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Bend/Central-Eastern Oregon News Releases for Mon. Dec. 9 - 7:58 pm
Mon. 12/09/19
Oregon State Penitentiary reports in-custody death (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 12/09/19 4:40 PM
Charles Gilbert
Charles Gilbert
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An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Charles E. Gilbert, died December 8, 2019. Gilbert was incarcerated at Oregon State Penitentiary and passed away in a local hospital. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified.

Gilbert entered DOC custody on March 29, 1989, from Multnomah County with an earliest release date of August 21, 2039. Gilbert was 76 years old. Next of kin has been notified.                                                                             

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,700 individuals who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state. While crime information is public record, DOC elects to disclose only upon request out of respect for any family or victims.

OSP is Oregon's only maximum-security prison, located in Salem, and houses over 2,000 individuals. OSP is surrounded by a 25-foot-high wall with 10 towers. The facility has multiple special housing units including death row, disciplinary segregation, behavioral health, intermediate care housing, and an infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care. OSP participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including the furniture factory, laundry, metal shop, and contact center. It provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, work-based education, inmate work crews, and pre-release services. OSP was established in 1866 and, until 1959, was Oregon's only prison.

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Attached Media Files: Charles Gilbert

Health Plan Quality Metrics Committee to meet December 12
Oregon Health Authority - 12/09/19 4:37 PM

December 9, 2019

Media contact: Allyson Hagen, 503-449-6457, allyson.hagen@dhsoha.state.or.us

Program Contact: Pete Edlund, 503-931-8873, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Health Plan Quality Metrics Committee to meet December 12

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s Health Plan Quality Metrics Committee (HPQMC).

When: December 12, 12:30-3:30 p.m.

Where: Clackamas Community College Wilsonville Training Center Room 210, 29353 SW Town Center, Loop E., Wilsonville. The public also may join remotely through a webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/rt/5441985918617611266 and listen-only conference line at 877-336-1828, access code 9657836.

Agenda: Welcome and roll call/introductions; review agenda and approve minutes; public comment 12:40-12:50; debrief November presentation on Oregon’s Health System Transformation; development of New and Innovative Measure Criteria; Discussion: OHA Health Equity definition; adjourn.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/Quality-Metrics-Committee.aspx.

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Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Pete Edlund at 503-931-8873, 711 TTY, .m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us">peter.m.edlund@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Drafts of eight CAT rules now available on Department of Revenue website
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 12/09/19 4:20 PM

Salem, OR — Drafts of eight administrative rules for Oregon’s new Corporate Activity Tax (CAT) are now available to the public on the CAT page of the Department of Revenue’s website at www.oregon.gov/dor, agency officials said today.

“The taxpaying community has expressed significant interest in the CAT administrative rulemaking process,” said Nia Ray, director of the Oregon Department of Revenue.  “By prioritizing the creation of rules that the agency believes are most urgently needed, and sharing them as early as possible, we hope to minimize the risk of confusion and non-compliance.”

The Oregon Legislature created the Corporate Activity Tax in House Bills 3427 and 2164 during the 2019 session and gave the Department of Revenue the responsibility of writing administrative rules to implement the new law.

The agency has identified nearly three dozen issues which may need to be addressed with administrative rules. Those issues have been prioritized into three groups.

The first group of rules—those most business taxpayers and tax preparers have said they need to understand first—will be officially filed with the Secretary of State on Jan. 1, 2020. The other two groups will follow on Feb.1, 2020 and March 1, 2020.

The eight drafts posted on the agency’s website this week address:

  • Estimated payments.
  • Estimated payments for unitary groups.
  • Underpayment of or delinquent estimated payments.
  • What establishes nexus between a business and Oregon.
  • What constitutes a unitary group for the CAT.
  • Property brought into Oregon.
  • The definition of agent.
  • Filing extensions.

Sharing draft rules ahead of officially filing them allows business taxpayers and tax professionals time to review the rules and use them as guidance on how to proceed starting Jan. 1. It also offers them an additional opportunity to have input into the rules.

The agency previously engaged more than 800 stakeholders in the rulemaking process through a series of public meetings, video conferences and conference calls. Department officials said they will welcome additional feedback on the draft rules.  Those with comments can send feedback via email to ules.dOR@oregon.gov">catrules.dor@oregon.gov. (Please include “comments on draft rules” in the subject line.)

When officially filed with the Secretary of State all of the rules for the CAT will initially be adopted as temporary rules. Temporary rules are only good for 180 days. Starting April 1, 2020 the department will begin the process of adopting permanent rules for the CAT. That process involves public comment, giving stakeholders another chance to provide input.

