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Bend/Central-Eastern Oregon News Releases for Tue. Feb. 7 - 2:27 pm
Tue. 02/07/23
February 14-15 Northwest Power & Conservation Council meeting
Northwest Power and Conservation Council - 02/07/23 2:21 PM

The Northwest Power and Conservation Council will hold its Council meeting on February 14-15 by webinar.

See the agenda and how to attend


Common School Fund will send a record $72.2 million to Oregon public schools in 2023
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 02/07/23 1:59 PM

Common School Fund will send a record $72.2 million to Oregon public schools in 2023

Fund that’s supported education since statehood sends highest-ever amount to schools


SALEM, Ore. – Oregon’s K-12 public schools will receive a record $72.2 million from the Common School Fund in 2023, officials announced during today’s State Land Board meeting. 

Every one of Oregon’s 197 public school districts receives money from the Common School Fund every year. How much each district receives depends on the number of students served. In 2023, Portland Public Schools, the state’s largest district, will receive $6.4 million. Lincoln County School District will receive about $675,000. Rogue River School District will receive just over $113,000. See 2023 distributions for all Oregon school districts.

The average 2023 distribution is approximately $367,000. Baker School District, with about 1,700 students, will receive $237,422 in 2023. 

“The Common School Fund is valuable in sustaining all of our efforts across our district,” said Erin Lair, Superintendent of Baker School District, “everything from maintaining facilities to instruction.” 

The Common School Fund has supported Oregon schools since statehood, when the federal government granted our new state nearly 3.4 million acres "for the use of schools." The State Land Board was established to oversee these school lands, which generate revenue for the Fund. 

Now valued at $2.1 billion, the Common School Fund is invested by the State Treasurer and the Oregon Investment Council. The Fund earned an average 4.42 percent rate of return over the three-year period ending in 2022. 

“We’re incredibly pleased with the Common School Fund’s performance in recent years under Treasury’s management. These sustained returns will allow us to send a record-setting amount to Oregon public schools,” said State Treasurer Tobias Read. “We look forward to seeing the positive impact this will have on students across the state, from increased resources in the classroom to facility improvements.”

Annually, 3.5 percent of the Fund is distributed to schools. The 2023 distribution of $72.2 million, the highest-ever distribution, is $8 million more than the 2022 distribution of $64.2 million and $12.1 million more than the 2021 distribution of $60.1 million.

Today, approximately 772,000 acres of school lands are managed by the Department of State Lands on behalf of the Land Board. $1.38 million in net income from school land leases, sales, and other land management activities was added to the Fund in fiscal year 2022. 

“Generation after generation of Oregon students have been supported by school lands,” said DSL Director Vicki Walker. “My grandchildren now benefit from the $2.4 million going to Eugene schools in 2023, just as my children did from past Common School Fund distributions.” 

About the State Land Board and the Department of State Lands: The State Land Board consists of Governor Tina Kotek, Secretary of State Shemia Fagan and State Treasurer Tobias Read. Established by the Oregon Constitution in 1859, the Land Board oversees the state’s Common School Fund. The Department of State Lands is the Land Board’s administrative agency, managing the lands and resources that help fund Oregon’s public schools and protecting the state’s waterways and wetlands for the many benefits they provide.

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www.oregon.gov/dsl


DPSST Private Security/Investigator Policy Committee Meeting Cancelled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 02/07/23 1:23 PM

PRIVATE SECURITY/INVESTIGATOR POLICY COMMITTEE

MEETING CANCELLED

 

Notice of Meeting Cancellation

The Private Security/Investigator Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training meeting scheduled for February 14th, 2023, at 1:30 p.m. has been cancelled.

The next Private Security/Investigator Policy Committee meeting date will be shared once available.

 


Mid Oregon Free Days Return to the High Desert Museum in February (Photo)
High Desert Museum - 02/07/23 9:30 AM
Visitors at Autzen Otter Exhibit, Photo by Jason Quigley
Visitors at Autzen Otter Exhibit, Photo by Jason Quigley
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2023-02/6924/161001/thumb_visitors_at_otters_photo_by_Jason_Quigley.jpg

BEND, OR — For the first time since winter 2020, Free Family Saturdays return to the High Desert Museum. On Saturday, February 11 and 25, visitors will get free admission to the Museum. 

“After three years, we are excited to throw open our doors for Free Family Saturdays,” said Museum Executive Director Dana Whitelaw, Ph.D. “They have always been highly popular and it’s an amazing day for witnessing the Museum’s educational mission in action.”

Along with free admission, visitors can enjoy a special Daily Schedule filled with numerous interpretive talks. Every hour from 11:00 am – 3:00 pm, there will be a Bird of Prey Encounter in the Bird of Prey Center pavilion. Visitors can meet a nonreleasable raptor in the Museum’s care and learn about their unique adaptations. Visitors can also experience nature encounters in Classroom A throughout the day. 

Visitors on Free Family Saturdays will be able to experience the Museum’s new exhibition, Creations of Spirit. Native artists commissioned for this original exhibition created artwork to be used in Native communities before arriving at the Museum. It includes acclaimed artists Joe Feddersen (Colville), Kelli Palmer (Wasco, Warm Springs) and H’Klumaiyat Roberta Joy Kirk (Wasco, Warm Springs, Diné). Creations of Spirit is a one-of-a-kind, celebratory experience featuring the stories of living works of art. highdesertmuseum.org/creations-of-spirit

Other temporary exhibitions include the original effort, Under the Snow. The exhibit, offered in English and Spanish, reveals the hidden world beneath the snow, called the subnivium. In this environment, animals create a matrix of tunnels to survive the winter’s frigid temperatures and hide from the predators that lurk above. The exhibit is filled with animations of animals and immerses the visitor in the winter landscape. Learn more at highdesertmuseum.org/under-the-snow.

And In the Arena: Photographs from America’s Only Touring Black Rodeo, will be open through June 25. Through the lens of San Francisco Bay area photographer Gabriela Hasbun, the exhibit documents the exhilarating atmosphere of the Bill Pickett Invitational Rodeo—the only touring Black rodeo in the country—and the showstopping style and skill of the Black cowboys and cowgirls who compete in it year after year. Learn more at highdesertmuseum.org/in-the-arena.

Winter hours are daily from 10:00 am – 4:00 pm. Learn more about all the Museum’s permanent and temporary exhibits at highdesertmuseum.org/exhibitions.

Free Family Saturdays are made possible by Mid Oregon Credit Union.

ABOUT THE MUSEUM:

The HIGH DESERT MUSEUM opened in Bend, Oregon in 1982. It brings together wildlife, cultures, art, history and the natural world to convey the wonder of North America’s High Desert. The Museum is a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization accredited by the American Alliance of Museums, is a Smithsonian Affiliate, was the 2019 recipient of the Western Museums Association’s Charles Redd Award for Exhibition Excellence and was a 2021 recipient of the National Medal for Museum and Library Service. To learn more, visit highdesertmuseum.org and follow us on FacebookInstagram and Twitter.

 

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Attached Media Files: Visitors at Autzen Otter Exhibit, Photo by Jason Quigley

Oregon Dept. of Forestry gives $4.4 million in grants to boost capacity at Oregon tree nurseries
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 02/07/23 8:28 AM

SALEM, Ore. – Ten tree nurseries across the state are receiving over $4.4 million this year to help them increase their ability to produce badly needed seedlings. The seedlings are needed to help reforest millions of acres deforested in recent years by wildfire, disease and pests. 

The money was given to ODF after passage by the Oregon Legislature in 2021 of House Bill 5006. The bill was a response to the devastating 2020 wildfires which burned a million acres of forest. In the wake of those fires, there were many barriers to reforesting, including shortages of money, labor, and for some smaller landowners appropriate tree seedlings. 

ODF Small Forestland Owner Assistance Unit Manager Nate Agalzoff said, “These grants are helping nurseries make strategic investments to increase their ability to grow more seedlings, which will enable them to better support reforestation needs in the future.”

Nurseries are using the funds to invest in everything from adding irrigation to building new greenhouses and seedbed space as well as storage facilities for storing seedling trees. Funds can also go toward:

  • equipment
  • the cost of collecting or purchasing tree seeds,
  • buying land on which to expand nursery facilities.

“These grants are increasing overall capacity across the state for whenever seedling demand rises,” said ODF Reforestation Program Project Coordinator Astrea Strawn. “In the case of nurseries in Union and Hood River counties, the grants also ensure there will be capacity to provide geographically appropriate seedlings for those areas.”

Strawn said funds must be spent before the end of this summer. 

“This makes us optimistic that landowners, especially smaller ones, will have better access to seedlings. When they do, they can promptly reforest after future tree losses to keep Oregon’s working forests working for Oregonians,” she said.

“The funding will allow Lava Nursery, Inc. to increase seedling production for the small woodland owners, helping them to meet their reforestation needs after forest fires and/or harvest operations,” said Lava’s Assistant Nursery Manager Jeff Snyder. “These funds will also allow for additional freezer storage capability for long-term storage of seedlings to ensure the best quality seedlings are available at the time of planting.”

To qualify for a grant, a nursery had to have experience growing high-quality commercial conifer trees for reforestation in Oregon, including Douglas-fir, grand fir, noble fir, western redcedar, ponderosa pine and others.

“The awards were targeted to nurseries which showed interest in helping with future reforestation needs, whether from wildfires or climate change losses,” said Strawn.

Nurseries which received funds include:

  • Brooks Tree Farm – Salem in Marion County $540,000
  • Drakes Crossing Nursery – Silverton in Marion County $540,000
  • PRT Growing Services – Cottage Grove and Hubbard $540,000
  • Trillium Gardens – Eugene in Lane County $531,000
  • Weyerhaeuser – Aurora and Turner in the Willamette Valley $500,000
  • Champoeg Nursery – Aurora in Marion County $458,000
  • Lava Nursery, Inc. – Parkdale in Hood County $458,000
  • Scholls Valley Native Nursery – Forest Grove in Washington County $367,000
  • The Plantworks, LLC – Cove in Union County $276,000
  • Kintigh Nursery – Springfield in Lane County $238,000

# # #


Russian Cryptocurrency Money Launderer Pleads Guilty
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 02/07/23 8:00 AM

PORTLAND, Ore.—On February 6, 2023, a Russian cryptocurrency money launderer previously extradited from the Netherlands to face charges in the District of Oregon pleaded guilty in federal court.

Denis Mihaqlovic Dubnikov, 30, pleaded guilty to one count of conspiracy to commit money laundering.

According to court documents, between at least August 2018 and August 2021, Dubnikov and his co-conspirators laundered the proceeds of Ryuk ransomware attacks on individuals and organizations throughout the United States and abroad. After receiving ransom payments, Ryuk actors, including Dubnikov and his co-conspirators, and others involved in the scheme engaged in various financial transactions, including international financial transactions, to conceal the nature, source, location, ownership, and control of the ransom proceeds.

Specifically, in July 2019, a United States-based company paid a 250 Bitcoin Ryuk ransom after a ransomware attack. On or about July 11, 2019, in Moscow, Russia, Dubnikov accepted 35 Bitcoin from a co-conspirator in exchange for approximately $400,000. The Bitcoin transferred to Dubnikov were directly sourced from the ransom paid by the American company. Dubnikov converted the Bitcoin to Tether and sent it to a second co-conspirator, who eventually exchanged it for Chinese Renminbi. Dubnikov’s co-conspirators laundered additional Bitcoin sourced from the original ransom payment. Dubnikov was compensated financially for his role in the scheme.

On November 2, 2021, Dubnikov was arrested in Amsterdam pursuant to a provisional arrest warrant. On August 16, 2022, he was extradited to the United States and made his initial appearance in federal court in the District of Oregon the next day.

Conspiracy to commit money laundering is punishable by up to 20 years in federal prison, three years’ supervised release, and a fine of $500,000. Dubnikov will be sentenced on April 11, 2023.

This case was investigated by the FBI and is being prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon. 

Dubnikov’s extradition was handled by the Justice Department’s Office of International Affairs. He was transferred to the District of Oregon by the FBI.

The Department of Justice thanks Dutch authorities for their assistance in securing the arrest and extradition of Dubnikov.

First identified in August 2018, Ryuk is a type of ransomware software that, when executed on a computer or network, encrypts files and attempts to delete any system backups. Of note, Ryuk can target storage drives contained within or physically connected to a computer, including those accessible remotely via a network connection. Ryuk has been used to target thousands of victims worldwide across a variety of sectors. In October 2020, law enforcement officials specifically identified Ryuk as an imminent and increasing cybercrime threat to hospitals and healthcare providers in the United States.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Mon. 02/06/23
** Update 2/6/23 ** Large Illegal Marijuana Grow Controlled By Cartel Dismantled in Alfalfa (Photo)
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/06/23 3:45 PM
Living Space
Living Space
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2021-09/5227/148205/thumb_DSCN9040.JPG

2/6/23 UPDATE 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

On Friday, February 3rd, 2023, the Deschutes County Illicit Marijuana Enforcement Team made an additional arrest in the case of the Alfalfa marijuana grow operated by and affiliated with a foreign Mexican drug cartel. Most laborers found working on the grow site were Mexican nationals and illegally trafficked into the United States to work in the illegal marijuana trade involuntarily. The laborers were found living in primitive wooden structures and dome tents with limited clean water sources and dumping wastewater directly into the soil.  

At the scene, Denise Elaine Johnson, of Bend, Oregon was arrested for illegally manufacturing marijuana plants and cannabinoid products. Ms. Johnson has since pled guilty to the charges in the Deschutes County Circuit Court. 

Detectives identified several additional people involved with this case as suspects.

Robert Dale Scheeler, age 30, of Houston, Texas, was one of the people identified for allegedly being responsible for facilitating the grow location and managing the operation. It was confirmed Mr. Scheeler fled the United States after the Search Warrant was executed on the Alfalfa marijuana grow. A warrant was issued for his arrest after being indicted by a Deschutes County Grand Jury and later failing to appear in court. 

In June of 2022, Mr. Scheeler was detained for this warrant by US Customs and Border Protection Agents when he attempted to re-enter the United States from Mexico through a port of entry in Texas. However, the Harris County Jail refused to house him due to ongoing COVID protocols. Ultimately, he was released into the United States.

DCIME Detectives continued to search for Mr. Scheeler and located him living in a Houston, Texas, RV park. 

On February 3rd, 2023, Robert Nicholas Scheeler was arrested by the Harris County (TX) Sheriff's Office Violent Persons Task Force / Criminal Warrants Section for the outstanding arrest warrant. Mr. Scheeler is currently held at the Harris County (TX) Sherrif's Jail pending his extradition to Deschutes County. An initial appearance will be scheduled once he returns to Oregon and is booked into the Deschutes County Jail. 

Additional arrests are forthcoming.  

The Deschutes County Illegal Marijuana Enforcement (DCIME) program is a partnership between the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, the Bend Police Department, and the Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office to address illegal marijuana activity in Deschutes County.

CONTACT FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:   Sgt. Kent Vander Kamp, 541-550-4869 or kentv@deschutes.org  

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ORIGINAL PRESS RELEASE 

On Thursday, September 2nd, 2021, Detectives with the Deschutes County Illegal Marijuana Enforcement team concluded a long-term investigation involving a large-scale illicit outdoor marijuana grow near Dodds Rd and Alfalfa Market Rd in the Alfalfa community. 

On September 2nd, 2021, DCIME detectives, with the assistance of the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office SWAT Team, executed a Search Warrant on the 30-acre property and located 49 greenhouses containing 9,227 marijuana plants in various stages of growth. In addition to the plants, 2,800 pounds of processed marijuana were also found. Also concerning, two pistols and an AR-15 rifle was found within the marijuana grow operation.

During the investigation, it was determined that this particular illegal marijuana grow site was operated by and affiliated with a foreign Mexican drug cartel attempting to cultivate illegal marijuana for sale throughout the United States commercially. Most of the laborers found working on the grow site are Mexican nationals and illegally trafficked into the United States to work in the illegal marijuana trade involuntarily. The laborers were found living in primitive wooden structures and dome tents with limited clean water sources and dumping wastewater directly into the soil.  

Approximately twenty-one people were detained and later released by Detectives at the scene. Some laborers fled into the neighboring property and offered no resistance when contacted by detectives. Several suspects, both foreign and domestic, have been identified. One person was arrested at the scene and released with a citation to appear in court. Detectives expect arrests to be forthcoming once additional follow-up investigations are complete. 

The possession of small amounts of marijuana is legal for recreational use in Oregon. However, large, unlicensed marijuana operations remain illegal. Due to these operations being unregulated, they pose dangers to the public and the environment. 

The Alfalfa community and surrounding areas in Deschutes County have been struggling with consistent groundwater sources. Since the beginning of DCIME, investigators have found illegal marijuana grows diverted or stolen significant water from nearby homes, commercial farms, or directly from pumps connected to underground sources in the arid central Oregon high desert. This particular grow site used underground water and maintained a complex watering system that supplied several on-site 15,000-20,000 gallon cisterns. 

Additionally, Illegal marijuana farms, including this one, often use pesticides and insecticides that threaten residential water supplies and endanger the end user. 

Illegal marijuana grow facilities have a very high electrical demand due to the lights, fans, and other equipment used. This grow site used jerry-rigged copper wire, extension cords, and power strips as permanent exterior wiring for processing equipment, lighting, fans, etc. Overloaded electrical wiring has caused fires in other marijuana grow facilities. 

The Deschutes County Illegal Marijuana Enforcement (DCIME) program is a partnership between the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, the Bend Police Department, and the Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office to address illegal marijuana activity in Deschutes County.

DCIME Detectives were assisted by the Deschutes County Central Oregon Drug Enforcement team, Bend Police Department, Redmond Police Department, Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, Oregon State Police, Crook County Sheriff’s Office and the Alfalfa Fire Department, and the US Drug Enforcement Administration with the investigation, eradication, and dismantling of this site. 

CONTACT FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:   Sgt. Kent Vander Kamp, 541-550-4869 or kentv@deschutes.org  

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is a full-service organization providing patrol, criminal investigations, corrections, civil and search and rescue. Special operations include a Marine Patrol, K-9 units, and Forest Patrol. Founded in 1916 and today directed by Sheriff L. Shane Nelson, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office serves over 157,000 residents in the unincorporated areas of the county. The agency has 221 authorized and funded personnel, including 175 sworn employees who provide services to the 3,055 square miles of Deschutes County.

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Attached Media Files: Living Space , Rifle , Bathroom , Section 2 , Section 1

Media opportunity: High school students planting trees to support recovery of the Santiam State Forest after the 2020 Labor Day fires, the work is coordinated by the State Forests Trust of Oregon
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 02/06/23 3:31 PM

What: Watch junior and senior high school students from the Career Education Technical Center in Salem plant Douglas-fir seedlings in the Fern Ridge Demonstration Area of the Santiam State Forest.  The tree planting is hosted by the State Forests Trust of Oregon and Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF).

Visuals: See 30-40 students receive hands-on training on how to plant trees.  Then they will plant trees.  Fern Ridge Demonstration Area is an area that was burned during the 2020 Labor Day fires. Students, teachers and forestry experts from ODF and the State Forests Trust will be available for interviews

People on-site available to interview: Several students; and Lorie Wigle, State Forests Trust of Oregon, Wildfire Restoration Fund Project Manager; Kyle Kaupp, ODF Santiam Unit Forester; John Walter, ODF silviculturist; Curtis Fisher, – CTEC Instructor, Residential Construction; David Fox – CTEC Instructor, Business Management; Tim Hoffman, ODF Public Affairs.

When:  Feb. 10; Time: 10 a.m.--noon

Where: Meet at the ODF Lyons Field Office, 22965 N Fork Rd SE, Lyons, OR 97358  (Just off Highway 22)—we will car pool from the office

Please send an RSVP by Feb. 8 so we can plan for safety gear and set up the carpool.  It is recommended that you drive an SUV or other higher clearance vehicle since the last part of the drive will be on gravel/dirt forest roads.  Event is rain or shine with limited shelter on site, you are advised to bring proper clothing including sturdy footwear. Hard hats will be required but no other safety gear.  ODF can provide hard hats.  RSVP to tim.l.hoffman@odf.oregon.gov.   For more information contact: Tim Hoffman, ODF public affairs, (503) 983-3761 (cell phone good for day of also)

Background: Webpages for more information:

State Forests Trust of Oregon

Oregon Department of Forestry : Restoring the Santiam State Forest : Recreation : State of Oregon

Oregon Department of Forestry : State forests : Forest resources : State of Oregon

CTEC – Career Technical Education Center – Salem Keizer Public Schools (salkeiz.k12.or.us)

 

Fast facts background:

  • The Department of Forestry will have planted over 3 million seedlings by the end of this season helping to restore the Santiam State Forest. 
  • State Forests Trust of Oregon is a non-profit organization that supports recreation and learning on state forests.  
  • After the devastating 2020 Labor Day fires, the Trust established a fund to restore recreation areas and promote education about wildfire.
  • The Fern Ridge project offers a future opportunity for education and interpretation on forest management practices. 
  • The State Forests Trust of Oregon has numerous supporters who have a strong connection to the forest and restoration because family members were engaged in replanting after the Tillamook Burn. We want to create similar opportunities on the Santiam State Forest.

 

For awareness--agenda for the day (of course news media can leave anytime):

10:00                    Meet in parking lot of ODF Lyons office.

10-10:30              Carpool to site

10:30-11              Orientation & information session for students and donors

11-11:15              Planting training 

11:15-12:30        Planting – participants

12:30-12:35        Group photo

12:35-1                Lunch 

1-1:30                  Return to ODF Lyons parking lot


Bend Police to host Community Academy beginning in April (Photo)
Bend Police Dept. - 02/06/23 3:12 PM
Community Academy
Community Academy
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2023-02/5593/161003/thumb_IMG_0525.JPG

Bend Police to host Community Academy beginning April 4

The City of Bend Police Department is excited to host its 39th Community Academy this spring. 

The Bend Police Department Community Academy has been recognized as a national and regional model in providing an inside look at how the Department operates. 

This spring's Community Academy, which will take place from April 4 through May 30, will be the Department’s 39th class of community members to participate. 

The goal of the program is to inform and educate participants about the Bend Police Department and the various ways police officers carry out the Department’s mission. Instruction includes classes on narcotics, traffic, CERT, K9s, officer survival and more. The course also includes a range day with firearm demonstrations. The classes are taught by officers who are selected based on their areas of expertise in law enforcement.

When students graduate, they are eligible to become Bend Police Department volunteers. Volunteers can serve in various assignments that support the Department. 

The class will meet once a week for nine consecutive weeks, from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Tuesday evenings. The Community Academy can accommodate 30 students per session. There is no charge to participate in the Community Academy. 

To participate, please complete the Community Academy Application, or pick up an application at the Bend Police Department’s reception desk, 555 NE 15th Street, in Bend. For more information, visit the Bend Police Department’s webpage. Applications can be submitted via email to urleigh@bendoregon.gov">cburleigh@bendoregon.gov, via mail to 555 NE 15th Street, Bend, Oregon 97702, or by dropping them off in person at the Department. 




Attached Media Files: Community Academy

$1 Million Powerball Ticket Sold in Beaverton as Jackpot Reaches $747 Million (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 02/06/23 12:23 PM
A player chooses their Powerball numbers
A player chooses their Powerball numbers
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2023-02/4939/160993/thumb_MicrosoftTeams-image_(3).png

Salem, Ore. –  Oregon is home to another $1 million Powerball winner thanks to a ticket purchased in Beaverton on February 4, 2023. A $100,000 winner was also purchased in Cottage Grove on February 3, 2023. The Powerball jackpot is an estimated $747 million for tonight’s drawing, making it the fifth-largest Powerball jackpot in history.

Since the Powerball jackpot run up began on November 21, 2022, the Oregon Lottery has sold about $15 million in tickets. Approximately a third of those sales will be returned to state beneficiaries to support economic development, education, veteran services, state parks and more. 

Retailers who sell lottery tickets also earn commissions from the boost in ticket sales and bonus payments for lower tier wins. In this case, the retailer who sold the $1 million ticket earned a $10,000 bonus. 

Powerball is a multi-state jackpot operated by 44 states, plus the District of Columbia, the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico. The largest prize won in Oregon was a $340 million jackpot in 2005. 

The Oregon Lottery recommends that you always sign the back of your ticket to ensure you can claim your prize. In the event of winning a jackpot, players should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Players have a year to claim their prize. 

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned nearly $15 billion for economic development, public education, outdoor school, state parks, veteran services, and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org




Attached Media Files: A player chooses their Powerball numbers

Bend Police make six DUII arrests in 12 hours, including two people arrested twice (Photo)
Bend Police Dept. - 02/06/23 11:44 AM
Press Release
Press Release
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2023-02/5593/160990/thumb_PRESS_RELEASE_FOR_FLASHALERT.png

Date: Feb. 6, 2023

Case #s:  
2023-00007109
2023-00007143
2023-00007165
2023-00007167
2023-00007169
2023-00007173

Incident: Bend Police make six DUII arrests in 12-hour window, including two people arrested twice

Arrested / Charges
Cameron Dale Friesen, 67-year-old Bend resident: DUII – alcohol, Driving While Suspended – misdemeanor, Resisting Arrest, Reckless Endangering

Scott Robert Fuhrman, 59-year-old Redmond resident: DUII – alcohol x2

David Dwayne Jones, 49-year-old Bend resident: DUII – alcohol x2

Andrew Donovan Charley, 44-year-old La Pine resident: DUII – alcohol 

 

Bend Police made six DUII arrests in less than 12 hours on Sunday night and early Monday morning, including two people who were arrested for DUII a second time after returning to their parked cars after their initial arrests. These six arrests were part of a total of nine DUII arrests made over the weekend.

At 4:25 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 5, Bend Police received a complaint of an intoxicated driver in the downtown area who was driving on a flat tire and reportedly had a bottle of liquor in his lap. Officers located the Subaru Legacy, overheating and with a flat tire, stopped in the road in the 61000 block of Chuckanut Drive. The driver, 67-year-old Cameron Friesen, then parked the vehicle in a driveway. He was arrested on suspicion of DUII – alcohol. Friesen was driving while suspended and was also charged with resisting arrest and reckless endangerment. Friesen blew a 0.23% BAC. He was lodged at the Deschutes County Jail. 

At 9:37 p.m. on Sunday, Feb. 5, Bend Police received a complaint of an intoxicated man who was knocking on doors at the Holiday Motel, then left northbound on Third Street in a Ford Ranger. Officers located the vehicle, driven by 59-year-old Scott Fuhrman, in the Rite Aid parking lot on SE Third Street, and arrested Fuhrman on suspicion of DUII. Fuhrman blew a 0.20% BAC. He was lodged at the Deschutes County Jail. 

At approximately 12:42 a.m. on Monday, Feb. 6, a Bend Police officer observed a Subaru Outback speeding, swerving and driving without its lights on. The officer conducted a traffic stop in the area of 200 SE 15th Street. The driver, 49-year-old David Dwayne Jones, was arrested on suspicion of DUII and blew a 0.22% BAC. Jones was refused at the Deschutes County Jail because he did not meet jail criteria to be lodged. He was transported to St. Charles Bend and issued a citation in lieu of arrest. 

At 1:35 a.m. on Monday, Feb. 6, a Bend Police officer observed Scott Fuhrman, who had been arrested and jailed several hours earlier on suspicion of DUII, get dropped off at his pickup truck and drive through the Rite Aid parking lot. He was again stopped and arrested on suspicion of DUII, and blew a 0.15% BAC. He was lodged at the Deschutes County Jail. 

At 2:15 a.m. on Monday, Feb. 6, a Bend Police officer observed a silver Ford Focus traveling west on NE Franklin Avenue at approximately 50 MPH fail to stop at a red light. The officer conducted a traffic stop on the vehicle at Third Street and Greenwood Avenue and arrested the driver, 44-year-old Andrew Donovan Charley, on suspicion of DUII. Charley blew a 0.20% BAC. He was lodged at the Deschutes County Jail. 

At 3:42 a.m. on Monday, Feb. 6, a Bend Police officer observed David Dwayne Jones, who was arrested on suspicion of DUII three hours earlier, drive his car out of the parking lot where it was parked during the initial DUII arrest and travel southbound on SE 15th Street. Jones blew a 0.19% BAC and was transported to the Deschutes County Jail, which again refused Jones because he did not meet jail criteria to be lodged. He was transported to St. Charles Bend and was lodged at the jail after his release. 




Attached Media Files: Press Release

Oregon Cannabis Commission's Patient Equity, Health Equity, and Governance Frame Working subcommittees meet via Zoom February 13
Oregon Health Authority - 02/06/23 11:30 AM

February 6, 2023

Media contact: Erica Heartquist, 503-871-8843, PHD.Communications@state.or.us

Oregon Cannabis Commission's Patient Equity, Health Equity, and Governance Frame Working subcommittees meet via Zoom February 13

What: A combined Zoom meeting for the Oregon Cannabis Commission’s Patient Equity, Health Equity and Governance Frame Working subcommittees.

Agenda: The full agenda will be available at iscommissionhttps://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/DISEASESCONDITIONS/CHRONICDISEASE/MEDICALMARIJUANAPROGRAM/Pages/Cannabis-Commission.aspx?utm_medium=email&utm_source=govdelivery">www.healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission.

When: Monday, Feb. 13, 10 a.m. to noon.

Where: Zoom Meeting. Members of the public may join remotely by phone at 1-669-254-5252; Meeting ID: 160 376 6913 Passcode: 697004

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight member-panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the senate. The commission provides advice to Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor and Cannabis Commission regarding Oregon Administrative Rules that govern medical cannabis as well as retail cannabis as it pertains to patients and caregivers.  Additionally, the commission is tasked with developing a long-term strategic plan for ensuring that cannabis will remain a therapeutic and affordable option for patients and monitoring federal laws, regulations, and policies regarding cannabis.

Visit iscommissionhttps://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/DISEASESCONDITIONS/CHRONICDISEASE/MEDICALMARIJUANAPROGRAM/Pages/Cannabis-Commission.aspx?utm_medium=email&utm_source=govdelivery">www.Healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission for more information.

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Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Megan Lockwood at 971-673-0620, 711 TTY or .lockwood@dhsoha.state.or.us">megan.r.lockwood@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


State Interoperability Executive Council
State of Oregon - 02/06/23 10:46 AM

The State Interoperability Executive Council (SIEC) will meet Tuesday, Feb. 14, 2023, 1:30 – 3:30 p.m. The meeting will take place virtually via Microsoft Teams. A call-in option is also available. The meeting is open to the public and comments will be taken from those in attendance or who call in. 

The agenda and handouts are posted on the council’s website. Instructions for those who wish to attend over the phone are outlined in the meeting agenda.

What: State Interoperability Executive Council  

When: Tuesday, Feb. 14, 1:30 – 3:30 p.m.

Where: Via Teleconference:

Microsoft Teams Link

Audio Call In: 503-446-4951 Pin: 486203846#

Who: Members of the State Interoperability Executive Council 

The SIEC was created under the State Chief Information Officer to be the statewide interoperability governing body and to serve as the primary steering group for the Oregon Statewide Interoperability Communications Plan (SCIP). The SIEC’s mission is to develop and maintain the SCIP, develop recommendations and guidelines for policy, identify technology and standards, and coordinate intergovernmental resources to facilitate statewide public safety communications interoperability.

REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION OF DISABILITIES – Reasonable accommodations, such as assistive hearing devices, sign language interpreters and materials in large print or audiotape, will be provided as needed. In order to ensure availability, please contact William Chapman at Enterprise Information Services at telephone 971-283-4607, or email SWIC.OR@das.oregon.gov at least 72 hours prior to the meeting with your request.


Sherman County Sheriff's Office Identifies Human Remains from 1989 with Othram DNA Lab and the Oregon State Medical Examiner's Office (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 02/06/23 8:14 AM
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On March 26, 1989, the remains of a skeletonized human body were discovered by a rafting group on the Sherman County side of the John Day River. On March 27, 1989, then-Sheriff Gerald Lohrey and additional Sherman County Sheriff’s Office deputies launched a jet boat at Cottonwood Bridge, approximately 13 miles east of Wasco, and recovered the incomplete skeletal remains. In addition to many long bones that had been half-buried in silt on the riverbank, a skull was collected with dental work.  

The discovery of the body made local headlines, but nothing was immediately known about the deceased. The remains were transported to the Oregon State Medical Examiner’s Office (SMEO) for examination. 

An examination of the body determined that the decedent was most likely a Caucasian male, between 40 and 50 years of age at the time of death, and around 5’6” to 5’9” in living stature. Evidence of compressed lumbar vertebrae by the forensic anthropologist indicated possible arthritic changes in the bone. It was noted that several teeth in the mandible exhibited restorations. Additional searches of the area were performed on March 28 and April 8, 1989; both searches yielded additional small bones and several teeth.

Leads on the possible identification of this individual were received by the Sheriff’s Office in the following days and weeks; numerous reporting parties indicated they believed the remains to be that of David West, Jr., a man who had disappeared from Sherman County trying to cross the John Day River during a large flooding event in 1964. Mr. West, Jr. had lived on a ranch near Bridge Creek and was known to cross the John Day often. He normally went back and forth across the river to feed cattle. He and a friend had even built a makeshift cable car across the river to assist in quickly navigating the waters back and forth over the John Day. The day the John Day River flooded in 1964, Mr. West was thought to be feeding cattle near Ashwood, Oregon. A friend went to check on him and saw that the cable car had been washed away, the large tree that had held the cable was uprooted, and Mr. West’s dog was injured and agitated on the bank of the river. David West Jr. was never seen or heard from again.

In 1989, Mr. West’s dentist was consulted, but no conclusive identification was ever made.  

The remains were retained by the SMEO. In 2010, the SMEO submitted a bone sample to the University of North Texas Center for Human Identification. The sample was processed and yielded a forensic DNA profile for comparison and upload into CODIS. Unfortunately, no genetic associations to missing persons or family reference standards in the CODIS database were established.

In April 2022, the SMEO recognized the effectiveness of investigative genetic genealogy on cold unidentified remains cases and submitted an additional bone sample to Othram, a private DNA lab specializing in advanced forensic DNA testing. Othram uses an in-house whole genome sequencing technique that can provide genetic information and possible familial associations even with a low-yield sample. The analysis revealed the name of two biological relatives of David West Jr. as being genetically associated with the remains.

Both the Gilliam County Sheriff Gary Bettencourt and the Sherman County Sheriff Brad Lohrey (the son of Sheriff Gerald Lohrey) worked to contact family members; Sheriff Bettencourt collected oral swab standards from one relative, and these were submitted and tested by Othram. 

The genetic association was confirmed through DNA comparison by Othram in September 2022, and the family was notified of the positive identification.

“We are very excited that such an old case was able to be solved. It is amazing what our forensic teams can accomplish with modern technology. This was a case that was a mystery for generations here at the Sherman County Sheriff’s Office. I’m happy that the family of the deceased finally has closure.” -Sheriff Brad Lohrey, Sherman County Sheriff’s Office

Hope is why we are here.

 




Attached Media Files: 2023-02/1002/160983/West-Othram_Case.JPG

Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs Advisory Committee to Hold Virtual Meeting in March
Ore. Department of Veterans' Affairs - 02/06/23 8:00 AM

The next meeting of the Advisory Committee to the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs will be held Wednesday, March 1, 2023, via Zoom. The meeting begins at 9:30 a.m.

The committee is made up of veterans appointed by the governor to provide counsel on veteran issues and represent veteran concerns across Oregon. Its nine members serve in a vital advisory role to the director and staff of the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs.

ODVA’s Reports to the Advisory Committee are available to the public on the ODVA website here: https://issuu.com/odva/stacks/38107bb40c054695831edf5634865ca4

This meeting is being held virtually. The public is invited to attend.

To attend:

Please pre-register at the following link:  https://us02web.zoom.us/meeting/register/tZMtceqhqTotGt1GVitnPFiJxrYVsmic7YgO

Pre-registration is required. Participants who pre-register will receive the meeting link.

Join by Zoom via Telephone: Dial 1 (253) 215-8782. When prompted, enter the meeting ID: 870 6397 1709# and password/participant ID: 654779#

When prompted, please state your first and last name.

Town Hall:

There will be a PACT Act Town Hall in which ODVA invites you to ask questions of the committee and director. This time is set aside for individuals to ask questions about the Pact Act. Community members are also invited to submit written public comments to the Committee at the following email address: odva_vaac@odva.oregon.gov.

More information can be found online at www.oregon.gov/odva/Pages/advisory.aspx or to contact the Advisory Committee, please email odva_vaac@odva.oregon.gov.

Established in 1945, the Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs is dedicated to serving Oregon’s diverse veteran community that spans five eras of service members. ODVA administers programs and provides special advocacy and assistance in accessing earned veteran benefits across the state. Learn about veteran benefits and services, or locate a local county or tribal veteran service office online at oregon.gov/odva.

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Sun. 02/05/23
Fatal Crash Highway 99- Marion County
Oregon State Police - 02/05/23 1:03 PM

On Saturday, February 4, 2023, at approximately 7:24 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single-vehicle crash on Highway 99 near milepost 43.

Preliminary investigation revealed a red Toyota Yaris was traveling southbound near Perkins Rd NE, when it crossed the center line, left the roadway into a ditch, and crashed into a tree.  The driver, identified as Jose Trinidad Sanchez Encizo (42) of Lebanon, was declared deceased at the scene. 

The Oregon State Police was assisted by Marion County Fire and Medics, the Oregon Department of Transportation, and the Marion County Medical Examiner’s Office. 


Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Search and Rescue assist injured snowmobile rider at Elk Lake Resort (Photo)
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/05/23 10:48 AM
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Released by: Deputy Shane Zook, Assistant Search and Rescue Coordinator

Released Date: 02/04/2023

Location: Elk Lake Resort

Person Assisted: 44 year old female, Corvallis, Or.

                       

On 02-04-23 at about 12:50 PM, Deschutes County Dispatch received a call regarding an injured snowmobile rider at Elk Lake Resort.  The injured rider was a 44 year old female from Corvallis, Oregon.  The injured rider had been taken to the Elk Lake Lodge, where staff at the lodge notified dispatch.

There happened to be a team of four search and rescue volunteers training on snowmobiles near Mt. Bachelor.  That team was directed by a Special Services Deputy to head to the Elk Lake Lodge.  Two members of that team are also part of the search and rescue medical team.  The first team arrived and made contact with the rider at 1:40 PM.  They began assessing the rider's condition and trying to keep her comfortable until she could be transported.  

At 1:13 PM, the deputy had also paged out additional volunteers to respond to Elk Lake Resort with an additional snowmobile, towing the snow ambulance which would transport the injured rider back to Dutchman Flat Snow Park.  The second team arrived at Elk Lake Lodge at about 3:00 PM.

The rider was loaded into the snow ambulance with a medical attendant and transported back to the Dutchman Flat Snow Park, where Bend Fire and Rescue were waiting with a ambulance to transport the rider to St. Charles Medical Center for further treatment.      

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is a full service agency that oversees the adult jail, provides patrol, criminal investigations, civil process and search and rescue operations. Special units include SWAT, Marine Patrol, ATV Patrol, Forest Patrol, along with five K9 teams. Founded in 1916 and today led by your duly elected Sheriff L. Shane Nelson, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office serves over 200,000 residents in Deschutes County. The agency has 259 authorized and funded personnel, which includes 191 sworn employees who provide services to the 3,055 square miles of Deschutes County.

 




Attached Media Files: 2023-02/5227/160975/Snowbulance.jpg , 2023-02/5227/160975/2-4-23__Elk_Lake.jpg

Sat. 02/04/23
Fatal Crash Highway 26- Washington County
Oregon State Police - 02/04/23 4:33 PM

Correction: The passenger of the Honda CRV, identified as Mariam El Hindawi (92) of Seaside.

On Friday, February 3, 2023, at approximately 12:04 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two-vehicle crash on Highway 26 at milepost 41. Preliminary investigation revealed a green Ford Ranger was traveling west on highway 26 when, for unknown reasons, it crossed the centerline and struck a white Honda CRV nearly head-on. 

The driver of the Ford Ranger, identified as Mark Leslie Kingman (69) of Brinnon, Washington, was deceased at the scene.  The driver of the Honda CRV, identified as Zeinab Muhieddine Kabbani McBoul (52) of Seaside, was transported to an area hospital with serious injuries.  The passenger of the Honda CRV, identified as Mariam, El Hindawi (92) of Seaside, Oregon, was transported to an area hospital with life-threatening injuries. After arriving at the hospital, Mariam succumbed to the injuries sustained in the crash. 

The Oregon State Police was assisted by the Washington County Sheriff’s Office, the Oregon Department of Transportation, and the Banks Fire Department.


Oregon Governor, other distinguished officials, host over 120 Oregon Army Guard Soldiers during demobilization ceremony (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 02/04/23 4:10 PM
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Clackamas, Ore.--Oregon Gov. Tina Kotek and other distinguished officials address more than 120 Soldiers in Charlie Company, 1st Squadron, 82nd Cavalry Regiment, Oregon Army National Guard, during a demobilization ceremony at the 41st Infantry Division, Armed Forces Readiness Center, Camp Withycombe, Clackamas, Ore., Feb. 4. U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden, Oregon, and Maj. Gen. Michael E. Stencel, Adjutant General, Oregon, also served as official hosts for the event. The event was held to acknowledge the Soldiers' efforts to support United States NATO Allies, while building readiness and enhancing bonds with partner nations as part of Operation Atlantic Resolve in Poland. The Soldiers first mobilized for this nearly yearlong deployment in early January 2022, and supported efforts to deter Russian aggression after the initial invasion into Ukraine on Feb. 24, 2022. This deployment was one of the largest mobilizations of Oregon National Guard Citizen-Soldiers since Operation Enduring Freedom in 2006. The event was livestreamed and may be viewed at this link. For more information on Atlantic Resolve, click here

Image 7616862: Soldiers in Charlie Company, 1st Squadron, 82nd Cavalry Regiment, Oregon Army National Guard, shake hands with distinguished guests and elected officials during a demobilization ceremony at the 41st Infantry Division, Armed Forces Readiness Center, Camp Withycombe, Clackamas, Ore., Feb. 4. Oregon Gov. Tina Kotek, U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden, Oregon, and Maj. Gen. Michael E. Stencel, Adjutant General, Oregon, served as official hosts for the event. The event was held to acknowledge the Soldiers' efforts to support United States NATO Allies, while building readiness and enhancing bonds with partner nations as part of Operation Atlantic Resolve in Poland. The Soldiers first mobilized for this nearly yearlong deployment in early January 2022, and supported efforts to deter Russian aggression after the initial invasion into Ukraine on Feb. 24, 2022. This deployment was one of the largest mobilizations of Oregon National Guard Citizen-Soldiers since Operation Enduring Freedom in 2006. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Hunter Bomar)

Image 7616863: Oregon Gov. Tina Kotek poses with Soldiers in Charlie Company, 1st Squadron, 82nd Cavalry Regiment, Oregon Army National Guard, after their demobilization ceremony at the 41st Infantry Division Armed Forces Readiness Center, Camp Withycombe, Clackamas, Ore., Feb. 4. Kotek, along with U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden, Oregon, and Maj. Gen. Michael E. Stencel, Adjutant General, Oregon, served as official hosts for the event. The event was held to acknowledge the Soldiers' efforts to support United States NATO Allies, while building readiness and enhancing bonds with partner nations as part of Operation Atlantic Resolve in Poland. The Soldiers first mobilized for this nearly yearlong deployment in early January 2022, and supported efforts to deter Russian aggression after the initial invasion into Ukraine on Feb. 24, 2022. This deployment was one of the largest mobilizations of Oregon National Guard Citizen-Soldiers since Operation Enduring Freedom in 2006. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Hunter Bomar)

Image 7616866: Oregon Gov. Tina Kotek addresses more than 120 Soldiers in Charlie Company, 1st Squadron, 82nd Cavalry Regiment, Oregon Army National Guard, during a demobilization ceremony at the 41st Infantry Division, Armed Forces Readiness Center, Camp Withycombe, Clackamas, Ore., Feb. 4. U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden, Oregon, and Maj. Gen. Michael E. Stencel, Adjutant General, Oregon, also served as official hosts for the event. The event was held to acknowledge the Soldiers' efforts to support United States NATO Allies, while building readiness and enhancing bonds with partner nations as part of Operation Atlantic Resolve in Poland. The Soldiers first mobilized for this nearly yearlong deployment in early January 2022, and supported efforts to deter Russian aggression after the initial invasion into Ukraine on Feb. 24, 2022. This deployment was one of the largest mobilizations of Oregon National Guard Citizen-Soldiers since Operation Enduring Freedom in 2006. (U.S. Army photo by Sgt. Hunter Bomar)




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Fatal Crash Highway 238- Jackson County
Oregon State Police - 02/04/23 11:57 AM

On Friday, February 3, 2023, at approximately 5:30 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single-vehicle crash on Highway 238 near milepost 32 just outside of Jacksonville.

Preliminary investigation revealed a green Honda Civic, was traveling east on highway 238 when the operator lost control of the vehicle negotiating a corner.  The vehicle slid off the eastbound shoulder and struck a tree before coming to rest.  The right front passenger, identified as Mynor Johan Dubon, (37) of Medford, was pronounced dead at the scene.  The driver, identified as Salvador Olivas-Espinoza (36), was transported to the hospital with life-threatening injuries.

OSP was assisted by the Oregon Department of Transportation, the Jackson County STAR Team, the Jacksonville Fire Department, and the Applegate Fire Department.


Fri. 02/03/23
Suspect Arrested in incident at Takoda's Restaurant in Sisters
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/03/23 4:13 PM

Released by: Lt. Chad Davis 

Release Date: February 3, 2023

 

Location: 425 W. Hwy 20, Sisters, OR  

 

Arrested: Christopher Seekell  ( 27 year old male)

 

Charges:  Disorderly Conduct in the 2nd degree (one count)

                 Harassment (one count)

                 Attempted Unlawful Entry to a Motor Vehicle (one count)

               

 

NARRATIVE:

On 1/31/2023 at 6:36 p.m., deputies with the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office were dispatched to the Takoda’s Restaurant in Sisters regarding an intoxicated male who had entered the restaurant.  The male, who was later identified as Christopher Seekell, was refusing to leave and being aggressive with the staff.  At one point, Seekell made a non-specific threat about doing a school shooting.  Seekell did not specify any school in this statement.  Seekell also threatened to return and shoot up Takoda’s. 

 

When staff asked Seekell to leave, he pushed a staff member and appeared he was going to assault the staff member.  Seekell eventually left the restaurant and the staff locked all of their doors to deny Seekell re-entry.  Seekell then went into the parking lot, which is shared with Bi-mart, and attempted to enter random vehicles.   Deputies arrived on scene and placed Seekell in custody without incident.  Seekell was lodged at the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office jail on the above listed charges. 

 

Following this incident, the Sheriff’s Office presented this case to the Deschutes County Threat Assessment team, who performed a threat assessment. 

 

 

The Deschutes County Threat Assessment Team, also referred to as TAT, is a multi-disciplinary team dedicated to the prevention of targeted acts of violence by adult members of the community. Through the cooperative sharing of information, resources and the knowledge gained through training with leading experts in the field of threat assessment, the team endeavors to identify, assess, and manage situations where the risk of violence is anticipated or imminent in order to enhance the safety of the community.

 

The Deschutes County Threat Assessment team meets weekly to review cases and individuals who are referred to the team. The team consists of members from Central Oregon law enforcement agencies, the Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office, Deschutes County Parole and Probation, Deschutes County Behavioral Health, Bend-La Pine School District and High Desert ESD. 

 

Seekell remains in custody, pending a future court date. Based on the investigation, it appears Seekell was under the influence of alcohol and controlled substances at the time of incident. 

 

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is a full service agency that oversees the adult jail, provides patrol, criminal investigations, civil process and search and rescue operations. Special units include SWAT, Street Crimes, Marine Patrol, ATV Patrol, Forest Patrol, along with six K9 teams. Founded in 1916 and today led by your duly elected Sheriff L. Shane Nelson, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office serves the nearly 190,000 residents in Deschutes County. The agency has 230 authorized and funded personnel, which includes 187 sworn employees who provide services to the 3,055 square miles of Deschutes County.

 

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Pursuit South of Bend Sends Driver to Jail with Multiple Charges (Photo)
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 02/03/23 3:58 PM
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Released by: Lt. Doug Sullivan

Release Date: February 3, 2023

Location: Beaver Dr. and Juniper Ln. Sunriver, OR

Arrested:     Joseph Tibbetts        Age: 50           Sunriver, Oregon

Charges:

Felony Elude

Misdemeanor Elude

DUII 

Resisting Arrest

Reckless Driving

DWS Revoked - Misdemeanor

NARRATIVE:

On February 3, 2023, at approximately 0018 hours, a deputy with the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office was conducting routine patrol on the south end of Bend, OR.  The deputy observed a white Chevrolet Suburban driving south on Hwy 97 at estimated speeds between 80-100 miles per hour. The deputy then observed the Suburban swerve in and out of its lane of travel in a reckless manner. The deputy initiated a traffic stop on Hwy 97 by activating their lights and sirens. The driver of the Suburban slowed to approximately 80 miles per hours as it continued south on Hwy 97 before taking the Cottonwood exit into Sunriver, OR. 

The driver, later identified as Joseph Tibbets, lost control of the vehicle on Juniper Ln. near the intersection of Beaver Dr. and slid into a snow bank. Tibbets immediately exited his vehicle and fled on foot to a residence on Juniper Ln.  A Sunriver PD officer deployed their Taser and Tibbets was taken into custody after a brief altercation with law enforcement on scene.

Tibbets was evaluated by medics on scene and staff at St. Charles Medical Center, Bend. Tibbets was then transported to Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office Jail, where he was booked on the above listed charges.

Tibbets was also arrested by Sunriver PD in connection with an unrelated purist that occurred in December of 2022.

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is a full-service agency that oversees the adult jail, provides patrol, criminal investigations, civil process and search and rescue operations. Special units include SWAT, Street Crimes, Marine Patrol, ATV Patrol, Forest Patrol, along with six K9 teams. Founded in 1916 and today led by your duly elected Sheriff L. Shane Nelson, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office serves over 200,000 residents in Deschutes County. The agency has 263 authorized and funded personnel, which includes 178 sworn employees who provide services to the 3,055 square miles of Deschutes County.

 

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DPSST Corrections, Police and Telecommunications Policy Committee Meeting Scheduled 2-16-23
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 02/03/23 3:08 PM

CORRECTIONS, POLICE AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS POLICY COMMITTEE

MEETING SCHEDULED

 

Notice of Special Meeting

The Corrections, Police and Telecommunications Policy Committees of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a special joint meeting at 10:00 a.m. February 16, 2023, in the Hall of Heroes Conference Hall at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST or Department) located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. For further information, please contact Shelby Wright at (503) 378-2191 or y.wright@dpsst.oregon.gov">shelby.wright@dpsst.oregon.gov.

The joint policy committee meeting will be live streamed on the DPSST Facebook page @ 

https://www.facebook.com/DPSSTOregon

Please visit the DPSST Boards and Committees webpage for a complete roster of each policy committee.

https://www.oregon.gov/dpsst/BD/Documents/Web%20Roster.pdf

 

Agenda Items

1. Introductions

2. Review of Public Comment and Policy Discussion for the Proposed Rule Changes for Oregon Administrative Rule (OAR) 259-008-0010, 259-008-0011, 259-008-0015, 259-008-0080

    Background Investigations and House Bill 2936

    Presented by Jennifer Howald

3. Next Policy Committee Meetings Scheduled

Telecommunications Policy Committee: May 3, 2023, at 9:00 a.m.

Corrections Policy Committee: May 9, 2023, at 10:00 a.m.

Police Policy Committee: May 18, 2023, at 10:00 a.m.

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to public meeting law and it will be digitally recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by the Policy Committee members, unless permitted by a Policy Committee Chair. Remember to always state your name for the record. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


Hoover Criminal Gang Member Sentenced to Federal Prison for Illegally Possessing a Firearm
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 02/03/23 1:26 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A Hoover Criminal Gang member and Portland resident was sentenced to federal prison today for illegally possessing a firearm as a convicted felon.

Anthony Devion Bagsby, 31, was sentenced to 24 months in federal prison and 3 years’ supervised release.

According to court documents, as part of an ongoing federal racketeering investigation of the Hoover Criminal Gang, law enforcement obtained photos online of Bagsby, a convicted felon, possessing firearms. Further investigation revealed that Bagsby frequented an apartment occupied by known Hoover Criminal Gang members on Halsey Street in northeast Portland. 

On April 16, 2021, while executing a federal search warrant on the apartment, investigators arrested Bagsby and several other individuals. They found a loaded Springfield XD-40 handgun in a basket in the kitchen. Three of the rounds found in the handgun were colored blue. In the living room, investigators found several items connected to Bagsby, including prescription medication and mail. In the same area, they found an empty magazine; several dozen 9mm cartridges; four .40 caliber rounds including one blue round matching the bullets found in the loaded handgun, and a plastic bag of methamphetamine. Investigators later located text messages on Bagsby’s phone wherein he bragged about obtaining a “brand new XD 40.”

On July 20, 2021, a federal grand jury indicted Bagsby on two counts of illegally possessing a firearm as a convicted felon. On October 18, 2022, he pleaded guilty.

This case was investigated by the FBI with assistance from the Portland Police Bureau, Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office, Gresham Police Department, and Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives. It was prosecuted by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of Oregon.

This case is part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN), the centerpiece of the Department of Justice’s violent crime reduction efforts. PSN is an evidence-based program proven to be effective at reducing violent crime. Through PSN, a broad spectrum of stakeholders work together to identify the most pressing violent crime problems in the community and develop comprehensive solutions to address them. As part of this strategy, PSN focuses enforcement efforts on the most violent offenders and partners with locally based prevention and reentry programs for lasting reductions in crime.

This prosecution is the result of an Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force (OCDETF) investigation. OCDETF identifies, disrupts, and dismantles the highest-level drug traffickers, money launderers, gangs, and transnational criminal organizations that threaten the U.S. by using a prosecutor-led, intelligence-driven, multi-agency approach that leverages the strengths of federal, state, and local law enforcement agencies against criminal networks.

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Attached Media Files: Bagsby Sentencing

Public comment period opens for proposed State Forest Implementation Plans
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 02/03/23 11:30 AM

SALEM, Ore. — The Oregon Department of Forestry opens a 30-day comment period starting today on proposed Implementation Plan revisions for the Astoria, Forest Grove, Tillamook, North Cascade, West Oregon, and Western Lane (including the Veneta and Southwest units) state forest districts. 

The comment period begins Feb. 3 and ends March 6 at 5 p.m. The implementation plans are available on ODF’s website. Comments can be submitted online by using this form, by emailing odf.sfcomments@odf.oregon.gov , or by mailing comments to ODF Public Affairs, 2600 State St., Salem, OR 97310.

State forests by law must provide social, economic, and environmental benefits to Oregonians, and are managed under long-range forest management plans, mid-range implementation plans, and annual operations plans. Implementation plans describe forest management activities such as timber harvest targets, road construction and maintenance, reforestation and young stand management, recreation, aquatic habitat restoration, and protection strategies for species of concern. 

At the direction of the Board of Forestry, ODF is continuing the development of a draft Western Oregon State Forests Habitat Conservation Plan (HCP) and Forest Management Plan (FMP) for Western Oregon State Forests. The HCP is currently going through the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) process.  Finalization of this process and issuance of Incidental Take Permits (ITPs) is expected to occur within fiscal year 2024. Revising the current implementation plans allows the agency to continue operations during this time of transition while focusing resources on developing a new forest management plan and accompanying implementation plans required to implement the HCP.


Oregon Health Policy Board to Meet February 7
Oregon Health Authority - 02/03/23 9:29 AM

February 3, 2023

Contacts: Amy Bacher, acher2@oha.oregon.gov">amy.bacher2@oha.oregon.gov (media inquiries)

Tara Chetock, 971-304-9917, a.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us">tara.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Oregon Health Policy Board to Meet February 7

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Policy Board

When: February 7, 8:30 am – 12:00 pm

Where: Virtual meeting. The public can join remotely via Zoom or a conference line.

To join via Zoom: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1611647226?pwd=UFFYbjdkSURoTWNCNWQ1Rk9DSGgvZz09

Meeting ID: 161 164 7226

Passcode: 832517

 To call in to the meeting on a mobile device, use the following number:

  +1 669 254 5252 US (San Jose), +1 646 828 7666 US (New York)

Proposed topics for the meeting agenda are listed below. The final meeting agenda and supporting materials will be posted on Oregon Health Policy Board’s (OHPB) website prior to the meeting. 

Agenda:

Agenda and meeting materials will be uploaded to the website prior to the February 7 meeting, to find materials please follow the link below:

https://www.oregon.gov/oha/OHPB/Pages/OHPB-meetings.aspx

To provide public comment, please submit your request for public comment at least 48 hours prior to the meeting at: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/OHPB-Public-Comment

For more information and meeting materials, please visit the OHPB meeting webpage at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/OHPB/Pages/index.aspx

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • CART (Communication Access Real-time Translation)
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Tara Chetock at 971-304-9917, 711 TTY, a.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us">tara.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Board on Public Safety Standards and Training & Policy Committee Vacancies
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 02/03/23 8:41 AM

2023 Board on Public Safety Standards and Training

 & Policy Committee

Open Vacancies – Recruitment

 

The Board on Public Safety Standards & Training (BPSST) and established Policy Committees have open vacancies looking to be filled. The current vacancies are as follows:

 

BPSST: All Board applications must be submitted through Workday.com

  • Two Representatives of the Private Security Industry
  • Member representing the public (Recommended by the Speaker of the House of Representatives)
  • Recommended to the Governor by the Oregon Fire Chiefs Association
  • Administrator of a Municipality recommended to the Governor by the executive body of the League of Oregon Cities
  • Representative of the Fire Service recommended to the Governor by the Oregon Fire District Directors Association
  • Representative of the Fire Service recommended to the Governor by the Oregon Volunteer Firefighters Association
  • Member who is chief of police recommended to the Governor by the Oregon Association Chiefs of Police

If interested in applying for a BPSST position, please complete the online application at Workday Board and Commission Opportunities. When applying for a BPSST position, please specifically state which vacant position you are applying for. (Please note that an account may need to be created if not already in Workday)

 

Policy Committees:

Telecommunications Policy Committee:

  • Representing telecommunicators
  • Recommended by and representing the Oregon State Police
  • Recommended by an representing a statewide association of public safety communication officers

Private Security/Investigator Policy Committee:

  • Representing the public who has never been employed or utilized as a private security provider or investigator 
  • Representing private business or governmental entity that utilizes private security services

Police Policy Committee:

  • Recommended by and representing the Oregon State Sheriffs’ Association

Corrections Policy Committee:

  • Representing Non-Management Corrections Officers

Fire Policy Committee:

  • Non-Management Firefighter recommended by a statewide organization of firefighters

 

If interested in applying for a Policy Committee position, please complete and submit the Policy Committee Interest Form. This form can also be found under the ‘Boards and Committees Resources’ section of the website linked below.

To inquire about a vacancy, please visit Department of Public Safety Standards & Training : Board on Public Safety Standards & Training and Policy Committees : Boards and Committees : State of Oregon.

For further information regarding the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training or its respective Policy Committees, please contact Shelby Wright at y.wright@dpsst.oregon.gov">shelby.wright@dpsst.oregon.gov.

 

Thank you,

DPSST Board & Committees Staff


OR 237 closed in eastern Oregon (Photo)
ODOT: East. Ore. - 02/03/23 8:16 AM
Blowing dust at MP 4 on OR237
Blowing dust at MP 4 on OR237
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2023-02/1204/160933/thumb_44A53702-8C24-40A5-A873-ADBB73C1D929.jpeg

OR237 is closed between mileposts 1.5 and 9 (between Island City and Cove) due to blowing dust and limited visibility. Use alternate routes. The highway will open when conditions allow. Check TripCheck.com for updates.
 




Attached Media Files: Blowing dust at MP 4 on OR237

Thu. 02/02/23
BLM waives day use fees in observance of Washington's Birthday
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 02/02/23 3:36 PM

REVISED STORY - CORRECTION: September fee-free day for National Public Lands Day is Sep. 23


PORTLAND, Ore, — In honor of George Washington’s birthday and to increase recreational access to public land, the Bureau of Land Management is waiving recreation standard amenity and day-use fees for visitors on Feb. 20, 2023. The BLM invites the public to visit the unique and diverse natural landscapes and visitor facilities on BLM-managed lands to celebrate the life of the first U.S. President George Washington.

This marks the second of the BLM’s fee-free days of 2023. Fee-free days refer to the waiver of standard amenity fees and day-use fees, such as visitor centers, picnic/day use areas, and National Conservation Lands units where fees are charged. Expanded amenity fees and other fees, like group day use, overnight camping, cabin rentals, and individual special recreation permits, will remain in effect unless the authorized officer determines it is appropriate to waive them.

BLM’s public lands offer spectacular beauty in the colder months. Find a map of BLM’s top recreation locations in the snow, rain, or ice here:
https://storymaps.arcgis.com/stories/766c58075f574db2b52f3d2e13b75bb8


Winter recreation on public lands

Be prepared:

  • Know before you go. Check with local offices for current conditions, including closures and travel restrictions.
  • Make sure tires have adequate traction for road conditions.
  • Ensure that a friend or family member is aware of your adventure plans.
  • Ensure you have the 10 essentials before venturing out: navigation tools (map, GPS, personal locator beacon), headlamp, sun protection (sunglasses and sunscreen, especially against snow glare!), first aid kit, knife/gear repair kit, fire essentials (fire starter, matches, lighter, etc.), shelter (i.e., an emergency blanket that folds up extremely small), extra food, extra water (beyond the minimum expectation), and extra clothes (layer up!).


Recommendations on where to go with snow (NOTE: these locations may or may not have fees): 

  • Burns: Steens Mountain offers an array of winter recreation opportunities, including snowmobiling, snowshoeing, and skiing. Individual permits must be obtained through the Burns District Office.
  • Lakeview: Gerber Recreation Site is popular for ice fishing and open year-round for camping. The paved roads are not plowed but remain clear of snow most winters. Wood River Wetland offers hiking, dog walking, bird watching, hunting, and (when there’s enough snow) snowshoeing. Be aware that the parking area is not plowed in the winter, so parking is not always available.
  • Medford: Cross country skiing and snowshoeing are available at the Cascade Siskiyou National Monument and Table Mountain Winter Play Area.
  • Washington State: Split Rock Recreation Site at Palmer Lake offers ice fishing (or regular fishing if there is no ice). Visitors can also hike on the Similkameen Rail Trail from Oroville to the Enloe Dam or on the Cowiche Canyon Trail (where there is usually little to no snow). The Yakima River Canyon Recreation Site is a great location for winter camping. If winter is mild, the Juniper Dunes Off-Highway Vehicle Area is a good option for recreation, and if the winter is cold, the Fishtrap Recreation Area offers ice fishing and cross-country skiing.

Recommendations on where to go with little to no snow (NOTE: these locations may or may not have fees):  

  • Northwest Oregon: The West Eugene Wetlands offer disc golf, the Sandy Ridge Trail System offers mountain biking, Shotgun Creek Recreation Site is open to off-highway vehicles, and the Wildwood Recreation Site has an underwater salmon viewing chamber.
  • Medford: Sites such as the Upper and Lower Table Rocks, Cathedral Hills, and Mountain of the Rogue offer winter hiking and tend to be free of snow.

In 2023, BLM will waive recreation standard amenity and day use fees for visitors on: 

  • January 16 (Birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr.)
  • February 20 (Washington’s Birthday)
  • June 19 (Juneteenth National Independence Day)
  • August 4 (Great American Outdoors Day)
  • September 23 (National Public Lands Day)
  • November 11 (Veterans Day)

For more information about the BLM’s recreation fee program, please visit https: //www.blm.gov/programs/recreation/permits-and-fees.


-BLM-

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 western states, including Alaska, on behalf of the American people. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. Our mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations.

 


State issues order to revoke licenses of Lake Oswego investment adviser (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 02/02/23 2:19 PM
2023-02/1073/160919/DFR_Logo.jpg
2023-02/1073/160919/DFR_Logo.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2023-02/1073/160919/thumb_DFR_Logo.jpg

SALEM – The Oregon Division of Financial Regulation (DFR) has issued an order to revoke the investment adviser and insurance licenses of David D. Swanson, Sr., a Lake Oswego-based investment adviser, effective March 1, 2023, for violations of the state’s securities and insurance laws arising out of Swanson’s unlawful sale of promissory notes to his clients. Swanson did not tell his clients he was borrowing the money to pay other clients. The delay in the effective date of the revocation allows for an orderly wind-down of his business. Swanson has also been under a cease-and-desist order since 2020.

The division’s order will permanently revoke the investment adviser representative and state investment adviser licenses of Swanson and his company, Swanson Financial Services, Inc., as well as Swanson’s resident insurance producer and resident insurance consultant licenses. The order also assessed civil penalties of up to $160,000 against Swanson and his companies.

The division’s investigation found that Swanson, acting through another of his companies, SF Commercial, LLC, sold promissory notes totaling more than $1.5 million to five clients ages 64 to 77 years old in 2018 and 2019. The clients’ investments ranged from $50,000 to $755,000. As an investment adviser, Swanson was prohibited from borrowing money from his clients. Swanson and his companies also failed to make meaningful disclosures about the true nature and purpose of the investments, including that the money invested by some clients would be used to pay back other clients. Swanson eventually paid back those loans.

“We will not stand for anyone taking advantage of others, especially our vulnerable populations,” said DFR Administrator TK Keen. “Investment advisers must put their clients’ needs and interests ahead of their own. If you have questions about your financial adviser, or believe you may have been taken advantage of in an investment scheme, you can contact our consumer advocates for help.”

The division’s consumer advocates can be reached at 888-877-4894 (toll-free). The division’s consumer advocate webpage also has information about how to file a complaint, check licenses, find resources, or contact an advocate.

DFR has resources available for people who need help with financial services, student loans, payday loans, choosing a financial professional, and more. There are also tips on how to manage finances, find loan help, get out of debt, and more on our financial help page.

The division – part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services – regulates, among others, financial service institutions (including banks and credit unions), investment services, and insurance companies to make sure they are licensed properly and following the law.

###

About Oregon DFR: The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit dfr.oregon.gov and www.dcbs.oregon.gov.​​




Attached Media Files: 2023-02/1073/160919/DFR_Logo.jpg

OHCS to join the Governor's newly established Housing Production Advisory Council
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 02/02/23 1:34 PM

SALEM, Ore. — Oregon Housing and Community Services (OHCS) to join Governor Tina Kotek’s 25-member Housing Production Advisory Council (HPAC) that will play a pivotal role in meeting the state’s housing production targets. Governor Kotek’s Executive Order NO. 23-04 established a production target of 36,000 homes per year for the next ten years. Currently the state is recruiting a diverse membership to join the statewide Housing Production Council.   

“This moment in time requires us to act with urgency and humanity to pursue solutions that meet the moment to address this housing crisis,” said Director Andrea Bell. “Housing is intersectional to everything. Economic justice, closing the racial wealth gap, improving public health outcomes and meeting our climate goals are dependent upon us, collectively, addressing this crisis.”  

“Governor Kotek’s commitment to solving the affordable housing crisis emboldens our pursuit of solutions that matter most to the people of Oregon in real ways. At the local, state and federal levels we must take every action necessary to work towards ensuring everyone has access to a safe and affordable place to call home. That is our commitment and collective responsibility.” 

HPAC’s main function is to recommend an action plan that includes concrete executive actions, policies and investments needed to meet the production target. People interested in the opportunity to help shape the state’s housing policies, are encouraged to apply to join the HPAC

About Oregon Housing and Community Services

Oregon Housing and Community Services provides resources for Oregonians to reduce poverty and increase access to stable housing. Our intentional focus on both housing and community services allows us to serve Oregonians holistically across the housing continuum, including preventing and ending homelessness, assisting with utilities, providing housing stability support, financing multifamily affordable housing and encouraging homeownership.

 ###


Pacific Power announces new grants focused on community enhancement and the environment
Pacific Power - 02/02/23 11:58 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Hotline: 503-813-6018

 

 

Pacific Power announces new grants focused on community enhancement and the environment 

Funding helps local community organizations working to strengthen livability 

in Central Oregon

 

BEND, Ore. (Feb.2 ,2023)Every day, organizations across Central Oregon are putting their hearts into projects and programs to nurture our local communities and care for the environment. These efforts weave together to create a stronger, more resilient future for the region. 

 

The Pacific Power Foundation, a nonprofit arm of Pacific Power, is donating more than $164,000 in new grant funding across the three states it serves to support organizations committed to community enhancement and environmental respect. From improving access to affordable housing and workforce training to restoring watersheds and caring for neighborhood trees that bring environmental benefits to urban areas, this round of grants will underwrite a wide range of efforts that meet critical needs and improve local livability. 

 

“We are inspired by these organizations, in towns large and small, that are working hard to lift up people in their communities and take care of the environment,” said Matt Chancellor, Pacific Power regional business manager. “It is an honor to support this indispensable work, while helping to boost the growth and vitality of the communities we serve.” 

 

This round of grants, focused on community enhancement and environmental respect, is one of the four grant cycles offered by the foundation annually.

 

The following five grants totaling $17,500 were given to Central Oregon organizations:

 

350Deschutes to help promote green job opportunities in the skilled trades field to underserved students and families. 

 

The Environmental Center to support the Garden for Every School Program that improves science education resources, student nutrition and environmental literacy outcomes. 

 

City Club of Central Oregon for The Civility Project that facilitates discussions on difficult topics including race, gender, sexuality, the environment, rural/urban divide and health. 

 

Envision Bend to support a 16-month community visioning project, including whole-community conversations and an action plan for the path forward.

 

Kindred Connections of J Bar J Youth Services to create a safe, temporary housing space for at-risk children of families in crisis.

 

About the Pacific Power Foundation:

The Pacific Power Foundation is part of the PacifiCorp Foundation, one of the largest utility-endowed foundations in the United States. The foundation was created by PacifiCorp, an electric utility serving 

2 million customers in six Western states as Rocky Mountain Power (Utah, Wyoming, and Idaho) and Pacific Power (Oregon, Washington, and California). The foundation’s mission, through charitable investments, is to support the growth and vitality of the communities served by Rocky Mountain Power and Pacific Power. Since it started in 1988, the PacifiCorp Foundation has awarded more than $60 million to nonprofit organizations. For more information, visit www.pacificpower.net/foundation.

 

###

 

 

 


Governor Tina Kotek to host demobilization ceremony to welcome home Citizen-Soldiers from Poland
Oregon Military Department - 02/02/23 11:30 AM

MEDIA ADVISORY

February 2, 2023


 

CONTACT

Lt. Col. Stephen Bomar

stephen.s.bomar.mil@army.mil

503-990-9508

 

Governor Tina Kotek to host demobilization ceremony to welcome home Citizen-Soldiers from Poland

 

What: Oregon Governor Tina Kotek, U.S. Senator Ron Wyden along with Maj. Gen. Michael E. Stencel, Adjutant General, Oregon, are scheduled to serve as the official hosts for a demobilization ceremony welcoming home more than 120 members of the Oregon Army National Guard Charlie Company, 1st Squadron, 82nd Cavalry Regiment. The event is to acknowledge the unit’s efforts supporting United States NATO Allies while building readiness and enhancing bonds with partner nations as part of Operation Atlantic Resolve in Poland.  It is also to recognize the sacrifice and support from loved ones, family, friends, co-workers, and employers, which make the mission a success. The unit was mobilized for this deployment in early January of 2022. The event will be livestreamed via YouTube link: https://www.youtube.com/live/ubB_dHG1nBs?feature=share

For more information on Atlantic resolve click here:https://www.europeafrica.army.mil/AtlanticResolve/

 

Where: RSVP by replying to omar.mil@army.mil/">Stephen.s.Bomar.mil@army.mil

When:  Saturday, February 4, at 10:00 a.m. 

 


Oregon State Radiation Advisory Committee meets Feb. 15
Oregon Health Authority - 02/02/23 8:59 AM

February 2, 2023

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@oha.oregon.gov

Oregon State Radiation Advisory Committee meets Feb. 15

What: A public meeting of the Oregon State Radiation Advisory Committee.

Agenda:  Program updates; legislative bill review; exemptions/rules update; emergency preparedness/response/incident overviews.

When: Wednesday, Feb. 15, 10 a.m.-1:30 p.m. A public comment period is offered at the end of the meeting.

Where: Via Teams Meeting: Members of the public may join remotely by phone at 971-277-2343; Passcode: 749 557 401#

Background: Per Oregon Revised Statute, the Radiation Advisory Committee (RAC) is comprised of eight members representative of Radiation Protection Services (RPS) registrants and licensees who use radiation devices/sources. RAC members advise RPS staff on radiation use and safety, including budgetary and administrative rule matters.

###

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Patty Thompson at 503-509-2622, or at icia.A.Thompson@dhsoha.state.or.us">Patricia.A.Thompson@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Health Care Workforce Committee to meet February 8, 2023, via Zoom meeting
Oregon Health Authority - 02/02/23 8:59 AM

February 2, 2023

Contact:

Amy Bacher, acher2@oha.oregon.gov">Amy.Bacher2@oha.oregon.gov (media inquiries)

Jaime Taylor 503-689-7926 jaime.taylor@dhsoha.state.or.us  (meeting information or accommodation)

Health Care Workforce Committee to meet February 8, 2023, via Zoom meeting

What: A public meeting of the Health Care Workforce Committee

When: Wednesday, February 8, 9:00 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. Public comment will be taken at 9:05-9:15 a.m.

Where: Virtual Meeting. The public can join remotely via Zoom or a conference line.

To join via Zoom: https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1603934523?pwd=dFEyKzFYMGY1c1cyMHpYd0ZxeU1ndz09

To join via audio:

+1 669 254 5252 US (San Jose) Meeting ID: 160 393 4523  Passcode: 660661

Agenda: Convene HCWF Meeting, Public Comment, Review of Member Survey Results; Discussion, Adjourn, Next Meeting – March 8, 2023

For more information, please visit the Workforce Committee’s website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/hpa/hp-hcw/pages/index.aspx

The Workforce Committee welcomes hearing from community members on the matters discussed by the committee and its other bodies, and other topics the public wishes the committee to consider.  If you wish to offer public comment, we appreciate you letting Marc Overbeck know in advance of the meeting, at c.overbeck@dhsoha.state.or.us">marc.overbeck@dhsoha.state.or.us. Advance notice is not required in order to offer public comment at the meeting.  

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jaime Taylor at 503.689.7926, 711 TTY, jaime.taylor@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Oregon Cannabis Commission's Health Equity Subcommittee sets Feb. 8 Zoom meeting
Oregon Health Authority - 02/02/23 8:58 AM

February 2, 2023

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@oha.oregon.gov

Oregon Cannabis Commission's Health Equity Subcommittee sets Feb. 8 Zoom meeting

What: A public Zoom meeting of the Health Equity Subcommittee of the Oregon Cannabis Commission.

Agenda: TBD. The full agenda will be available at www.healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission.

When: Wednesday, Feb. 8, 10 a.m. to noon.

Where: Zoom Meeting. Members of the public can join remotely by phone at 1-669-254-5252; Meeting ID: 161 147 5011 Passcode: 681007.

Background: The Oregon Cannabis Commission was established in the 2017 legislative session through HB 2198. The commission consists of the state health officer or designee and an eight member-panel appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate. The commission provides advice to Oregon Health Authority and the Oregon Liquor and Cannabis Commission regarding Oregon Administrative Rules that govern medical cannabis as well as retail cannabis as it pertains to patients and caregivers. Additionally, the commission is tasked with developing a long-term strategic plan for ensuring that cannabis will remain a therapeutic and affordable option for patients and monitoring federal laws, regulations, and policies regarding cannabis.

Visit www.Healthoregon.org/cannabiscommission for more information.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) Programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written material in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Megan Lockwood at 971-673-0620, 711 TTY or .lockwood@state.or.us">megan.r.lockwood@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Wed. 02/01/23
Two Arrested for Cocaine and Methamphetamine Trafficking in Klamath County
Central Oregon Drug Enforcement (CODE) - 02/01/23 7:20 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: February 1st, 2023

Released by: Sergeant Kent Vander Kamp 

Gilchrist, OR – 

On February 1st, 2023, at approximately 1:30 PM, the Central Oregon Drug Enforcement Team concluded an investigation with the arrest of Robert Edward King III, age 40, of Sacramento, California, and Gregory Wyatt Stites, age 32, of La Pine, Oregon. 

During a concurrent investigation, CODE detectives identified Mr. Stites as a drug trafficker in the central Oregon area. The initial investigation alleges Mr. Stites imports controlled substances from the southern Oregon area into central Oregon, where he distributed them into the community.

After a surveillance operation, Oregon State Police Troopers stopped the white 2007 Volvo sedan driven by Mr. Stites, and Mr. King was the passenger on Highway 97 at milepost 191. This was in rural Klamath County, between Crescent and Gilchrist. 

CODE drug detection K9, Bonnie, was deployed and alerted to the presence of a controlled substance inside the Volvo and luggage.  Both Mr. Stites and Mr. King consented to a search of the vehicle and luggage. 

As a result, CODE Detectives and OSP Troopers gathered and seized a commercial quantity of methamphetamine and cocaine, a user quantity of powder fentanyl, and a loaded 9mm pistol. 

A “commercial quantity” is defined by statute as ten grams or more of a mixture or substance containing a detectable amount of cocaine. This is not a separate criminal charge but rather an increase in the sentencing guidelines. 

Mr. Stites was lodged in the Klamath County Sheriff’s Jail with the following criminal charges.

  • Felon in Possession of a Weapon
  • Possession of a Controlled Substance
  • Attempted Delivery of a Controlled Substance

Mr. King was lodged in the Klamath County Sheriff’s Jail with the following criminal charges.

  • Possession of a Controlled Substance x2
  • Attempted Delivery of a Controlled Substance x2

CONTACT FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:   Sgt. Kent Vander Kamp, 541-550-4869 or kentv@deschutes.org 

The Central Oregon Drug Enforcement (CODE) team is a multi-jurisdictional narcotics task force supported by the Oregon-Idaho High-Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) program and the following Central Oregon law enforcement agencies:  Bend Police Department, Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, Redmond Police Department,  Prineville Police Department, Crook County Sheriff’s Office, Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office, Madras Police Department, Oregon State Police, Sunriver Police Department, Black Butte Police Department, United States Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Warm Springs Tribal Police Department, Deschutes, Crook, and Jefferson County District Attorney’s, and the Oregon National Guard.

The Oregon-Idaho HIDTA program is an Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) sponsored counterdrug grant program that coordinates and provides funding resources to multi-agency drug enforcement task forces to disrupt or dismantle local, multi-state, and international drug trafficking organizations.

###


Quadruple Fatal Crash - HWY 226 - Linn County
Oregon State Police - 02/01/23 5:23 PM

Correction: The Sorrento operator's name is spelled Petrime and she was from Scio.

On Monday, January 30, 2023, at approximately 7:26 P.M., the Oregon State Police responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 226, near Fish Hatchery Dr., in Linn County.

 

The preliminary investigation indicated a silver Hyundai Elantra, operated by Travis O. Longo (20) of Albany, was traveling westbound on Hwy 226, near MP 4. While negotiating a curve at a high rate of speed, the Hyundai crossed into the eastbound traffic lane and struck a white Kia Sorrento, operated by Jessica M. Petrine (29), head-on. The collision caused the Elantra to roll and come to a rest on its roof. 

 

As a result of the collision, Jessica M. Petrime was pronounced deceased at the scene. An 8 month old female passenger, of the Sorrento, was transported to the Lebanon Community Hospital with reportedly non-life threatening injuries. 

 

Travis O. Longo was also pronounced deceased at the scene, as well as both of his passengers: Chloe L. Richmond (18) of Lebanon and Skye R. Huskey (18) of Lebanon.

 

Excessive speed is considered to be the greatest contributing factor to this crash. The Elantra was observed, just prior to the crash, traveling eastbound on Hwy 226, in reported speeds in excess of 100mph.

 

The highway was closed for approximately 6 hours while the on-scene investigation was conducted.

 

OSP was assisted by the Linn County Sheriffs’ Office, Scio Fire, and ODOT.


Combined Measure 110 providers served more than 60,000 people during early implementation, preliminary reporting shows
Oregon Health Authority - 02/01/23 5:01 PM

February 1, 2023

Media contact: Timothy Heider, 971-599-0459, timothy.heider@oha.oregon.gov

Combined Measure 110 providers served more than 60,000 people during early implementation, preliminary reporting shows

SALEM, Ore. — Combined Measure 110 funding reached more than 60,000 Oregonians during the earliest phases of implementation, according to financial and operational reports filed with Oregon Health Authority (OHA).

The reporting shows that Measure 110 providers served more than 18,000 over the first three months of operation from June 1 through Sept. 30 — during a time when the service networks were still being established statewide.

That first round of reporting shows that the early Behavioral Health Resource Network (BHRN) providers spent over $10 million on network infrastructure in that early phase. The reporting largely encompasses smaller networks almost exclusively in rural areas of the state that were funded during the early implementation.

An earlier round of Measure 110-related funding called Access to Care grants — $34.5 million in bridge funding to approximately 70 statewide service providers before the formal Measure 110 rollout — ultimately reached more than 42,000 people who received substance use disorder treatment and additional support ranging from harm reduction to temporary housing.

The early financial reporting provides a preliminary account of services and spending. Measure 110 providers receive their funding on a quarterly basis. Because of this, many had not received their first quarterly payment during that first reporting period. OHA is continuing to work with providers to ensure that all data is collected.

As of July 1, the Oversight and Accountability Council (OAC), which is responsible for awarding Measure 110 grants, had approved 19 BHRNs and $72 million in funding.

The first BHRN was approved last May. The last, in Jackson County, was approved Aug. 31.

In all, the OAC obligated $265 million to 42 BHRNs and 11 tribal partners.

These service networks now exist in every Oregon county. Each offers a comprehensive array of community-based and culturally specific services for anyone seeking treatment, regardless of their ability to pay.

The initial data reflects the logistical and operational challenges that many providers confronted in building this first-in-the-nation system of care for substance use and addiction. Some of the reporting organizations were startup collaboratives; many others had to quickly accelerate and expand their existing operations to meet the required service demands of Measure 110 funding.

The data shows that BHRN providers spent approximately $3.1 million for hiring employees and other ramp-up expenses, and about $4.8 million for building construction and other necessary foundational investments to build and sustain a long-term drug treatment infrastructure in Oregon.

Over the next year, as the service networks are fully realized, these long-term investments will shift toward maintaining treatment services and supports, providing a more comprehensive assessment of Measure 110’s effectiveness.

“These preliminary reports show that local programs are putting Measure 110 funds to use and giving people who are using drugs access to life-saving treatment, harm reduction, housing and other supports,” said OHA Director James Schroeder. “While these are still early and partial reports, Measure 110 services are beginning to ramp up across the state. We’ll continue to share these progress reports each quarter.”

“The previous system that existed to address substance use was in place for 50 years, and our new system is moving as quickly as possible to become fully operational,” said OAC Tri-Chair Blue Valentine.

“Measure 110 funding has provided innovative ways for behavioral health providers in our communities to provide trauma-informed and culturally specificservices to thousands of people seeking these services, “said OAC Tri-Chair LaKeesha Dumas.

The reports yielded several examples of Measure 110 dollars making an immediate impact for communities and for people in need.

  • OnTrack, Inc., in Medford, an organization that provides support services for youth, adults and families, is renovating a home to provide transitional housing for people who are transitioning from residential treatment settings and are awaiting full-time housing placement. Once complete, the home will provide housing for five to seven adults for up to six months.
  • Faith, Hope, and Charity, which is based in Corvallis but serves Linn County, hired three peer support specialists who provide outreach and support for houseless people. As a result, they were able to assist 25 additional clients with services ranging from applying for health insurance, temporary housing, food, employment, and drivers’ licenses.
  • The Marie Equi Institute in Portland purchased and distributed harm reduction supplies for houseless people and others who work or live close to people at high risk for overdose. They have also used the additional funding for online and in-person classes on how to administer naloxone to people experiencing overdoses.

The deadline for the next round of reporting is in April for expenditures and clients served from October through December 2022.

More about the early data reports can be found on the Measure 110 web page.

Background: In November 2020, Oregon voters passed Measure 110, the Drug Addiction Treatment and Recovery Act of 2020, which became effective Dec. 4, 2020, to better serve people actively using substances or diagnosed with a substance use disorder. In July 2021, the legislature passed SB 755, which amended the act and made it more feasible to implement.

People who provide drug treatment and recovery services and advocates for criminal justice reform wrote Measure 110 in response to the high rate of drug addiction and overdoses in Oregon, and the disproportionate impact of those outcomes on Oregon’s communities of color.

Their goal was to establish a more equitable health-based and effective approach to substance use disorder.

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Updated fish habitat map available now
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 02/01/23 4:34 PM

The map identifies streams where removal-fill permits are often required to help protect critical habitat for salmon species

The State of Oregon today released the 2023 essential salmonid habitat map, which shows streams where activities like building docks or adding riprap usually require a removal-fill permit.   

The map identifies streams that are critical habitat for Chinook salmon, steelhead trout, and other sensitive, threatened or endangered fish species. Oregon law protects these streams by requiring a removal-fill permit for most projects that remove or add any materials. View the 2023 map and learn more

The map is updated as often as yearly to reflect current Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife data. These regular updates keep habitat information accurate, which in turn helps property owners do their part to protect fish, said Oregon Department of State Lands Director Vicki Walker. 

“Anyone who lives along a river or stream should check the map,” Walker said. “The first step in protecting fish populations is knowing whether a waterway is essential habitat.” 

The 2023 update added approximately 53 miles of essential habitat. Approximately 30 stream miles are no longer essential habitat. See the draft map to view 2023 changes.

The annual map update process includes Tribal engagement and a public review and comment period. The updated map goes into effect February 1 of each year. 

Stay informed about future map updates by joining DSL’s email list for essential salmonid habitat map information. Sign up to receive emails.

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www.oregon.gov/dsl


Prevent a blood shortage -- donate in February
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 02/01/23 3:59 PM

Keep blood on the shelves for patients like young Noelle who had 3 transfusions during open-heart surgery

 

Portland, Ore. (February 1, 2023) — Spring is close, but February often brings unpredictable winter weather that can cause blood drive cancellations and make it difficult for donors to make it to their appointments safely. As the American Red Cross continues to monitor seasonal challenges that could impact the blood supply, donors are urged to make and keep appointments to help prevent a shortage in the weeks to come. Donors of all blood types – particularly type O blood donors, the most needed blood group by hospitals – and platelet donors are needed daily to meet the needs of patients like 3-year-old Noelle of Forest Grove, Oregon, who needed three transfusions during an open-heart surgery. Her grandmother, Pamela Richardson of Eugene, has dedicated herself to donating blood as a thank you to those who saved her granddaughter’s life.

 

“They had to replace her blood three times. The whole surgical team thought they were going to lose this baby on the operating table. They just kept pumping her full of blood,” recalls Pamela. “She survived because people had donated blood that she could have.” Pamela adds, “Donating once every eight weeks is the least I can do to thank people and the health care community for saving her life.”

 

Click here to see the complete video interview with Pamela Richardson. 

 

In thanks for helping keep hospital shelves stocked, all who come to give in February will get a $10 Amazon.com Gift Card by email, thanks to Amazon. Those who come to donate this month will also automatically be entered to win a trip for two to Clearwater Beach, Florida. Details are available at RedCrossBlood.org/heart.

 

Protect the blood supply from dropping – book a time to give blood or platelets by visiting RedCrossBlood.org, downloading the Red Cross Blood Donor App, or calling 1-800-RED CROSS. 

 

Upcoming blood donation opportunities Feb. 2-14

February 2

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 16317 SE Bluff Rd., Sandy, OR, 1:00 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.

 

February 3

Lloyd Center Mall, 2201 Lloyd Center, Portland, OR, 11:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.

Banks Fire District 13, 13430 NW Main St., Banks, OR, 1:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Bend Blood Donation Center, 815 SW Bond St. Suite 110, Bend, OR, 7:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. 

 

February 6

Reedwood Friends Church, 2901 SE Steele St., Portland, OR, 8:30 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Kingpins PDX, 3550 SE 92nd Ave., Portland, OR, 1:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Talent Community Center, 104 E Main St., Talent, OR, 12:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m.

 

February 8

Clear Auto Center, 4000 SW Hocken Ave., Beaverton, OR, 9:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

Trinity Lutheran Church, 2194 SE Minter Bridge Rd., Hillsboro, OR, 10:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Elks Lodge, 350 Belton Rd., Saint Helens, OR, 10:00 a.m. – 2:45 p.m.

Mountain View High School, 1500 SE Blairmont, Vancouver, WA, 9:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

 

February 14

Bank of America, 121 SW Morrison, Portland, OR, 9:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.

River View Cemetery, 306 S. Taylor Ferry Rd., Portland, OR, 11:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 10509 SE 5th St., Vancouver, WA, 1:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.

 

Visit RedCrossBlood.org and put in your zip code to find a donation site near you. 

Click here for b-roll of people giving blood.

 

How to donate blood

Simply download the American Red Cross Blood Donor App, visit RedCrossBlood.org, call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) or enable the Blood Donor Skill on any Alexa Echo device to make an appointment or for more information. All blood types are needed to ensure a reliable supply for patients. A blood donor card or driver’s license or two other forms of identification are required at check-in. Individuals who are 17 years of age in most states (16 with parental consent where allowed by state law), weigh at least 110 pounds and are in generally good health may be eligible to donate blood. High school students and other donors 18 years of age and younger also have to meet certain height and weight requirements.

 

Blood and platelet donors can save time at their next donation by using RapidPass® to complete their pre-donation reading and health history questionnaire online, on the day of their donation, before arriving at the blood drive. To get started, follow the instructions at RedCrossBlood.org/RapidPass or use the Blood Donor App.

 

Oregon and Washington still require face masks be worn at all blood drives and donation sites.

 

Amplify your impact − volunteer! 

Another way to support the lifesaving mission of the Red Cross is to become a volunteer blood donor ambassador at Red Cross blood drives. Blood donor ambassadors help greet, check-in and thank blood donors to ensure they have a positive donation experience. 

 

Volunteers can also serve as transportation specialists, playing a vital role in ensuring lifesaving blood products are delivered to nearby hospitals. For more information and to apply for either position, visit redcross.org/volunteertoday

 

About the American Red Cross:

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides comfort to victims of disasters; supplies about 40% of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; distributes international humanitarian aid; and supports veterans, military members and their families. The Red Cross is a nonprofit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to deliver its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or CruzRojaAmericana.org, or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.

 

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State releases reports on health insurance company compliance with Oregon Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA) (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 02/01/23 2:45 PM
Division of Financial Regulation logo
Division of Financial Regulation logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2023-02/1073/160869/thumb_DFR-logo-blue.jpg

SALEM – All 12 health insurance companies in the individual, small group, and large group markets in Oregon failed to comply fully with the Reproductive Health Equity Act (RHEA) at varying levels, according to reports released today by the Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services’ (DCBS) Division of Financial Regulation (DFR). The agency found that most noncompliance involved improperly charging copays, coinsurance, and deductibles or failing to cover mandated benefits.

The division examined Aetna Life Insurance Company, BridgeSpan Health Company, Cigna Health and Life Insurance Company, HealthNet Health Plan of Oregon, Kaiser Foundation Health Plan of the Northwest, Moda Health Plan, PacificSource Health Plans, Providence Health Plan, Regence BlueCross BlueShield of Oregon, Samaritan Health Plans, UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company, and UnitedHealthcare of Oregon.

The examinations found that each of the 12 insurers failed to pay all eligible claims according to RHEA requirements. They applied copays, coinsurance, and deductibles, which are prohibited under RHEA for reproductive health and preventive care services. In some cases, insurers improperly denied claims for RHEA covered services.

In addition, the reports found that three insurers – Aetna, BridgeSpan, and Regence – failed to cover certain types of contraceptives or applied improper limitations on the amount or timing of when a member could refill a prescription.

Finally, examiners found that Cigna, HealthNet, Kaiser, and Samaritan each failed to properly resolve all consumer complaints and maintain adequate records demonstrating that they timely and adequately resolved member complaints, appeals, and grievances. 

“RHEA is a critically important tool in the state’s effort to remove barriers to reproductive health care,” said Oregon Insurance Commissioner Andrew Stolfi, who is also the DCBS director. “As with every law, our insurers had an obligation to fully and timely implement each aspect of RHEA across all of their systems. It is disappointing to see that this did not happen. We will continue to monitor each insurer until they fully comply with RHEA and make whole any consumer harmed by these failures.”

Throughout the examination process, the division identified issues for each insurance company to immediately address to ensure members receive benefits mandated under the law, and progress towards full implementation of RHEA was observed and noted in several reports. Completion of these reports, which are similar to audits, is one of many steps the division takes in monitoring and addressing insurer compliance with the law.

Next steps include implementation of corrective action plans and ongoing data reporting and compliance monitoring with each insurer, as well as issuing regulatory guidance to clarify expectations. The DFR enforcement team will also now review the reports to determine appropriate penalties, restitution, and other action for each company. Finally, the division plans to continue working with community partners to raise awareness of benefits available under RHEA and other reproductive health laws. Consumers who believe they have not received the services or benefits they are owed under the law are encouraged to contact their insurer or the division’s consumer advocacy team at 888-877-4894 (toll-free) or go to the DFR help page

The Oregon Legislature passed House Bill 3391 (RHEA) in 2017. Starting in 2019, health insurance companies were required to provide, with no cost share, a specified list of reproductive health, sexual health, preventive care, and other health care services, including contraception and abortion.  

For more information on available benefits and to find a list of health insurance plans subject to RHEA, visit DFR’s reproductive health benefits webpage.

For more information on the RHEA examination process, findings, and recommendations, visit the division’s RHEA webpage.

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About Oregon DFR: The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit dfr.oregon.gov and www.dcbs.oregon.gov.​​




Attached Media Files: Division of Financial Regulation logo

Camper fire in Juniper Ridge 2-1-23 (Photo)
Bend Fire & Rescue - 02/01/23 2:27 PM
Credit Bend Fire
Credit Bend Fire
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2023-02/6802/160868/thumb_2023-1131_RV_fire_Juniper_Ridge_photo_2_2023-02-01.jpg

Bend Fire Department was dispatched to a reported motorhome and encampment on fire in Juniper Ridge as noted by multiple callers. Crews arrived to find the motorhome and camp fully involved but had not spread to neighboring camps. The occupant had already escaped the motorhome and was safely in another vehicle away from the fire when we arrived. 

The main fire was stopped quickly but took another hour to fully extinguish due to the extent of what had burned. Bend Fire Department engines were assisted by a water tender from Redmond Fire and Rescue and deputies from DCSO. The fire was determined to be caused by a failed heater I the motorhome. The failure allowed the propane tank to catch fire and spread to the rest of the vehicle and adjacent materials. One motorhome, 2 vehicles and an adjacent tarped area were destroyed in the fire. Damages were estimated at $20,000 for the vehicles and contents lost. No injuries were reported. 




Attached Media Files: Credit Bend Fire , Credit Bend Fire

Oregon employers, workers invited to take a 'Safety Break' May 10 (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 02/01/23 11:25 AM
DCBS logo
DCBS logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2023-02/1073/160861/thumb_DCBS-logo-blue.jpg

Salem – It’s a day to recognize employer and worker successes in cultivating safe and healthy jobsites. It’s a day to engage in direct conversations – including employee feedback – about what’s working and what can be improved. It’s a day to pause and reflect on future challenges and to forge new plans to minimize or eliminate worksite hazards.

Employers and workers across the state are invited to take part in Safety Break for Oregon, coordinated by Oregon OSHA. The annual event – now in its 20th year – calls on employers, supervisors, and workers across Oregon to take the time to celebrate their safety and health achievements, and to examine and renew their efforts to shield people from harm while on the job. 

Will you take the Wednesday, May 10, stand-down as an opportunity to refresh your knowledge and training? Will you conduct a clear-eyed assessment of where safety and health could be improved at your worksite? Or will you celebrate your successes and recognize emerging safety leaders? 

The choice of activity is yours. Sign up now. You could even win a $100 prize.

“Employers across all types of industries can use this statewide stand-down as an opportunity to remind everyone at their business or organization about the importance of health and safety in the workplace,” said Renee Stapleton, administrator for Oregon OSHA. “Not merely symbolic, Safety Break for Oregon is a time to carefully consider on-the-job safety and health, and to bring employers and employees together to talk about hazards, protective methods, and expectations – all with an emphasis on preventing injury and illness in the workplace.”

Oregon OSHA encourages employers and workers to share their Safety Break activities on social media; tag Oregon OSHA on Facebook and LinkedIn with #SafetyBreak.

As you plan your Safety Break event, make sure to follow the current COVID-19 guidance and workplace rules. If you have questions about how to apply Oregon OSHA rules to your workplace, contact our technical specialists for free. If you want free and confidential help reviewing and improving your safety and health program, contact our consultation services. Moreover, Oregon OSHA offers many free education and training resources that you may find helpful as you plan your Safety Break for Oregon activity.

Employers that sign up online by Friday, May 5, and participate in Safety Break for Oregon will be entered to win one of three $100 checks to be used for a luncheon of their choice.

The prizes will go to participating companies as part of a random drawing. The Oregon SHARP Alliance sponsors the contest. The nonprofit group promotes safety and health management by encouraging teamwork and cooperation among people, employers, and organizations to improve workplace health and safety for Oregon workers.

For more information, ideas on how to host an event, or to download graphics, visit the Safety Break for Oregon website

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Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state's workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, go to osha.oregon.gov.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.oregon.gov/dcbs.

 

 

 


 

 




Attached Media Files: DCBS logo , Oregon OSHA logo , Safety Break for Oregon logo

State Land Board to meet February 7 in Salem
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 02/01/23 9:57 AM

Agenda items include initiating rulemaking for use restrictions at Crump Lake to protect cultural resources and annual reports on management of school lands and forests

SALEM, Ore. – The State Land Board will meet on Tuesday, February 7 at 10 a.m. at the Department of State Lands building in Salem.

Agenda items the Land Board will consider include:   

  • Easement in city of Prineville to expand the water system to meet community needs. The city of Prineville applied for a permanent easement on school lands to maintain the access road, waterline, and water holding tanks to expand its water system to meet the needs of the growing city.
  • Easement to address erosion and safety at Clatskanie River bridge crossing. The Oregon Department of Transportation applied for a permanent easement to reinforce protection against erosion for the US30 Clatskanie River bridge crossing.
  • Easement in Tillamook County to improve native fish passage on Illingsworth Creek. Tillamook County Public Works applied for a permanent easement to replace an undersized culvert across Illingsworth Creek. Part of the Salmon SuperHwy in partnership with Trout Unlimited, this project will replace the culvert with a 46-foot bridge to restore full passage for native fish.
  • Sale of 123 acres of subsurface rights in Yamhill County to advance wildlife habitat conservation project. The Yamhill Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD) applied to purchase 123.54 acres of subsurface mineral and geothermal rights located east of the city of Sheridan. The Yamhill SWCD is seeking federal grants to purchase the surface rights, intending to manage the property exclusively for wildlife habitat and conservation. Ownership of subsurface rights is a requirement of the federal grant to ensure the conservation easement.
  • Rulemaking to protect cultural and natural resources at Crump Lake. Frequent droughts have dried up the lakebed of Crump Lake during the summer and increasingly extending into dry years. Since 2014 DSL has received reports from State Police and local Tribes regarding vandalism of and looting of significant cultural artifacts, enabled by the low water conditions which expose the lakebed. DSL Directors have implemented multiple emergency closures of the lake to all public uses during low water conditions, most recently in July of 2022. Those temporary closures have helped to reduce negative impacts. DSL is requesting the Land Board initiate a rulemaking process for consideration of a permanent rule to close the lake during low water conditions as an effective method of protecting natural and cultural resources surrounding property, and the environment around Crump Lake.

The Land Board will also hear annual reports on the Common School Fund audit, the management and performance of school lands, and DSL Strategic Plan progress.

Meeting Details and Agenda 

Tuesday, February 7, 2023, at 10 a.m. 
Department of State Lands
Land Board Room
775 Summer St. NE, Salem

The full meeting agenda and materials are available on the DSL website. The meeting will be livestreamed to the DSL YouTube channel

The public may submit written testimony or sign up to provide spoken testimony (in person, by video, or phone) during the meeting. Advanced sign-up is required, and the deadline is by 10 a.m. on Monday, February 6.

If you need assistance to participate in this meeting due to a disability, please contact Arin Smith at 503-986-5224 or in.n.smith@dsl.oregon.gov">arin.n.smith@dsl.oregon.gov at least two working days prior to the meeting. 

Visitors are not permitted to bring backpacks, bags, or large purses into the Department of State Lands building prior to, during, or following Land Board meetings. Purses, medical bags, and diaper bags are permitted, but may be subject to inspection by the Oregon State Police.

State Land Board and the Department of State Lands: The State Land Board consists of Governor Tina Kotek, Secretary of State Shemia Fagan and State Treasurer Tobias Read. Established by the Oregon Constitution in 1859, the Land Board oversees the state’s Common School Fund. The Department of State Lands is the Land Board’s administrative agency, managing the lands and resources that help fund Oregon’s public schools and protecting the state’s waterways and wetlands for the many benefits they provide.

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www.oregon.gov/dsl


Urban League of Portland is Recipient of OnPoint's Membership Campaign (Photo)
OnPoint Community Credit Union - 02/01/23 9:30 AM
2023-02/963/160856/header_refer-a-friend_1049x670.jpg
2023-02/963/160856/header_refer-a-friend_1049x670.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2023-02/963/160856/thumb_header_refer-a-friend_1049x670.jpg

OnPoint’s Refer a Friend campaigns have raised more than $296,250 for six non-profit organizations since 2018

PORTLAND, Ore., February 1, 2023—OnPoint Community Credit Union today kicked off its Refer a Friend non-profit campaign to benefit one of the region’s oldest civil rights and social service organizations. 

OnPoint selected Urban League of Portland for the campaign that runs February 1 through March 31. Refer a Friend provides members with the opportunity to support local community organizations while introducing friends and family to OnPoint’s full range of financial services.

Founded in 1945, the Urban League of Portland invests in and provides programs for areas that affect the social and economic security of Black families in Oregon and SW Washington. Those include:

“Our programs have played a crucial role in improving the civil rights and social justice for Oregon and Southwest Washington’s Black community since our founding,” said Julia Delgado, Vice President, Urban League of Portland. “The support from OnPoint and its members will enable us to build upon our work and continue providing services and programs to help our region’s Black community achieve equality in education, employment, health, economic security and quality of life.” 

$50 for referring members, $50 for new members, $50 for the Urban League

OnPoint’s Refer a Friend incentivizes OnPoint members year-round to recommend the credit union to their friends, family or business associates by giving $50 to both the new and referring member when an account is opened. At select times throughout the year, OnPoint donates an additional $50 to local non-profits for each new account opened through Refer a Friend.

“We must continue to come together to remove barriers and actively create opportunities for underrepresented communities,” said Jo Davis, Diversity, Equity and Inclusion Program Manager, OnPoint Community Credit Union. “We are proud to build on our support of the Urban League of Portland through our Refer a Friend program and advance its critical work in our fight for racial equity in Oregon and Southwest Washington.”

OnPoint’s last Refer a Friend campaign, held in September/October 2022, raised more than $33,850 for JoyRx | Children’s Cancer Association. Since the beginning of the Refer a Friend program in 2018, OnPoint has donated $296,250 to six organizations through eight different campaigns. OnPoint members who are interested in learning more can visit www.onpointcu.com/rates-rewards/refer-a-friend/, or stop by their local OnPoint branch.

In November 2022, OnPoint announced donations of $2.3 million to more than 377 non-profits in Oregon and Southwest Washington, with more than $695,000 pledged to organizations focused on diversity, equity and inclusion. Visit www.onpointcu.com/community-giving to learn more about OnPoint’s support of local organizations like the Urban League of Portland. 

ABOUT ONPOINT COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION

OnPoint Community Credit Union is the largest credit union in Oregon, serving over 500,000 members and with assets of $9.1 billion. Founded in 1932, OnPoint Community Credit Union's membership is available to anyone who lives or works in one of 28 Oregon counties (Benton, Clackamas, Clatsop, Columbia, Coos, Crook, Curry, Deschutes, Douglas, Gilliam, Hood River, Jackson, Jefferson, Josephine, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Morrow, Multnomah, Polk, Sherman, Tillamook, Wasco, Washington, Wheeler and Yamhill) and two Washington counties (Skamania and Clark) and their immediate family members. More information is available at www.onpointcu.com or 503-228-7077 or 800-527-3932.

ABOUT URBAN LEAGUE OF PORTLAND

Empowering Black communities in Oregon and Southwest Washington since 1945. Urban League is one of Oregon’s oldest civil rights and social service organizations, empowering African-Americans and others to achieve equality in education, employment, health, economic security and quality of life. We do this by investing in stable housing; through workforce development; community health; education and well-being; for our youth, adults and seniors. Our culturally specific programs and services, combined with our powerful advocacy and civic engagement, empowers Black communities to thrive across Oregon and SW Washington.




Attached Media Files: 2023-02/963/160856/header_refer-a-friend_1049x670.jpg

Triple Your Impact: Pacific Power Will Match Your Contribution to Oregon Energy Fund 2-for-1
Pacific Power - 02/01/23 9:10 AM

Triple Your Impact: Pacific Power Will Match Your Contribution to Oregon Energy Fund 2-for-1

PORTLAND, Ore — Feb. 1, 2023 -- Helping your neighbors and their families stay warm just got easier. Pacific Power will match every dollar you donate to the Oregon Energy Fund with $2 more.

Pacific Power customers who receive their bills by mail will find an Oregon Energy Fund contribution envelope included in February. Customers who pay their bills electronically can send a check or enroll in the fixed donation program. 

This program allows customers to donate any dollar amount, starting at $1 per month, which is then incorporated into their monthly bill. Fixed donations will also be matched 2-for-1 by Pacific Power. To enroll in the fixed donation program, call Pacific Power toll-free at 1-888-221-7070.

Donations may be tax-deductible and are forwarded directly to the Oregon Energy Fund, which verifies eligibility and allocates funds to those in need. All funds donated are used to assist families in need from the same county in which the donor resides.

Customers who need bill assistance themselves can talk to Pacific Power representatives who can help with payment plans that work for their individual needs and direct them to agencies that may be able to help. Pacific Power's customer service number is 1-888-221-7070.

About Pacific Power

Pacific Power provides safe and reliable electric service to more than 764,000 customers in Oregon, Washington and California. The company supplies customers with electricity from a diverse portfolio of generating plants including hydroelectric, thermal, wind, geothermal and solar resources. Pacific Power is part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity producers in the United States, with 2 million customers in six western states. For more information, visit www.pacificpower.net.

 


Electronic Government Portal Advisory Board to Meet
State of Oregon - 02/01/23 9:09 AM

Salem, Oregon-The Electronic Government Portal Advisory Board (EPAB) will meet at 1:30 p.m. on Tuesday, February 7, 2023. The meeting will take place remotely via the internet on Microsoft Teams and is open to the public. The agenda and handouts will be posted on the advisory board’s website: (https://www.oregon.gov/epab/Pages/Meeting-Documents.aspx

What:        Meeting of the Electronic Government Portal Advisory Board  

When:       Tuesday, February 7, 2023, 1:30 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Where:      Microsoft Teams (Click here to join the meeting)

Call Toll free: 1-503-446-4951 | Participant pin code: 711413499#

Who:         Members of the Electronic Government Portal Advisory Board 

The Legislature established the advisory board with enactment of ORS 276A.270-276. The board will advise the State Chief Information Officer (CIO) on key decisions and strategic choices about how the state CIO manages and operates the state’s web portal services.

The Oregon.gov portal is the connection point for citizens to access state agency services and information on the internet. The board provides oversight to specific websites, services and online payments where agencies choose to utilize the State Chief Information Officer’s E-Government Program as their service provider.

With the board’s advice, the state CIO wants to make the Oregon web portal services and their operation as effective as they can be for Oregonians to interact with state government.