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Bend/Central-Eastern Oregon News Releases for Wed. Aug. 17 - 4:31 pm
Wed. 08/17/22
Subject Arrested After Report of Dispute (Photo)
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/17/22 3:58 PM
2022-08/5227/156813/thumbnail_MR_Badge.jpg
2022-08/5227/156813/thumbnail_MR_Badge.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/5227/156813/thumb_thumbnail_MR_Badge.jpg

RELEASED BY: Sergeant Jayson Janes

DATE: August 17, 2022

ARRESTED: Charles Smith Harris Jr, 52 year old male, Bend OR

CHARGES: Coercion, Menacing, Unlawful Use of a Weapon, Felon in Possession of a Restricted Weapon, Criminal Mischief II, and Resisting Arrest

VICTIM: 43 year old female, Bend OR

LOCATION: Juniper Ridge area east of Hwy 97

 

On August 16, 2022 at approximately 1:11 PM Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office Deputies responded to the Juniper Ridge area for a reported dispute. The information given to deputies was that Charles Harris Jr was currently outside of the victim’s trailer threatening her with a chain and causing damage to her trailer. 

Deputies arrived on scene and began the investigation. They determined that Harris was likely in possession of weapons and was currently in his camp trailer. Deputies attempted to negotiate with Harris to get him to exit his trailer without success. Harris told deputies he would not allow them to take him into custody and refused to leave his trailer. 

A search warrant was written and later granted to enter and search Harris’ trailer. Due to Harris’ refusal to cooperate and the likelihood of weapons, members of the DCSO SWAT team responded to assist with taking Harris into custody. 

Deputies negotiated with Harris for over three hours without success. Harris at one point exited the trailer, but refused to follow commands from law enforcement. After multiple announcements about the possibility of force being used against Harris if he didn’t comply, Harris continued refusing to obey commands from law enforcement. Less lethal methods were ultimately utilized and K9 Ronin was deployed to assist in taking Harris into custody.  

Harris was transported to St. Charles Medical Center where he is being treated for his injuries sustained during the incident. Upon his release from St. Charles, Harris will be lodged in the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office Jail for the above mentioned charges. 

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is a full service agency that oversees the adult jail, provides patrol, criminal investigations, civil process and search and rescue operations. Special units include SWAT, Marine Patrol, ATV Patrol, Forest Patrol, along with six K9 teams. Founded in 1916 and today led by your duly elected Sheriff L. Shane Nelson, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office serves over 200,000 residents in Deschutes County. The agency has 259 authorized and funded personnel, which includes 193 sworn employees who provide services to the 3,055 square miles of Deschutes County.




Attached Media Files: 2022-08/5227/156813/thumbnail_MR_Badge.jpg

OHA and ODE provide updates on COVID-19 and planning for coming school year
Oregon Health Authority - 08/17/22 3:49 PM

August 17, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, orCOVID19.media@odhsoha.oregon.gov

OHA and ODE provide updates on COVID-19 and planning for coming school year

PORTLAND, Ore. — Oregon Health Authority (OHA) and Oregon Department of Education (ODE) provided updates today on the status of the COVID-19 pandemic and efforts to ensure Oregon schools can maintain in-person instruction during the 2022-2023 school year.

Dean Sidelinger, M.D. MSEd, health officer and state epidemiologist at OHA, noted hospitalizations of COVID-19-positive patients continued to decline since July. He also encouraged Oregon families to schedule COVID-19 vaccinations, along with routine childhood immunizations, to protect their children as they prepared to head back to classrooms.

“The immunization schedule is designed to provide immunity early in life, before children are likely to be exposed to diseases,” said Sidelinger.

Sidelinger also provided a fall vaccine update. Pending federal and state approvals, he said, Oregon should expect to receive supplies of bivalent COVID-19 vaccine boosters this fall from both Pfizer and Moderna. The bivalent vaccines have been designed to target BA.4 and BA.5 Omicron subvariants and the original strain.

Sidelinger also encouraged all eligible residents to get boosted: “OHA’s message to anyone who is eligible for a booster is simple — if you are eligible, get your booster now and do not wait until the fall.”

Colt Gill, director of ODE, outlined what families and students can expect with COVID-19 planning and in-person instruction for the academic year.

“As we head into the coming year, we are holding strong to our North Star goal of providing equitable access to in-person instruction all day, every school day, for every student,” said Gill.

Gill also highlighted resources for K-12 schools available from ODE. These include COVID-19 planning documents, the Care and Connection tools and Oregon Classroom WISE, a suite of free print and video resources, guided tutorials, role plays, and interviews with youth and school personnel to support the mental and emotional well-being of students and school staff.

Here are the talking points from today’s media availability. You can also watch it here.

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Alleged Russian Cryptocurrency Money Launderer Extradited from the Netherlands to the United States
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 08/17/22 2:10 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—An alleged cryptocurrency money launderer was extradited this week from the Netherlands to the United States to face charges in the District of Oregon.

In August 2021, a federal grand jury in Portland charged Denis Mihaqlovic Dubnikov, 29, a Russian citizen, for his role in an international cryptocurrency money laundering conspiracy.

According to the indictment, between at least August 2018 and August 2021, Dubnikov and his co-conspirators are alleged to have knowingly and intentionally laundered the proceeds of ransomware attacks on individuals and organizations throughout the United States and abroad. Specifically, Dubnikov and his accomplices laundered ransom payments extracted from victims of Ryuk ransomware attacks.

After receiving ransom payments, Ryuk actors, Dubnikov and his co-conspirators, and others involved in the scheme engaged in various financial transactions, including international financial transactions, to conceal the nature, source, location, ownership, and control of the ransom proceeds.

In July 2019, Dubnikov laundered more than $400,000 in Ryuk ransom proceeds. Those involved in the conspiracy laundered at least $70 million in ransom proceeds.

On November 2, 2021, Dubnikov was arrested in Amsterdam pursuant to a provisional arrest warrant.

Dubnikov made his initial appearance in federal court in the District of Oregon today before U.S. Magistrate Judge Jolie A. Russo. He was arraigned and pleaded not guilty. A five-day jury trial is scheduled to begin on October 4, 2022.

If convicted, Dubnikov faces a maximum sentence of 20 years in federal prison, three years’ supervised release, and a fine of $500,000.

First identified in August 2018, Ryuk is a type of ransomware software that, when executed on a computer or network, encrypts files and attempts to delete any system backups. Of note, Ryuk can target storage drives contained within or physically connected to a computer, including those accessible remotely via a network connection. Ryuk has been used to target thousands of victims worldwide across a variety of sectors. In October 2020, law enforcement officials specifically identified Ryuk as an imminent and increasing cybercrime threat to hospitals and healthcare providers in the United States.

This case was investigated by the FBI. It is being prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon.

Dubnikov’s extradition was handled by the Justice Department’s Office of International Affairs. He was transferred to the District of Oregon by the FBI.

Justice Department components who worked on this seizure coordinated their efforts through the department’s Ransomware and Digital Extortion Task Force, which was created to combat the growing number of ransomware and digital extortion attacks.

The Task Force prioritizes the disruption, investigation, and prosecution of ransomware and digital extortion activity by tracking and dismantling the development and deployment of malware, identifying the cybercriminals responsible, and holding those individuals accountable for their crimes. The Task Force also strategically targets the ransomware criminal ecosystem as a whole and collaborates with domestic and foreign government agencies as well as private sector partners to combat this significant criminal threat.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime. The defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt in a court of law.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

First pediatric monkeypox (hMPXV) case identified in Oregon
Oregon Health Authority - 08/17/22 11:57 AM

August 17, 2022

CORRECTION: This version corrects the subheadline that was included in an earlier version.

EDITORS: Health Officer and State Epidemiologist Dr. Dean Sidelinger will answer questions about the first pediatric monkeypox case during today’s media availability that OHA and the Oregon Department of Education are co-hosting at 1 p.m. Interested reporters can join via this link. A livestream will be available for the public on YouTube.

Media Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, Jonathan.N.Modie@dhsoha.state.or.us

First pediatric monkeypox (hMPXV) case identified in Oregon

Public health officials say child case is linked to previously confirmed case

PORTLAND, Ore. – Oregon Health Authority (OHA) is confirming the state’s first pediatric case of monkeypox virus (hMPXV).

OHA and county public health officials say the case is linked to an adult monkeypox infection that was confirmed last month.

“We have a known connection to a previously diagnosed case,” said Dean Sidelinger, M.D., health officer and state epidemiologist at OHA. “This child did not get the virus at school, child care or another community setting.”

To protect patient confidentiality, OHA is not disclosing the child’s sex, age, county of residence or how the child is connected to the previously diagnosed case.

The pediatric case is one of 116 presumptive and confirmed cases of monkeypox in Oregon, which also includes 112 men and four women. Illness onset ranges from June 7 to Aug. 9. The cases are in seven counties: four in Clackamas, one in Columbia, one in Coos, 20 in Lane, one in Marion, 73 in Multnomah and 16 in Washington. About 27.6% of cases identify as Hispanic/Latino.

Nationwide, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there are nearly 12,700 cases in 49 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico. They are among more than 38,000 cases in 93 countries.

The Oregon child was tested for monkeypox Aug. 11, and the test results were reported to public health Aug. 15. Since receiving test results, the local public health authority, with support from OHA, has been conducting a case investigation and contact tracing to determine whether there are other exposures. During these investigations, public health provides guidance on how to avoid spreading the virus to others and offers vaccines to close contacts.

Sidelinger acknowledged concerns of parents who are preparing to send their students back to school in the coming weeks, as monkeypox cases continue to rise in Oregon and other states. But he emphasized that risk of monkeypox spreading in school settings is low, since the most common means of person-to-person transmission is direct contact with the rash, scabs or body fluids of a person with the virus.

“Monkeypox is not COVID-19. This virus is not easily spread unless you have that prolonged, close, skin-to-skin contact with an infected person,” Sidelinger said.

Symptoms of the virus can include fever, swollen lymph nodes, chills, headache, muscle aches and fatigue. Not everyone will have these symptoms, but everyone will experience a rash or sores. The rash can affect the skin of the face, arms, legs and torso, as well as the genitals, in and/or around the anus (butthole), or in the mouth.

Initially, the rash can look like a pimple with an area of red skin underneath it. From there, the pimples can get a little bigger, form indentations, and fill with fluid or pus. Typically, they then scab. It usually takes two to four weeks to heal over with fresh skin.

OHA recommends people who test positive for monkeypox or who are awaiting test results isolate at home to avoid spread of infection to others. There are additional precautions they and household members can take to further reduce transmission risk that can be found on OHA’s If a clinician recommends that you receive an Orthopoxvirus test page. The CDC also has information on its Preventing Spread to Others page.

People who suspect they have monkeypox should contact their health care provider to let them know before going in to be seen. Those who don’t have a health care provider can call 2-1-1 to get help finding a clinic or health care provider, or reach out to their local public health authority to find a clinic or provider.

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Oregon's Unemployment Rate Holds Steady at 3.5% in July
Oregon Employment Department - 08/17/22 10:58 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: August 17, 2022


CONTACT INFORMATION: 
umenauer@employ.oregon.gov">Gail Krumenauer, State Employment Economist
(971) 301-3771
David Cooke, Economist (971) 375-5288
Video and Audio available at 10 a.m.
 

Oregon’s Unemployment Rate Holds Steady at 3.5% in July

Oregon’s unemployment rate was 3.5% in July, unchanged from 3.5%, as revised, in June. The U.S. unemployment rate was also 3.5% in July. Oregon’s unemployment rate has tracked very closely with the national unemployment rate for the past two years, with both rates declining rapidly during May 2020 through early 2022 as the economies recovered. Over the past five months, unemployment rates for the U.S. and Oregon have averaged 3.6%, near record lows dating back almost 50 years.

The labor market is tight, and many people have gotten back to work. Over the past two years, Oregon’s labor force participation rate rose rapidly. The share of the population 16 and older that is either employed or unemployed reached 63.5% in July, its highest rate in a decade.

In Oregon, nonfarm payroll employment grew by 4,200 in July, following gains averaging 6,300 jobs in the prior eight months. Monthly gains in July were largest in leisure and hospitality (+1,500 jobs), other services (+1,400), manufacturing (+1,300), and private educational services (+1,300). Retail trade (-700 jobs) was the only major industry that shed a substantial number of jobs.

As of July, Oregon has regained 94% of jobs lost at the onset of the pandemic. The U.S. has regained 100%. Oregon’s private sector is close to a full jobs recovery, having regained 99% of pandemic recession losses. However, Oregon’s government sector has only regained 49% of the jobs it lost during March through June 2020.

Professional and technical services was one of the fastest growing industries over the past two years. It added 1,900 jobs in July and has grown by 10,400 jobs since February 2020. Over the past 12 months, architectural and engineering services added 1,700 jobs, or 9.4%, which was the highest growth rate of the component industries within professional and technical services.

Retail trade has inched downward since late last year. In July, it dropped to 209,000 jobs, which is back to where it was in late 2016. Over the past 12 months, the weakest retail trade sectors were building material and garden supply stores (-1,700 jobs) and general merchandise stores (-2,400 jobs).

Next Press Releases

The Oregon Employment Department plans to release the July county and metropolitan area unemployment rates on Tuesday, Aug. 23, and the next statewide unemployment rate and employment survey data for August on Wednesday, Sept. 14.

 

Notes: 

All numbers in the above narrative are seasonally adjusted, except for the component industries within retail trade and professional and technical services.

The Oregon Employment Department and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) work cooperatively to develop and publish monthly Oregon payroll employment and labor force data. The estimates of monthly job gains and losses are based on a survey of businesses. The estimates of unemployment are based on a survey of households and other sources. 

The Oregon Employment Department publishes payroll employment estimates that are revised by using employment counts from employer unemployment insurance tax records. All department publications use this Official Oregon Series data unless noted otherwise. This month’s release incorporates the October, November and December 2021 tax records data. The department continues to make the original nonfarm payroll employment series available; these data are produced by the BLS.

 

The PDF version of the news release can be found at QualityInfo.org/press-release. To obtain the data in other formats such as in Excel, visit QualityInfo.org, then within the top banner, select Economic Data, then choose LAUS or CES. To request the press release as a Word document, contact the person shown at the top of this press release. 

To file a claim for unemployment benefits or get more information about unemployment programs, visit Oregon.gov/employ

The Oregon Employment Department (OED) is an equal opportunity agency. Everyone has a right to use OED programs and services. OED provides free help. Some examples are: Sign language and spoken language interpreters, written materials in other languages, braille, large print, audio and other formats. If you need help, please call 971-673-6400. TTY users call 711. You can also ask for help at OED_Communications@employ.oregon.gov.

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Attached Media Files: 2022-08/930/156791/employment_in_Oregon_--_July_2022_--_press_release.pdf

Bend fire announces procession information for Harro Brothers
Bend Fire & Rescue - 08/17/22 10:47 AM

Bend Fire & Rescue has announced that the procession carrying Engineer Daniel Harro and his twin brother Mark Harro home to Bend will pass through town on Highway 20/Greenwood Avenue today, Wednesday August 17, sometime between 4:15 and 4:45pm. The Harro brothers will be transported home from Idaho by a Bend Fire & Rescue medic unit and escorted by Bend Fire & Rescue personnel. They will be escorted to the Idaho border by the Idaho State Police and then escorted by the Oregon State Police home to Bend. 
Those wishing to pay their respects to the Harro families by viewing the procession are encouraged to line the sidewalks of NE Greenwood Avenue between 8th Street and 12th Street. There is ample street parking along the Greenwood Avenue side streets, and Bend Fire encourages people to respect the designated parking lots of local businesses and maintain a safe distance from the roadway as traffic will be flowing normally on both ends of the procession. On-duty Bend Fire & Rescue crews will be staged at the Pilot Butte Drive-In, 917 NE Greenwood, to view the procession. 
The public should expect traffic congestion in the area of Niswonger-Reynolds Funeral Home on Irving Avenue during that time as well, as fire apparatus break free from the procession and return to quarters. Bend Police and Public Works may temporarily close streets near the funeral home to assist with traffic congestion from fire apparatus. We thank our community for their patience and support during this difficult time for our organization and the Harro families. 


Annual maintenance fees for mining claims due Sept. 1
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 08/17/22 9:56 AM

PORTLAND, Ore- Bureau of Land Management (BLM) officials remind mining claimants that annual maintenance fees are due on Thursday, September 1, 2022. The fee is required for claimants who hold unpatented mining claims or sites on Federal lands and wish to retain those claims on public lands through the 2023 assessment year. If a claimant is unable to pay the fee, they can file a Maintenance Fee Waiver Certification (Small Miner’s Waiver) by the same date. If the BLM does not receive a payment or waiver certification postmarked on or before Sept. 1, the mining claim will be declared forfeit and void.

A mining claim is a parcel of land for which the claimant has asserted a right of possession and the right to develop and extract a discovered, valuable, mineral deposit. This right does not include exclusive surface rights (see Public Law 84-167).  Generally, claimants are required to do annual assessment work on a mining claim.  Paying the maintenance fee replaces this requirement, while ensuring the claimant is still invested in the claim.  

“Mineral development is an important land use within the BLM's multiple-use mandate,” said Todd Curtis, the BLM Deputy State Director for Resources, Lands and Minerals. “In communities across the country, mining provides jobs, economic activity and important commodities that are essential to maintain a high quality of life.”

This year, the BLM posted the annual reminder packet online at: Oregon-Washington - Mining and Minerals | Bureau of Land Management (blm.gov). It was not sent out in a hard copy.

Therefore, we encourage submission of mining claim filings by mail or online through the Mineral and Land Records System (MLRS) at https://mlrs.blm.gov/s/.  Most mining claim filings and payments may be submitted in MLRS except for the Maintenance Fee Waiver Certification. Waiver certifications must be mailed to the office .

The BLM Oregon/Washington State Office is available to assist by phone at (503) 808-6001 (option 2), or by email at BLM_OR_SO_Land_Office_Mail@blm.gov.  

You can send the original copy of Maintenance Fee Waiver Certification and/or other filings and payments to the Oregon/Washington State Office:

 

By USPS at:

Bureau of Land Management

Attn: Mining Claims  

PO Box 2965

Portland, OR 97208

 

For packets sent by FedEx or UPS, the street address is

Bureau of Land Management

Attn: Mining Claims 

1220 S.W. 3rd Avenue

Portland, OR 97204

 

The Oregon/Washington State Office public room in Portland remains temporarily closed to in-person visits.  However, the mail is being regularly checked and processed in order of receipt. 

-BLM- 

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 western states, including Alaska, on behalf of the American people. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. Our mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. 


Tue. 08/16/22
Praxis Health - Voted Best of Central Oregon For The 5th Year In A Row! (Photo)
Praxis Health - 08/16/22 5:16 PM
Praxis Health - Voted Best of Central Oregon 2022
Praxis Health - Voted Best of Central Oregon 2022
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/6977/156772/thumb_Facebook_Praxis_Best_Of_Oregon_(Single_Photo)_Post_2022.png

Central Oregon  – Praxis Health is proud to have been voted Best Medical Group of Central Oregon for the fifth year in a row (The Source Weekly). We are honored by this tremendous achievement and wanted to thank all of our patients and devoted staff. We could not have achieved this milestone without each one of you.


We believe that excellent health care begins with a meaningful, long-lasting relationship between a patient and their care team. We achieve this by compassionately listening to our patient’s personal needs, wants, desires, and goals so that the patient and their family are central to the care and medical process. This can mean putting the patient's needs, as they define them, at the forefront of the services we provide. We are truly honored by the people who choose us as partners on their health care journey.


Praxis Health is rooted in our local communities and our goal is to remain connected to the people and places as we continue to grow. Our staff will continue to trailblaze a path towards delightful patient experiences for people who live, work, and play in Central Oregon. 


We promise to continue to deliver outstanding, personalized care to all of our patients while honoring the needs of each community that we serve. For more information about us, please visit our website at GoPraxisHealth.com.
 




Attached Media Files: Praxis Health - Voted Best of Central Oregon 2022 , Praxis Health - Voted Best of Central Oregon 2022

The Teagle Foundation & Arthur Vining Davis Foundations Award Transfer Pathways Implementation Grant to The Alliance
Oregon Alliance of Independent Colleges & Universities - 08/16/22 4:08 PM

TUALATIN, OR – The Oregon Alliance of Independent Colleges and Universities (The Alliance) has been awarded a three-year, $321,200 implementation grant by the Teagle Foundation and Arthur Vining Davis Foundations in support of their work on the Oregon Transfer Pathways to the Liberal Arts (OTP-LA) project.

The Alliance represents regionally-accredited, private, nonprofit colleges and universities across the state of Oregon. Together, with colleagues from ten of The Alliance’s liberal arts institution partners and Oregon’s 17 community colleges, they will build on a 2020 planning grant to develop clear, curricular pathways between Oregon’s community colleges and private, liberal arts institutions. The ten Alliance member institutions participating in the Oregon Transfer Pathways to the Liberal Arts work are: Bushnell University, Corban University, George Fox University, Lewis & Clark College, Linfield University, Multnomah University, Pacific University, University of Portland, Warner Pacific University, and Willamette University.

The Alliance and partners seek to create and build on existing consortium-level degree pathways that ensure students’ ability to transfer credits from a community college to an Alliance member institution in a clear, efficient, and consistent manner, paving the way to timely completion of bachelor’s degree programs. As part of this project, The Alliance and its members will establish a guarantee of admission to students who complete the Oregon Transfer Module (OTM) or earn an Associate of Arts Oregon Transfer (AAOT) or Associate of Science Oregon Transfer (ASOT) degree at an Oregon community college. This will help reduce the number of credits lost in transfer and create a clear path for students to enroll in an Alliance college or university. The first four disciplines that The Alliance and partners will focus on are biology, English/writing, mathematics, and psychology.

“We are grateful to The Teagle Foundation and Arthur Vining Davis Foundations for providing this opportunity for Oregon’s private, nonprofit colleges and universities to expand the quality and breadth of educational offerings for community college transfer students,” said Alliance President Brent Wilder. “We are eager to continue demonstrating the value and relevance of Oregon’s private colleges in a rapidly-changing higher education climate.”

With the confidence and support of The Teagle Foundation and The Arthur Vining Davis Foundations, The Alliance and its partners look forward to strengthening efforts to facilitate transfer as part of the community college student’s successful journey towards earning their bachelor’s degree.

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The Oregon Alliance of Independent Colleges and Universities (“The Alliance”) is comprised of 12 private, nonprofit, independent colleges and universities in the state of Oregon. These institutions deliver high-quality experiential learning with high-impact teaching strategies. The Alliance is the collective voice of Oregon’s independent, nonprofit higher education sector. For more information, visit www.oaicu.org.


Immunization Policy Advisory Team (IPAT) meets September 1 via Zoom
Oregon Health Authority - 08/16/22 3:14 PM

August 16, 2022

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Immunization Policy Advisory Team (IPAT) meets September 1 via Zoom

What: Meeting of Oregon’s Immunization Policy Advisory Team (IPAT).

Agenda: Draft agenda items include:

  • Public comment (see process below);
  • Update on school immunizations;
  • Epidemiology update: COVID, hMPXv (human monkeypox virus), Polio, tetanus;
  • ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS) update;
  • Future of COVID update from the COVID Response & Recovery Unit (CRRU);
  • “Let’s Play Catch Up”: what we know and plans for routine and COVID vaccination efforts;
  • Final agenda will be available at meeting or via email request three days prior to the meeting date by contacting info@state.or.us .

When: Thursday, September 1, 12:00-2:00pm.

Where: Virtually via Zoom meeting – Register in advance for this meeting:

https://www.zoomgov.com/meeting/register/vJItcuqorzsoHxgNSP3BgpkjhMRwuYYCNos

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the meeting. Be sure to watch for that confirmation – you will need it to join the meeting.

Public comment is welcomed and encouraged. The purpose of public comment is to help inform IPAT members. Anyone interested in submitting public comment is invited to do so. All written comment received by noon on Friday, August 26 will be shared with IPAT voting members and staff prior to the meeting on September 1.

If you prefer to provide your comment during the meeting, please notify Anne Vancuren at imm.info@dhsoha.state.or.us before noon on Friday, August 26th. We have 15 minutes on the agenda for public comment, allowing three minutes each for five people. If we receive more than five requests for live public comment, we will choose the five via lottery. If you are not chosen, you are encouraged to submit your comment in writing by the same deadline on August 26.

Background: The Oregon Immunization Program works to reduce the incidence of vaccine-preventable disease in Oregon. Our staff members identify and promote evidence-informed public health best practices to both the public and health care professionals throughout the state. For more information, visit the program’s website: www.healthoregon.org/IMM.

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact 711 TTY or imm.info@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


 


OHA and ODE hold media briefing Wednesday on COVID-19 and the 2022-2023 school year
Oregon Health Authority - 08/16/22 1:23 PM

Aug. 16, 2022

Contact: OHA External Relations, orCOVID19.media@odhsoha.oregon.gov

OHA and ODE hold media briefing Wednesday on COVID-19 and the 2022-2023 school year

PORTLAND, Ore. — Oregon Health Authority (OHA) and Oregon Department of Education (ODE) are co-hosting a COVID-19 media availability on Wednesday, Aug. 17, from 1-2 p.m., via Zoom.

Dean Sidelinger, M.D. MSEd, health officer and state epidemiologist at OHA, will provide an update on the state’s pandemic response and the importance of COVID-19 vaccines and routine childhood immunizations. Colt Gill, director of ODE, will highlight what families and students can expect with COVID-19 planning and in-person instruction for the academic year. Both will be available to answer reporters’ questions.

Interested reporters can join via this link. A livestream will be available for the public on YouTube.

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Registration open for the Oregon Main Street Conference in Klamath Falls, October 5-7
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 08/16/22 10:59 AM

"Engage-Inspire-Empower” is the theme of the 2022 Oregon Main Street Conference that will take place October 5-7 in downtown Klamath Falls at the Ross Ragland Theater and Ragland Cultural Center.

Through inspired leadership, main street programs throughout Oregon are helping to increase the vitality of historic downtowns and traditional commercial districts. The conference theme reflects the goals of Main Street communities to engage people from all walks of life, inspire their communities towards enhancement, and empower leaders to make a difference.

The 2022 Oregon Main Street Conference is a great way to look at the “big picture” of why our main street districts are so incredibly important to the health and well-being of local communities – physically, economically, and socially. Sessions cover a variety of topics for both beginners and those with experience. The format includes keynotes, interactive workshops, and networking time.  

The opening keynote will feature Mary Means who is best known for leading the team that created the National Main Street Center. More than 1,600 towns and historic neighborhood corridors in 45 states have successfully used the Main Street Approach™ to bring people back to their historic cores. Mary is the author of Main Street's Comeback and How It Can Come Back Again, published in 2020. 

Also featured is Andrew Howard with Team Better Block. He is internationally respected for his people focused design approach and rapid-implementation strategies that are being replicated around the world. Howard’s overarching goal is to equip new leaders to take action in their communities. 

Staff and volunteers of organizations focusing on downtown historic preservation and economic development, downtown business and property owners, government leaders, chamber of commerce professionals and volunteers, and others with an interest in the future of downtown will benefit from attending this conference.

 “We want to thank everyone who has participated in the planning or offered to help with the conference, including our amazing local partner the Klamath Falls Downtown Association,” said Sheri Stuart, coordinator of the Oregon Main Street Network. “The community has been very welcoming and responsive.”

Oregon Main Street is part of Oregon Heritage in Oregon Park and Recreation Department.

For more information about the Oregon Main Street Conference, visit

www.oregonmainstreet.org or contact Sheri Stuart at i.stuart@oprd.oregon.gov">sheri.stuart@oprd.oregon.gov or 503.986.0679.


First Responders Compete in Battle of the Badges Blood Drive
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 08/16/22 10:47 AM

Salem Fire and Police go above and beyond call of duty to help prevent blood shortage

Portland, Ore (August 16, 2022) — Salem, Oregon first responders are gearing up to see which department can recruit the most blood donors during the American Red Cross Battle of the Badges blood drive competition on August 17th and 18th at the Salem Police Department, 333 Division Street NE, from 8:30 a.m. - 1:30 p.m.

During the Battle of the Badges Blood drive Salem Police and Salem Fire Departments will compete to see who can recruit the most blood donors. The blood drive encourages community members to join local first responders to help save lives. At the blood drive, donors will vote for their favorite agency after they donate and the winning team of first responders is announced at the end of the drive on day two.

“We, and our public safety partners at Salem Police, love a good challenge, but for this battle, the clear champions are the community members who will be rolling up their sleeves with us to respond to this great need,” said Brian Carrara, Deputy Fire Chief, Salem Fire Department.

The American Red Cross has faced a concerning drop in blood and platelet donations this summer causing the blood supply to shrink nearly 20% last month.

“Saving lives and helping others has always been the top priority for our first responders and with the Red Cross seeing a dip in donations this summer, this event is more important than ever,” said Angel Montes, Donor Services Executive, Red Cross Cascades Region. “By helping replenish the blood supply, first responders go above and beyond the call of duty.”

Not able to donate during the Salem Battle of the Badges? Visit one of the drives below: 

Upcoming blood donation opportunities Aug. 16-31:

8/17

  • Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints 3017 NW 18th Ave., Camas, WA, 2pm – 7pm
  • Concorde Career College Portland, 1425 NE Irving St., Building 100, 10:30am-4pm

8/19

  • Peoples Community Federal Credit Union, 7403 NE Hazel Dell Ave Vancouver, WA, 10am - 3pm
  • Milwaukie Community Center, 5440 SE Kellogg Creek Dr., 9:30am-2:30pm

8/22

  • First United Methodist Church-Ashland, 175 N. Main St., 10am-3pm
  • Little Big Burger – Beaverton, 12345 SW Horizon Blvd #41, 11am-5pm

8/25

  • Queen of Peace Catholic Church- Salem, 4227 Lone Oak Rd SE, 12pm-6pm

8/29

  • Starbucks Springfield3348 Gateway St., 10am-4pm

To find a blood donation site near you, visit www.redcrossblood.org and enter your zip code.

As a thank-you, all who come to give Aug. 1-31 will be automatically entered for a chance to win gas for a year, a $6,000 value. There will be three lucky winners. Everyone who comes to give blood or platelets in August will also receive a $10 e-gift card to a merchant of choice. Donors can schedule an appointment to give using the Red Cross Blood Donor App, by visiting RedCrossBlood.org or by calling 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767).  

Blood drive safety 

The Red Cross follows a high standard of safety and infection control. The Red Cross will continue to socially distance wherever possible at blood drives, donation centers and facilities. While donors are no longer required to wear a face mask, individuals may choose to continue to wear a mask for any reason. The Red Cross will also adhere to more stringent face mask requirements per state and/or local guidance, or at the request of blood drive sponsors. Donors are asked to schedule an appointment prior to arriving at a drive.  

Oregon and Washington still require face masks be worn at all blood drives and donation sites.

About the American Red Cross:

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides comfort to victims of disasters; supplies about 40% of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; distributes international humanitarian aid; and supports veterans, military members and their families. The Red Cross is a nonprofit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to deliver its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or CruzRojaAmericana.org, or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.

 

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Terms apply. Visit rcblood.org/fuel for details. 


Death Investigation Highway 30 -- Clatsop County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 08/16/22 8:57 AM
2022-08/1002/156765/Press_Release_Vehcile_Photo.JPG
2022-08/1002/156765/Press_Release_Vehcile_Photo.JPG
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On Saturday, August 13, 2022, at about 2:30 AM, Oregon State Police Troopers responded to a death investigation on Highway 30 near milepost 89.  Upon arrival Troopers located a deceased male, identified as Kevin Lilly (32) of Portland. 

The Oregon State Police and Clatsop County Major Crime Team responded to the scene.  Investigators are requesting anyone who may have information or saw a maroon Mercedes passenger car between 12:00 AM – 2:30 AM in the area to please contact the Oregon State Police at OSP (677) or 800-442-0776.  Reference Case Number SP22-210574.

The Clatsop County Major Crime Team is comprised of agencies from the Oregon State Police, Clatsop County Sheriff’s Office, Astoria Police Department, Seaside Police Department, Cannon Beach Police Department and the Clatsop County District Attorney’s Office. 

There is no risk to public safety regarding this investigation.

Photograph provided by OSP.

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Attached Media Files: 2022-08/1002/156765/Press_Release_Vehcile_Photo.JPG

Fatal Crash Interstate 5 -- Marion County
Oregon State Police - 08/16/22 8:22 AM

On Monday August 15, 2022, at about 2:40 PM, Oregon State Police (OSP) Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two-vehicle crash on Interstate 5 SB near milepost 277. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Honda Civic, operated by Jacob Hernandez-Arellano, age (18), of Salem, was driving southbound and made a lane change from the left lane to the middle lane into the path of a 2015 Freightliner semi-truck with trailer, operated by Jasvir Singh, age (52), of Yuba City, California. The vehicles crashed and came to rest a short distance away in the right lane and shoulder. 

Hernandez-Arellano was pronounced deceased at the scene by emergency personnel.  A juvenile passenger in the Honda Civic received non-life threatening injuries and was transported to the Salem Memorial Hospital.  Singh was not injured.

Southbound Interstate 5 was closed for about 2 ½ hours. 

OSP was assisted by Life Flight, Aurora Fire, Metro West Ambulance, Falck Ambulance, TVFR, Woodburn Fire, and ODOT.

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Triple Fatal Crash US 101 -- Lincoln County
Oregon State Police - 08/16/22 7:21 AM

On Monday August 15, 2022, at about 10:40 AM, Oregon State Police (OSP) Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two-vehicle crash on US 101 near milepost 122. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that a southbound Chevrolet S-10 Blazer operated by, Matthew Phillips, age (31), of Otis, crossed the center line of the highway and struck a northbound Freightliner Dump Truck operated by, Claude Segerson, age (69), of Otis.  The Chevrolet S-10 Blazer came to rest in the northbound lane and the Freightliner Dump Truck left the roadway and went down an embankment. 

Phillips and his passenger, Christopher Padilla, age (30), of Otis, as well as Segerson were all pronounced deceased at the scene by emergency personnel. 

US 101 was closed for about six (6) hours. 

OSP was assisted by ODOT, Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office, Newport Police Department, Lincoln City Police Department, North Lincoln Fire and OSP/LCSO Chaplains. 

 

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Mon. 08/15/22
Fatal Crash Highway 293 -- Wasco County (Update Names Released)
Oregon State Police - 08/15/22 7:00 PM

The names of the occupants involved in the August 10, 2022 crash are:

Elijah Wilson, age 23, from Salem (Driver)

Tabitha Scott, age 24, from Newberg (Passenger)

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Previous Release:

On August 10, 2022, at about 6:30 PM, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Highway 293 near milepost 8. 

Preliminary investigation revealed a Chevrolet Cobalt, operated by an unknown adult male, was southbound and for unknown reasons left the roadway going down an embankment where it crashed into a tree.  The final resting spot of the crash was on private property.  The unknown adult male and an unknown adult female passenger were declared deceased at the scene by emergency personnel. 

The crash was reported to emergency personnel by a landowner who found the vehicle on his property.  It is unknown when the crash happened.  It was learned that the involved vehicle had been reported stolen earlier in the day from Fossil. 

Troopers are attempting to identify both occupants.

OSP was assisted by Shaniko Fire, Jefferson County Fire, ODOT and several landowners. 

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Additional Arrests Made in SE Bend Long-Term Investigation (Photo)
Bend Police Dept. - 08/15/22 4:55 PM
Press Release
Press Release
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Date: August 15, 2022

Case #: 2022-00044998

Incident: Outstanding Suspect Arrested in SE Bend Long-Term Investigation 

Date / Time of Incident: August 15, 2022 / 2:14 p.m. 

Location: 20636 Foxborough Lane

Arrested: Erick Sean Kelly, 27-year-old Bend resident 
Charges: Mail theft – four counts
Frequenting a place where controlled substances are used, kept or sold
Delivery of a Schedule II controlled substance – fentanyl
Multiple warrants

Arrested: Chelsea Catherine Kelly, 25-year-old Bend resident
Charges: Frequenting a place where controlled substances are used, kept or sold
Multiple warrants 

Arrested: Christine Elaine Witham, 30-year-old Bend resident 
Charges: Theft III
Possession and delivery of a Schedule II controlled substance – fentanyl
Possession of methamphetamine – misdemeanor
Tampering with evidence
Frequenting a place where controlled substances are used, kept or sold

Arrested: Charles Anthony Mansfield, 33-year-old Bend resident
Charges: Probation violation
Frequenting a place where controlled substances are used, kept or sold 

Cited and released: Brittany Nichole Miller, 35-year-old Bend resident
Kamilla Makenzie Thomas, 21-year-old Bend resident
Laura Lenore Wattenbarger, 37-year-old Bend resident
Sierra Jodi Connell, 24-year-old Bend resident
Charge: Frequenting a place where controlled substances are used, kept or sold

On Aug. 1, the Central Oregon Emergency Response Team served a search warrant at 20636 Foxborough Lane as part of a monthslong investigation into drug activity. The search warrant was based on the illegal sale of drugs, possession of stolen property, and unlawful possession of a firearm. A handgun, a pepper ball gun, and numerous stolen items were seized during the search. 

During that initial search warrant, officers arrested Chelsea Catherine Kelly, 25, and Clayton T. Kirkey, 36, at the home on Foxborough Lane. Hayden Riley Jeffrey Liapes, 29, was also issued a citation. Christine Elaine Witham, 30, was released pending additional investigation at that time. 

An additional suspect, Erick Sean Kelly, 27, was not located during the initial search warrant execution. 

Bend Police continued to investigate the case, and on Sunday, Aug. 14, learned from Deschutes County Sheriff’s deputies that Erick Kelly and Witham were suspects in a shoplifting incident in the La Pine area. Bend Police located Witham, and a search of her vehicle turned up nearly 400 fentanyl pills, criminal amounts of methamphetamine, evidence of drug sales and distribution, $1,200 in cash, and stolen property. Witham was arrested and lodged in the Deschutes County Adult Jail on the charges listed above. 

On Monday, Aug. 15, Bend Police officers, with assistance from Deschutes County Sheriff’s deputies, observed Erick Kelly and Chelsea Kelly enter the Foxborough Lane home. Officers made contact, but the suspects refused to come out of the home. Bend Police applied for and received a search warrant, then entered the home. 

Officers arrested Erick Kelly on outstanding warrants, as well as the charges listed above. They arrested Chelsea Kelly on multiple warrants, as well as Charles Anthony Mansfield on a probation violation and frequenting a place where controlled substances are used, kept or sold. They were all transported to and lodged at the Deschutes County Adult Jail. Brittany Nichole Miller, Kamilla Makenzie Thomas, Laura Lenore Wattenbarger and Sierra Jodi Connell were at the home and were all cited and released for frequenting a place where controlled substances are used, kept or sold. 




Attached Media Files: Press Release

Oregon Man Sentenced to Federal Prison for Kidnapping Ex-Girlfriend
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 08/15/22 4:22 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A Oregon man was sentenced to federal prison today for kidnapping his ex-girlfriend and transporting her from her home in Ilwalco, Washington to Rainier, Oregon.

James Donald Cooley, 61, a resident of Rainier, was sentenced to 120 months in federal prison and three years’ supervised release.

According to court documents, on May 18, 2020, Cooley traveled from his home in Rainier to his ex-girlfriend’s home in Ilwalco without notice or invitation. After parking his vehicle on the side of Highway 101 near his ex-girlfriend’s home, Cooley approached the woman and a confrontation ensued. Cooley grabbed the woman’s arms, tied her hands with zip ties, and began pulling her toward the highway. Cooley drug the woman several hundred feet to his vehicle, put a knife to her throat, shoved her into the backseat, and began driving back to Rainier, threatening to kill her several times en route.

When Cooley arrived at his residence, his sister, who also lives in Rainier, spotted Cooley’s ex-girlfriend at his residence. The ex-girlfriend told Cooley’s sister that she feared Cooley was going to kill her. Cooley’s sister immediately contacted the Columbia County Sheriff’s Office to report the incident. Sheriff deputies responded and arrested Cooley.

On June 17, 2020, Cooley was charged by criminal complaint with kidnapping. On February 11, 2022, Cooley waived indictment and pleaded guilty to the single charge.

This case was investigated by the FBI with assistance from Columbia County Sheriff’s Office. It was prosecuted by Greg Nyhus, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the U.S. Attorney’s Office in the District of Oregon.

Domestic violence involving a current or former partner is a serious crime that includes both physical and emotional abuse. Sometimes these crimes are hidden from public view with survivors suffering in silence, afraid to seek help or not knowing where to turn. The traumatic effects of domestic violence also extend beyond the abused person, impacting family members and communities.

If you or someone you know are in immediate danger, please call 911.

If you need assistance or know someone who needs help, please contact the National Domestic Violence Hotline by calling 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) or texting “START” to 88788. Many communities throughout the country have also developed support networks to assist survivors in the process of recovery.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Director Bell emphasizes state, local partnership at Oregon Mayors Conference panel discussion on homelessness (Photo)
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 08/15/22 3:50 PM
Oregon Housing and Community Services Director Andrea Bell (second from right) addresses the audience at the annual Oregon Mayors Association Conference at the Best Western Plus in Lincoln City on August 12, 2022. Other panelists included (from left) Nort
Oregon Housing and Community Services Director Andrea Bell (second from right) addresses the audience at the annual Oregon Mayors Association Conference at the Best Western Plus in Lincoln City on August 12, 2022. Other panelists included (from left) Nort
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LINCOLN CITY, Ore. — In a panel discussion on homelessness with local leaders on Friday, August 10, Oregon Housing and Community Services Director Andrea Bell outlined what the state is doing to prevent and end homelessness.

“We are continuing to focus on supply, supply, supply—supply of affordable housing,” she said at the annual Oregon Mayors Association Summer Conference. “We don’t have enough affordable housing and haven’t had enough for a very long time. We also need to open up that stock of affordable housing by opening up pathways to homeownership. At the same time, we need to focus on preservation of affordable housing.”

Accompanied on the panel by North Bend Mayor Jessica Engelke and Gresham Mayor Travis Stovall, who provided their own cities’ experiences and efforts, Bell emphasized the importance of partnership between leaders on the state and local level. 

“We’ve been able to make some collective strides,” Bell said. “It’s not just because of the state. It is primarily because of the partnerships we have with leaders, with leaders like yourselves, with leaders of these communities who are actually doing this work on the ground.”

Permanent supportive housing is one area where progress is being made. In 2019, OHCS set out to increase the number of new units by 1,000 by 2023. That goal has not only been met but exceeded a year early with more than 1,200 created across the state. 

Working with local governments to fund and build navigation centers is another way these partnerships have worked to get things done. It is these innovative solutions that have proven to be—and will continue to be—real solutions and pathways to help get people out of unsheltered homelessness and into permanent homeownership, Bell said. 

Although progress has been made, there is still much to be done. 

“We are here today because we do not accept homelessness is a fact of life; we do not accept housing instability as a fact of life,” Bell said. “And so that’s great, but what are we going to do about it?”

One of the agencies’ priorities is to quickly work to increase the statewide supply of affordable housing options. OHCS is more than 80% of the way to meeting the Statewide Housing Plan goal to fund 25,000 affordable rental homes with more than 21,000 in the pipeline. 

In addition to preparing to ask the Legislature for $800 million in funding for the 2023-25 biennium to sustain homeless services and eviction prevention, among its other programs, OHCS will continue to listen for feedback from local governments. 

“The reality is that at the end of the day, our job, our responsibility is to the people of Oregon and to all of you to have what you need from us.” 




Attached Media Files: Oregon Housing and Community Services Director Andrea Bell (second from right) addresses the audience at the annual Oregon Mayors Association Conference at the Best Western Plus in Lincoln City on August 12, 2022. Other panelists included (from left) Nort

Bend Firefighter Dies In Plane Crash (Photo)
Bend Fire & Rescue - 08/15/22 3:48 PM
Engineer Daniel Harro
Engineer Daniel Harro
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/6802/156755/thumb_9E85157A-6F98-4FB7-960C-08584DD2977A.jpeg

Bend Fire & Rescue was struck with the tragic loss of a dedicated member on the morning of Monday, August 15, 2022. Engineer Daniel Harro, 38, was killed in a small plane crash near Yellow Pine, ID. The cause of the crash is unknown at this time and is under investigation by local authorities.  Engineer Harro and his twin brother Mark were returning to Bend from a back-country plane camping trip near McCall, ID. Daniel was the plane’s pilot and an avid flight enthusiast. He is survived by his wife, Elisif. “This is a devastating loss for our family.” said Bend Fire Chief Todd Riley. “Daniel was well-loved and well-respected by everyone who worked with him. We will miss his presence every day.” 

Harro, who had previously worked for the Scappoose Fire Department, began his career with Bend Fire on January 13, 2014 as a Firefighter/Paramedic. Daniel quickly established himself as a proven leader, and became heavily involved with the Bend Fire & Rescue specialty Rescue Team as well as serving on the Bend Professional Firefighter’s Local 227 Executive Board. A strong paramedic, Harro worked with department administrators and physician advisors to assist in the updating of Emergency Medical Service (EMS) protocols, maintaining Bend Fire & Rescue as a top-level provider of emergency medical services in the state of Oregon.

The Bend Fire Department family is shocked and heartbroken by this tragedy. Bend Fire & Rescue administrative staff and Local 227 representatives are coordinating active member honor services for Engineer Harro with the Oregon Fire Service Honor Guard and the Harro family. 




Attached Media Files: Engineer Daniel Harro

Public Health Advisory Board Strategic Data Plan Subcommittee meets Tuesday, Aug. 16, via Zoom
Oregon Health Authority - 08/15/22 2:38 PM

August 15, 2022

Media Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, Jonathan.N.Modie@dhsoha.state.or.us

Public Health Advisory Board Strategic Data Plan Subcommittee meets Tuesday, Aug. 16, via Zoom

What: A public meeting of the Strategic Data Plan Subcommittee of the Public Health Advisory Board.

Agenda: Discuss what was learned from previous work; discuss and develop a new framework for the PHAB Strategic Data Plan.

When: Tuesday, Aug. 16, 1-2 p.m. A public comment period is offered at the end of the meeting.

Where: Zoom conference call:

(669) 254-5252, participant code: 1605421162#.

Background: Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan. The Strategic Data Plan subcommittee develops recommendations for a plan that is grounded in equity and centers community values and experiences. 

For more information, see the board's website.

Program contact: Cara Biddlecom, a.m.biddlecom@state.or.us">cara.m.biddlecom@state.or.us, 971-673-2284.

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Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact: Cara Biddlecom at 971-673-2284, 711 TTY, or a.m.biddlecom@state.or.us">cara.m.biddlecom@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon Nurses File Wage Theft Lawsuit Against Providence
Oregon Nurses Assn. - 08/15/22 1:33 PM

More than 200 Oregon Nurses Association (ONA) members have joined a class action lawsuit against Providence to address Providence’s systemic failure to pay workers the wages they’ve earned.

(Portland, OR) – An Oregon Nurses Association (ONA) member leader filed a class action lawsuit against Providence St. Joseph Health for wage theft today seeking injunctive relief to stop Providence from continuing to shortchange frontline health care workers. In addition, more than 200 ONA members have provided notice of intent to seek monetary damages, including back pay, through the class action. The goal of the lawsuit is to recover lost wages and damages incurred by thousands of frontline health care workers at Providence following Providence’s move to a faulty payroll system.

In July, Providence switched to a new Genesis payroll system which systematically underpays nurses and other frontline health care workers. This has led to lost wages and benefits for nurses and frontline health care workers including but not limited to: unpaid hours; unpaid overtime; unpaid differentials; unpaid certification pay; and other lost hours and benefits. Individual impacts range from nurses missing a few dollars to workers missing entire paychecks. 

ONA represents more than 4,000 frontline nurses working in 10 Providence Health System hospitals and facilities from Portland to Medford. Hundreds of nurses and other frontline health care workers at all 10 Providence Oregon facilities have been negatively impacted by Providence’s wage theft. 

“It would be a problem if this happened to a handful of workers. This is an out-and-out disaster. Providence is paying frontline nurses and health care workers pennies on the dollar and keeping the difference. This is a multi-billion dollar company cheating nurses and working families out of their hard-earned livelihoods. Robbing workers of the money they rely on for food, rent and basic needs is unacceptable," said ONA Executive Committee Chair at Providence Portland Medical Center Richard Botterill, RN. ”It’s a simple solution. Providence needs to pay frontline health care workers the money they’ve earned.” 

Today’s class action lawsuit seeks to recover lost wages and damages owed to all workers at Providence including nurses, allied health workers, technicians, housekeepers, food services staff, doctors and other workers who have suffered from Providence’s failure to pay workers the wages they are owed. More than 200 frontline nurses who are victims of Providence’s wage theft have already signed on to the class action lawsuit and thousands of other nurses and health care workers have been negatively impacted by Providence’s unpaid wages. Workers who have been victims of Providence’s wage theft but who are not named in the lawsuit will still benefit from a fair settlement. The lawsuit is filed in Multnomah County Circuit Court. While the exact amount of theft is too large to determine without a comprehensive audit, lost wages and penalties could be in the millions. 

ONA nurses at all 10 ONA Providence bargaining units have also filed grievances against Providence. The grievances offer Providence another way to correct its wage theft by demanding Providence immediately:

  • Reinstate the prior payroll system as a backup to ensure payroll records are accurate and to prevent Providence from continuing to underpay frontline nurses and health care workers.
  • Conduct a comprehensive audit of all time card records since the implementation of the Genesis payroll system to determine and correct all improper wage deductions and restore any lost benefits including potential lost paid time off (PTO).
  • Pay direct and indirect damages to all workers affected by Providence’s improper wage deductions, including but not limited to banking overdraft fees, fines for missed rent or mortgage payments and credit card late payment penalties.

ONA brought concerns about Providence’s payroll system change to management months ago. Providence assured nurses the system had been thoroughly tested. As frontline workers began losing pay and continued raising concerns–including filing more than 90,000 HR payroll tickets pointing out Providence’s mistakes–Providence management again assured nurses the problems would be quickly fixed. However, nurses and workers have now gone more than 3 full pay periods without a comprehensive resolution.  

Nurses and health care workers have incurred debt and shouldered added financial stress because of Providence’s systemic theft and incompetence. Providence has the responsibility to make these nurses and workers whole. 
Providence St. Joseph Health is the third-largest health system in the US and one of the largest employers and companies in Oregon with tens of billions in annual revenue. Despite its national reach, Providence regularly collects more than half of its total profits from Oregonians. 

The Oregon Nurses Association (ONA) is the state’s largest and most influential nursing organization. We are a professional association and labor union which represents more than 15,000 nurses and allied health workers throughout the state, including more than 4,000 nurses working at 10 Providence Oregon health care facilities throughout the state. ONA’s mission is to advocate for nursing, quality health care and healthy communities. For more information visit: www.OregonRN.org.

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Oregon Department of Forestry dousing fires quickly thanks to more people and equipment
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/15/22 1:00 PM

SALEM, Ore.— “Frankly, our people have been kicking butt,” said the Oregon Department of Forestry’s Tim Holschbach, Deputy Chief of Policy and Planning for the Fire Protection Division.

As of today, ODF Districts have suppressed 418 fires, and held them to 582 acres total. The 10-year average for this point in the fire season is 590 fires and 56,121 acres burned.

“Although there is a possibility for holdover fires from the recent lightning to add fires to the map, ODF’s firefighters have been doing a remarkable job keeping them small,” Holschbach said.

More people have been the key to knocking out fires on lands the department is responsible for protecting. 

“Investments into the wildfire protection system from Senate Bill 762 allowed us to not only hire additional season firefighters to increase response, but also additional full-time positions to increase response capacity year-round,” said Holschbach.  “I can’t say how many millions of dollars in firefighting costs we have saved by being able to quickly suppress these fires—keeping them small, off the landscape and out of our communities.”

A big part of putting out wildfires is detecting them early and a key part of that effort is the multi-mission aircraft (MMA) that is in its third season of operation.  This unique aircraft was made possible through an investment from the Oregon Forest Land Protection Fund—which consists of landowner dollars paid for fire protection each year.

“The MMA has state of the art thermal cameras that overlay that information through an augment reality mapping system,” said Jamie Knight, ODF State Aviation Operations Specialist.   “This ‘eyes in the skies’ asset can then feed that information into a firefighting data base used state-wide called the State of Oregon Fire Situation Analyst system (SOFSA).  Our dispatch centers around the state can see those maps and quickly send the best resources to attack the fire.”

Those resources can include ground-based firefighters and equipment, or one or more of the 27 aircraft on exclusive use contracts with the state.  The mix of aircraft include eight tankers, five fixed wing detection/aerial supervision aircraft, along with 14 helicopters.

“We have one large tanker, typically based in Medford, Redmond, La Grande or Klamath Falls,” said Knight.  “Five wheeled single engine aircraft that operate from smaller airfields like John Day and Prineville, and then we have two fire boss amphibious aircraft that can scoop up water from nearby lakes.”

The other 21 aircraft are based strategically at airfields around Oregon. Each fire district can request any available aircraft from around the state to aid in putting out fires.  This aerial response is often key to reach hard to get at fires in remote areas.

“Our aircraft and other fighting equipment is decentralized to allow each of our fire districts to quickly respond to any fire,” said Holschbach.  “But our most valuable asset is our people.  They live and work in communities they protect, and they have been doing a great job this fire season.”

For more information on ODF’s firefighting efforts, visit ODF’s Wildfire Blog or follow them on ODF’s Facebook account.


Abortion
Oregon Values and Beliefs Center - 08/15/22 12:45 PM

From July 8–16, 2022, the Oregon Values and Beliefs Center conducted a statewide survey to determine Oregonians’ thoughts on abortion in light of the recent Federal Supreme Court Roe v. Wade ruling. A description of the methodology used for the research is provided below. 

 The question numbers in this document correspond with the survey questionnaire (Q27-33). Due to rounding, the percentages reported below may not add to 100% or compare exactly to the percentages for the same question in the annotated questionnaire or tabs.

https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/Do-you-happen-to-personally-know-someone-such-as-a-close-friend-family-member-or-yourself-who-has-had-an-abortion-300x300.png 300w, https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/Do-you-happen-to-personally-know-someone-such-as-a-close-friend-family-member-or-yourself-who-has-had-an-abortion-150x150.png 150w, https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/Do-you-happen-to-personally-know-someone-such-as-a-close-friend-family-member-or-yourself-who-has-had-an-abortion-512x512.png 512w" sizes="100vw" width="600">

The topic of abortion is personal for most Oregonians; almost three in four people know someone, like a close friend or family member, who has had an abortion, or have had one themselves (70% )(Q28), which is a bit higher than the national average according to a March, 2022 survey conducted by Pew Research Center[1] (59%).

  • Women are about 15% more likely than men to know someone who has had an abortion (77% compared to 62%).
  • Oregonians who have attended at least some college are much more likely to know someone who has had an abortion (74%-77%) compared to those with a high school degree or less (58%).
  • Oregonians with annual incomes over $100K (75%) are also more likely than those who make less than $100K (68%) to personally know someone who has.
  • Multnomah residents report a higher rate of a personal connection to someone who has had an abortion compared to those living in the rest of the state (79%, 67%).

Should Abortion be Legal?

About three in four Oregonians think that abortion should be legal in all or most cases (72%) compared to about one in four Oregonians who think that abortion should be illegal in all or most cases (23%)(Q27). 

Oregonians in July of 2022 show stronger support for legal abortion than the country as a whole in March of 20221 (72% compared to 61%).

Women are more likely than men to think abortion should be legal (76% to 67%). College graduates are more likely to think abortion should be legal compared to those with some college or less formal education (80% to 65-71%), Those who did not attend college are less sure if abortion should be legal or illegal compared to those with some college or a college degree under their belt (9% to 2-4% saying they don’t know). There is no difference between income levels as to whether abortion should be legal or illegal.

In What Cases do Oregonians Support Abortion?

Oregonians clearly support access to abortion when pregnancy threatens the pregnant person’s life (83%). In other cases, support for access generally declines as pregnancy progresses: 71% support access in the first 6 weeks, 65% support access in the first trimester, and 44% support access in the second trimester (Q33A-D).

Oregonians are the most split when it comes to considering abortion in the second trimester, with 44% supporting access to abortion and 45% opposing access (Q33C).

Multnomah County and those living in the rest of the state come together in agreement when it comes to access to an abortion when the pregnancy threatens the pregnant person’s life (87%, 82%) (Q33D).

Does the Roe v. Wade Decision Change Voting Behavior?

https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/On-June-24-the-Supreme-Court-overturned-Roe-v.-Wade.-Does-this-make-you-more-likely-or-less-likely-to-vote-in-November-If-you-havent-heard-anything-about-this-please-say-so.-2-300x300.png 300w, https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/On-June-24-the-Supreme-Court-overturned-Roe-v.-Wade.-Does-this-make-you-more-likely-or-less-likely-to-vote-in-November-If-you-havent-heard-anything-about-this-please-say-so.-2-150x150.png 150w, https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/07/On-June-24-the-Supreme-Court-overturned-Roe-v.-Wade.-Does-this-make-you-more-likely-or-less-likely-to-vote-in-November-If-you-havent-heard-anything-about-this-please-say-so.-2-512x512.png 512w" sizes="100vw" width="600">

A plurality of Oregonians say the Supreme Court overturning Roe v. Wade will not change their voting behavior in the upcoming election (46%). However, of those who say their voting behavior will change (44%), Oregonians are ten times more likely to vote in November (40%) than less likely (4%)(Q29).

Those who are more likely to vote in November are: women (43% compared to 37% of men) and Democrats and Independents (54% and 38% compared to 30% of Republicans). There are no differences between those living in Multnomah County and the rest of the state in the ways in which they predict this will affect their voting behaviors.

A Majority Would Vote to Reinstate Roe v. Wade

If it were put up to a general vote, a majority of Oregonians would vote to reinstate Roe v. Wade (62%) while a little fewer than a quarter of Oregonians would vote to keep Roe v. Wade overturned (22%)(Q30). 

Among those who are more likely to keep it overturned are: men (27% compared to 16% of women), white Oregonians (22% compared to 16% of BIPOC Oregonians), rural Oregonians (29% compared to 16% of urban Oregonians), and Oregonians over the age of 75 (42% compared to 13%-15% of Oregonians under the age of 45). 

Some Oregonians Have Already Given Thought to Abortion

A majority of Oregonians had already given some thought to issues around abortion before the Supreme Court’s recent decision to overturn Roe v. Wade (69%)(Q31).

Women are more likely than men to have thought about abortion (74%, 63%). 

Those who make $50,000 or more a year (71-79% compared to 63% of those with a lower income), and those with at least a four-year college degree (81% compared to 55-72% of those with less formal education) are more likely to have thought about abortion in the past. 

Does This Decision Make You More or Less Likely to Vote in November?

https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/Thinking-about-the-State-elections-in-November-are-you-more-likely-to-vote-for-someone-who-is-pro-life-or-pro-choice-2-300x300.png 300w, https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/Thinking-about-the-State-elections-in-November-are-you-more-likely-to-vote-for-someone-who-is-pro-life-or-pro-choice-2-150x150.png 150w, https://oregonvbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/Thinking-about-the-State-elections-in-November-are-you-more-likely-to-vote-for-someone-who-is-pro-life-or-pro-choice-2-512x512.png 512w" sizes="100vw" width="600">

When it comes to the upcoming election in November, Oregonians are almost three times as likely to vote for a pro-choice candidate (58%) than for a pro-life candidate (21%)(Q32).

Men are more likely to vote for a pro-life candidate compared to women (24%, 18%).

Tri-county area and Willamette Valley residents are more likely than those living in the rest of the state to prefer pro-choice candidates (65% and 57% compared to 51%).  Conversely, of those living in the rest of the state, 23% prefer pro-life candidates, 10% don’t care, and 12% are undecided. 

If it were put up to a general vote, a majority of Oregonians would vote to reinstate Roe v. Wade (62%) while a little fewer than a quarter of Oregonians would vote to keep Roe v. Wade overturned (22%) (Q30). 

More men than women would vote to keep Roe v. Wade overturned (27% compared to 16% of women).

Language Choice Could Change the Response

For many Oregonians, their views on access to abortion is more nuanced than simply “for” or “against” legalization, as illustrated by their word-for-word responses (Q34-35):

“I do not believe in abortion, but think a woman has the right to determine what happens with her body.” 

Woman, age 65-74, Clackamas County, Native American, American Indian 
or Alaska Native

“I might oppose having an abortion around 22-24 weeks, if there was universal Healthcare/ better funded social programs AND the ability to successfully gestate a baby outside the womb.”

Woman, age 30-44, Columbia County, Hispanic/Latino/a/x and white

“We should maximize freedom to choose and maximize access to birth control so that abortions are available but rare.”

Man, age 75+, Multnomah County, white

“I believe in bodily autonomy. I would like to see more pro-family laws and regulations put in place and abortions reduced in necessity but access to an abortion must always remain legal.”

Nonbinary or gender non-conforming, age 30-44, Marion County, white

Demographic Trends

Identifying what unites us. Understanding what divides us.

Reported below are statistically significant subgroup differences between BIPOC and white Oregonians, urban and rural Oregonians, and age groups.  Many of these differences are not major and are presented to inform public education and communications initiatives.  

OVBC surveys currently use aggregated data to analyze the opinions of BIPOC residents in comparison to the opinions of residents who identify as white and not another race. BIPOC residents are not a monolith; the grouping represents a wide diversity of races and ethnicities. The findings included in this memo should not be construed such that all people of color are believed to share the same opinions. Disaggregated race data will be provided when sample sizes permit reliability.

  • Oregonians aged 45 and older are more likely to personally know someone who has had an abortion than those under age 45 (70%-81% compared to 56%-63%) (Q28).
    • The likelihood of knowing someone who has had an abortion rises with age with the exception of Oregonians 75 and older, from 56% of 18-29-year-olds to 81% of 65-74-year-olds, then dropping back down to 74% of those aged 75 and older. This oldest age group would have been at least 25 years old when the supreme court ruled on Roe v. Wade.
  • Three in four of those 18-29 are in support of legal access to abortion (77% compared to 59% of those 75+) (Q27). 
    • Conversely, Oregonians over the age of 75 are more likely to think abortion should be illegal (39%) compared to Oregonians under the age of 64 (17%-22%).
    • No age group dips below 50% in preferring pro-choice candidates in November, with the outer extremes being 65% of those 18-29 compared to 50% of those 75+ (Q32).
      • There is an increase in support for pro-life candidates as age increases, with 15% of those 18-29 and 36% of those 75+ saying they will be more likely to vote for a pro-life candidate in November.
    • Although residents 18-29 are more in support of legal access to abortion, they report having thought about it less in the past than older Oregonians (67% compared to 84% of those 75+) (Q31).
  • Approximately two-thirds of nearly every age group would vote to reinstate Roe v. Wade if given the chance (60-65%). For Oregonians 75 or older, half would vote the same (52%)(Q30).
  • Oregonians aged 75 and older are far more likely than any other age group to say they would vote to keep Roe v. Wade overturned if they were given the opportunity (42% vs. 13%-28%).
  • A majority of all age groups support legal access to abortion when the pregnancy is within the first 6 weeks (60-75%) (Q33A), as well as 14 weeks along or less (57-69%)(Q33B).
    • Support is lowest for legal access to abortion among Oregonians 75 or older, except when the pregnant person’s life is threatened (88% of those 65 and older compared to 78-79% of those 18-44)(Q33D).
  • Urban Oregonians are more likely to think abortion should be legal in all or most cases compared to rural Oregonians (79% to 61%)(Q27).
  • Rural Oregonians are twice as likely as urban Oregonians to think that abortion should be illegal in all or most cases (33% to 16%), and nearly twice as likely to say that, if given the opportunity, they would vote to keep Roe v. Wade overturned (29% rural; 16% urban) (Q27,Q30).
  • Urban Oregonians and rural Oregonians are equally likely to personally know someone who has had an abortion (72%)(Q28).
  • Urban Oregonians are more likely to vote in the November election due to the Supreme Court’s recent ruling compared to rural Oregonians (44% to 35%)(Q29).
    • There is no difference between rural and urban Oregonians as to how much thought they had given to issues surrounding abortion (Q31).
  • When it comes to the upcoming State election in November, rural Oregonians are almost twice as likely to vote for a pro-life candidate than urban Oregonians (27% to 16%)(Q32). 
    • Urban Oregonians are more likely to vote for a pro-choice candidate than rural Oregonians (67% to 47%)(Q32).
  • Compared to BIPOC Oregonians, white Oregonians are more likely to say that their voting behaviors will not change due to the Supreme Court ruling (48% to 38%)(Q29), although for both BIPOC and white Oregonians, four in ten say this ruling will increases their will to vote in November (40%, 41%).
    • Compared to BIPOC Oregonians, white Oregonians are more likely to have given thought to abortion issues prior to the Supreme Court’s recent ruling (72% to 60%)(Q31).
    • There are no differences between BIPOC Oregonians and white Oregonians as to whether abortion should be legal or whether they will vote for a pro-life or pro-choice candidate in the upcoming state election (Q27 & Q32).
    • If it were put up to a general vote, white Oregonians are more likely to say they would vote to keep Roe v. Wade overturned compared to BIPOC Oregonians (22% compared to 16%) (Q30).

Methodology: The online survey consisted of 1,572 Oregon residents ages 18+ and took approximately 15 minutes to complete. Respondents were contacted by using professionally maintained online panels. In gathering responses, a variety of quality control measures were employed, including questionnaire pre-testing, validation, and real-time monitoring of responses. To ensure a representative sample, demographic quotas were set, and data weighted by area of the state, gender, age, and education.

Statement of Limitations: Based on a 95% confidence interval, this survey’s margin of error for the full sample ±2.47%. Due to rounding or multiple answer questions, response percentages may not add up to 100%.




Attached Media Files: OVBC July 2022 Annotated Questionnaire , OVBC July 2022 Crosstabs

OHA Establishes Four New Regional Health Equity Coalitions
Oregon Health Authority - 08/15/22 12:00 PM

August 15, 2022

Media Contact: Liz Gharst, eth.a.gharst@state.or.us">elizabeth.a.gharst@state.or.us, 971-666-2476

OHA Establishes Four New Regional Health Equity Coalitions

Oregon Health Authority (OHA) is pleased to announce the establishment of four new Regional Health Equity Coalitions (RHECs), a program operated by OHA’s Equity and Inclusion division.

RHECs are autonomous, community-led groups that are non-governmental in nature. Community members come together to identify the most pressing health equity issues in their local communities and develop solutions through policy and systems changes. These efforts focus on issues impacting priority populations which are communities of color, Tribal communities including the nine federally recognized Tribes of Oregon and other American Indian and Alaska Native persons, immigrants, refugees, migrant and seasonal farmworkers, low-income individuals and families, people with disabilities and LGBTQIA2S+ communities, with communities of color as the leading priority.

RHECs form a vital link between communities and health systems—increasing authentic community engagement, providing support and leadership to health equity efforts across Oregon and mobilizing systemic and policy changes.

"Expansion of the Regional Health Equity Coalition program is an important opportunity to continue developing and resourcing statewide capacity among community partners to address health inequities,” says Leann Johnson, Director of the Equity and Inclusion division. “These are key partnerships that are working to advance OHA's strategic goal of eliminating health inequities by 2030."

The four new RHECs and regions they represent are as follows:

  • Eastern Oregon Health Equity Alliance (Morrow and Union counties)
  • Mid-Willamette Valley Health Equity Coalition (Marion and Polk counties)
  • South Coast Equity Coalition (Coos and Curry counties)
  • Transponder (Lane and Douglas counties)

Existing RHECs and regions they represent are as follows:

  • Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs
  • Eastern Oregon Health Equity Alliance (Malheur and Umatilla counties)
  • Linn Benton Health Equity Alliance (Linn and Benton counties)
  • Mid-Columbia Health Equity Advocates (Hood River and Wasco counties)
  • Oregon Health Equity Alliance (Clackamas, Multnomah, and Washington counties)
  • SO Health-E (Jackson and Josephine counties)

OHA is working to secure additional resources for another five RHECs in the 2023 – 2025 biennium which, if successful, would result in a total of 15 RHECs.

For more information, contact Danielle Droppers at danielle.a.droppers@state.or.us or visit here.


 


Fatal Crash Highway 238 -- Josephine County (Age Correction)
Oregon State Police - 08/15/22 11:23 AM

Age correction for Braden Hales, age 23, from Williams.

Previous Release:

On August 10, 2022, at about 2:45 PM, Oregon State Police (OSP) Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two-vehicle crash on Highway 238 near milepost 4. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Toyota Camry, operated by, Braden Hales, age 34, from Williams, pulled out onto Highway 238 from Jaynes Drive and into the path of a northbound Ford F250 pickup, operated by Ed DeVos, age 56, from Williams.  The vehicles crashed and came to rest on the shoulder of the roadway. 

Hales was pronounced deceased at the scene by emergency personnel.  A juvenile passenger in the Toyota Camry received non-life threatening injuries and was transported to Rogue Reginal Medical Center.  DeVos was not injured. 

OSP was assisted by Josephine County Sheriff's Office, Mercy Flights, Rural Metro Battalion 5 and ODOT.

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Media advisory: Oregon Employment Department to Host Media Briefing Aug. 17, 1 p.m.
Oregon Employment Department - 08/15/22 10:47 AM

 

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 
Aug. 15, 2022

Media Contact: 
Communications@employ.oregon.gov  

MEDIA ADVISORY

Oregon Employment Department to Host 
Media Briefing Aug. 17, 1 p.m.

WHO:           David Gerstenfeld, Acting Director, and Gail Krumenauer, State Employment Economist

WHEN:         Wednesday, 1 p.m., Aug. 17, 2022

WHAT:          The Oregon Employment Department is hosting a video-conference media briefing to share updates on economic and workforce-related trends, progress on modernization and Paid Leave Oregon, OED’s new director of equity and inclusion, and new ways to contact us for help with unemployment insurance. 

WHERE:       Via Zoom video conference: Members of the media must RSVP by emailing Communications@employ.oregon.gov by noon on Wednesday, Aug. 17. We will provide video conference login information to all reporters who RSVP. RSVPs must indicate if the reporter wants to ask a question of the presenters. 

After the briefing concludes, we will email a recording of the video conference to reporters who RSVP’d.

OTHER:       The Oregon Employment Department updates claims processing progress data each week. Visit this link for weekly updates on claims. For updates on Paid Leave Oregon, visit paidleave.oregon.gov. For updates on modernization activities, visit francesinfo.oregon.gov.

###

The Oregon Employment Department (OED) is an equal opportunity agency. Everyone has a right to use OED programs and services. OED provides free help. Some examples are sign language and spoken language interpreters, written materials in other languages, braille, large print, audio and other formats. If you need help, please call 971-673-6400. TTY users call 711. You can also ask for help at Communications@employ.oregon.gov.




Attached Media Files: 2022-08/930/156733/2022.08.15_OED_Media_Advisory_-_August_17_Media_Briefing.pdf

Cultural Trust awards more than $3.4 million to 138 Oregon cultural organizations (Photo)
Oregon Cultural Trust - 08/15/22 10:45 AM
Antonio Lopez and Kyra Laubacher dance at an Instaballet showcase. The Eugene troupe will hire its first executive director with help from an $18,547 Cultural Trust award.
Antonio Lopez and Kyra Laubacher dance at an Instaballet showcase. The Eugene troupe will hire its first executive director with help from an $18,547 Cultural Trust award.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/1171/156742/thumb_Instaballet_antonio_kyra_creative_hour_resize_small_(2_of_7).jpg

Salem, Ore. – A new library for Grants Pass, the restoration of an iconic ski lodge in Sisters, Montavilla Jazz Festival’s 10th anniversary celebration and multimedia documentation of the Talent community’s rise from the ashes of the Almeda Fire – those are just a few of the important arts, heritage and humanities projects to be supported by FY2023 grant allocations from the Oregon Cultural Trust.   

FY2023 grant awards totaling an historic $3,422,748 will be distributed to 138 arts, heritage and humanities organizations across the state, the Cultural Trust announced today. Made possible by generous Oregonians who invested a record $5.7 million in the Cultural Tax Credit in FY2022, this year’s awards bring the cumulative total of Cultural Trust grants to almost $40 million since its founding in 2001.

The FY2023 awards include a total of $855,687 to the Cultural Trust’s five statewide partners (Oregon Arts Commission, Oregon Heritage Commission, Oregon Humanities, Oregon Historical Society and the State Historic Preservation Office); and $855,687 to 45 County and Tribal Cultural Coalitions – who regrant an annual average of 450 additional awards in their communities.

In addition, $1,711,374 in competitive Cultural Development Program grants will go directly to 88 cultural organizations serving most geographic regions of the state. 

“It is astounding and so gratifying to see our funding for Oregon culture grow every year,” said Niki Price, chair of the Cultural Trust board. “Through the pandemic and unstable economic times, Oregonians remain committed to preserving and strengthening organizations that bring such beauty and meaning to our lives.” 

“We have now surpassed 10,000 grant awards since the Cultural Trust was formed,” said Brian Rogers, executive director. “And thanks to the incredible success of the new Celebrate Oregon! license plate, which funds promotion of the Cultural Tax Credit, we are poised to engage even more Oregonians in the future. We are confident the best is yet to come for arts, heritage and humanities in Oregon.” 

The FY2023 Cultural Development Program recipients feature 11 organizations receiving their first-ever Cultural Trust award, 65 percent of which are located outside of Portland. First-time recipients include: 

  • Enlightened Theatrics, Salem: $17,983

To support a holiday family production of “SEUSSICAL THE MUSICAL” comprised of professional, community and student artists.

  • Friends of the Opera House, Elgin: $12,599

To support the Friends of the Opera House in offering specialized training for its actors by inviting acting coaches, vocal instructors, choreographers and visual artists to workshop with the community theater. 

  • PassinArt: A Theatre Company, Portland: $37,336

To support the 2023 Pacific Northwest Multi-Cultural Readers Series & Film Festival Aug. 18 through 21. The Festival will include live theatre, readings, films, youth workshops, artist development workshops and panels showcasing the new work of BIPOC storytellers from Oregon and across the country. The hybrid festival also will include a gala and cultural and civic celebrations, creating city-wide access and enthusiasm for this exciting body of work.

  • Rice Northwest Museum of Rocks and Minerals, Hillsboro: $13,613 

To support the creation of activity sheets, maps, brochures and trail signs available on-site and online, as well as staff training for how to best use the new resources with the visiting public.

Other Cultural Development recipient highlights include: 

  • Friends of Santiam Pass Ski Lodge, Sisters: $29,080

To support the restoration of historic Santiam Pass Ski Lodge through the repair and restoration of its iconic stone foundation, chimney and fireplace. 

  • Music Workshop, Portland: $22,623

To support access to free, multicultural music education resources for Oregon K-8 music teachers and their students by creating inspirational and culturally relevant music history and appreciation programming, then working with school administrators and music teachers to implement the programming into their curriculum.

  • Talent Historical Society, Talent: $8,451

To support the Talent Historical Society in documenting the Almeda Fire, its impact on the community of Talent and the town's recovery to preserve and share. The Historical Society has been collecting stories, images and videos in the voices of residents in two languages. The history with be shared with the public in a book, an exhibit in the museum and a portable "Fire Remnants" exhibit. 

  • Josephine Community Library Foundation, Grants Pass: $31,175

To support the purchase of a centrally located piece of property for the future home of the new Grants Pass library branch and a community commons that will more fully meet the information, culture, technology and community gathering needs of local residents.

The 88 Cultural Development grant awards range from $5,000 to $38,000 with an average award of $19,396. Sixty-six percent of the 133 eligible applications were funded.

Cultural Development Program awards fund nonprofit projects that increase access to culture, invest in organizational capacity, support community creativity and provide historic preservation. Applications were reviewed and scored by peer review panels; final award amounts were determined and approved by the Cultural Trust Board of Directors at its July 28 meeting. More than 60 percent of Cultural Trust funding (including awards to County and Tribal Coalitions) is awarded outside of the Portland Metro area. 

See a full list of County and Tribal Cultural Coalition allocations.

See a list of the 88 Cultural Development recipients, alphabetical by region

# # #

Created in 2001 by the Oregon Legislature, the Oregon Cultural Trust was established as an ongoing funding engine for arts, heritage and humanities across the state. Funding comes through the Cultural Tax Credit, which empowers Oregonians to direct more of the taxes they pay to supporting cultural opportunities for all. Oregon is the only state in the country that gives its citizens this choice. Sixty percent of the money goes directly to cultural organizations and agencies in the form of grants. The remaining 40 percent helps grow a permanent fund for culture. It’s described by the Oregonian as “A way to make paying state taxes satisfying.” Oregonians directed a record $5.7M of their state taxes to fund arts, heritage and humanities in fiscal year 2022. The Trust’s three grant programs fund five Statewide Partners45 County and Tribal Coalitions and qualified cultural nonprofits through competitive Cultural Development grants. Learn more at CulturalTrust.org.

 




Attached Media Files: Antonio Lopez and Kyra Laubacher dance at an Instaballet showcase. The Eugene troupe will hire its first executive director with help from an $18,547 Cultural Trust award. , An archival photo from the University of Oregon’s “Outliers and Outlaws” project documenting the lesbian community in Eugene from the 1960s through the 1990s. A $35,680 Cultural Trust award will support the production and distribution of a documentary fil , Only the shell of the historic Malmgren Garage in Talent survived the Almeda Fire. The fire and community rebuilding spirit will be documented in a multimedia project by the Talent Historical Society, supported by a Cultural Trust award. , The newly restored log entry of Santiam Pass Ski Lodge near Sisters. A Cultural Trust award will support the repair and restoration of the Lodge’s foundation, chimney and fireplace. , The Rice Northwest Museum of Rocks and Minerals in Hillsboro, a first-time Cultural Trust award recipient, will receive $13,613 to support activity sheets, maps, brochures and trail signs available on-site and online. , My Voice Music’s $29,793 Cultural Trust award will support hiring a new operations manager to help launch an East Portland music center and develop programs in rural Oregon.

Oregon Heritage Commission to meet Aug. 28-29 in Salem and seeks to fill vacancy
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 08/15/22 9:00 AM

SALEM, Oregon – The Oregon Heritage Commission will meet Aug. 28-29 in Salem and online. The agenda includes a field trip on Aug. 28 to the Brooks Historical Society and Powerland Heritage Park and the business meeting will take place on Aug. 29 at the North Mall Office Building, Rm. 124A&B, 725 Summer Street NE, Salem, OR 97301. 

The business meeting will include a report on the recent cycle of Oregon Heritage MentorCorps, results of the Economic Impact and Value of Oregon’s Heritage Organizations and Activities study, information on Oregon Arts Commission Cultural Districts conversation, and recommendations for the Commission’s FY23 Oregon Cultural Trust funds. To view the full agenda and/or to register for the virtual meeting option visit here

There is an appointed position vacancy on the Oregon Heritage Commission. The Heritage Commission is especially seeking members with knowledge and experience related to community institutions, heritage tourism, or education/higher education and who have experience working with diverse cultural groups. The Commission seeks applications from those that live in the Portland metro area. 

The Heritage Commission’s nine members represent a diversity of cultural, geographic, and institutional interests. The Commission is the primary agency for coordination of heritage activities in the state. This includes carrying out the Oregon Heritage Plan, increasing efficiency and avoiding duplication among interest groups, developing plans for coordination among agencies and organizations, encouraging tourism related to heritage resources, and coordinating statewide anniversary celebrations.

The group meets four-six times per year in changing locations around the state and will offer virtual options to attend meetings. Commissioners are also asked to occasionally participate in meetings or events in their regions and work on other projects outside of meeting time. Appointed Commissioners are reimbursed for their travel and related expenses while conducting official commission business.

More information about the Oregon Heritage Commission is available online at www.oregonheritage.org and from Commission coordinator Katie Henry at 503-877-8834 or katie.henry@oprd.oregon.gov

To request appointment, go to Gov. Kate Brown’s Boards and Commissions webpage at https://www.oregon.gov/gov/Pages/board-list.aspx

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Fatal Crash South Sixth Street and Hope Street -- Klamath County
Oregon State Police - 08/15/22 8:56 AM

On Saturday August 13, 2022, at about 9:30 PM, Oregon State Police (OSP) Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a vehicle versus pedestrian crash on South Sixth Street near Hope Street in Klamath Falls.  

Preliminary investigation revealed that, an adult male pedestrian, walked out into the roadway and stopped in the middle of the travel lane facing westbound traffic. A westbound Toyota pickup, operated by James Richardson-Lawson, age 38, from Klamath Falls, collided with the pedestrian.

The pedestrian was pronounced deceased at the scene by emergency personnel.  Richardson-Lawson was uninjured and cooperated with investigators at the scene. 

The name of the pedestrian is being withheld pending next of kin notification. 

OSP was assisted by Klamath County Sheriff's Office and ODOT.

### 


Oregon Outdoor Recreation Committee seeks volunteers to fill vacancies
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 08/15/22 8:00 AM

Salem, Oregon—Two positions on the Oregon Outdoor Recreation Committee (OORC) are now open for volunteers to apply. The committee is recruiting for one member to represent the interests of people with disabilities and one member to represent members of an historically underrepresented community or tribal government. 

The OORC evaluates, scores and ranks project applications for funding assistance from the Land and Water Conservation Fund Grant Program (LWCF).  The nine-member committee is appointed by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department director. Each member serves a four-year term and may be eligible to serve a second term. 

The OORC generally meets once a year, virtually or in Salem. The time commitment varies and duties include reviewing and evaluating an average of 15-20 grant applications each annual funding cycle. The OORC’s priority ranking list is forwarded to the director of the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department and to the Oregon State Parks Commission. 

Those interested in serving must submit an interest form to the LWCF program coordinator by Monday, Sept. 19. The form is available online at https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/GRA/Pages/GRA-lwcf.aspx#8 

The Land and Water Conservation Fund Program is a competitive grant program funded by the National Park Service and administered by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. Grants are awarded to local governments, federally recognized tribal governments, and eligible state agencies for land acquisition, development, and rehabilitation projects for public outdoor recreation areas and facilities. 

For more information about the advisory committee or application process, contact Nohemi Enciso, LWCF program coordinator, at nohemi.enciso@oprd.oregon.gov or 503-480-9092.

XXX

 

 


Fri. 08/12/22
** UPDATED - ADDITIONAL SEARCH WARRANT EXECUTED ** - CODE and DCIME Dismantle Chinese Cartel Marijuana Operation in Jefferson County (Photo)
Central Oregon Drug Enforcement (CODE) - 08/12/22 2:34 PM
Mold Door - 10th St
Mold Door - 10th St
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/6078/155353/thumb_687.jpg

UPDATED AUGUST 12, 2022

Madras, Oregon - 

On Friday, August 12th, 2022, at approximately 7:30AM, detectives with the Oregon State Police, Central Oregon Drug Enforcement Team, Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office, Deschutes County Illegal Marijuana Enforcement team, and United States Homeland Security Investigations executed a search warrant in Madras, Oregon. 

This is a continuation of the June 2022 investigation and series of search warrants related to the international drug organization that is alleged to be growing and processing illicit marijuana from Madras and Culver, Oregon before delivering it to Portland for nationwide distribution. The previous press release can be found below.

Earlier this week, detectives applied for and received a Search Warrant at 637 NE 10th St, Madras. During this search warrant, 60 lbs of bulk unprocessed marijuana and 807 plants were seized. Several additional suspects, both foreign and domestic, have been identified. Detectives expect additional arrests are forthcoming once additional follow-up investigations and search warrants are complete. 

Detectives found this particular grow site used jerry-rigged copper wire that bypassed the circuit breakers, inferior extension cords, and power strips secured with zip ties as permanent exterior wiring for processing equipment, lighting, fans, etc. Overloaded electrical wiring has caused fires in other marijuana to grow facilities. 

The Madras community and surrounding areas in Jefferson County have been struggling with severe drought conditions. Since the beginning of CODE and DCIME, investigators have found illegal marijuana grows diverted or stolen significant water from nearby homes, commercial farms, or directly from pumps connected to underground sources in the arid central Oregon high desert. It is estimated that indoor marijuana cultivation uses between 2.5 and 3.0 gallons per day per plant. That equals to about 2,421 gallons per day or 72,630 gallons of water per month at this grow site alone. US Department of Interior and the USGS estimates that an average person uses 3,000 gallons of water monthly, so a family of 4 would use 12,000 gallons for bathing, cooking, washing, recreation and watering.

Additionally, Illegal marijuana farms, including this one, often use pesticides and insecticides that threaten residential water supplies and endanger the end user. This particular grow site was also infested with black mold. According to the CDC, Black mold is dangerous to those with immune suppression, asthma, or other respiratory problems. There are reports that ingesting or inhaling toxigenic molds, like black mold, can cause unique or rare health conditions such as pulmonary hemorrhage or memory loss. 

This remains an active investigation. CODE and DCIME have identified additional grow sites operated by this organization. Investigators know the remaining locations and will continue to dismantle these sites as the investigation progresses.

CONTACT FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:   Sgt. Kent Vander Kamp, 541-550-4869 or kentv@deschutes.org 

The Central Oregon Drug Enforcement (CODE) team is a multi-jurisdictional narcotics task force that identifies, disrupts, and dismantles local, multi-state, and international drug trafficking organizations using an intelligence-driven, multi-agency prosecutor-supported approach. CODE is supported by the Oregon-Idaho High-Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) program and the following Central Oregon law enforcement agencies:  Bend Police Department, Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, Redmond Police Department, Prineville Police Department, Crook County Sheriff’s Office, Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office, Madras Police Department, Oregon State Police, Sunriver Police Department, Black Butte Police Department, United States Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Warm Springs Tribal Police Department, Deschutes, Crook, and Jefferson County District Attorney’s, and the Oregon National Guard.

The Oregon-Idaho HIDTA program is an Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) sponsored counterdrug grant program that coordinates and provides funding resources to multi-agency drug enforcement task forces, including the Central Oregon Drug Enforcement Team. 

The Deschutes County Illegal Marijuana Enforcement (DCIME) program is a partnership between the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, the Bend Police Department, and the Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office to address illegal marijuana activity in Deschutes County.

If you are aware of controlled substance violations in your community, please submit your anonymous tip through the DEA online tip line HERE. 

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PREVIOUS RELEASE

Jefferson County, OR – 

On Tuesday, June 14th, 2022, Detectives with the Central Oregon Drug Enforcement Team, Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office, Deschutes County Illegal Marijuana Enforcement team, and Unites States Homeland Security Investigations concluded a two-year investigation involving an international drug organization that is alleged to be growing and processing illicit marijuana from Madras and Culver, Oregon before delivering it to Portland for nationwide distribution. 

This case began with community complaints, and tips about several of the organization’s twenty grow locations in the Jefferson County area. As a result, Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office Detectives began investigating and discovered a complex criminal network that required investigative assistance. 

The Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office Detectives requested the assistance of the Central Oregon Drug Team and the Deschutes County Illicit Marijuana Enforcement Team to further their investigation. Over the next 18 months, CODE and DCIME detectives, special agents, and intelligence analysts conducted hundreds of hours of physical and electronic surveillance on over twenty-three members of the organization, twenty properties, bank accounts, and Chinese-food restaurants around the pacific northwest and Asia. 

With the assistance of the US Drug Enforcement Administration, Internal Revenue Service, US Customs and Border Patrol, US Department of Homeland Security, CODE, and DCIME, Detectives determined the organizational structure and identified the leadership. It was discovered that proceeds from the marijuana sales were often laundered through Chinese restaurants and businesses before being diverted back to China disguised as an international business transaction.

Robert Joseph Dale, age 64, of Madras, Oregon, is alleged to be one of the leaders in this criminal organization. The illicit grow site properties are owned mainly by Robert Joseph Dale or with his family members or a business entity owned and controlled by Mr. Dale. Additionally, a few other property owners have been identified as members of the organization and are still outstanding at his time. 

Most of the fourteen Chinese laborers contacted by detectives were trafficked into the United States through Mexico and found work in restaurants throughout Oregon and Washington. Later, this cartel organization recruited restaurant laborers to work in the illegal marijuana trade for salary. The laborers were found living at the grow sites and often were moved by the cartel from grow site to grow site. 

CODE and DCIME detectives, with the assistance of the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office SWAT Team, the Central Oregon Emergency Response Team (CERT), and the Southern Oregon OSP Marijuana Team executed six Search Warrants at:

-              885 SW Ford Lane, Culver, OR

-              141 SW Dover Lane, Madras, OR

-              1932 SW Bear Drive, Madras, OR

-              8781 SW Feather Drive, Culver, OR

-              1735 NE Hilltop, Madras, OR

-              1703 NE Hilltop, Madras, OR

During the search warrant, fifteen people were detained, and 16,240 lbs of processed marijuana, 17,704 plants, 4 firearms, and a large US currency cache were seized as evidence.

Ten laborers were detained, identified, interviewed, and later released by Detectives. The laborers will not be identified as time. 

Five people were arrested at the scene and later lodged at the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Jail. The following people have been charged with the Unlawful Manufacturing, Delivery and Possession of Marijuana. In addition to the above charges, Robert Dale was also charged with the Unlawful Possession of a Firearm. 

Robert Joseph Dale, age 64, of Madras, Oregon

Dong Hai Zhu, age 51, of Beaverton, Oregon

Sky Hong He Su, age 39, of Portland, Oregon

Wenjian Yan, age 36, of Brooklyn, New York

Sam Chen, age 45, of Madras, Oregon 

Several additional suspects, both foreign and domestic, have been identified. Detectives expect additional arrests are forthcoming once additional follow-up investigations are complete. 

CODE and DCIME dismantled the largest, more active grow sites operated by this organization. Investigators know the remaining locations and will dismantle these sites soon.

The possession of small amounts of marijuana is legal for recreational use in Oregon. However, large, unlicensed marijuana operations remain illegal. Due to these operations being unregulated, pose dangers to the public and the environment. 

The Culver and Madras community and surrounding areas in Jefferson County have been struggling with severe drought conditions. Since the beginning of CODE and DCIME, investigators have found illegal marijuana grows diverted or stolen significant water from nearby homes, commercial farms, or directly from pumps connected to underground sources in the arid central Oregon high desert. These growing sites used underground water and assigned water rights while maintaining a complex watering system that supplied over 17,000 plants. 

Additionally, Illegal marijuana farms, including this one, often use pesticides and insecticides that threaten residential water supplies and endanger the end user. 

Illegal marijuana grows facilities have a very high electrical demand due to the lights, fans, and other equipment used. Many of these grow sites used jerry-rigged copper wire, extension cords, and power strips secured with zip ties as permanent exterior wiring for processing equipment, lighting, fans, etc. Overloaded electrical wiring has caused fires in other marijuana to grow facilities. The Jefferson County building compliance staff also examined these properties for building code violations. 

CODE and DCIME were assisted at the scene by the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office, Crook County Sheriff’s Office, Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, Oregon State Police, US Homeland Security, and the US Drug Enforcement Administration with the investigation, eradication, and dismantling of these sites. 

CONTACT FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:   Sgt. Kent Vander Kamp, 541-550-4869 or kentv@deschutes.org 

The Central Oregon Drug Enforcement (CODE) team is a multi-jurisdictional narcotics task force that identifies, disrupts, and dismantles local, multi-state, and international drug trafficking organizations using an intelligence-driven, multi-agency prosecutor-supported approach. CODE is supported by the Oregon-Idaho High-Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) program and the following Central Oregon law enforcement agencies:  Bend Police Department, Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, Redmond Police Department, Prineville Police Department, Crook County Sheriff’s Office, Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office, Madras Police Department, Oregon State Police, Sunriver Police Department, Black Butte Police Department, United States Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Warm Springs Tribal Police Department, Deschutes, Crook, and Jefferson County District Attorney’s, and the Oregon National Guard.

The Oregon-Idaho HIDTA program is an Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) sponsored counterdrug grant program that coordinates and provides funding resources to multi-agency drug enforcement task forces, including the Central Oregon Drug Enforcement Team. 

The Deschutes County Illegal Marijuana Enforcement (DCIME) program is a partnership between the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, the Bend Police Department, and the Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office to address illegal marijuana activity in Deschutes County.

If you are aware of controlled substance violations in your community, please submit your anonymous tip through the DEA online tip line HERE. 

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Attached Media Files: Mold Door - 10th St , Water - 10th St , Power Box - 10th St

Field Training Officer (FTO) Training Development Workgroup Meeting Scheduled 8-16-22
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 08/12/22 2:05 PM

FIELD TRAINING OFFICER (FTO)

TRAINING DEVELOPMENT WORKGROUP

MEETING SCHEDULED

 

Notice of Regular Meeting

The DPSST FTO Training Development Workgroup will meet from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. on August 16, 2022, in the Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. For further information, please contact Marsha Morin at 503-378-2155.

Streamed Live on Facebook @

 https://www.facebook.com/DPSSTOregon

1.     Administrative Statement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law. This meeting is being streamed live on Facebook and recorded in the form of minutes. Discussion of issues will only be conducted by workgroup members. Please be mindful of comments and side conversations.

2.     Introductions

3.     Overview of FTO Certification Discussions

Presented by Jim deSully and Marsha Morin

  • FTO Certification Workgroup Purpose
  • Governor’s Police Training and Standards Taskforce Report
  • Summary of Field Training Officer Workgroup Discussions
  • Purpose of DPSST Field Training Manuals

4.     FTO Training Development Workgroup

Presented by Jim deSully

  • Workgroup Purpose
  • Framework Discussion
  • Curriculum Development Discussion
  • Identifying Training Topics
  • Additional Discussion Topics

5.     Implementation Discussion Topics

Presented by Jim deSully and Marsha Morin

  • Transitioning or Recognizing Current Field Training Officers
  • Fiscal Impact Considerations

6.     Workgroup Meeting Schedule

 


Oregon State Police SW Drug Enforcement Team make illegal marijuana bust- Jackson County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 08/12/22 12:25 PM
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On August 11, 2022, the Oregon State Police Southwest Region Drug Enforcement team, assisted by the Interagency Marijuana Enforcement Team (IMET) of the Medford Police Department and Jackson County Sheriff’s Office, served three related illegal marijuana search warrants in Jackson County.  The investigation was the result of evidence obtained that marijuana was being illegally exported from Oregon on the black market.  After the operation was concluded, a total of 11,416 illegal marijuana plants and approximately 500-pounds of processed marijuana which was packaged for export, were seized.

The first location was in the 1200 block of Yankee Creek Rd. Eagle Point, was a large illegal marijuana cultivation farm where 5,024 illegal marijuana plants contained in twenty-six large greenhouses, in addition to the approximately 500-pounds of processed marijuana, were seized and destroyed. 

Simultaneously, two additional search warrants were served in the 100 block of Trout Way, Medford, on two industrial warehouses which contained sophisticated, illegal indoor hydroponic marijuana growing operations. A total of 6,392 illegal marijuana plants were seized and destroyed.

The investigation is ongoing and no further information is available at this time.




Attached Media Files: 2022-08/1002/156723/Yankee_Creek_Grow.JPG , 2022-08/1002/156723/Yankee_Creek_Grow-_3.JPG , 2022-08/1002/156723/Yankee_Creek_Grow-_2.JPG

UPDATE - Oregon Department of Human Services announces that Charlie Gibson has been found
Oregon Department of Human Services - 08/12/22 10:17 AM

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division, is thankful for the community support to find Charlie Gibson. 

Charlie Gibson, age 15, is a child who went missing from Roseburg, Oregon on Aug. 3. They were found Aug. 11.

Sometimes when a child is missing they may be in significant danger and ODHS may need to locate them to assess and support their safety. As ODHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and assess their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. 

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Oregon Division of Financial Regulation: Insurance companies not using state wildfire risk map
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 08/12/22 10:10 AM

Aug. 12, 2022

Salem – Insurance companies in Oregon did not use, and currently have no plans to use, the state wildfire risk map in their decision-making, according to data released today by the Oregon Division of Financial Regulation. 

During informal discussions before the state wildfire risk map was released, insurers told the division they were not planning on using the map. Once concerns were raised during public listening sessions on the new map, the division put out a formal data call to all relevant insurers doing business in Oregon to confirm they were not using or planning to use the state wildfire risk map for underwriting or rating decisions. A data call is a formal inquiry that insurers are required by law to answer truthfully.

Underwriting is the process an insurance company uses to determine the risk of offering or renewing an insurance product to a consumer. Rating is the process to determine the amount of premium to be paid to insure a risk such as a home. 

The data call asked the following:

  • Does the company use the state wildfire map for rating or underwriting?
  • Does the company use the state wildfire map for any other purposes?
  • Does the company plan to use the state wildfire map for any purpose in the future?

All of the insurers responded that they do not use the map for rating and underwriting and have no plans to use it for rating and underwriting. In addition, the division has not received any new proposed rate filings that include the state wildfire map as a rating factor. The division does not set rates or determine what rates should be; however, all rates used by insurance companies in Oregon must be filed with the division for review. The filing must include the methodology used to develop rates and the proposed rates must be actuarially justified, adequate, not excessive, and nondiscriminatory.

“This confirms what we knew: Insurance companies are not using the state wildfire risk map,” said Oregon Insurance Commissioner Andrew Stolfi. “Insurance companies have been using their own risk maps and other robust risk management tools to assess wildfire risk for years in making rating and underwriting decisions. We believe there has been confusion between decisions based on insurers’ continued use of their own tools, including their own risk maps, and the discussions on the new state wildfire risk map. We encourage insurers and agents to be careful in how they describe underwriting and rating decisions.

“We are here to protect consumers from any misinformation and welcome any documentation consumers have from insurance companies identifying that the map was used to influence underwriting or rating decisions. We also encourage homeowners to contact our consumer advocates with questions or concerns about changes to their policy.”

Consumers can contact the Division of Financial Regulation’s consumer advocacy hotline at 888-877-4894 (toll-free). Consumers can also file a complaint online at dfr.oregon.gov.

Also this week, the division issued a homeowners insurance guide to help people better understand how insurance companies determine whether to offer and renew insurance policies and set their rates. The division also issued a bulletin informing insurance agents that no insurers are using the state map for underwriting or rating decisions and reminding them that it is a violation of the Oregon Insurance Code to share false or misleading information.

“The unfortunate reality is that wildfire risk has increased in Oregon, especially over the past few years, and companies are responding to that,” Stolfi said. “One option for people who are canceled or nonrenewed is to work with an insurance agent, who can help you find a policy that fits your needs. There are nearly 150 companies offering homeowners insurance in Oregon, so we encourage those affected by wildfire risk to search across several different companies and to contact our consumer advocates if they need help.” 

For more information on wildfires and insurance, go to https://dfr.oregon.gov/insure/home/storm/Pages/wildfires.aspx.

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The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit dfr.oregon.gov and dcbs.oregon.gov.




Attached Media Files: Bulletin for insurance agents , Homeowner insurance guide

Fatal Crash Highway 95 -- Malheur County
Oregon State Police - 08/12/22 8:52 AM

On Wednesday August 10, 2022, at about 3:45 PM, Oregon State Police (OSP) Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two-vehicle crash on Highway 95 near milepost 59.   

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Mitsubishi SUV, operated by, Derric Williams, age 27, from Fort McDermitt NV, was southbound and for unknown reasons crossed into the on-coming lane.  The Mitsubishi SUV crashed into a northbound Peterbilt Semi-truck, operated by Danell Vincent-Moore, age 58, from Lincoln Park, Michigan.   

Williams was pronounced deceased at the scene by emergency personnel.  Vincent-Moore was un-injured in the crash. 

Four passengers in the Mitsubishi SUV, two adults and two children, sustained undisclosed injuries and were transported via air ambulance to hospitals in Boice, ID. 

Highway 95 was closed for about five (5) hours. 

OSP Troopers are continuing the investigation into the cause(s) of the crash. 

OSP was assisted by ODOT, Treasure Valley Ambulance, Jordan Valley Ambulance, and a BLM Fire Crew.   

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Governor's Commission on the Law Enforcement Medal of Honor - Open Vacancies
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 08/12/22 8:28 AM

The Governor’s Commission on the Law Enforcement Medal of Honor has two open vacancies looking to be filled

 

Governor’s Commission on the Law Enforcement Medal of Honor Application– Click here

For further information regarding the Workday application process, please visit View Job Posting Details - Workday (myworkday.com). Please note that you may need to create an account if not already in Workday.

Please forward this statement and application link to members of your organization or other individuals you would recommend. 

Here is some additional information about this Commission.

The Governor's Commission on the Law Enforcement Medal of Honor consists of seven members appointed by the Governor.

  • A representative of the Governor’s office;
  • A representative of the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training;
  • A representative of the Oregon Association of Chiefs of Police;
  • A representative of the Oregon State Sheriffs’ Association;
  • A representative of a statewide organization of police officers;
  • A representative of a statewide organization of peace officers; and 
  • A surviving family member of a law enforcement officer killed in the line of duty. 

Members serve a four-year term at the pleasure of the Governor. A member of the commission is not entitled to compensation and expenses as provided in ORS 176.262.

This Commission shall:

  • Adopt rules establishing qualifications for nomination as a recipient of the Law Enforcement Medal of Honor and the Law Enforcement Medal of Ultimate Sacrifice;
  • Meet at least once every six months to consider candidates for nomination for the Law Enforcement Medal of Honor and the Law Enforcement Medal of Ultimate Sacrifice; and 
  • Nominate candidates for the Law Enforcement Medal of Honor and the Law Enforcement Medal of Ultimate Sacrifice.

Commission meetings will in Salem at DPSST and commission members will be able to participate remotely by phone or computer. All meetings are public meetings. 

This announcement was prepared by the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training on behalf of the Governor’s Commission on the Law Enforcement Medal of Honor.

We thank you for your time and assistance.


Thu. 08/11/22
OHA introduces new monkeypox (hMPXV) website
Oregon Health Authority - 08/11/22 4:48 PM

August 11, 2022

Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, Jonathan.N.Modie@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA introduces new monkeypox (hMPXV) website

PORTLAND, Ore. – Oregon Health Authority today launched a new website dedicated to helping people in Oregon learn more about the ongoing monkeypox outbreak that has affected 89 countries and 49 states as of Aug. 10.

The new website includes information for the public, clinicians, public health and community organizations; the website is also available in Spanish.

Anyone can get monkeypox. However, during the current outbreak, most cases have been detected among gay or bisexual men or men who report having sex with other men. Monkeypox is spread primarily through close, skin-to-skin contact, which may include sex, cuddling, massage and kissing.

To protect yourself and others, be aware of your health. Monkeypox may start with fever, achiness or sore throat, but may also start with just a rash or sores. If you're feeling sick and notice any new rashes – especially on the genitals or around the anus – avoid close, skin-to-skin contact and talk to a health care provider (or call 211 if you don't have one).

Let your provider know, before the appointment, that you think you might have monkeypox and cover any lesions you have. Ask your provider about monkeypox testing. Even if you are not in a high-risk category, but you think that your symptoms or rash are concerning for monkeypox, talk to your provider. Testing may be recommended for you.

The new monkeypox website includes a weekly summary of case data and will be updated on Wednesdays.

As of Aug. 10, 95 people have tested positive for monkeypox in Oregon. Cases have been reported in Clackamas (3), Columbia (1), Coos (1), Lane (17), Marion (1), Multnomah (57) and Washington (15) counties.

These data are preliminary and subject to change.


Health Care Workforce Committee to meet August 17 via Zoom meeting
Oregon Health Authority - 08/11/22 4:27 PM

August 11th, 2022

Contact: Liz Gharst, 971.666.2476 eth.a.gharst@dhsoha.state.or.us">elizabeth.a.gharst@dhsoha.state.or.us (media inquiries)

Marc Overbeck, 503.689.5321, c.overbeck@dhsoha.state.or.us">marc.overbeck@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Health Care Workforce Committee to meet August 17 via Zoom meeting

What: A public meeting of the Health Care Workforce Committee

When: Wednesday, August 17th, 9:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Public comment will be taken at 9:05-9:15 a.m.

Where: Virtual Meeting Only. The public can join remotely via Zoom or a conference line. To join via Zoom:

https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1619616758?pwd=ZlRMSWJnd3ZsRG5EWlM0bnREeFJyQT09

One tap mobile (iPhone) +16692545252,,1619616758#,,,,455480#

Agenda: Presentation and Discussion: Nursing Workforce Study, Discussion: Licensing Boards Included in Health Care Reporting Program Statute, Other Topics of Interest/Discussion.

For more information, please visit the Workforce Committee’s website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/hpa/hp-hcw/pages/index.aspx

The Workforce Committee welcomes hearing from community members on the matters discussed by the committee and its other bodies, and other topics the public wishes the committee to consider.  you wish to offer public comment, we appreciate you letting Marc Overbeck know in advance of the meeting, at c.overbeck@dhsoha.state.or.us">marc.overbeck@dhsoha.state.or.us. Advance notice is not required in order to offer public comment at the meeting.  

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jaime Taylor at 503.689.7926, 711 TTY, jaime.taylor@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Nurses at St. Alphonsus-Ontario Continue to Fight for Respect in the Workplace (Photo)
Oregon Nurses Assn. - 08/11/22 4:13 PM
2022-08/6931/156705/ONA-Voice-logo-300dpi.jpg
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Union leadership waits for resolution on multiple labor violations 

Ontario, Ore. - Since April 5, 2022, administrators at St. Alphonsus-Ontario have illegally pushed nurses to end their union affiliation. ONA has represented nurses at St. Alphonsus-Ontario for more than ten years and the existing contract was negotiated in 2019. Over the last year, the administration has not paid contractually obligated raises and bonuses, refused to bargain over working conditions during the COVID-19 pandemic, ignored grievances, and circulated information disparaging Oregon Nurses Association (ONA). The actions are violations of federal law and in response, ONA filed multiple unfair labor practice (ULP) charges with the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB). 

A vote to determine if ONA would continue to represent nurses at St. Alphonsus-Ontario closed today, but the NLRB has impounded those votes while it reviews ONA’s request that the NLRB review the ULP charges before counting and certifying the election. ONA alleges that St. Alphonsus management repeatedly interfered in the voting process by supporting an anti-union petition on paid time, by holding captive audience meetings, by blocking ONA’s access to nurses and the facility, and by posting negative messages about ONA around the hospital. 

ONA will continue to represent and fight for the nurses of St. Alphonsus-Ontario as the NLRB handles each ULP. St. Alphonsus administration is failing to meet the high standards of care that patients and their families deserve. At any point, management could return to the negotiating table to improve working conditions for nurses and outcomes for patients and the community. 

The vote only involves nurses at St. Alphonsus-Ontario. Nurses and techs at St. Alphonsus-Baker City continue to be represented by ONA. 

The Oregon Nurses Association (ONA) is the state’s largest and most influential nursing organization. We are a professional association and labor union which represents more than 15,000 nurses and allied health workers throughout the state. We are a proud state affiliate of AFT and the American Nurses Association. ONA’s mission is to advocate for nursing, quality health care and healthy communities. For more information visit: www.OregonRN.org. ###




Attached Media Files: 2022-08/6931/156705/ONA-Voice-logo-300dpi.jpg

Missing child alert -- Charlie Gibson is missing and is believed to be in danger (Photo)
Oregon Department of Human Services - 08/11/22 4:05 PM
Smith
Smith
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/973/156706/thumb_Smith.jpg

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division, asks the public to help find Charlie Gibson, age 15, a child in foster care who went missing from Roseburg, Oregon on Aug. 3. Charlie, who uses they/them pronouns, is believed to be in danger.

ODHS asks the public for help in the effort to find Charlie and to contact 911 or local law enforcement if they believe they see them.

Charlie frequents Canyonville, Oregon as well as the Cow Creek area in southern Douglas County. It is likely that Charlie is with two adults: Delmagene Smith, who uses they/them pronouns and prefers to use the first names Dallas or Shawn; and David Allen Laird, who uses he/him pronouns. Smith and Laird may be attempting to travel out of state with Charlie, possibly to Texas. 

Preferred name: Charlie Gibson
Legal name: Charlize Gibson
Pronouns: They/them
Date of birth: Sept. 8, 2006
Height: 5-feet-3
Weight: 135 pounds
Hair: Brown with red highlights
Eye color: Brown
Other identifying information: Charlie was last seen wearing a backless white and black shirt, long jean shorts and black high-top shoes.
Roseburg Police Department Case #22-3764
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children #1457593

Sometimes when a child is missing they may be in significant danger and ODHS may need to locate them to assess and support their safety. As ODHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and assess their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. 

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Attached Media Files: Smith , Charlie Gibson

Jury Convicts Florida Man for Using a Minor to Produce Sexually Explicit Material
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 08/11/22 3:30 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A federal jury in Portland found a New Smyrna Beach, Florida man guilty today for video recording himself sexually abusing a child he met on social media and sharing the abuse video with others online.

Michael Wayne Lyon, 39, was found guilty of using a minor to produce a visual depiction of sexually explicit conduct.

According to court documents and trial testimony, in October 2017, Lyon began exchanging messages online with a 13-year-old child. He first claimed to be 15 years old and later “confessed” to be being 17. Lyon’s conversations with the child quickly turned sexually explicit and he convinced the child to send him naked photos of herself. After Lyon admitted to being in his 30s, the child tried to end their communication. Lyon persisted, continued contacting the child, and, in March 2018, travelled to the Pacific Northwest to meet the child.

Fearing for the safety of her family, the child agreed to meet Lyon. After traveling from Seattle to Oregon in a rented vehicle, Lyon took the child to a hotel near her residence where he sexually assaulted her. Lyon video recorded himself abusing the child and later shared the video online with several of the child’s friends and acquaintances. The child’s brother and mother captured a recording of the video before it disappeared and notified law enforcement. Local authorities interviewed the child’s parents and several other witnesses, but did not pursue the case further.

From 2018 through 2020, Lyon continued contacting the child and created multiple social media accounts to avoid the child’s repeated attempts to block him. Lyon’s messages became increasingly threatening and, later, openly violent. In October 2020, he threatened to kill the child and her family. Soon after, the child’s mother reported Lyon’s abuse and threats to the FBI. 

On December 11, 2020, Lyon was charged by federal criminal complaint and an arrest was issued. Nine days later, he was arrested by local law enforcement in Hollidaysburg, Pennsylvania and turned over to the FBI. Lyon has remained in federal custody since his arrest.

On February 2, 2021, a federal grand jury in Portland returned a two-count indictment charging Lyon with cyberstalking and using a minor to produce a visual depiction of sexually explicit conduct.

Lyon faces a maximum sentence of 35 years in federal prison with a 15-year mandatory minimum sentence, a $500,000 fine and a life term of supervised release.

“In trials involving the sexual abuse of children, jurors are tasked with taking in and reviewing a horrendous set of facts. In this case, the young witness took the stand to tell the jury the details of what happened in her own words. The law enforcement community recognizes the courage it takes to go to police and to face an abuser at trial. Because of this strong young witness, the defendant was brought to justice, making our communities and children safer,” said Natalie Wight, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

“Michael Lyon displayed horrific and disturbing behavior victimizing an innocent child over and over again,” said William Brooks, Assistant Special Agent in Charge of the FBI Portland Field Office. “The FBI and our law enforcement partners work every day to shut down child predators and deliver justice for victims. While this verdict effectively ends Mr. Lyon’s ability to sexually exploit children, the damage caused by this crime can linger for a lifetime for the victim. The FBI remains constant in our commitment to provide resources for victims to assist in the healing process.”

This case was investigated by FBI Portland’s Child Exploitation Task Force (CETF).

It was prosecuted by Pamela Paaso and Suzanne Miles, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

Anyone who has information about the physical or online exploitation of children are encouraged to call the FBI at 1-800-CALL-FBI (1-800-225-5324) or submit a tip online at tips.fbi.gov.

The FBI CETF conducts sexual exploitation investigations, many of them undercover, in coordination with federal, state and local law enforcement agencies. CETF is committed to locating and arresting those who prey on children as well as recovering and assisting victims of sex trafficking and child exploitation.

This case was brought as part of Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative launched in May 2006 by the Justice Department to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse. For more information about Project Safe Childhood, please visit www.justice.gov/psc.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council has now approved BHRNs in 33 counties for drug treatment and recovery services
Oregon Health Authority - 08/11/22 2:49 PM

August 11, 2022

Media contact: Timothy Heider, 971-599-0459,

timothy.heider@dhsoha.state.or.us

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council has now approved BHRNs in 33 counties for drug treatment and recovery services

The Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council (OAC) approved Behavioral Health Resource Networks (BHRNs) in two more county regions, covering Klamath and Lane counties, Wednesday, August 10.

The OAC has now approved BHRNs in 33 out of 36 counties.

The new approvals represent an investment of more than $35.5 million, bringing the total BHRN funding to approximately $186.7 million. To date, nearly $229 million has been allocated in support of Measure 110, including Access to Care (ATC) grant funding.

OHA has developed a statewide map visualization that shows the BHRNs that have been approved for funding (in orange), along with those that have been selected by the OAC (in blue) and are in negotiations for funding approval.

See OHA’s robust new dashboard showing the BHRN approval and funding progress to date. OHA will continue to provide frequent updates on the funding process.

BHRN data gathering will take “phased approach”

The OAC has adopted guidelines for data reporting by the established BHRNs. A full description of what is required, along with sample reports in English and Spanish, can be found under “Grantee Resources” on the Measure 110 webpage.  

Other M110 funds to be disbursed

A three-month extension was offered to ATC grantees through Sept. 30, 2022.

Twenty-eight of the original 66 recipients received first-round extensions for a total of $5,725,054.93. Fifty-four of the original 66 recipients requested second-round extensions; of those, 41 were found eligible for additional funds totaling $4,356,343.

The additional funds are in the process of being disbursed, bringing the total ATC funds to be disbursed to approximately $41.6million. 

These funds will prevent a lapse of funding or interruption of service for grantees while the OAC continues to review and approve applications. 

ATC grantees comprise 70 substance use treatment programs that provide treatment, housing, vocational training and other life-changing support services. 

Read more about Measure 110

Background: In November 2020, Oregon voters passed Measure 110, the Drug Addiction Treatment and Recovery Act of 2020, which became effective Dec. 4, 2020, to better serve people actively using substances or diagnosed with a substance use disorder. In July 2021, the legislature passed SB 755, which amended the act and made it more feasible to implement.

People who provide drug treatment and recovery services and advocates for criminal justice reform wrote Measure 110 in response to the high rate of drug addiction and overdoses in Oregon, and the disproportionate impact of those outcomes on Oregon’s communities of color.

Their goal was to establish a more equitable and effective approach to substance use disorder. OHA is working with the OAC to develop a first-in-the-nation health-based approach to substance use and overdose prevention system, which is more helpful, caring and cost-effective than punishing and criminalizing people who need help.

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OHA Releases 2021 CCO Metrics Report
Oregon Health Authority - 08/11/22 2:29 PM

August 11 2022

Media Contact: Liz Gharst, eth.a.gharst@state.or.us">elizabeth.a.gharst@state.or.us, 971-666-2476

OHA Releases 2021 CCO Metrics Report

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) released the 2021 Coordinated Care Organization (CCO) Metrics Report, showing the results of Oregon’s Quality Incentive Program. The program rewards CCOs for improving the quality of care provided to Oregon Health Plan members. This program is one of several key health system transformation mechanisms for achieving Oregon’s health equity goal and vision for better health, better care and lower costs.

Although the COVID-19 public health emergency continued and the Delta variant drove surges in hospitalizations and deaths, performance on CCO incentive metrics began to rebound in 2021 after sharp declines in 2020.

The report shows an encouraging return to a focus on increasing quality, consistent with the Metrics and Scoring Committee’s decisions about 2021 benchmarks. Normally, the committee sets incentive metric benchmarks that are aspirational goals to encourage ongoing improvement. To balance ongoing quality improvement needs with concerns about the pandemic’s pressures on the health care system, however, the committee set significantly lower benchmarks for 2021, after suspending benchmarks entirely for 2020 due to the public health emergency.

CCOs earned substantial bonuses for performance on the metrics. The 2021 Quality Pool for CCO incentive metrics was almost $235 million, representing 3.75% of the total amount all CCOs were paid in 2021. The share of these bonus funds that each CCO earned depends on the number of members it serves and its performance on the 14 incentive metrics.

“After the initial shock of 2020, this report shows CCOs regaining ground in 2021,” said OHA’s Interim State Medicaid Director Dana Hittle. “Despite ongoing challenges, we saw CCOs improve over 2020 performance on most of these key measures of care for Oregon Health Plan members. This is very positive progress.”

Report highlights

In sharp contrast to 2020, statewide performance in 2021 showed improvement on most of the 14 incentive measures. The exceptions were two immunizations measures, which worsened for both children and adolescents, and the measure of drug and alcohol screening and referrals, which improved for the screening rate but worsened for the referrals rate. This report contains both encouraging trends and areas for improvement.

  • Oral health measures regained substantial ground in 2021. Preventive dental services improved by 25.9% over 2020 in ages 1 to 5 and 17.1% in ages 6 to 14. Oral evaluations for adults with diabetes improved by 21.7%.
  • The rate of CCO members who receive postpartum care after giving birth continued to improve in 2021, up 5.6% from 2020. The postpartum period is an important time for physical recovery; addressing pregnancy spacing and family planning needs; managing chronic conditions that may have been exacerbated during pregnancy; providing breastfeeding support; and ensuring mental health.
  • Improvements are needed in rates of youth immunizations, which are down 7.7% for adolescents and 8.3% for immunizations received by the child’s second birthday. Because these measures include a “look back” for immunizations received in previous years, they continue to be affected by disruptions in preventive care that occurred earlier in the pandemic.

In 2021, the Health Equity measure: Meaningful access to health care services for persons with limited English proficiency was incentivized for the first time, following extensive development work by a public workgroup and other partners. The measure’s goal is to achieve meaningful access to health care services for all CCO members through quality communication and language access services, as well as the delivery of culturally responsive care. Additional metrics to incentivize upstream, systems-level changes are included in the 2022 and 2023 CCO incentive metrics sets and will be reported in future years.

For highlights of statewide performance, snapshots of CCO performance, and details on how much each CCO earned through the Quality Incentive Program, visit the OHA Health Policy and Analytics website. A dashboard coming this fall will include additional measures, with options to explore breakouts of statewide and CCO performance by race, ethnicity and language.


BPA finances still strong with one quarter left in FY 2022
Bonneville Power Administration - 08/11/22 11:55 AM

Strong market prices continue to bolster BPA’s net secondary revenues

Portland, Oregon – Three quarters through the fiscal year, the Bonneville Power Administration expects to finish the year with higher than expected net revenues, primarily driven by net secondary sales. BPA’s current net revenue forecast is $836 million compared to a rate case net revenue forecast of $178 million.

Both BPA’s Power and Transmission business lines are expected to finish fiscally stronger than originally projected. 

“Bonneville continues to reap the benefits of higher than normal market prices for power and an almost ideal volume and runoff shape to the river,” said Administrator and CEO John Hairston. “If this trend continues through the remaining three months, this will be BPA’s strongest financial year since 2006.”

The new $836 million net revenue forecast has grown $270 million since BPA’s mid-year forecast. 

With just three months remaining in the fiscal year, it looks highly likely that BPA’s reserves distribution clause will activate for both Power and Transmission. The RDC is a process for determining the distribution of financial reserves to purposes determined by the administrator.  The process, outlined in the General Rate Schedule Provisions, states the administrator determines what part, if any, will be applied to debt reduction, incremental capital investment, rate reduction, or any other purposes. 

BPA’s financial reserves are now projected to be $1.594 billion at year’s end. Power Services financial reserves for risk are projected at 243 days cash on hand, and Transmission Services reserves for risk are projected at 159 days cash on hand. BPA’s financial policy sets the maximum days cash on hand with no RDC at 120 days. As of now, that would mean a $500 million RDC for Power Services and a $72 million RDC for Transmission Services. 

“We are pleased to be in this position of very strong top-line and bottom-line financial performance that will likely lead to the reserves distribution clause triggering for both Power and Transmission and be able to pass back the benefits of this solid financial year in some form to our customers,” said Chief Financial Officer Marcus Harris. 

While most of the financial news for BPA is overwhelmingly positive, inflation, higher interest rates, supply chain constraints and the start of a new water year loom. 

“Barring an unexpected setback, this year looks like it will be among BPA’s financially strongest,” said Harris. “However, we start this process over in October. A new fiscal year will bring a new set of opportunities and challenges and requires a refocus to again manage the bottom lines of both the Power and Transmission business lines.”

BPA’s full third quarterly business review is available at Quarterly Business Review - Bonneville Power Administration (bpa.gov)  

About BPA
The Bonneville Power Administration, headquartered in Portland, Oregon, is a nonprofit federal power marketer that sells wholesale, carbon-free hydropower from 31 federal dams in the Columbia River Basin. It also markets the output of the region’s only nuclear plant. BPA delivers this power to more than 140 Northwest electric utilities, serving millions of consumers and businesses in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, western Montana and parts of California, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming. BPA also owns and operates more than 15,000 circuit miles of high-voltage power lines and 261 substations, and provides transmission service to more than 300 customers. In all, BPA provides nearly a third of the power generated in the Northwest. To mitigate the impacts of the federal dams, BPA implements a fish and wildlife program that includes working with its partners to make the federal dams safer for fish passage. It also pursues cost-effective energy savings and operational solutions that help maintain safe, affordable, reliable electric power for the Northwest. www.bpa.gov 

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Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council holds public meetings in August
Oregon Health Authority - 08/11/22 10:59 AM

August 11, 2022

Media contact: Aria Seligmann, 503-910-9239, ia.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us">aria.l.seligmann@dhsoha.state.or.us

Measure 110 Oversight and Accountability Council holds public meetings in August

What: Public meetings of the Drug Treatment and Recovery Act (Measure 110) Oversight and Accountability Council.

Agenda: The council will finalize approval of BHRN applications. Agendas will be posted on the Oversight and Accountability Council web page prior to each meeting.

When/Where:

Virtual meetings are Wednesdays from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m.

Aug. 17: https://youtu.be/wi7JYWRQqoQ

Aug. 24: https://youtu.be/fcDyn3NUzq8

Aug. 31: https://youtu.be/rkDujcMo_Hk

Purpose: The Drug Treatment and Recovery Act (Measure 110) Oversight and Accountability Council (OAC) oversees the establishment of Behavioral Health Resource Networks throughout Oregon. The OAC holds regular meetings to accomplish the necessary steps to fund and set up the networks.

Read more about the OAC. Read more about Measure 110.

Questions? Contact e110@dhsoha.state.or.us">OHA.Measure110@dhsoha.state.or.us

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jessica Carroll at 503-580-9883, 711 TTY or roll@dhsoha.state.or.us">jessica.a.carroll@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


 


UPDATE - Oregon Department of Human Services announces that Davin Moore has been found
Oregon Department of Human Services - 08/11/22 10:45 AM

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division, is thankful for the community support to find Davin Moore. 

Davin Moore, age 14, is a child who went missing from Hermiston on Aug. 5. He was found Aug. 10. 

Sometimes when a child is missing they may be in significant danger and ODHS may need to locate them to assess and support their safety. As ODHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and assess their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. 

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UPDATE: Missing child alert -- Oakley Miller is missing and believed to be at risk (Photo)
Oregon Department of Human Services - 08/11/22 10:38 AM
Remington Miller
Remington Miller
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/973/156529/thumb_Remington_Miller.jpg

UPDATE - This alert has been updated to include new information that: 

  • McKinzie Simonis is believed to be traveling with Oakley Miller in a silver Mitsubishi Lancer with Washington license plates.
  • They are suspected to be in Union or Baker County.

(Salem) – Oakley Miller, age 3-months, went missing with his mother McKinzie Simonis from La Grande, Oregon on Aug. 3. The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division believes that Oakley may be at risk and is searching for him to assess his safety.

McKinzie Simonis is believed to be traveling with Oakley Miller in a silver Mitsubishi Lancer with Washington license plates. They are believed to be in Union County or Baker County, including the Oregon cities of North Powder, Halfway and Huntington. 

McKinzie Simonis and Oakley may be with Oakley’s father, Remington Miller. 

ODHS asks the public to help in the effort to find Oakely. Anyone who suspects they have information about the location of Oakley or McKinzie Simonis should call 911, local law enforcement or the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline at 1-855-503-SAFE (7233)

Name: Oakley Miller
Pronouns: He/him
Date of birth: April 25, 2022
Hair: Blonde 
Eye color: Blue
Other identifying information: Oakley is a young infant who is likely with his mother, McKinzie Simonis.
Union County Sheriff’s Office Case #SO220612
National Center for Missing and Exploited Children #1457364

Sometimes when a child is missing they may be in significant danger and ODHS may need to locate them to assess and support their safety. As ODHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and assess their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. 

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Attached Media Files: Remington Miller , Oakley Miller , Oakley Miller and McKinzie Simonis

The Dog Ate My Scratch-it (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 08/11/22 10:37 AM
2022-08/4939/156680/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg
2022-08/4939/156680/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/4939/156680/thumb_OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg

Aug. 11, 2022 – Salem, Ore. – Officials at the Oregon Lottery have seen Lottery tickets in many different states. Washed in a pair of jeans, dropped in a mud puddle, and even run over by cars. But earlier this week was a first.

The Oregon Lottery received a letter with a torn-up ticket and a picture of two dogs. That’s right, the dogs ate the Lottery ticket.

Nathan and Rachael Lamet of Salem sent the damaged ticket to the Lottery with a note and a picture of their two Alaskan Klee Kias, “Apple” and “Jack.” The Lamets have owned the dogs since they were puppies, “Apple” is 11 months old and “Jack” is two years old. 

“For some reason we left the ticket on the ottoman and they decided it was delicious,” said Rachel Lamet. “I went to bed and when I woke up it was eaten to the point that I thought it was unable to be checked. But my husband thought it was hilarious and someone might get a good laugh at at the very least. He said it’s for sure a winner.”

Oregon Lottery personnel didn’t roll over, and fetched all the pieces of the ticket and were able to put the ticket back together, and soon realized Nathan was right. The “delicious” $3 Pharaoh’s Gold Crossword was an $8 winner.

When the Lamets found out they had won, and the check was being mailed to them, they couldn’t believe it was actually a winning ticket.

“That’s too funny,” Rachael said. “We are definitely getting more chew toys, they go through a lot. We love them, but they are crazy sometimes.”

The Oregon Lottery does mail-in claims so players can send in their winning tickets through the mail. Usually these claims are processed and paid within 10 business days. 

Lottery officials recommend that you always sign the back of your tickets with each Oregon Lottery game you play, to ensure you can claim any prize you may win. In the event of winning a jackpot, players should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. And above all, make sure the ticket is out of reach of any furry friends!

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned nearly $14 billion for economic development, public education, Outdoor School, state parks, Veteran Services, and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org  




Attached Media Files: 2022-08/4939/156680/OL_LOGO_VERT.jpg , 2022-08/4939/156680/OL_LOGO_HORZ.jpg , Apple and Jax, the two dogs. , The winning $8 ticket. , The letter the Lamets sent in with their "doggie treat" ticket.

BLM announces new opportunity for partnerships to support management of wild horses and burros
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 08/11/22 10:21 AM

WASHINGTON, D.C. — The Bureau of Land Management is announcing new grants available to public and private partners to help support the agency’s mission to manage and protect wild horses and burros. The funding opportunity is open to local and state governments, tribes, other federal agencies and non-profit organizations. 

 

“The BLM is excited to continue our efforts at working collaboratively with institutions of education, non-profit organizations and other government agencies to manage and protect wild horses and burros on public lands,” said Holle’ Waddell, BLM Wild Horse and Burro Division Chief. “Whether it’s to help improve habitat quality, find good homes for our living legends, or apply birth control on the range, I encourage the broader wild horse and burro community to seriously consider this opportunity to partner with the BLM on these important actions.” 

 

This is the second year that the BLM has invited proposals for wild horse and burro projects through a new streamlined and centralized funding opportunity. Grant sizes will range from $1,000 to $50,000. 

 

An example of an on-going project awarded through the previous funding opportunity can be found in Oregon, where a public-private partnership helps dart difficult-to-reach wild horses with a birth-control vaccine. Thanks to the collaboration with local non-profit partner High Desert Strategies, 150 wild horses have been treated on public lands in eastern Oregon, which is slowing herd growth and reducing the need to remove animals to address overpopulation. 

 

Partnerships formed through this funding opportunity will support critical activities important to the management of wild horses and burros. Proposed off-range projects will be accepted until October 31, 2022 and could include activities such as facilitating the placement of excess animals into private care or providing educational opportunities to the public. Projects to support on-range activities, such as building habitat improvements or applying fertility control to wild horses and burros, can be submitted November 1, 2022 to January 31, 2023. 

 

Proposals to care for excess wild horses and burros in off-range facilities and proposals to fund research are not eligible under this funding opportunity. 

 

Applicants may propose to partner with BLM field, district state and national offices. Interested applicants are encouraged to contact the relevant BLM subject matter expert identified in the funding opportunity notice to discuss the type of projects that may be possible, and whether they would meet the requirements under this funding opportunity.

 

To learn more or for instructions on how to submit an application, visit the Notice of Funding Opportunity on Grants.gov

 

-BLM-

 

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 western states, including Alaska, on behalf of the American people. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. Our mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations.


Central Oregon Drug Enforcement Team Welcomes Drug Detection K9 Ladybug to the Team (Photo)
Central Oregon Drug Enforcement (CODE) - 08/11/22 10:00 AM
Campfire
Campfire
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/6078/156662/thumb_9873.jpg

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: August 11, 2022

Released By: Sergeant Kent Vander Kamp

Bend, OR - 

The Central Oregon Drug Enforcement Team welcomes Bend Police drug detection K9 Ladybug and her handler, Detective Rob Pennock, to the team. Ladybug is highly trained at using her sense of smell to detect a variety of controlled substances, except marijuana. She will be a valuable tool to her teammates during our investigations all around central Oregon. 

K9 Ladybug was selected to join CODE based on her unusually high play, prey, hunt and retrieve drives.  K9 Ladybug was also selected based on her socialization, personality, size, and confidence in all environments such as elevated and slick surfaces, confined spaces, and inclement weather.   

Detective Pennock and K9 Ladybug have taken and passed the Drug Detection Dog Certification Test as written and administered by WSPCA (Washington State Police Canine Association) as well as the OPCA (Oregon Police Canine Association) and CNCA (California Narcotic Canine Association).  

Ladybug, who recently celebrated her 10th birthday, is a Belgian Malinois from California.  When she’s not working, she enjoys hanging out around campfire with her family and lots of tummy scratches.

CONTACT FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:   Sgt. Kent Vander Kamp, 541-550-4869 or kentv@deschutes.org 

The Central Oregon Drug Enforcement (CODE) team is a multi-jurisdictional narcotics task force supported by the Oregon-Idaho High-Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) program and the following Central Oregon law enforcement agencies:  Bend Police Department, Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, Redmond Police Department,  Prineville Police Department, Crook County Sheriff’s Office, Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office, Madras Police Department, Oregon State Police, Sunriver Police Department, Black Butte Police Department, United States Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Warm Springs Tribal Police Department, Deschutes, Crook, and Jefferson County District Attorney’s, and the Oregon National Guard.

The Oregon-Idaho HIDTA program is an Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) sponsored counterdrug grant program that coordinates and provides funding resources to multi-agency drug enforcement task forces to disrupt or dismantle local, multi-state and international drug trafficking organizations.

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Attached Media Files: Campfire , Work Car

Oregon Community Foundation Invests $1 Million in Visionary Oregon Arts and Culture Projects Through 2022 Creative Heights Initiative (Photo)
Oregon Community Foundation - 08/11/22 9:30 AM
2022 Warm Springs Community Action Team_5_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation
2022 Warm Springs Community Action Team_5_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/6858/156666/thumb_2022_Warm_Springs_Community_Action_Team_5_Courtesy_of_Oregon_Community_Foundation.jpg

Oregon Community Foundation Invests $1 Million in Visionary Oregon Arts and Culture Projects Through 2022 Creative Heights Initiative

Fourteen Grantees Working to Celebrate Culture, Preserve History and Build Community in Oregon 

 

Portland, Ore. – Thursday, August 11, 2021 – Oregon Community Foundation (OCF) announced today that the foundation will invest $1 million in visionary Oregon arts and culture projects through OCF’s 2022 Creative Heights Initiative. 

 

Many of this year’s Creative Heights grantees are elevating cultural voices, shining a light on little-known history and launching significant new structures for artists to thrive. 

 

“We are deeply honored to receive a Creative Heights grant from Oregon Community Foundation to commission and produce Nu Nah-Hup: Sacajawea’s Story,” said Lisa Lipton, Executive Director, Opera Theater Oregon. “We are so fortunate to be guided by Sacajawea’s descendent, Rose Ann Abrahamson. Working together to share Sacajawea’s story through opera will help preserve her Agai-Dika / Lemhi Shoshone language as well as celebrate her Indigenous perspective and contributions.”

 

OCF’s 2022 Creative Heights awards support projects by visionary artists and arts and culture organizations that are working to celebrate culture, preserve history and build community in Oregon. 

 

“We’re thrilled to announce this group of 2022 Creative Heights awards. These artist-driven projects represent some of the most ambitious and important proposals that we’ve ever seen,” said Jerry Tischleder, Senior Program Officer, Arts and Culture, Oregon Community Foundation. “We’re grateful for the incredible work that artists across Oregon are creating to spark the connection and inspiration that bring communities together.”

 

Following is a snapshot of just a few of the extraordinary projects that OCF is supporting with the 2022 Creative Heights Initiative:

Joshua Caraco and Tumelo Michael MoloiLane Arts Council

$100,000 2022 Creative Heights Grant

To develop a musical theater performance using elements of Tumelo Michael Moloi's personal journey growing up in South Africa to living on a farm in Junction City as a medium to connect the struggle against apartheid in South Africa to the US Civil Rights and Black Lives Matter movements.

 

“This Creative Heights grant from Oregon Community Foundation will allow us to bring ideas we have talked about for years out into the world,” said co-lead artist Joshua Caraco. “We hope it will bring perspective and help foster global understanding and support. We also want to create art that people can't wait to tell their friends about.”

 

Opera Theater Oregon / Rose Ann Abrahamson

$100,000 2022 Creative Heights Grant

For Rose Ann Abrahamson's Nu Nah-Hup: Sacajawea's Story, which reimagines the extraordinary Shoshone woman who was a crucial member of the historic 1804-1806 Lewis and Clark Expedition, from her  Agai-Dika / Lemhi Shoshone Indigenous perspective in a new opera-theater work.

 

“Sacajawea’s story will be told with some of the most amazing music in the world,” said Rose Ann Abrahamson, great-great-grandniece of Sacajawea. “To be able to share her voice and the stories of her people through opera, ‘Oose’ from the bottom of our hearts.” 

 

[Editor Notes: Oose: Gratitude and thanks. Thank you, twice. Photo available. Photo caption: Rose Ann Abrahamson and Justin Ralls at the Sacajawea Education, Interpretive and Cultural Center in Salmon, Idaho – the ancestral homeland of the Agai-Dika / Lemhi Shoshone people. August, 2021. Photo credit: Courtesy of Opera Theater Oregon and Oregon Community Foundation.]

 

Warm Springs Community Action Team / LaRonn Katchia

$72,500 2022 Creative Heights Grant

To write, film, and edit a full-length documentary entitled "A Bridge to the Future," by Warm Springs tribal member LaRonn Katchia that captures the transformation of community in the de-/re-construction of the 125-year-old Warm Springs (BIA) Commissary - a symbol of a tribal community claiming a new future.

 

“With the Creative Heights grant from Oregon Community Foundation, we will be able to tell our story, transforming the oldest building on the Warm Springs reservation into a business incubator to help tribal entrepreneurs thrive,” said LaRonn Katchia, Filmmaker, Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs. “It is important to help build our economy within the reservation and to document this journey through an authentic indigenous lens.”

 

A complete list of all 14 2022 Creative Heights grantees can be found online, in OCF’s Press Room.

 

OCF’s Creative Heights initiative provides opportunities for artists and culture bearers to stretch their creative capacity, share new works and test new ideas. The initiative has invested roughly $1 million per year since 2014, encompassing 112 projects across a range of visual art, dance, folk and traditional arts, film/video/media, literary arts, museum exhibitions, humanities projects, music, theater and performance arts, history and heritage projects, and multidisciplinary artistic works.

 

About Oregon Community Foundation

Oregon Community Foundation (OCF) works with donors and volunteers to award grants and scholarships to every county in Oregon. From 2020 to 2021, OCF distributed more than $560 million, supporting more than 4,000 nonprofits and 6,000 students. With OCF, individuals, families, businesses, and organizations create charitable funds that meet the needs of diverse communities statewide. Since its founding in 1973, OCF has distributed more than $2 billion toward advancing its mission to improve lives for all Oregonians. For more information, please visit: oregoncf.org.

 

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Attached Media Files: 2022 Creative Heights Grants List_Oregon Community Foundation , OCF Arts and Culture_2022 Creative Heights Grants_FINAL News Release_08 11 2022 , 2022 Warm Springs Community Action Team_5_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation , 2022 Warm Springs Community Action Team_1_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation , Rose Ann Abrahamson-Desecdant of Sacajawea_Courtesy of Opera Theater Oregon and Oregon Community Foundation , Rose Ann Abrahamson-Desecdant of Sacajawea_Courtesy of Opera Theater Oregon and Oregon Community Foundation , Joshua Caraco and Tumelo Michael Moloi_2_Courtesy of Lane Arts Council and Oregon Community Foundation , Joshua Caraco and Tumelo Michael Moloi_1_Courtesy of Lane Arts Council and Oregon Community Foundation , Creative Heights 2022_Courtesy of Oregon Community Foundation

Board of Forestry hosts virtual special public meeting on Aug. 24
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/11/22 9:29 AM

SALEM, Ore. — The Oregon Board of Forestry will hold a virtual special meeting starting at 8 a.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 24. The meeting will be livestreamed on the department’s YouTube channel.

The board’s business agenda includes:

  • Private Forest Accord overview and author comments
  • Private Forest Accord rulemaking discussion
  • 2023-2025 Agency budget development

View the agenda and board meeting details.

Live testimony is available for decision item #2 - Private Forest Accord rulemaking discussion and item #3 - 2023-2025 Agency budget development. 

Sign-up is required and instructions to provide live testimony are available online. Sign-up closes Friday, Aug. 19 at 5 p.m. Written comments can be submitted before or up to Aug. 24 to oardofforestry@odf.oregon.gov">boardofforestry@odf.oregon.gov, with the appropriate agenda item included with the submission.

Accommodations for people with disabilities, and special materials, services, or assistance can be arranged by calling ODF’s Public Affairs Office at least 72 hours in advance of the meeting at 503-945-7200 or by email at estryinformation@odf.oregon.gov">forestryinformation@odf.oregon.gov.

The Oregon Board of Forestry consists of seven citizens nominated by the Governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. Responsibilities include appointing the State Forester, setting management direction for state-owned forests, adopting rules governing timber harvest and other practices on private forestland, and promoting sustainable management of Oregon’s 30-million-acre forestland base. Read more information about the board.


Reminder: Media briefing on monkeypox (hMPXV) today at 11 a.m.
Oregon Health Authority - 08/11/22 9:19 AM

August 11, 2022

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, jonathan.n.modie@dhsoha.state.or.us

Reminder: Media briefing on monkeypox (hMPXV) today at 11 a.m.

PORTLAND, Ore. — Oregon Health Authority’s Zoom media briefing on monkeypox (hMPXV) in Oregon is today (Aug. 11) at 11 a.m.

Dean Sidelinger, M.D., health officer and state epidemiologist at OHA, will join Patrick Luedtke, M.D., Lane County’s senior public health officer, and Katie Cox, executive director of The Equi Institute, to give an update on the state’s response to the outbreak and reporting of cases in Oregon, and take questions.

Interested reporters can join via Zoom at this link. A livestream also is available via YouTube at this link.

 


Members Selected for Police Chief's Advisory Council (Photo)
Bend Police Dept. - 08/11/22 9:17 AM
Press Release
Press Release
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2022-08/5593/156673/thumb_PRESS_RELEASE_FOR_FLASHALERT.png

Bend Police Chief Mike Krantz is pleased to announce the new members of the Police Chief’s Advisory Council. 

Over the past 18 years, the Police Chief’s Advisory Council has served as an engagement and communication tool for creating and maintaining relationships with the community. 

The PCAC will serve three critical missions: 

  • To advise the Chief of Police and the Police Department on various issues from the community perspective.
  • To act as a communication conduit between community networks and the Police Department.
  • To enhance trust between the community and the law enforcement agencies that serve them.

Chief Krantz and a team of City of Bend employees considered 64 applications and selected 19 members to join the advisory council. Those interested were required to fill out an application and complete a limited volunteer background check. 

As members of the PCAC, they will be expected to conduct a ridealong with an officer, participate in the Community Academy, and attend 90-minute monthly meetings that will focus on community problem solving. They may also observe some police training and create an annual outcome plan for the Advisory Council. Members will serve as community contacts. Members will typically serve a two-year term and the application process will be reopened annually to include additional voices on the advisory council. 

“I appreciate these 19 community members’ willingness to volunteer to be a part of the Police Chief’s Advisory Council,” Chief Krantz said. “I value our community’s thoughts, opinions and concerns and expect this group will help us better serve the community.” 

Chief Krantz sought a diverse group of members to reflect the Bend community, and the new members of the Police Chief’s Advisory Council range in age from 29 to 79 and hail from all quadrants of the City of Bend. They are: 

  • Elizabeth Allen
  • Lisa Anderson
  • Angelica Bocanegra-Chavez
  • Julie Borshell
  • Michael Chamness
  • Lance Gomez
  • Charles Johannessen, Jr. 
  • Hans Jorgensen
  • Steven Koski
  • Joel Lee
  • Terry Leggert
  • Marcus LeGrand
  • Jennifer Lingard
  • Kelly Musgrove
  • Caroline Ramoz
  • Julie Sandvigen
  • Stephen Tilden
  • Laura Winberry
  • Kelly Windolph



Attached Media Files: Press Release

Registration is Live for SOLVE's Beach & Riverside Cleanup!
SOLVE - 08/11/22 9:11 AM

 

For Immediate Release

 

Oregonians Encouraged to Sign Up for SOLVE’s Statewide 

Beach & Riverside Cleanup, September 17

 

 

Downloadable image: 

SOLVE volunteer takes in the views of the coastline while collecting litter.

https://solveoregon.my.salesforce.com/sfc/p/1I000002vkol/a/8W000001pUKx/u_uaU.XTfDGCtKDd38R_PYSolsae4GtCwLLZPR.IGZU

Portland, Ore., August 11, 2022 – Come together with thousands of Oregonians on Saturday, September 17, for SOLVE’s Beach & Riverside Cleanup, in partnership with the Oregon Lottery. Volunteer registration is now live, and all Oregonians, from Astoria to Brookings, Pendleton to Sunriver, are encouraged to sign up for this statewide cleanup event. 

For nearly four decades, SOLVE has hosted the annual Beach & Riverside Cleanup. With the support of SOLVE, community leaders and partner organizations host restoration events, urban litter cleanup projects, and beach cleanups. Each volunteer project is aimed at caring for one of Oregon’s most precious resources, our water, from source to sea.

Thanks to the efforts of over 3,000 dedicated volunteers who participated in last year’s Beach & Riverside Cleanup, over 60,385 pounds of trash and marine debris were removed, and 32,717 square feet of invasive plants were cleared.

Removing invasive plant species, nurturing native plants, and collecting litter are all easy ways volunteers can positively impact Oregon’s water quality.

Each piece of litter collected removes the possibility of it entering a nearby river, waterway, or storm drain, where it can eventually make its way to the sea and contribute to our global marine debris crisis. Invasive plant species crowd out native plants and typically have shallow roots, leading to increased erosion and poor water filtration. 

Since 1969, SOLVE has been mobilizing volunteers to restore and preserve Oregon’s natural spaces,” says Oregon Lottery Director, Barry Pack. “The Oregon Lottery is proud to continue supporting SOLVE’s Beach & Riverside Cleanup. Now more than ever, it’s important for Oregonians to come together for a common cause. SOLVE’s Beach & Riverside Cleanup provides the perfect opportunity.

Interested community members are encouraged to visit solveoregon.org to see a list of volunteer projects and sign up. To create a culture of sustainability around litter cleanups, it is suggested that you bring your own reusable gloves, buckets, and safety vests. The Beach & Riverside Cleanup is a great way to bond with family members, coworkers, and neighbors, all while collectively giving back to some of Oregon’s most beautiful places. Join the action today at solveoregon.org.

SOLVE’s Beach & Riverside Cleanup is in partnership with the Oregon Lottery, with additional support from Metro, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, Oregon Department of Transportation, Onpoint Community Credit Union, Rogue Ales & Spirits, Chevron, Fred Meyer, Bamboo Sushi, Clean Water Services, City of Beaverton, Next Adventure, and Deep Blue Pacific Wind.

About SOLVE
SOLVE is a statewide non-profit organization that brings Oregonians together to improve our environment and build a legacy of stewardship. Since 1969, the organization has grown from a small, grassroots group to a national model of volunteer action. Today, SOLVE mobilizes and trains tens of thousands of volunteers of all ages across Oregon to clean and restore our neighborhoods and natural areas, and build a legacy of stewardship for our state. Visit solveoregon.org for more information. 

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Oregon approved to issue an additional $46 million in Pandemic EBT food assistance to 80,000 young children
Oregon Department of Human Services - 08/11/22 9:07 AM

Need to know: 

  • Families who receive Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits and have young children may receive additional food benefits for their children this Fall.
  • Oregon will provide approximately $46 million in additional food assistance for 80,000 young children.
  • These food benefits will be issued in Fall 2022 with the exact dates yet to be determined.
  • These additional food benefits are part of the Pandemic EBT (P-EBT) program, a temporary COVID-19 program meant to provide additional food support for children whose access to adequate and quality food may have been impacted by COVID-19.  

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS) received approval from the federal government to provide additional food benefits for young children whose families received Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits between September 2021 and May 2022. 

These additional food benefits will provide approximately $46 million in additional food assistance for 80,000 young children in Oregon. The additional food benefits will be issued to families’ existing EBT cards in Fall 2022, with the exact dates yet to be determined.

“We are grateful to be able to provide these additional food benefits to families with young children in Oregon,” said Jana McLellan, interim director of the ODHS Self-Sufficiency Programs. “As communities continue to be impacted by COVID-19 and the rising cost of food, we know that many families are experiencing hardship and are struggling to get enough healthy food for themselves and their children. We encourage anyone who is struggling to meet their basic needs to contact our partners at 211, the Oregon Food Bank and their local Community Action Agency for support during this difficult time.”

Eligibility for P-EBT food benefits

  • Families must have received SNAP benefits at any time between September 2021 and May 2022.
  • Children in the family who were age 5 and under at any time during this period are eligible to receive additional food benefits. 
  • Families will receive the additional food benefits for every month during this period that:
    • One or more children in their household were ages 5 and younger 
    • The family was receiving SNAP benefits.

Eligible families will receive an extra $63 food benefit per child on their EBT card for every month the children were ages 5 or younger and their family was receiving SNAP benefits. Families can receive up to $567 in additional food benefits for each child who is eligible.

These additional food benefits are part of the Pandemic EBT (P-EBT) program, a temporary COVID-19 program meant to provide additional food support for children whose access to adequate and quality food may have been impacted by COVID-19. 

Families whose EBT card has been lost or stolen should call the toll-free replacement card line at 1-855-328-6715 to request a replacement card as soon as possible. The replacement line is open Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Visit pebt.oregon.gov for more information about the P-EBT program.

P-EBT does not replace any child nutrition program already offered and families are encouraged to continue to participate in meal programs in their communities.  

P-EBT food benefits are issued in addition to regular SNAP benefits including emergency allotments that are also being issued due to the impact of COVID-19. P-EBT benefits are not considered in a public charge test.

Resources to help meet basic needs

About SNAP

Administered by ODHS, SNAP is a federal program that provides food assistance to approximately 1 million eligible, low-income families and individuals in Oregon, including many older adults and people with disabilities. Oregonians in need can apply for benefits, including SNAP, child care, cash assistance and Medicaid. Learn more at https://govstatus.egov.com/or-dhs-benefits. For local resources in your area, such as food or shelter, please call 2-1-1 or reach out to the state’s Aging and Disability Resource Connection (ADRC) at 1-855-ORE-ADRC or 1-855-673-2372.


Fatal Crash US 199 -- Josephine County
Oregon State Police - 08/11/22 5:42 AM

On Wednesday August 10, 2022, at about 4:55 PM, Oregon State Police (OSP) Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two-vehicle crash on US 199 near milepost 6. 

Preliminary investigation revealed that a southbound Ford 550 pickup operated by, Robert Clair, age 31, from Grants Pass, crossed the center line of the highway and struck a northbound Harley Davidson motorcycle operated by, Johnny Porter, age 45, from Cave Junction.  Porter was ejected from the motorcycle and was pronounced deceased at the scene by emergency personnel. Clair was not injured in the crash. 

US 199 was closed for about one hour. 

OSP was assisted Josephine County Sheriff’s Office, ODOT, AMR, Rural Metro Fire and Grants Pass Fire.

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