The CAT is imposed on businesses for the privilege of doing business in Oregon. It applies to all business entities including those located inside and outside of Oregon. It is measured on a business’s commercial activity—the total amount a business realizes from commercial activity in Oregon.

Businesses with taxable commercial activity in excess of $1 million must pay the Corporate Activity Tax. The tax is $250 plus 0.57% of gross receipts greater than $1 million after subtractions.

More information about the Corporate Activity Tax is available on the Department of Revenue’s website. It includes a list of frequently asked questions and a form to sign-up for email updates on the CAT. Stakeholders can direct questions or comments about the CAT via email to cat.help.dor@oregon.gov or call 503-945-8005.

Visit www.oregon.gov/dor to get tax forms, check the status of your refund, or make tax payments; call 800-356-4222 toll-free from an Oregon prefix (English or Spanish); 503-378-4988 in Salem and outside Oregon; or email questions.dor@oregon.gov. For TTY (hearing or speech impaired), call 800-886-7204.


Final week to buy health insurance and qualify for help paying for it; open enrollment ends Sunday, Dec. 15 (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 12/09/19 1:52 PM
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(Salem) – Oregonians who do not get health insurance through their employers and who do not qualify for the Oregon Health Plan have only until Sunday, Dec. 15, at 11:59 p.m. (Pacific) to sign up for coverage and get help paying for the coverage. Get started now by estimating your subsidy and reviewing the plans and prices at OregonHealthCare.gov/windowshop

“It’s a busy time of year, but don’t wait until the final hours. There are many health plans to choose from and you’re going to want time to shop for the right one,” said Chiqui Flowers, administrator of the Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace. The Marketplace is a part of state government that helps connect Oregonians to coverage. It partners with HealthCare.gov, the website where people apply for federal subsidies.

Throughout Oregon, between seven and 41 plans are available, depending on your county. People who qualify for subsidies can use that financial help on any plan. Last year, 74 percent of Oregonians who enrolled through the Marketplace got subsidies. The average bottom-line premium for them was $140 per month.

Oregonians will see increased advertising in this final week of enrollment. Video and audio ads on Hulu, Spotify, broadcast TV, and other outlets highlight consumer testimonials and lay out how and why to enroll. Samples are online at http://bit.ly/subsidy-testimonials and http://bit.ly/coverage-and-subsidies.  

To get help filling out the subsidy application and reviewing health plan options, use the directory at OregonHealthCare.gov/gethelp, or call the Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace at 1-855-268-3767 (toll-free).

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The Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace, a part of state government, helps people get health insurance when they do not have job-based coverage, and do not qualify for the Oregon Health Plan or another program. The Marketplace is the state-level partner to HealthCare.gov, and a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS). For more information, go to OregonHealthCare.gov.




Attached Media Files: 2019-12/1073/129912/Marketplace_Logo.jpg

Proposed agreement would enhance protections for natural resources on 30,000 acres of forest in Clackamas County
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 12/09/19 9:30 AM

SALEM, Ore. – Some 30,000 acres of privately owned forestland in Clackamas County could receive enhanced protections for water quality and wildlife habitat under a voluntary stewardship agreement being proposed by Seattle-based Port Blakely and the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF). The agreement would be the largest of its kind in Oregon.

The proposed agreement can be viewed online at https://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Working/Pages/FPA.aspx

ODF is now accepting comments on the agreement and will do so until 5 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 9. Comments can be emailed to IVATEFORESTS.PUBLICCOMMENT@oregon.gov">PRIVATEFORESTS.PUBLICCOMMENT@oregon.gov.

An informational session about the agreement is scheduled on Wednesday, Jan. 8 from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. followed by a public hearing from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. where in-person comments will be accepted by ODF. Both meetings will be at the Molalla Fire Station 82, located at 320 N. Molalla Ave. in Molalla.

Stewardship agreements are voluntary land management agreements available to landowners under Oregon’s Forest Practices Act rules. They were established by the Oregon Legislature in their current form through House Bill 2114-B in 2007.

Under a stewardship agreement, a landowner agrees to exceed ODF regulatory requirements designed to protect natural resources, such as water quality and fish and wildlife habitat, in exchange for long-term regulatory certainty under Forest Practices Act rules. About 13 such agreements are in place in Oregon but Port Blakely’s would cover the largest amount of forestland.

The proposed stewardship agreement contains forest management and conservation measures that provide enhanced protection for fish-bearing streams and aquatic water bodies. The measures also aim to create and sustain a mosaic of diverse habitats to meet the needs of many land-based wildlife species. The habitat requirements of 20 total species, both listed and unlisted by the Oregon State Department of Fish and Wildlife, are addressed, including breeding, foraging and dispersing habitats.

