www.federalregister.gov/documents/2018/10/10/2018-21106/inadmissibility-on-public-charge-grounds.

National Academy for State Health Policy analysis: https://nashp.org/federal-proposal-broadens-public-charge-definition-what-are-the-implications-for-states/

Kaiser Family Foundation analysis: https://www.kff.org/disparities-policy/fact-sheet/proposed-changes-to-public-charge-policies-for-immigrants-implications-for-health-coverage/.

http://bit.ly/2OSnMPZ


I-84 EASTBOUND is closed at Exit 216 due to a crash (Photo)
ODOT: East. Ore. - 10/10/18 11:28 AM
I-84 MP 254 EB truck crash six miles west of La Grande
I-84 MP 254 EB truck crash six miles west of La Grande
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-10/1204/118659/thumb_I84EB_truck_Crash_101018.jpeg

UPDATE WITH PHOTO: I-84 EASTBOUND is closed at Exit 216 (six miles east of Pendleton) due to a crashed semi truck near MP 254, about a six miles west of La Grande. EASTBOUND travelers are advised to use alternate routes, or wait until freeway is open. The WESTBOUND freeways is not impacted at this time. Check TripCheck.com or call 511 / 800-977-6368 for update conditions.




Attached Media Files: I-84 MP 254 EB truck crash six miles west of La Grande

DCBS releases national study on workers' compensation costs
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 10/10/18 10:14 AM

(Salem) – Oregon’s workers’ compensation rates remain among the lowest in the nation, according to an analysis released today by the Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS). This reflects the state’s ongoing success in making workplaces safer and keeping costs under control.

The biennial study ranks all 50 states and Washington, D.C., based on premium rates that were in effect Jan. 1, 2018.

Oregon had the sixth least expensive rates in 2018, an improvement from its ranking as the seventh least expensive state the last time the study was done, in 2016. DCBS recently announced that Oregon workers’ compensation rates would decline further – an average 9.7 percent – in 2019. Workers’ compensation pays injured workers for lost wages and medical care for job-related injuries.

“Oregon continues to demonstrate that it’s possible to maintain low employer costs while providing strong support to workers,” Governor Kate Brown said. “We must remain committed to working together to balance employer rates and worker benefits, and to help injured workers heal and return to work quickly.”

The study shows New York had the most expensive rates, followed by California. Meanwhile, North Dakota had the least expensive rates. In the Northwest, Washington’s rates were the 16th most expensive and Idaho was the 21st most expensive.

Oregon researchers also compared each state’s rates to the national median (the 26th ranked state) rate of $1.70 per $100 of payroll. Oregon’s rate of $1.15 is 68 percent of the median.

To produce a valid comparison of states, which have various mixes of industries, the study calculates rates for each state using the same mix of the 50 industries with the highest workers’ compensation claims costs in Oregon.

A summary of the study was posted today; the full report will be published later this year.

Oregon has conducted these studies in even-numbered years since 1986, when Oregon’s rates were among the highest in the nation. The department reports the results to the Oregon Legislature as a performance measure. Oregon’s relatively low rate today underscores the success of the state’s workers’ compensation system reforms and its improvements in workplace safety and health. 

Oregon has long taken a comprehensive approach to making workplaces safer, keeping business costs low, and providing strong worker benefits. This approach includes enforcing requirements that employers carry insurance for their workers, keeping medical costs under control, and helping injured workers return to work sooner and minimize the impact on their wages.

It also includes efforts to prevent on-the-job injuries by enforcing workplace safety and health rules, and advising employers about how to improve worker safety and health.

“Oregon employers and employees understand the importance of keeping workplaces safe,” said Cameron Smith, DCBS director. “That commitment continues to be a major factor in keeping costs down.”

Here are some key links for the study/workers’ compensation costs:

• To read a summary of the study, go to https://www.oregon.gov/dcbs/reports/Documents/general/prem-sum/18-2082.pdf  

• Prior years’ summaries and full reports with details of study methods can be found at https://www.oregon.gov/dcbs/reports/protection/Pages/general-wc-system.aspx  

• Information on workers’ compensation costs in Oregon, including a map with these state rate rankings, is at https://www.oregon.gov/dcbs/cost/Pages/index.aspx

Learn about Oregon’s return-to-work programs, workers’ compensation insurance requirements, and more at https://wcd.oregon.gov/Pages/index.aspx

Request a no-cost workplace safety or health consultation, and learn about workplace safety and health requirements and resources at https://osha.oregon.gov/Pages/index.aspx

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The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov.