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Bend/Central-Eastern Oregon News Releases for Thu. Jun. 20 - 12:58 pm
Thu. 06/20/24
Fatal Dirt Bike Crash Claims the Life of Two Juveniles (Photo)
Deschutes County Sheriff's Office - 06/20/24 12:20 PM
Media Release
Media Release
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Released By: Sergeant Jason Wall

Release Date: June 20, 2024

Location: U.S.F.S. Road 1028, south of Skylight Cave

Deceased: 14-year-old female (name withheld), 14-year-old male (name withheld)

Involved Juveniles: 15-year-old female (name withheld), 15-year-old male (name withheld)

 

Narrative: 

On June 19th, 2024, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office was dispatched to a report of a dirt bike crash on U.S. Forest Service Road 1028, south of Skylight Cave. Four juveniles were riding dirt bikes on U.S. Forest Service Road 1028, when two of the juveniles did not arrive at their destination. These juveniles were riding in pairs on two dirt bikes. Two of the riders checked the area and located the other two juveniles, who had crashed their dirt bike and were seriously injured.

The juveniles on scene began life saving efforts and contacted 911. A passerby assisted the juveniles until deputies arrived and took over life saving measures. Paramedics arrived a short time after the deputies, continuing life saving measures. Both juveniles were wearing helmets at the time of the crash, speed and variable terrain appear to be factors in the crash. Both juveniles were pronounced deceased at the scene. 

Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office detectives responded to the scene, assisted by the Oregon State Police, who conducted a crash reconstruction. A medical examiner also responded to the scene to assist with the investigation.

At this time the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office will not be releasing the names of those involved, as they are juveniles. The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office has made official notice to the involved families.

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office was assisted by the Oregon State Police, Black Butte Ranch Police, and the Sisters Fire District.

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is a full-service agency that oversees the adult jail, provides patrol, criminal investigations, civil process and search and rescue operations. Special units include SWAT, Street Crimes, Marine Patrol, ATV Patrol, Forest Patrol, along with six K9 teams. Founded in 1916 and today led by your duly elected Sheriff L. Shane Nelson, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office serves over 200,000 residents in Deschutes County. The agency has 263 authorized and funded personnel, which includes 178 sworn employees who provide services to the 3,055 square miles of Deschutes County.




Attached Media Files: Media Release

Longstanding Central Oregon Fundraiser High Desert Rendezvous Returns August 24 - Raffle Tickets Now Available to Name New Falcon at Museum (Photo)
High Desert Museum - 06/20/24 11:30 AM
Photo by Rob Kerr
Photo by Rob Kerr
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-06/6924/173173/thumb_thumbnail_High-Desert-Museum_Rendezvous.49.jpg

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Thursday June 20, 2024

BEND, OR — It’s time to secure your seats! Tickets are now available for the High Desert Museum’s annual fundraiser, High Desert Rendezvous. Returning for its 35th year on Saturday, August 24, Rendezvous promises an evening of celebration in support of the Museum’s dynamic programs, exhibitions and wildlife.

“Rendezvous proves to be a highlight of the summer season year after year,” said Museum Executive Director Dana Whitelaw, Ph.D. “We’re excited to see old friends and make new ones as we celebrate the Museum’s accomplishments and raise a glass to our generous community.”

Also, raffle ticket sales are already underway to name the Museum’s new aplomado falcon. The lucky winner, to be selected during Rendezvous, will not only have the honor of naming the falcon but will also receive additional perks, including a behind-the-scenes wildlife tour, meet and greet with the falcon, a High Desert Museum Family Membership, eight tickets to the Raptors of the Desert Sky 2025 show, a falcon stuffed animal and a framed naming certificate. The winner does not have to be at Rendezvous to win. The chosen name should resonate with the essence of the High Desert, pay homage to the aplomado falcon and be appropriate for the Museum's audiences. Tickets are $25 each and only 750 will be sold. They can be purchased today at highdesertmuseum.org/hdr.

The Rendezvous experience begins at the Museum's entrance, where guests are warmly welcomed by animal ambassadors like the golden eagle, porcupine and desert tortoise. Inside a hosted bar and delectable appetizers await, alongside previews of the evening’s live auction items and an opportunity to bid on exquisite artworks showcased in the juried exhibition, Art in the West. This exceptional exhibition opens at the Museum on Saturday, July 20, with a detailed gallery guide available online on July 13 at highdesertmuseum.org/aiw.

As the evening progresses, guests are invited to dine under an outdoor tent decorated with twinkling lights. Amid the ambiance, there's much to indulge in: an exciting live auction, captivating entertainment and the recognition of this year’s Rendezvous honoree, The Bend Foundation. The Bend Foundation is the philanthropic arm of the Brooks Resources Corporation, the very organization that donated the 135-acres the Museum sits on today.

Funds from High Desert Rendezvous support the Museum’s meaningful exhibitions, wildlife encounters and educational programs that inspire wonder about the High Desert region. As a result, this beloved annual event ensures that the Museum continues to inspire lifelong learners, spark meaningful conversations and cultivate a community where diverse cultures, landscapes and wildlife can thrive together.

Individual tickets for the Rendezvous are priced at $2o0 for members and $250 for nonmembers. For those seeking a communal experience, sponsorship tables accommodating parties of eight or 10 are also available. Secure your tickets now at highdesertmuseum.org/hdr for an unforgettable evening at the Museum!

High Desert Rendezvous is presented by Bonta Gelato and Ferguson Wellman with support from First Interstate Bank. 

ABOUT THE HIGH DESERT MUSEUM: 

The High Desert Museum opened in Bend, Oregon in 1982. It brings together wildlife, cultures, art, history and the natural world to convey the wonder of North America’s High Desert. The Museum is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization accredited by the American Alliance of Museums, is a Smithsonian Affiliate, was the 2019 recipient of the Western Museums Association’s Charles Redd Award for Exhibition Excellence and was a 2021 recipient of the National Medal for Museum and Library Service. To learn more, visit highdesertmuseum.org and follow us on Facebook and Instagram.

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Attached Media Files: Photo by Rob Kerr , Photo by Robert Davis , Photo by John Williams

Press Release: Oregon's Nonfarm Payroll Employment Rises by 4,000 in May
Oregon Employment Department - 06/20/24 10:08 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:  June 20, 2024

CONTACT INFORMATION: 
Gail Krumenauer, State Employment Economist 
(971) 301-3771

Video and Audio available at 10 a.m.

Oregon’s Nonfarm Payroll Employment Rises by 4,000 in May

Salem, OR  In May, Oregon’s seasonally adjusted nonfarm payroll employment rose by 4,000 jobs, following a revised gain of 2,400 jobs in April. Health care and social assistance gained 1,900 jobs in May, while leisure and hospitality added 1,000. Monthly declines were largest in retail trade (-800) and construction (-400).

Private-sector job growth has been very slow over the year, gaining 3,500 jobs (+0.2%). Health care and social assistance was the primary source of growth with a solid gain of 16,200 jobs (+5.7%). All four component industries have been adding jobs at a rapid clip. Elsewhere in the private sector, manufacturing dropped 3,700 jobs over the year, retail trade lost 3,400, and construction dropped 2,200 jobs in the past year.

The public sector added 9,100 jobs over the past 12 months. Local, state, and federal government are all at least 2% above their job counts a year ago. Local education gained 3,400 jobs over the year to reach 142,600 in May. This is the first spring that local schools reached the employment level in spring 2019, prior to the pandemic.

Oregon’s unemployment rate was 4.2% in May for the fourth straight month. Looking back at the past few years, Oregon’s monthly unemployment rate has been 4.2% or lower every month since October 2021. The U.S. unemployment rate was 4.0% in May.

Next Press Releases

The Oregon Employment Department plans to release the May county and metropolitan area unemployment rates on Tuesday, June 25, and the next statewide unemployment rate and employment survey data for June on Wednesday, July 17.

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Notes:

All numbers in the above narrative are seasonally adjusted except for the local government education job figures.

The Oregon Employment Department and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) work cooperatively to develop and publish monthly Oregon payroll employment and labor force data. The estimates of monthly job gains and losses are based on a survey of businesses. The estimates of unemployment are based on a survey of households and other sources.

The Oregon Employment Department publishes payroll employment estimates that are revised quarterly by using employment counts from employer unemployment insurance tax records. All department publications use this Official Oregon Series data unless noted otherwise. The department continues to make the original nonfarm payroll employment series available; these data are produced by the BLS.

 

The PDF version of this news release can be found at QualityInfo.org/press-release. To get the data in other formats such as in Excel, visit QualityInfo.org, select Tools, then choose LAUS or CES under the Economy header. To request the press release as a Word document, contact the person shown at the top of this press release.

To file a claim for unemployment benefits or get more information about unemployment programs, visit unemployment.oregon.gov.

The Oregon Employment Department (OED) is an equal opportunity agency. OED provides free help so you can use our services. Some examples are sign language and spoken-language interpreters, written materials in other languages, large print, audio, and other formats. To get help, please call 503-947-1444. TTY users call 711. You can also send an email to communications@employ.oregon.gov.

El Departamento de Empleo de Oregon (OED) es una agencia de igualdad de oportunidades. El OED proporciona ayuda gratuita para que usted pueda utilizarnuestros servicios. Algunos ejemplos son intérpretes de lengua de señas e idiomas hablados, materiales escritos en otros idiomas, letra grande, audio y otros formatos. Para obtener ayuda, por favorllame al 503-947-1444. Usuarios de TTY pueden llamar al 711. También puede enviar un correo electrónico a communications@employ.oregon.gov.