“Port Blakely’s forest management plan is intended to ensure that there are better habitat conditions over the long term,” said Private Forests Division Chief Kyle Abraham. “In exchange for that commitment to enhanced stewardship, the company gets long-term certainty about state forestry rules governing water quality and wildlife habitat.”

A few examples cited by Port Blakely include leaving more wildlife trees standing in a unit after harvest, leaving wider stream buffers, retaining upland habitat patches, retaining legacy features that are relics of past forests, and placing large woody debris into small and medium fish-bearing streams to enhance aquatic habitat.

“This agreement is a great example of Port Blakely’s approach to stewardship forestry, our commitment to demonstrate that forestlands are best managed for shared economic, environmental and community benefits,” said Court Stanley, President of US Forestry for Port Blakely. “It will allow us to continue to protect and enhance fish and wildlife habitat while also ensuring long-term regulatory certainty, and therefore economic stability, for our customers, employees, and family owners.”

The Oregon Legislature authorized ODF to enter into such voluntary stewardship agreements with landowners more than a decade ago. Under such agreements, landowners agreeing to follow a written forest management plan reviewed and approved by ODF will be allowed to continue operating under that plan for a set number of years, regardless of future regulatory changes. The length of the proposed Port Blakely agreement is 50 years.

A family-owned company since the early 20th century, Port Blakely has been involved in forestry in the Pacific Northwest for five generations. The company, owns 149,000 acres of forestland in both Oregon and Washington State as well as 93,000 acres in New Zealand. In parallel to the stewardship agreement, the company reports that it is also working with federal agencies to finalize a complementary Habitat Conservation Plan (HCP) for this forestland. It would be the company’s third voluntary federal conservation agreement.  Since 2002 the company’s U.S. forestlands have been certified through the Sustainable Forest Initiative, earning recertification every year since.

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Sun. 12/08/19
Missing Endangered Infant Located after State-Wide Search
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 12/08/19 4:29 AM

Released by: Sergeant James McLaughlin

Release Date: December 8th, 2019

Location 19000 Block of Shoshone Rd. Bend

Arrested: Skeele, Amber Joy 30 year old female, Eugene resident 

Charges: Custodial Interferance I, Burglary I, Contempt of Court

Narrative:

On 12/8/19 at approximately 8:45pm, Deschutes County Sheriff’s deputies were dispatched to an in-progress domestic dispute on Shoshone Road in the Deschutes River Woods neighborhood.  While in route, deputies learned that two females had engaged in a physical struggle with the father of an infant child, and fled the residence with the child.  Deputies subsequently learned one of the females, Amber Skeele, was the child’s mother, and the Oregon Department of Human Services (DHS) had removed the infant from her care, placing the infant with his father, due to a recent arrest involving child neglect, which is still under investigation. 

Probable Cause was developed for the crimes of Custodial Interference in the First Degree, Burglary in the First Degree, and Contempt of Court. 

Deputies conducted an extensive search of the region for the females and their associated vehicle.  Skeele was reportedly from the Eugene area, but other information was available that she may travel east to Idaho.  Deschutes County issued a statewide all-points bulletin broadcast in an attempt to locate the vehicle for the safety of the child. 

At approximately 12:30am on 12/8/19, a Lane County deputy and a trooper with the Oregon State Police located the vehicle in the Eugene area.  Both females were found in the vehicle with the child.  Skeele was arrested and the child was returned safely to his father.  Skeele was transported to the Deschutes County Adult Jail and booked on the aforementioned charges.  Information on possible criminal charges for the other female will be forwarded to the District Attorney for review.  

Numerous investigative techniques were used to locate the child.  The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office Patrol Division was assisted in this investigation by Deschutes County 911, the Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office, and the Deschutes County Detectives Division; as well as the Oregon State Police, Lane County Sheriff’s Office, Sunriver Police Department, Eugene Police Department, Deschutes and Lane County DHS, and the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children. 

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is a full service agency that oversees the adult jail, provides patrol, criminal investigation, civil process and search and rescue operations.  Special units include SWAT, Marine patrol, ATV Patrol, Forest Patrol, along with four K9 teams.  Founded in 1916 and today lead by your duly elected Sheriff L. Shane Nelson, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office serves the nearly 190,000 residents in Deschutes County.  The agency has 230 authorized and funded personnel, which includes 187 sworn employees who provide services to the 3,055 square miles of Deschutes County.


Sat. 12/07/19
Fatal Crash on Hwy 395 - Umatilla County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 12/07/19 6:28 PM
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On Friday, December 6, 2019 at approximately 10:03 P.M. Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a vehicle crash on Hwy 395 at the intersection of E Punkin Center Rd.  