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Attached Media Files: 2024-06/930/173167/May_2024_employment_in_Oregon--_press_release_6.20.24.pdf

Early Morning structure fire at El Sanchos Taco Shop East Location (Photo)
Bend Fire & Rescue - 06/20/24 5:48 AM
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An early morning fire broke out around 1:00 am this morning at 335 NE Dekalb Avenue, El Sancho's Taco Shop East. Reporting witnesses stated they saw flames coming from the West side of the restaurant, on the alley side. The fire originated on the East side of the building, and spread up and into the attic. Fire crews were able to extinguish the fire within 30 mins. The estimated building loss to El Sancho's is $180,000, and contents estimated at $75,000-$85,000. Several cars from the adjacent car dealership, Auto Kings, also sustained damage from the radiant heat 20 feet away. No information on loss for those vehicles. The fire cause is still under investigation. 




Attached Media Files: 2024-06/6802/173164/Sanchos_IMG_1667.jpg

Wed. 06/19/24
House fire on West Ridge Ave Bend 6-19-24 (Photo)
Bend Fire & Rescue - 06/19/24 5:08 PM
Credit Bend Fire
Credit Bend Fire
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Bend Fire & Rescue was dispatched to a house fire on West Ridge Ave at 04:42 am on 6/19/24. Neighbors called stating the back of a house was on fire. Crews arrived and found a large three-story house with fire on all floors. The main part of the fire was stopped within 30 minutes but took another 3 ½ hours to fully contain the fire in attic and many concealed roof and wall spaces. The house was unoccupied at the time as its undergoing extensive renovations. No other structures were threatened by the fire. Bend Fire was assisted on scene by fire crews from Alfalfa, Cloverdale and Sunriver Fire Departments. Redmond Fire Department sent crews to Bend to help run other medical calls in town. A total of 7 fire engines, 2 ladder trucks, 2 ambulances, and multiple command staff, total of 40 personnel on scene. The building has a value of approximately $2,000,000 and the loss is estimated at least $1,500,000. The home owners and contractors insurance companies have been contacted and will be working to rebuild the house. 

One Bend Fire & Rescue employee sustained injuries in a fall inside the house during fire operations. The employee was treated and released from St Charles Medical Center with non-life-threatening injuries and is recovering at home as of this evening. 

The fire was caused by improperly disposed of oily rags. A contractor was staining the 2nd floor areas and forgot to add water to the bucket of used rags before leaving the day before. Several neighbors reported smelling smoke in the area several hours prior to smoke being seen coming from the house when the 911 calls were made. 

Bend Fire & Rescue reminds everyone that oily rags can start a fire if not properly disposed of. The most common type of spontaneous combustion fires is those caused by improperly disposed of oil and stain-soaked rags. Spontaneous combustion of oily rags occurs when rag or cloth is slowly heated to its ignition point through oxidation. A substance will begin to release heat as it oxidizes. If this heat has no way to escape, like in a pile, the temperature will raise to a level high enough to ignite the oil and ignite the rag or cloth. The fire from this can spread quickly to other combustibles and cause great damage to your home or property. 

To properly and safely dispose of oily rags, Bend Fire & Rescue recommends the following steps:

  1. Use a container with a tight-fitting lid. A metal can is preferable, but a plastic can or zip lock bag can work if nothing else is available. 
  2. Place soiled and used rags inside and then fill the rest the way with water, seal the top and do not open it. This will prevent the oils from oxidizing, and thus keeping the rags from heating up and igniting. 
  3. Contact your local garbage disposal company for their policy on disposal of the can and contents.  Some companies will permit disposal in regular household trash.



Attached Media Files: Credit Bend Fire

UPDATE: Bend Police locate missing Flagstaff woman (Photo)
Bend Police Dept. - 06/19/24 4:21 PM
Julie Negrelli in outfit last ween wearing
Julie Negrelli in outfit last ween wearing
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UPDATE: At approximately 4 p.m., Bend Police located Ms. Negrelli in Bend. She is uninjured. Thank you to the public for your assistance in this investigation. 

 

Date: June 19, 2024

Case #: 2024-00034118

Incident: Bend Police seek public’s assistance in locating missing Flagstaff, Ariz., woman

Date / Time of Incident: June 18, 2024 / 7:34 p.m.

Location: Campfire Motel, 700 block of NE Third Street, Bend

Missing: Julie Collins Negrelli, 42-year-old Flagstaff, Arizona woman 

Bend Police are asking for the public’s help in locating a woman reported missing from the Campfire Motel on Tuesday evening. 

At approximately 7:34 p.m. on Tuesday, Bend Police responded to a report of a missing person at the Campfire Hotel. The caller reported that his girlfriend had left for a walk on Monday evening around 9:30 p.m., taking only her phone and room key, and had failed to return. He told police he’d last spoken to her at about 1:25 a.m. on Tuesday morning, when she told him she was at a convenience store helping a homeless person get something to eat. She said she planned to return to the hotel when she was done, but her boyfriend has not heard from her since that time.   

The woman, identified as 42-year-old Julie Negrelli, was visiting Central Oregon with her boyfriend to go rock climbing. She is described as a white female with blue eyes and brown hair. She stands approximately 5 feet 2 inches and weighs approximately 115 pounds. Her nose is pierced on both sides, she has a small cross tattoo on her sternum, and she was last seen wearing a gray hoodie sweatshirt that says “One Eyed Buffalo” and black leggings. Her picture is attached to this release. 

Negrelli is not familiar with the area. Overnight, officers conducted an extensive search for Negrelli but were unsuccessful. That search is ongoing. 

If you see Negrelli, please call nonemergency dispatch at 541-693-6911. 




Attached Media Files: Julie Negrelli in outfit last ween wearing , Julie Negrelli

Fatal Crash - HWY 211 - Marion County
Oregon State Police - 06/19/24 11:43 AM

Marion County, Ore. 18 June 24- On Tuesday, June 18, 2024, at 12:06 a.m., Oregon State Police responded to a vehicle versus pedestrian crash on Hwy 211, near milepost 1, in Marion County.

The preliminary investigation indicated an eastbound Kia Soul, operated by Keoki Kahee (23) of Canby, struck a pedestrian, Martin Cabanas Salgado (56) from an unknown city, who was reportedly walking on the fog line.

The pedestrian (Cabanas Salgado) was declared deceased at the scene.

The Kia operator (Kahee) and passenger, Taylor Hayes (22) of Canby, were uninjured and were cooperating with investigators.

The highway was impacted for approximately four hours during the on-scene investigation. The cause of the crash is under investigation.

OSP was assisted by the Woodburn Police Department, Woodburn Fire, and ODOT.

# # #

About the Oregon State Police
Oregon State Police (OSP) is a multi-disciplined organization that is charged with protecting the people, wildlife, and natural resources in Oregon. OSP enforces traffic laws on the state’s roadways, investigates and solves crime, conducts postmortem examinations and forensic analysis, and provides background checks, and law enforcement data. The agency regulates gaming and enforces fish, wildlife, and natural resource laws. OSP is comprised of more than 1,400 staff members – including troopers, investigators, and professional staff – who provide a full range of policing and public safety services to Oregon and other law enforcement agencies throughout Oregon.


Fatal Crash - HWY 26 - Crook County
Oregon State Police - 06/19/24 11:18 AM

Crook County, Ore. 17 June 24- On Monday, June 17, 2024, at 5:51 a.m., Oregon State Police responded to a single-vehicle crash on Hwy 26, near milepost 26, in Crook County.

The preliminary investigation indicated a westbound Toyota Tundra, operated by Clifford Dean Shields (54) of Prineville, for unknown reasons, drifted across the eastbound lane, left the roadway, and struck a rock and tree. The vehicle began to roll and came to rest on the passenger side on the east side of the highway. Motorists in the area stopped, extricated the operator, and performed CPR. 

The operator of the Toyota (Shields) was declared deceased at the scene.

The highway was impacted for approximately 3 hours during the on-scene investigation. A medical event is considered the possible cause of the crash.

OSP was assisted by the Crook County Sheriff's Office, Crook County Fire and Rescue, and ODOT.

# # #

About the Oregon State Police
Oregon State Police (OSP) is a multi-disciplined organization that is charged with protecting the people, wildlife, and natural resources in Oregon. OSP enforces traffic laws on the state’s roadways, investigates and solves crime, conducts postmortem examinations and forensic analysis, and provides background checks, and law enforcement data. The agency regulates gaming and enforces fish, wildlife, and natural resource laws. OSP is comprised of more than 1,400 staff members – including troopers, investigators, and professional staff – who provide a full range of policing and public safety services to Oregon and other law enforcement agencies throughout Oregon.


Fatal Crash - Interstate 84 - Umatilla County
Oregon State Police - 06/19/24 11:09 AM

Umatilla County, Ore. 16 June 24- On Saturday, June 16, 2024, at 5:57 p.m., Oregon State Police responded to a two-vehicle crash on Interstate 84, near milepost 220, in Umatilla County.

The preliminary investigation indicated a westbound Dodge Ram 1500, operated by Barbara Claudine Abercrombie (56) of Irrigon, struck the rear of a Peterbilt commercial motor vehicle and trailer, operated by Marshall Lee Mondry (29) of Meridian (ID), as it was slowly descending a steep grade with its hazard lights activated.

The operator of the Dodge (Abercrombie) was declared deceased at the scene. 

The operator of the Peterbilt (Mondry) was not injured.

The highway was impacted for approximately 4 hours during the on-scene investigation. 

OSP was assisted by the Umatilla Tribal Police Department, Umatilla Tribal Medics, and ODOT.

# # #

About the Oregon State Police
Oregon State Police (OSP) is a multi-disciplined organization that is charged with protecting the people, wildlife, and natural resources in Oregon. OSP enforces traffic laws on the state’s roadways, investigates and solves crime, conducts postmortem examinations and forensic analysis, and provides background checks, and law enforcement data. The agency regulates gaming and enforces fish, wildlife, and natural resource laws. OSP is comprised of more than 1,400 staff members – including troopers, investigators, and professional staff – who provide a full range of policing and public safety services to Oregon and other law enforcement agencies throughout Oregon.


Tue. 06/18/24
Two people arrested for trafficking fentanyl in Central Oregon (Photo)
Central Oregon Drug Enforcement (CODE) - 06/18/24 4:56 PM
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Current date: June 18th, 2024

Date of incident: June 14th, 2024

Case #: 2024-0016781

Arrested

Tamar Dibben, 24-year-old Redmond resident

Abigail Bates, 24-year-old Redmond resident

Charges: Unlawful possession of schedule II-controlled substance and Unlawful delivery of schedule II-controlled substance

On June 14th, 2024, at approximately 8:20 PM, the Central Oregon Drug Enforcement Team, in collaboration with the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office and Redmond Police Department, concluded a short-term drug investigation with the arrest of Tamar Dibben and Abigail Bates, both age 24, of Redmond.

On June 14th, 2024, Drug agents conducted a surveillance operation which led to a traffic stop on Hwy. 20 near Black Butte Ranch.  Deschutes County Deputies conducted the stop at the direction of the CODE team, as reasonable suspicion was established that Dibben and Bates were involved in illegal drug activity. Redmond Police, and K9 Sadie, were present for the traffic stop, Sadie was deployed and alerted to the odor presence of drugs in the vehicle.

CODE Detectives applied for and were granted a search warrant for the two occupants and the vehicle.  CODE Detectives executed the search warrant that same evening and located a large quantity of fentanyl powder, fentanyl pills, and cash. Detectives also located a smaller amount of methamphetamine and alprazolam.

Tamar Dibben and Abigail Bates were both transported and lodged at the Deschutes County Adult Jail.  Additional charges may be filed in this case as the investigation is ongoing.

CODE Detectives were assisted by the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office and the Redmond Police Department during this investigation.

The Central Oregon Drug Enforcement (CODE) team is a multi-jurisdictional narcotics task force supported by the Oregon-Idaho High-Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) program and the following Central Oregon law enforcement agencies:  Bend Police Department, Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, Redmond Police Department,  Prineville Police Department, Crook County Sheriff’s Office, Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office, Madras Police Department, Oregon State Police, Sunriver Police Department, Black Butte Police Department, United States Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Warm Springs Tribal Police Department, Deschutes, Crook, and Jefferson County District Attorney’s, and the Oregon National Guard.

The Oregon-Idaho HIDTA program is an Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) sponsored counterdrug grant program that coordinates and provides funding resources to multi-agency drug enforcement task forces to disrupt or dismantle local, multi-state and international drug trafficking organizations.




Attached Media Files: 2024-06/6078/173141/41.jpg , 2024-06/6078/173141/42.jpg , 2024-06/6078/173141/40.jpg

Leader of International Drug Trafficking Organization Operating in Lane County Sentenced to Federal Prison
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 06/18/24 1:50 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—The leader of an international drug trafficking organization operating in Lane County, Oregon, responsible for trafficking large quantities of methamphetamine, heroin, and cocaine into the state between 2018 and 2020, was sentenced to federal prison today.

Victor Diaz-Ramirez, 33, was sentenced to 135 months in federal prison and five years’ supervised release.

“While communities across our state continue to struggle with the ongoing drug crisis, there are criminal enterprises, like the Diaz-Ramirez drug trafficking organization, whose sole purpose is to profit from addiction and suffering. This far-reaching investigation demonstrates the deep commitment of all involved law enforcement agencies to combatting drug trafficking and keeping our communities safe,” said Nathan J. Lichvarcik, Chief of the U.S. Attorney’s Office Eugene and Medford Branch Offices.

“Drug traffickers like Mr. Diaz-Ramirez prey on our communities by peddling large amounts of methamphetamine, heroin, and cocaine, often to our most vulnerable,” said David F. Reames, Special Agent in Charge, U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) Seattle Field Division. “I am gratified that the hard work of DEA, the U.S. Attorney’s Office and our many partners from law enforcement agencies across Oregon led to the lengthy sentence Mr. Diaz-Ramirez received in this case. Justice was truly served.”

According to court documents, from at least March 2018 through August 2020, while operating out of Mexico, Diaz-Ramirez helped lead an international drug trafficking organization responsible for trafficking large quantities of methamphetamine, heroin, and cocaine from Mexico into the United States. Diaz-Ramirez’s organization used a network of associates to transport the drugs from Southern California to Oregon and deliver them to local distributors in exchange for cash. 

As part of this investigation, law enforcement seized more than 178 pounds of methamphetamine, 12 pounds of heroin, six pounds of fentanyl, 18 rifles, three rifle optics, and ammunition. Investigators also forfeited approximately $1.2 million from the organization, including more than $400,000 in cash. In total, 35 people—including sources of supply in Mexico, couriers, local cell operators in Lane County, and first and second level distributors responsible for sales in and around Eugene—were charged and have been convicted for their roles in Diaz-Ramirez’s organization.

On August 5, 2020, a federal grand jury in Eugene returned an indictment charging Diaz-Ramirez with conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine. On November 1, 2023, Diaz-Ramirez pleaded guilty to a one-count superseding criminal information charging him with conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute methamphetamine.

This case was investigated by DEA, FBI, IRS-Criminal Investigation, U.S. Marshals Service, Springfield Police Department, Eugene Police Department, Lane County Sherriff’s Office, Oregon State Police, Linn Interagency Narcotics Enforcement Team (LINE), and Douglas Interagency Narcotics Enforcement Team (DINT). It was prosecuted by Joseph Huynh and Judi Harper, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

This prosecution is the result of an Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force (OCDETF) investigation. OCDETF identifies, disrupts, and dismantles the highest-level drug traffickers, money launderers, gangs, and transnational criminal organizations that threaten the U.S. by using a prosecutor-led, intelligence-driven, multi-agency approach that leverages the strengths of federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies against criminal networks.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Save the date for the March 3-6, 2025, Oregon GOSH Conference, the Pacific Northwest's largest workplace safety and health conference (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 06/18/24 11:11 AM
GOSH 2025 logo
GOSH 2025 logo
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Salem – With more than 160 workshops and sessions, the Oregon Governor’s Occupational Safety and Health (GOSH) Conference will be held March 3-6, 2025, at the Oregon Convention Center in Portland. The event offers an outstanding opportunity to gain up-to-date knowledge that can be used to strengthen workplace safety and health programs across the state.

The event is the largest workplace health and safety conference in the Pacific Northwest and one of the largest in the U.S. It welcomes everyone from safety committee members and emerging environmental health and safety professionals to quality control supervisors, labor advocates, and employers across industries to gather for a variety of learning opportunities.

Registration for the conference is expected to open in winter 2024. But you can participate in and support the GOSH Conference now. Nominations are being accepted for the 2025 GOSH Awards, which will honor organizations and people who make exceptional contributions to workplace safety and health. Award nominations are due Oct. 25, 2024.

You can also learn about the event’s keynote speaker, Sally Spencer-Thomas, co-founder and president of United Suicide Survivors International. A clinical psychologist and award-winning mental health advocate, Spencer-Thomas is the lead author on the National Guidelines for Workplace Suicide Prevention. During GOSH, her presentation – “You Can’t Fix Your Mental Health With Duct Tape: Why Burnout Mitigation, Mental Health Promotion, Addiction Recovery, and Suicide Prevention are Health and Safety Priorities” – will go to the heart of why mental health in the workplace matters.

Learn more about Spencer-Thomas by visiting the GOSH website’s keynote speaker page

Sponsorship opportunities to support the 2025 GOSH Conference are available, too. And the conference will again feature the Columbia Forklift Challenge, inviting trained forklift drivers to compete in an obstacle course to highlight their skills – and the importance of forklift safety. 

You can stay updated about the conference – including registration, exhibits, the forklift challenge, and other information – by visiting the event’s website. You can also get connected to GOSH updates by signing up to receive emails

The conference is a collaborative effort by the Oregon Occupational Safety and Health Division (Oregon OSHA), the Columbia-Willamette Chapter of the American Society of Safety Professionals, and labor and businesses in Oregon and southwest Washington. 


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About Oregon OSHA: Oregon OSHA enforces the state's workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. The division is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest consumer protection and business regulatory agency. Visit osha.oregon.gov and dcbs.oregon.gov.




Attached Media Files: GOSH 2025 logo , DCBS logo , Oregon OSHA logo

Hospital Association of Oregon Appeals Court Decision in Health Care Market Oversight Program Case
Hospital Association of Oregon - 06/18/24 10:44 AM

Lake Oswego, Ore. — Today, the Hospital Association of Oregon filed a notice of appeal to the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, appealing the district court's summary judgment order in the case of Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems v. State of Oregon et al., case number 22-cv-1486 (D. Or.).

The hospital association intends to argue that the state law creating the Health Care Market Oversight Program is unconstitutional and a violation of the Due Process Clause. The hospital association will ask the Ninth Circuit to reverse the U.S. District Court’s order and enter judgment in its favor. 

The Oregon Legislature passed HB 2362 in 2021 to create the Health Care Market Oversight Program, which gives Oregon Health Authority (OHA) significant power to oversee transactions involving health care entities, and aims to promote transparency, support statewide priorities, and monitor impacts.

The hospital association challenged the law on two grounds: first, the law’s open-ended and vague wording violates the Due Process Clause of the U.S. Constitution because it imposes costs and penalties without fair notice or defined standards. And second, the law violates the Oregon Constitution because it delegates legislative power to a state agency, OHA. In May, a U.S. District Court judge ruled the law does not violate the Due Process Clause of the U.S. Constitution and declined jurisdiction over the state constitutional claim.

“This law was intended to enhance health equity and access to care, both goals we support, but it falls short,” said President and CEO Becky Hultberg. “Instead, it excessively empowers the Oregon Health Authority, leading to costly and arbitrary processes that divert resources away from supporting patient care. We look forward to arguing our case before the appellate court.”

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About the Hospital Association of Oregon 

Founded in 1934, the Hospital Association of Oregon is a mission-driven, nonprofit trade association representing Oregon’s 61 community hospitals. Together, hospitals are the sixth largest private employer statewide, employing more than 70,000 employees. Committed to fostering a stronger, safer, more equitable Oregon where all people have access to the care they need, the hospital association provides services to Oregon’s hospitals ensuring all are able to deliver dependable, comprehensive health care to their communities; educates government officials and the public on the state’s health landscape and works collaboratively with policymakers, community based organizations and the health care community to build consensus on and advance health care policy benefiting the state’s four million residents. 


Adaptive Management Program Committee meets June 24
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/18/24 10:36 AM

SALEM, Ore. — The Adaptive Management Program Committee will meet at noon on Monday, June 24 in the Clatsop Room, Building C, at the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters, located at 2600 State St. in Salem. To join virtually, please use the Zoom video conference information found on the agenda.

The committee’s agenda includes:

  • Finalize Eastern Oregon Steep Slopes question package (Substantial decision item)
  • Affirm roads research questions honed by the IRST (Substantial decision item)
  • Introduce process for determining new priorities (Substantial decision item)

The meeting is open to the public to attend in person and online via Zoom. Public comments will be accepted near the start of the meeting. Requests for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting by emailing ogram@odf.oregon.gov">adaptivemanagementprogram@odf.oregon.gov.

The 13-member committee The Adaptive Management Program Committee helps determine if forest practices are meeting their goals to protect natural resources through a science-based and transparent process. The committee sets the research agenda that the Independent Research and Science Team (IRST) implements. View more information on the AMPC webpage.


Structure Fire at 1933 NW Hill Street on June 18, 2024 (Photo)
Bend Fire & Rescue - 06/18/24 9:58 AM
Photo courtesy of Bend Fire & Rescue
Photo courtesy of Bend Fire & Rescue
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-06/6802/173119/thumb_IMG_8923.JPG

At 0522 hours on Tuesday, June 18 2024, multiple callers to 911 reported a structure on fire just west of the Bend Parkway and north of the Revere exit.  First arriving crews found a large house on fire at 1933 NW Hill Street and began suppression efforts.  The fire, which originated on the exterior of the home, burned up the siding and into the attic and void spaces of the structure, resulting in a fire that was both stubborn and challenging to extinguish.  Crews remained on scene until approximately 0930 completing extinguishment, and will recheck the structure periodically throughout the day.  

The 2,600 square foot structure, which was built in 1920, was formerly a care home and had multiple bedrooms.  The home was occupied at the time of the fire by eight adult tenants, all of whom were displaced and are receiving assistance from the Red Cross.  Losses are estimated at $400,000 to the structure and $200,000 to the contents. 

Upon investigation, it was found that cigarettes were improperly discarded into a combustible container on the front deck area of the home.  The fire smoldered for several hours, one tenant reported he thought he smelled smoke at approximately 11:30 pm prior to going to bed but dismissed it as drift smoke from a wildfire.  The fire smoldered undetected, consuming the deck area and traveling up the exterior siding into the attic space.  While the home did have smoke alarms, it does not appear that they operated.  One of the tenants woke up smelling smoke and alerted the other occupants to the fire.  

This could have been a far different outcome had one of the tenants not awakened to the smell of smoke.  In 2022 there were 3,790 civilian fire deaths and 13,250 injuries due to home structure fires.  A smoke alarm can double your chances of surviving a fire, but only if it is working properly.  Smoke alarms are designed to last about 10 years, after that they can start malfunctioning or may quit working altogether.  Bend Fire & Rescue has programs aimed at ensuring that EVERY HOME has at least one working smoke alarm.  For more information, visit our website at https://www.bendoregon.gov/government/departments/fire-rescue/community-resources-programs/home-consultations




Attached Media Files: Photo courtesy of Bend Fire & Rescue

Fatal Crash - HWY 58 - Lane County
Oregon State Police - 06/18/24 8:26 AM

Lane County, Ore. 15 June 24- On Saturday, June 15, 2024, at 3:08 p.m., Oregon State Police responded to a single-vehicle crash on Hwy 58, near milepost 46, in Lane County.

The preliminary investigation indicated an eastbound Ford F-350, operated by Will Ed Bryson Jr. (77) of Klamath Falls, left the roadway for unknown reasons and struck a tree. 

The operator of the Ford (W. Bryson) was declared deceased while in transport to an area hospital.

The passenger of the Ford, Lynda Ellen Bryson (78) of Klamath Falls, was transported by ground ambulance and life-flighted to an area hospital.

The highway was not impacted during the on-scene investigation.

OSP was assisted by Oakridge Fire and ODOT.

# # #

About the Oregon State Police
Oregon State Police (OSP) is a multi-disciplined organization that is charged with protecting the people, wildlife, and natural resources in Oregon. OSP enforces traffic laws on the state’s roadways, investigates and solves crime, conducts postmortem examinations and forensic analysis, and provides background checks, and law enforcement data. The agency regulates gaming and enforces fish, wildlife, and natural resource laws. OSP is comprised of more than 1,400 staff members – including troopers, investigators, and professional staff – who provide a full range of policing and public safety services to Oregon and other law enforcement agencies throughout Oregon.


Fatal Crash - HWY 86 - Baker County
Oregon State Police - 06/18/24 8:14 AM

Baker County, Ore. 14 June 24- On Friday, June 14, 2024, at 9:55 a.m., Oregon State Police responded to a single motorcycle crash on Hwy-86, near milepost 30, in Baker County.

The preliminary investigation indicated an eastbound Harley Davidson motorcycle, operated by Scott Douglas Moss (66) of Boise (ID), failed to negotiate a left-hand turn and left the roadway. The Harley traveled approximately 100 feet along the shoulder and 30 feet down an embankment, ejecting both operator and passenger. The motorcycle came to rest partially on top of the operator. 

The passenger on the Harley, Joan Gayle Moss (68) of Boise (ID), was declared deceased at the scene.

The operator of the Harley (S. Moss) was life-flighted due to injuries.

The highway was not impacted during the on-scene investigation.

OSP was assisted by the Baker County Sheriff's Office and ODOT.

# # #

About the Oregon State Police
Oregon State Police (OSP) is a multi-disciplined organization that is charged with protecting the people, wildlife, and natural resources in Oregon. OSP enforces traffic laws on the state’s roadways, investigates and solves crime, conducts postmortem examinations and forensic analysis, and provides background checks, and law enforcement data. The agency regulates gaming and enforces fish, wildlife, and natural resource laws. OSP is comprised of more than 1,400 staff members – including troopers, investigators, and professional staff – who provide a full range of policing and public safety services to Oregon and other law enforcement agencies throughout Oregon.


Mon. 06/17/24
Oregon State Fire Marshal announces first deliveries of new water tenders to Oregon fire service (Photo)
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 06/17/24 3:52 PM
2024-06/1062/173104/OSFM_Water_Tenders_(8).JPG
2024-06/1062/173104/OSFM_Water_Tenders_(8).JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-06/1062/173104/thumb_OSFM_Water_Tenders_(8).JPG

SALEM, OR – The Oregon State Fire Marshal is proud to announce the first deliveries of new water tenders to the Oregon fire service as part of the agency's Engine Program. These initial deliveries mark a significant milestone in the state's ongoing efforts to enhance firefighting capabilities and protect communities from the growing wildfire crisis.

The first three water tenders have been delivered to the Amity Fire District, Winston-Dillard Fire District, and Cloverdale Rural Fire Protection District. These tenders are the first of 30 that will be distributed across the state, boosting the resources available to local structural fire agencies.

The state fire marshal purchased 76 apparatus as part of the OSFM Engine Program, including 26 Type 3 engines, 20 Type 6 engines, and 30 water tenders. To date, eight type 3 engines have been delivered, with more expected to arrive throughout the summer. Deliveries of water tenders and type 6 engines will continue through the coming weeks.

"We are thrilled to see the first of these new water tenders delivered to our fire districts," Oregon State Fire Marshal Mariana Ruiz-Temple said. "This program represents a significant investment in the safety of our communities and the effectiveness of our firefighting efforts.”

The OSFM Engine Program is funded through 2021’s Senate Bill 762. The goal is to modernize equipment within the Oregon structural fire service, ensuring local fire agencies have the necessary tools to effectively combat wildfires and protect lives and property.

For more information about the OSFM's Engine Program and ongoing efforts to improve wildfire response, please visit the OSFM Engine Program webpage.

Click here for video and photos of today’s delivery.




Attached Media Files: 2024-06/1062/173104/OSFM_Water_Tenders_(8).JPG

Oregon Wildlife Foundation Invites Public to Celebrate Herman's Birthday (Photo)
Berg & Associates - 06/17/24 2:13 PM
OWF invites the public to celebrate Herman's Birthday from 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Saturday, June 22, at the Spruce Gifts & Provisions store at Bonneville Fish Hatchery.
OWF invites the public to celebrate Herman's Birthday from 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Saturday, June 22, at the Spruce Gifts & Provisions store at Bonneville Fish Hatchery.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-06/6329/173096/thumb_50090875887_0fdc276671_o.jpg

(CASCADE LOCKS, Ore.) – Herman the Sturgeon is kind of a big deal in Oregon; a white sturgeon with a colorful history celebrating a birthday on Saturday, June 22. You are invited to join that celebration and toast it with “High Five, Herman” special summer IPA, courtesy of and available at Ferment Brewing Company’s tasting room in Hood River. 

Herman’s story includes trips between the Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife’s (ODFW) Roaring River Fish Hatchery near Scio and the Oregon State Fairgrounds in Salem. Beginning in the 1930’s and up until the 1980’s, one Herman or another was a mainstay at the State Fair’s Animal Village exhibit. Life on the road is hard on a fish so ODFW stopped trucking Herman places and started planning for a permanent home. 

To provide Herman with a safe and healthier environment, a campaign was launched in 1997 to build him a suitable habitat at Bonneville Fish Hatchery in the Columbia River Gorge. In partnership with ODFW, the Oregon Wildlife Foundation (OWF) raised the funding needed, more than $350,000, to construct the Sturgeon Viewing and Interpretive Center at Bonneville Fish Hatchery. Dedicated on Sept. 27, 1998, the Center is one of Oregon’s top visitor attractions. 

The Center has served its purpose and mission for over 25 years. However, prolonged exposure to Columbia River Gorge weather has taken a toll on the building, and the interpretive signage within it needs to better speak to a present-day audience.

The Foundation is currently working with ODFW on a development plan for the hatchery, including needed repairs, improvements, and updates to the Interpretive Center’s signage.

If you would like to help us in our efforts, tax-deductible donations can be made using the following form https://secure.givelively.org/donate/oregon-wildlife-foundation/sturgeon-interpretive-center

“Bonneville Fish Hatchery is the right place for Herman to be and for the public to learn about sturgeon conservation challenges,” said Tim Greseth, Executive Director of the Foundation. With the Columbia River just a stone’s throw away, visitors can imagine what the river might have been like when it was teeming with salmon and these prehistoric fish.”

OWF also owns and operates Spruce Gifts & Provisions stores at the hatchery and in downtown Hood River. The store at Bonneville features coffee drinks, treats, local and regional gift items, and, of course, Herman the Sturgeon memorabilia. Proceeds from the sale of merchandise at Spruce Gifts & Provisions stores help support fish and wildlife conservation throughout Oregon.

The Foundation cordially invites you to join them in celebrating Herman’s birthday between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. on June 22. This is an all-ages experience to celebrate the passing of another year in Herman’s long and storied life. Come out and wish him a happy birthday, take an “ussie” with a legendary fish, sign Herman’s birthday card, and pick up a souvenir of your visit to Bonneville Fish Hatchery.

Guests, 21 years of age and older are invited to continue the celebration at Ferment Brewing Company’s tasting room in Hood River with their “High Five, Herman!” IPA.  “High Five, Herman!” was brewed using regional, environmentally responsible ingredients from mission-driven suppliers. Mainstem Malt, a company that works directly with farmers in the Columbia River Basin to supply Salmon-Safe grains, provides the malt for this beer. The hops, sourced from Crosby Hops in Woodburn, are also Salmon-Safe, meaning they are grown using watershed-friendly and climate-resilient stewardship practices to protect water quality and wildlife habitats. 

Sturgeon Conservation

Herman the Sturgeon is approximately 10 feet long, weighs over 500 pounds, and is over 80 years old, but who cares, age is just a number! There are records of larger and older white sturgeon in the Columbia River and elsewhere in Oregon, but Herman is an excellent example of this large and long-lived species. Worldwide, there are 23 species of sturgeon, with seven found in North America. Only two, white and green sturgeon, are found along the West Coast and in Oregon. Both are Oregon Conservation Strategy species, see www.oregonconservationstrategy.org for more information.

Herman comes from a long line of prehistoric bottom-feeders. Sturgeon evolved during the Jurassic Period of the Mesozoic Era, when dinosaurs still roamed the earth. Sturgeon have changed very little since then. What has changed is the availability of quality sturgeon habitat and their food supply.

According to an information sheet on sturgeon from ODFW, “White sturgeon in most of the Columbia River Basin aren’t listed under the Endangered Species Act (ESA), however, these populations still face many challenges. The free-flowing river systems these fish have adapted to have now been impeded by hydropower dams, separating the river system into reservoirs. These dams have had many negative impacts, including direct mortality, restricted movement and blocked access to the ocean, flooded historic spawning habitats, and reduced habitat complexity. Climate change has increased the frequency of low water years, increasing temperatures within the Columbia River Basin and creating other unfavorable and lethal environmental conditions.”

Bonneville Hatchery and Sturgeon Viewing and Interpretive Center

The Sturgeon Viewing and Interpretive Center is located at Bonneville Fish Hatchery, 70543 NE Herman Loop, in Cascade Locks. From I-84, take Exit 40 to Bonneville Dam/Fish Hatchery. Follow the signs to the hatchery and park in the parking lot. For more information on the Sturgeon Viewing and Interpretive Center visit www.myodfw.com/bonneville-hatchery-visitors-guide.

Oregon Wildlife Foundation

Oregon Wildlife Foundation is an apolitical operating charitable foundation dedicated to increasing private and public funding support for wildlife conservation projects in Oregon. Since 1981, OWF has directed tens of millions of dollars in private and public support to a broad range of projects throughout Oregon. For more information visit www.myowf.org.

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Herman’s Birthday Schedule

10 a.m. Birthday celebration kicks off, meet OWF staff, a coloring station for kids (of all ages) and self-guided tours of the Sturgeon Interpretive Center.

12 p.m. Cupcakes and treats courtesy of the Spruce Gifts & Provisions store

1 p.m. Wrap up of festivities

How To Be a Sturgeon Steward:

  • Be good to our natural places
    • properly dispose of trash
    • think responsibly about activities that impact our streams like
      • motor oil from leaky vehicles or improper disposal, 
      • detergents from driveway washing of vehicles, and
      • the use of phosphate-rich fertilizers on lawns.
  • Use less water and electricity.
  • Follow Fish and Wildlife regulations. 
  • Report the illegal taking of sturgeon (poaching) to Oregon State Police or through the Turn In Poachers hotline: 1-800-452-7888.



Attached Media Files: OWF invites the public to celebrate Herman's Birthday from 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Saturday, June 22, at the Spruce Gifts & Provisions store at Bonneville Fish Hatchery. , OWF invites the public to celebrate Herman's Birthday from 10 a.m. - 1 p.m. Saturday, June 22, at the Spruce Gifts & Provisions store at Bonneville Fish Hatchery.

UPDATED: Health officials confirm measles in Clackamas County household
Oregon Health Authority - 06/17/24 12:58 PM

This is a corrected version of a press release sent this morning.

June 17, 2024

Media Contacts: Jonathan Modie, PHD.Communications@oha.oregon.gov

Health officials confirm measles in Clackamas County household

Two people believed to have been exposed in Marion County between May 19, June 4

PORTLAND, Ore.—Oregon Health Authority (OHA) and county public health officials are investigating two cases of measles in a single Clackamas County household.

One household member, an unvaccinated adult, was confirmed to have measles Friday, June 14. The individual developed a rash June 11. While the time range of the exposure is believed to be between May 19 and June 4, the specific location of the exposure, which occurred in Marion County, is unknown, suggesting there may be other, unreported measles cases in Oregon.

The second household member, an unvaccinated child, developed symptoms a few days later. Both individuals are recovering.

“Spreading measles from one person to another is pretty easy, as it’s a highly infectious disease,” said Paul R. Cieslak, M.D., medical director for communicable diseases and immunizations at OHA’s Public Health Division. “That’s why it’s extremely important that all adults and children in their household be up to date on vaccinations.”

“Adults of any age born during or after 1957 can still be vaccinated,” added Cieslak.

People might have been exposed if they were in any of these areas during these times:

  • Oregon Health & Science University facilities:
    • OHSU Immediate Care Richmond Clinic, between 4:40 p.m. and 5:40 p.m. Wednesday, June 12.
    • OHSU Hospital Emergency Department, between 6 p.m. Wednesday, June 12, and 7:15 p.m. Friday, June 14 (risk at this location is believed to be low because the patient was masked and airborne precautions were promptly implemented).

How measles spreads and symptoms

Measles spreads through the air after a person with measles coughs or sneezes. People are contagious with measles for four days before a rash appears and up to four days afterward. The virus particles can also linger in the air for up to two hours after someone who is infectious has left the area.

Measles typically starts with a fever, cough, runny nose and red eyes. A rash usually follows, beginning on the face and spreading to the rest of the body. Symptoms begin seven to 21 days after exposure to a person with measles. Common complications of measles include ear infection, lung infection and diarrhea. Swelling of the brain is a rare but much more serious complication. In developed countries in recent years, one or two out of every 1,000 measles cases has been fatal.

Determining your risk of measles

Most Oregonians have been vaccinated to prevent measles, usually as children. Anyone who has received a measles vaccination at any time in their life has a low risk of getting measles. Risk is much higher for anyone who has not received measles vaccination who may have been exposed to the disease.

Measles poses the highest risk to:

  1. Unvaccinated pregnant people.
  2. Infants younger than 1 year old.
  3. People with weakened immune systems.

You are considered immune to measles if any of the following apply:

  • You were born before 1957.
  • You’ve been diagnosed with measles at any point in your life.
  • A blood test proves that you are immune.
  • You have had two doses of measles vaccine.

What to do if you suspect measles in your household

Public health officials urge people experiencing symptoms of measles not to arrive unannounced at a medical office if they:

  1. Have a measles-like rash, or
  2. Have been exposed to measles within the previous 21 days, AND
  3. Have any other symptom of measles (such as fever, cough or red eyes).

Individuals planning to seek medical care should first call a health care provider or urgent care center by telephone to create an entry plan to avoid exposing others in waiting rooms.

Learn more about measles at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/DISEASESCONDITIONS/DISEASESAZ/Pages/measles.aspx.

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Oregon to honor fallen fire fighters during June 20 memorial ceremony (Photo)
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 06/17/24 12:20 PM
The names of fallen firefighters MoStadelli, Brandon W. Norbury and Brian Edwards Flowers are engraved on the Oregon Fallen Fire Fighters Memorial at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem on Jun3 12, 2020.
The names of fallen firefighters MoStadelli, Brandon W. Norbury and Brian Edwards Flowers are engraved on the Oregon Fallen Fire Fighters Memorial at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem on Jun3 12, 2020.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-06/1187/173102/thumb_20240612_Fire_Memorial_Engraving_05.jpg

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 17, 2024

 

SALEM, Ore. - The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) and the Oregon Fire Service Honor Guard will host the annual Oregon Fallen Fire Fighters Memorial to honor members of the fire service who have died in the line of duty. The event takes place at 1 p.m. on Thursday, June 20 at the Oregon Public Safety Academy, located at 4190 Aumsville Highway SE in Salem.

The memorial commemorates Oregon’s fire service members who have made the ultimate sacrifice since 1881, including career, volunteer, wildland and structural fire fighters. The names of three fallen firefighters were added to the wall during an engraving ceremony held Wednesday, June 12. An honor guard stood watch as the names of Mo Stadelli of the Salem Fire Department and Brandon W. Norbury and Brian Edward Flowers of the Gresham Fire Department were added to the memorial, joining those of 176 previously fallen fire service members.

Mo Stadeli served as a professional firefighter with the Salem Fire Department for more than twenty-five years. In 2018, he was diagnosed with tonsillar cancer and he passed away on February 24, 2019.

On February 3, 2023, after participating in routine hose evolution training, Brandon W. Norbury of Gresham Fire & Emergency Services suffered a cardiac arrest and collapsed on the training ground. Despite life-saving efforts of other fire department members, Norbury was pronounced dead after being rushed to the hospital.

After a fifteen-year career, Gresham Fire & Emergency Services Firefighter Brian Edward Flowers passed away on November 19, 2023 after a monthslong battle with Occupational Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

For more information on the Oregon Fallen Fire Fighters Memorial, including the names of the fallen, history of the memorial, and the Oregon Fire Service Honor Guard’s involvement, please visit DPSST’s Oregon Fallen Fire Fighters Memorial website.

For questions about the Oregon Fallen Fire Fighters Memorial, please contact Brooke Bell-Uribe at 503-569-8260.

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About DPSST

The mission of the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) is to pursue excellence in training and accountability for public safety professionals. DPSST certifies and licenses police, corrections, and parole and probation officers, as well as regulatory specialists, emergency telecommunicators and medical dispatchers, criminal justice instructors, private security providers, private investigators, fire service professionals and polygraph examiners in the State of Oregon.  DPSST works with public and private safety agencies around the state to provide basic, leadership and specialized training at the 237-acre Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem and regionally throughout the state.




Attached Media Files: The names of fallen firefighters MoStadelli, Brandon W. Norbury and Brian Edwards Flowers are engraved on the Oregon Fallen Fire Fighters Memorial at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem on Jun3 12, 2020. , The names of fallen firefighters MoStadelli, Brandon W. Norbury and Brian Edwards Flowers are engraved on the Oregon Fallen Fire Fighters Memorial at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem on Jun3 12, 2020. , The names of fallen firefighters MoStadelli, Brandon W. Norbury and Brian Edwards Flowers are engraved on the Oregon Fallen Fire Fighters Memorial at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem on Jun3 12, 2020. , The names of fallen firefighters MoStadelli, Brandon W. Norbury and Brian Edwards Flowers are engraved on the Oregon Fallen Fire Fighters Memorial at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem on Jun3 12, 2020. , The names of fallen firefighters MoStadelli, Brandon W. Norbury and Brian Edwards Flowers are engraved on the Oregon Fallen Fire Fighters Memorial at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem on Jun3 12, 2020.

Portland Man Sentenced to Federal Prison for Distributing Fentanyl and Stealing Covid Relief Program Funds
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 06/17/24 11:54 AM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A local man was sentenced to federal prison today for distributing counterfeit Oxycodone pills containing fentanyl in and around Portland and stealing federal funds intended to help small businesses during the Covid-19 pandemic.

Yuriy Viktorovich Vasilchuk, 33, a Portland resident, was sentenced to 49 months in federal prison and three years’ supervised release. He was also ordered to pay $32,855 in restitution to the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA).

According to court documents, in early 2021, special agents from Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) identified Vasilchuk as a Portland area source of supply for counterfeit Oxycodone pills containing fentanyl. In December 2021, Vasilchuk was located in a stolen vehicle. He was arrested with 88 counterfeit Oxycodone pills and later released.

On May 3, 2022, a federal grand jury in Portland returned an indictment charging Vasilchuk with one count of possessing with intent to distribute fentanyl. Following his indictment, HSI special agents and probation officers from the Multnomah County Department of Community Justice (DCJ) attempted to arrest Vasilchuk who was again located in a stolen vehicle. As the probation officers approached Vasilchuk’s stolen vehicle, Vasilchuk sped off, nearly striking a nearby probation officer. After fleeing for several miles and causing multiple accidents, Vasilchuk’s vehicle became inoperable and he fled on foot. Soon after, investigators located Vasilchuk hiding in an abandoned RV and placed him under arrest.

Following his arrest, investigators obtained evidence that, between March and November of 2021, while he was actively distributing fentanyl, Vasilchuk applied to receive Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) funds and Economic Injury Disaster Loans (EIDL) from the SBA. In his applications, Vasilchuk falsely stated that he had not, within the past five years, been convicted of or pleaded guilty to a felony involving fraud, bribery, embezzlement, or making a false statement on a loan application. Based on the false information provided, the SBA disbursed more than $32,000 to Vasilchuk, which he in turn spent on various personal expenses.

On August 22, 2023, Vasilchuk was charged by criminal information with wire fraud. On March 11, 2024, he pleaded to one count each of wire fraud and possessing with intent to distribute fentanyl, resolving both of his criminal cases.

These cases were investigated by HSI, the Westside Interagency Narcotics Team (WIN), and the SBA Office of Inspector General with assistance from the Portland Police Bureau and DCJ. They were prosecuted by Cassady A. Adams and Rachel K. Sowray, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon.

WIN is a Washington County, Oregon-based multi-jurisdictional narcotics task force supported by the Oregon-Idaho High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) program that includes members from the Washington County Sheriff’s Office, Beaverton and Hillsboro Police Departments, Oregon National Guard Counter Drug Program, FBI, U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), and Homeland Security Investigations (HSI).

The Oregon-Idaho HIDTA program is an Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) sponsored counterdrug grant program that coordinates with and provides funding resources to multi-agency drug enforcement initiatives.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Butte Creek Falls state forests recreation area to reopen after the 2020 wildfires (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/17/24 11:22 AM
The Oregon Department of Forestry is reopening one of the true gems of the state forests' recreations areas, Butte Creek Falls, on June 21. Pictured is the upper falls, there is also a lower falls
The Oregon Department of Forestry is reopening one of the true gems of the state forests' recreations areas, Butte Creek Falls, on June 21. Pictured is the upper falls, there is also a lower falls
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-06/1072/173098/thumb_Butte-Creek-Falls-2.JPG

SANTIAM STATE FOREST, Ore. – The Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) is reopening one of the true gems of the state forests’ recreations areas, Butte Creek Falls, on June 21.

The drive into the recreation area goes though ridges and valleys of burned and blacken trees from the 2020 fires.  The deadly Beachie Creek fires killed several people, destroyed homes and scorched more than 400,000 acres.  However, near the recreation area the trees turn green and the area around the upper and lower waterfalls are lush and untouched by fire.

“We were really fortunate the fires skipped over this area,” said Joe Offer, ODF’s Recreation Program Manager.  “The trailhead and the paths to the two sets of falls are open, so is the camping area and the 100-yard shooting range.”

ODF recreation staff and work crews from the South Fork Forest Camp (A jointly run facility by ODF and the Department of Corrections) and the DOC’s Santiam Correctional Institute have been working hard to get the area open after being closed for nearly four years.

“There was a lot of vegetation and debris on the trails,” said Offer.  “But thanks in large part to the adults in custody crews they are cleared and just last week they repaired one of the foot bridges.  The crew had to transport the lumber, tools, and a generator down the trails to get the job done.”

Another major improvement was made after the 2020 fires but is just now opening.

“The 100-yard shooting range was a joint project with Trash No-Land,” said Offer.  The non-profit dedicated to responsible target shoot works to improve safety and reduce fire risks at dispersed ranges across the state.  Funding for the improvements came from the NRA’s Public Range Fund. The range is located on Butte Creek 615 Road just off the Butte Creek Mainline Road. A new gravel backdrop, concrete barriers at approximately 100-yards, parking and new informational signs were all part of the improvements at the former gravel pit.

Most people head straight to the trailhead that has parking for five or six vehicles while there are three campsites for tents at the campground. There is also additional parking at the campground with a connector trail to the main trail that goes to the falls.

“Our future plan is to expand both parking areas, the campground and offer additional camping opportunities within this northern block of the Santiam,” said Offer.  “But right now we just wanted to get everything open then start working on new improvements.”

The area was closed mainly for safety reasons while ODF did post-fire timber harvesting and removed roadside hazardous burned and dead trees. 

“This operation was the largest and most challenging of all ODF’s post-fire restoration timber sales as it was within one of the highest severity portions of the fires’ footprint,” said Kyle Kaupp, Santiam Unit Forester. “It included more than 20 miles of roadside hazard tree mitigation across multiple road systems, all which were accessible by the same travel route to this recreation area.”

 The work in the area was difficult, but careful consideration of high elevation weather, extensive safety measures, technical harvesting systems, and contractor availability were among the long list of factors that allowed the operation to be successful. 

“ODF has also begun to replant trees for the future of the forested areas, said Kaupp.  “So far, nearly 200,000 seedlings have been planted in this specific area alone.”

And the ODF’s work in the area continues so there are still some restrictions.

“There are salvage harvest operations on-going, so one place that remains closed is the High Lakes Recreation Area,” said Offer.  “We are asking folks to not go into that area until all operations are complete and we determine the best way to manage recreation in such a heavily burned landscape.”   

For updates, more information and maps to the area see the Santiam State Forests recreation site status webpage.  For information on all Oregon State Forests recreation sites visit the ODF Recreation website.  For more information on Trash No Land visit their webpage.




Attached Media Files: The Oregon Department of Forestry is reopening one of the true gems of the state forests' recreations areas, Butte Creek Falls, on June 21. Pictured is the upper falls, there is also a lower falls , The Oregon Department of Forestry is reopening one of the true gems of the state forests' recreations areas, Butte Creek Falls, on June 21. , Adults in custody work crews repair a footbridge on the trail to the lower falls. At Butte Creek. Work was performed by ODF Recreation staff, and ODF South Fork Forest Camp work crews operated out of Salem and the Santiam Corrections Institution. South Fork Forest Camp is a jointly run facility by ODF and the Department of Corrections. , Hikers can hear the falls almost immediately as they take the scenic trail down to Butte Creek Falls. There are upper and lower falls, be sure to visit both. , Although not highlighted as often as the upper falls, the lower falls are also worth the short additional hike down to see them. They are on the same main trail. , There are three campsites for tents at the campground. There is also additional parking at the campground with a connector trail to the main trail that goes to the falls. , Adults in custody work crews repair a footbridge on the trail to the lower falls. At Butte Creek. Work was performed by ODF Recreation staff, and ODF South Fork Forest Camp work crews operated out of Salem and the Santiam Corrections Institution. South Fork Forest Camp is a jointly run facility by ODF and the Department of Corrections.

OnPoint Community Credit Union Expands Support for Foster Youth through Youth Villages Oregon Partnership (Photo)
OnPoint Community Credit Union - 06/17/24 10:04 AM
2024-06/963/173094/2024_blog_hero-youth_villages_success_stories-young_adults_with_counselors-1015x540.jpg
2024-06/963/173094/2024_blog_hero-youth_villages_success_stories-young_adults_with_counselors-1015x540.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-06/963/173094/thumb_2024_blog_hero-youth_villages_success_stories-young_adults_with_counselors-1015x540.jpg

OnPoint’s support allows foster youth to open high-yield savings accounts without a co-signer and increases access to financial education

Portland, Ore., June 17, 2024 — More than 4,000 children in Oregon were in foster care at the end of 2023, according to the Oregon Department of Human Services. Although the state has seen a decline in children in foster care, foster youth face significant challenges as they transition to adulthood. Without adequate support, they are at higher risk for homelessness, substance abuse, unemployment and incarceration

To address these challenges, OnPoint Community Credit Union announced today it will offer OnPoint Savers® accounts to foster youth between 13 and 17 years old in Youth Villages’ transition-age programs without requiring a co-signer. 

“Our partnership with Youth Villages Oregon reflects our commitment to supporting the most vulnerable members of our community,” said Rob Stuart, President and Chief Executive Officer of OnPoint Community Credit Union. “By having access to savings accounts and financial education, we are providing foster youth in Oregon a safe place to save their money and an opportunity to build a strong foundation for their future.”

A history of supporting Oregon’s youth in foster care

Since 2020, OnPoint has donated nearly $85,000 to Youth Villages Oregon, and sends employee volunteers to teach a range of financial education courses. The courses cover budgeting, credit, student debt and taxes to help foster youth develop the skills needed for financial independence.

"Financial literacy is a critical skill that can significantly impact a young person's future, especially for those transitioning out of foster care," said Andrew Grover, Executive Director at Youth Villages Oregon. "Our partnership with OnPoint enables us to provide these critical financial tools and education to help foster youth build a stable and independent future.

Youth Villages Oregon also received funding from the Marcia H. Randall Foundation and the Delbrueck Family Fund of Oregon Community Foundation, totaling $100,000 in donations for its 2024 financial literacy program. These funds will provide financial session stipends and a savings account match for Portland Metro youth enrolled in the program. 

Youth Villages Oregon has been serving youth in Oregon since 2011 through LifeSet, an evidence-informed program helping foster youth learn skills to navigate adulthood. Youth Villages Oregon serves more than 750 youth and families each year across 12 counties. 

Honoring OnPoint’s roots in education

OnPoint was founded in 1932 by 16 schoolteachers and continues to honor its founders’ mission to provide quality education in the region. Learn more about the credit union’s commitment to financial education in Oregon and Southwest Washington.

ABOUT ONPOINT COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION

OnPoint Community Credit Union is the largest credit union in Oregon, serving over 563,000 members and with assets of $9.2 billion. Founded in 1932, OnPoint Community Credit Union’s membership is available to anyone who lives or works in one of 28 Oregon counties (Benton, Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Coos, Crook, Curry, Deschutes, Douglas, Gilliam, Hood River, Jackson, Jefferson, Josephine, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Morrow, Multnomah, Polk, Sherman, Tillamook, Wasco, Washington, Wheeler and Yamhill) and two Washington counties (Skamania and Clark) and their immediate family members. OnPoint Community Credit Union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration (NCUA). More information is available at www.onpointcu.com or 503-228-7077 or 800-527-3932.

ABOUT YOUTH VILLAGES

Youth Villages is a national leader in mental and behavioral health committed to finding the most effective solutions to help children, families and young adults overcome obstacles and live successfully. Working through direct services, partnerships with innovative public agencies and advocacy, we collaborate to bring positive change to child welfare, children’s mental health and justice systems. Our 4,500 employees serve more than 43,000 children and young adults in more than 100 locations in 26 states and the District of Columbia. Youth Villages has been recognized by the Harvard Business School and U.S. News & World Report and was identified by The White House as one of the nation’s most promising results-oriented nonprofit organizations.




Attached Media Files: 2024-06/963/173094/2024_blog_hero-youth_villages_success_stories-young_adults_with_counselors-1015x540.jpg

Fri. 06/14/24
Fatal Crash - Interstate 84 - Union County
Oregon State Police - 06/14/24 1:39 PM

Union County, Ore. 13 June 24- On Thursday, June 13, 2024, at 6:43 a.m., Oregon State Police responded to a single-vehicle crash on Interstate 84, near milepost 270, in Union County.

The preliminary investigation indicated an eastbound GMC Yukon, operated by Tyree Jourdan Hescock (41) of La Grande, left the roadway for unknown reasons and traveled on the wrong side of a guardrail. The GMC struck the guardrail and began to roll, ejecting the operator who was not wearing a seatbelt.

The operator of the GMC (Hescock) was declared deceased at the scene.

The highway was impacted for several hours during the on-scene investigation. The cause of the crash is under investigation.

OSP was assisted by La Grande Fire, Union County Sheriff's Office, and ODOT.

# # #

About the Oregon State Police
Oregon State Police (OSP) is a multi-disciplined organization that is charged with protecting the people, wildlife, and natural resources in Oregon. OSP enforces traffic laws on the state’s roadways, investigates and solves crime, conducts postmortem examinations and forensic analysis, and provides background checks, and law enforcement data. The agency regulates gaming and enforces fish, wildlife, and natural resource laws. OSP is comprised of more than 1,400 staff members – including troopers, investigators, and professional staff – who provide a full range of policing and public safety services to Oregon and other law enforcement agencies throughout Oregon.


Public Safety Memorial Fund Board Meeting Scheduled 6-17-2024
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 06/14/24 12:40 PM

PUBLIC SAFETY MEMORIAL FUND BOARD

MEETING SCHEDULED

 

Notice of Special Meeting

The Public Safety Memorial Fund Board will hold a special meeting on June 17, 2024, at 11:00 a.m. at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE Salem. For further information, please contact Shelby Wright at (503) 378-2191.

 

Agenda Items

1. Introductions

2. Nicholas Berg (DPSST #16489); Mist-Birkenfield Rural Fire Protection District; Initial Application for Benefits

    Presented by Kathy McAlpine

3. Next meeting – July 25, 2024, directly following the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training meeting at 9:00 a.m.

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. 


OnPoint Community Credit Union Awards $40,000 in Scholarships to Six Outstanding OSAA Seniors (Photo)
OnPoint Community Credit Union - 06/14/24 10:36 AM
Nidhi Nair of Lake Oswego High School, Lake Oswego Public Schools
Nidhi Nair of Lake Oswego High School, Lake Oswego Public Schools
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-06/963/173039/thumb_Nidhi_Nair.jpg

OnPoint and OSAA have awarded $101,000 to 31 students since 2018

PORTLAND, Ore., June 14, 2024 — OnPoint Community Credit Union and the Oregon School Activities Association (OSAA) today announced six graduating seniors have won scholarships worth up to $10,000. The awards are part of the 2024 OnPoint Community Credit Union Scholar Program.

The program recognizes graduating Scholar Athletes and Activity Scholars from OSAA member schools with two $10,000 scholarships and four $5,000 scholarships. The two winners of the $10,000 scholarships are Nidhi Nair of Lake Oswego High School and Savannah White of Pleasant Hill High School.

The four winners of the $5,000 scholarships are Kale Bingaman of Imbler High School, Jillian Bremont of Redmond High School, Salahedin Safi of Reynolds High School and Linnea Naone of Glencoe High School. OnPoint received more than 450 applications from 164 OSAA member schools this year.

“We are honored to celebrate these six students who have demonstrated exceptional achievements in academics, sports and community service,” said Rob Stuart, President and Chief Executive Officer of OnPoint Community Credit Union. “Each of these winners has shown remarkable dedication, leadership and a commitment to making a positive impact. Their hard work and perseverance are truly inspiring, and we are proud to support them as they continue to pursue their dreams.”

OnPoint’s Scholar Program honors graduating Oregon high school seniors who have earned a 3.50 or higher unweighted cumulative grade point average and have earned a varsity letter in an OSAA-sanctioned sport or competed in an OSAA-sanctioned activity.

“Following a record number of applicants, we’re excited to honor these outstanding scholars for their tremendous achievements,” said Peter Weber, OSAA Executive Director. “We sincerely appreciate OnPoint’s continued commitment and financial support as we partner to recognize top high school seniors throughout Oregon.”

Winners of the 2024 OnPoint Community Credit Union Scholar Program:

$10,000 Scholarship Winners

Nidhi Nair of Lake Oswego High School, Lake Oswego Public Schools, is committed to making a positive impact in both her local community and beyond. Nair founded the Random Acts of Kindness Club and successfully implemented the program in two different schools, fostering a culture of compassion and empathy. She volunteers with Hunger Fighters, a nonprofit food pantry that provided essential items to over 13,000 guests in 2023 alone. Nair is also an active member of her school, serving as ASB Secretary and Editor-in-Chief for the school newspaper. She also participated in Lake Oswego’s We the People Constitutional Law team, which led her to compete in the Harlan Institute Supreme Court competition. In the classroom, Nair has been recognized as a National Speech and Debate Association Academic All-American, AP Scholar with Honors and a recipient of the Rotary Club Educational Excellence Award. Nair will continue to use her talents to pursue a degree in Political Science, with aspirations of a future career in law.

Savannah White of Pleasant Hill High School, Pleasant Hill Public Schools, has an extensive agricultural background and a deep-rooted passion for community engagement. While competing in volleyball and basketball, White dedicated over 500 hours of community service through her role as vice president of the Pleasant Hill Future Farmers of America (FFA), where she promoted leadership and agriculture beyond the classroom. Her exemplary contribution to the program earned her a State Degree at the 2023 FFA State Convention. She also participated on the Oregon High School Equestrian Team (OHSET), where she fostered teamwork and furthered her positive impact on the local community. White challenged herself with a rigorous academic course load, taking over seven Advanced Placement (AP) classes while also learning Chinese and Spanish to enrich her cultural understanding and broaden her global perspective. White will continue to pursue her interests in agriculture through a degree in forest engineering at Oregon State University.

$5,000 Scholarship Winners

Salahedin Safi of Reynolds High School, Reynolds Public Schools, is a driven and compassionate student-athlete, dedicated to inclusivity and academic excellence. When not competing in basketball or track and field, Safi developed an inclusive environment at Reynolds by creating the Muslim Student Association. As founder of the Muslim Student Association, Safi spearheaded initiatives to bridge the understanding between Muslim students and school faculty, fostering a culture of respect and acceptance. His effort and dedication to the Muslim Student Association led Safi to create a sustainable foundation for many future generations of students at Reynolds. Safi has maintained a 4.0 weighted GPA while enrolling in 11 college-level classes. Safi will be attending Portland State University with a major in civil engineering. 

Jillian Bremont of Redmond High School, Redmond Public Schools, participated in soccer, basketball, track and field and cheerleading during her time at Redmond High School. Bremont uses her passion for sports to serve young members of the local community, coaching youth soccer and basketball teams and volunteering with the Redmond Swim programs and Unified Sports teams on campus. During the pandemic, she helped with the Redmond Cares program, gathering goods and household items for impacted families. Outside of the classroom and volunteer work, Bremont spends every morning before school helping at an early childcare program at a local elementary school while also juggling two jobs. Bremont earned a 4.346 weighted GPA and will graduate with 56 college credits. 

Kale Bingaman of Imbler High School, Imbler Schools, is a multi-sport athlete, participating in football, basketball, and track and field during his time at La Grande. When not competing, Bingaman participates in many community improvement organizations, such as Future Farmers of America (FFA), Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA), National Honor Society (NHS), 4-H Club and the Community 101 Foundation for the State of Oregon. These organizations enabled Bingaman to help his local community by working at concession stands, hosting assemblies, washing cars, cleaning school grounds, organizing food drives and serving meals during community banquets. His dedication to Imbler led him to raise over $13,000 for a new digital communications board, which serves as one of La Grande’s primary methods of reaching community members. Bingaman maintained a 4.0 GPA while juggling many dual credit courses. Bingaman hopes to continue his education at Montana State University and major in agricultural business.

Linnea Naone of Glencoe High School, Hillsboro Public Schools, participated in basketball and track and field, and was captain of the Crimson Tide soccer and swimming teams. Through mentorship and volunteerism, Naone uses her passion for athletics as an avenue to give back to her community. She uses her background as a swimmer and lifeguard to mentor new lifeguards and give back at her local recreation centers. Naone is also a mentor for young students at a local Title 1 elementary school, where she helps guide and inspire future generations of student-athletes. She also volunteers at EveryBody Athletics, helping create an inclusive environment for disabled individuals to learn and thrive in athletics. Naone shows a high commitment to self-improvement, evidenced by her participation in track clubs during the off-season to develop her talents as an athlete. Naone maintained a 3.9 GPA while taking many AP classes. She has earned a spot on the track and field team at Seattle Pacific University and will major in health sciences.

All graduating seniors who participated in OSAA activities were eligible to apply for a scholarship. The Scholar Program is part of OnPoint’s partnership with OSAA as the title sponsor of the Oregon high school state championships.

OnPoint selected winners based on letters of recommendation and personal essays about their community leadership, classroom success and how participating in OSAA activities has helped them achieve their goals.

Visit onpointcu.com/community-giving to learn more about OnPoint’s support of local organizations like OSAA.

ABOUT ONPOINT COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION

OnPoint Community Credit Union is the largest credit union in Oregon, serving over 563,000 members and with assets of $9.2 billion. Founded in 1932, OnPoint Community Credit Union’s membership is available to anyone who lives or works in one of 28 Oregon counties (Benton, Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Coos, Crook, Curry, Deschutes, Douglas, Gilliam, Hood River, Jackson, Jefferson, Josephine, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Morrow, Multnomah, Polk, Sherman, Tillamook, Wasco, Washington, Wheeler and Yamhill) and two Washington counties (Skamania and Clark) and their immediate family members. OnPoint Community Credit Union is federally insured by the National Credit Union Administration (NCUA). More information is available at www.onpointcu.com or 503-228-7077 or 800-527-3932.

ABOUT THE OREGON SCHOOL ACTIVITIES ASSOCIATION

The Oregon School Activities Association (OSAA) is a private non-profit, board-governed association comprised of 297 member high schools. A member of the National Federation of State High School Associations, the OSAA annually sponsors 124 teams and 440 individual state championships for students competing in 19 interscholastic activities. For more information, www.osaa.org or follow @OSAASports on social media.

 




Attached Media Files: Nidhi Nair of Lake Oswego High School, Lake Oswego Public Schools , Jillian Bremont of Redmond High School, Redmond Public Schools , Salahedin Safi of Reynolds High School, Reynolds Public Schools , Kale Bingaman of Imbler High School, Imbler Schools , Linnea Naone of Glencoe High School, Hillsboro Public Schools , Savannah White of Pleasant Hill High School, Pleasant Hill Public Schools

Bend Fire & Rescue Launches Community Survey to Inform Five-Year Strategic Plan
Bend Fire & Rescue - 06/14/24 9:00 AM

This week Bend Fire & Rescue launched an online community survey to help guide the development of the department’s next five-year strategic plan. 

“Community input is an invaluable part of our planning process,” said Fire Chief Todd Riley, “by gaining an understanding of the priorities of those we serve, we are able to better meet the expectations held by our community.”
Bend Fire takes great responsibility in providing excellent emergency response and community-centered education programs to all who are served by the department. 

The department is primarily funded through tax dollars. In May 2023, voters approved an operating levy for Bend Fire & Rescue to maintain current service levels through June 2029. Input received in the community survey will help to prioritize the use of tax dollars and efforts to serve the community. 

“We are extremely grateful the community chose to continue funding crucial positions, equipment and training, and we want to be mindful of this trust in our department as we plan for the next five years,” said Chief Riley.

The survey is available online now at bendoregon.gov/Fire and will be open through 5 p.m. on June 28. 

Bend Fire & Rescue is the largest department in Central Oregon offering fire and emergency medical services to Bend and the surrounding rural community known as Deschutes Rural Fire Protection District #2. 


INSIGHT SCHOOL OF OREGON - PAINTED HILLS | REGULAR BOARD OF DIRECTORS MEETING | June 20, 2024 @11:30am
Insight School of Ore. - Painted Hills - 06/14/24 8:21 AM

The ISOR-PH regular board meeting is scheduled for June 20, 2024 @11:30am.

Insight School of Oregon Painted Hills Board Members are hereby notified that the regular Meeting of the Board will be held June 20, 2024 @11:30am. 

 

The next regular scheduled meeting will take place on June 20 @11:30am

Insight School of Oregon Painted Hills Board Members are hereby notified that the Meeting of the Board will be held at:

1.Via Teleconference - using any of the following US phone numbers

+1 253 215 8782

+1 346 248 7799

+1 669 900 9128

+1 301 715 8592

+1 312 626 6799

+1 646 558 8656

Meeting ID is: 936 9648 8538

And

2. Via Zoom Meeting Link:

https://zoom.us/s/93696488538

The Public has been invited to the Board Meeting with notices posted at the following locations:

A. FlashNet Newswire

http://flashalertbend.net/press-releases.html

B. Insight School of Oregon Painted Hills Office

603 NW 3rd Street

Prineville, OR 97754