The preliminary investigation revealed that a gold, 2009 Toyota Camry, operated by Michelle Dawn Fry (45) of Umatilla,  was traveling northbound on Hwy 395 and failed to stop at a red light and collided with a black 2006 KIA Spectra, operated by Elidio Salas De La Paz (77) of Hermiston, which was traveling southbound on Hwy 395 making a left hand turn onto E Punkin Center Rd. 

Salas De La Paz and his wife/passenger Alicia Salas (75) were both transported by ambulance to Good Shepherd Medical Center, Hermiston.  Alicia Salas was pronounced deceased at the hospital.

Fry was lodged at the Umatilla County Jail on the charges of Manslaughter, DUII, Assault, and reckless driving.

OSP was assisted by ODOT, Umatilla County Fire District #1, Umatilla County Sheriff's Office and Hermiston Police Department.




Attached Media Files: 2019-12/1002/129881/20191206_223932.jpg

Domestic Investigation
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 12/07/19 2:16 AM

Domestic Violence Investigation

12/07/19

By: Sergeant Troy Gotchy

 

Suspect:  29 year old male

                Redmond, Oregon

 

Victim:  22 year old female

              Redmond, Oregon

 

On 12/06/19 at approximately the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office was dispatched to a possible domestic dispute in the Terrebonne area.  Deschutes County Dispatch received a 911 call, and could hear a female screaming and crying.  During the phone call Dispatchers could hear what they believed to be a Domestic Assault in progress.

A Deputy with the Sheriff’s Office and two Officers with the Redmond Police Department arrived on the scene and witnessed an assault taking place.  The Deputy and the two Officers were able to get the victim out of the residence safely.  The male suspect ran into another room and locked himself inside.  It was believed the suspect might have access to weapons in that room.  The Deputy and the two Officers evacuated the victim to a safe location, and set a perimeter around the house.

Several more Deputies and several Officers from the Redmond and Bend Police Department arrived on scene to assist along with armor from the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office.  Several attempts were made to contact the male including phone calls into the house, and loud hailing from the armor.  There was no response from the residence.

This is an ongoing investigation and the names of the suspect and victim will not be released at this time.  The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office was assisted at the scene by the Redmond Police Department, the Bend Police Department, the Redmond Fire Department, and the Oregon Department of Transportation.

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is a full service agency that oversees the adult jail, provides patrol, criminal investigations, civil process and search and rescue operations. Special units include SWAT, Marine Patrol, ATV Patrol, Forest Patrol, along with four K9 teams. Founded in 1916 and today lead by your duly elected Sheriff L. Shane Nelson, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office serves the nearly 190,000 residents in Deschutes County. The agency has 230 authorized and funded personnel, which includes 187 sworn employees who provide services to the 3,055 square miles of Deschutes County.


Fri. 12/06/19
Injury Hit and Run Crash
Bend Police Dept. - 12/06/19 8:23 PM

Date; Friday December 6th, 2019

Case; 2019-395596

Date and Time of Incident; December 6, 2019 @ 3:37 pm

Type of Incident; Injury Hit and Run Motor Vehicle Crash

Location; SE 15th Street @ SE Golden Gate Place

Victim; (52) year old female Bend Resident

Passenger; Juvenile Bend Resident

Suspect; Harry Clifford Shearer (41) year old Bend Resident

Charges;

Felony Fail to perform duties of a driver (Hit and Run)

DUII/alcohol

Attempt to Elude

Narrative;

On December 6, 2019 at 3:37 pm Officers from the City of Bend responded to a reported head on motor vehicle crash in the roundabout at SE 15th Street @ SE Golden Gate Place. Citizens reported to Deschutes County 911 dispatch that a gray Honda Accord drove the wrong way into the roundabout and collided with a black Jeep Wrangler. The driver of the Jeep, a 52 year old female Bend resident, sustained injuries in the crash. An Off Duty member of Bend Fire and Rescue assisted at the crash by providing care to the injured female. The female was later transported by Bend Fire and Rescue to St. Charles Medical Center Bend via ambulance. A juvenile passenger in the Jeep was transported by personal vehicle to St. Charles Medical Center Bend for evaluation. The male driver and only occupant of the Honda sustained visible injuries from the crash. The male fled the crash on foot. Citizens that witnessed the crash provided responding officers with a physical description of the fleeing suspect. Additional citizens contacted police and provided Officers with information on the suspect’s direction of travel and to the presence of evidence the suspect discarded as he fled.  Officers not involved in the crash investigation established a perimeter to contain the suspect. At 4:03 pm a Bend Police Officer on the perimeter observed a male matching the suspect’s description in the area of SE 27th Street and SE Stevens Road. The Officer attempted to contact the male but the male fled. The Officer followed the male and detained him after the male attempted to hide in a snow covered open area. The male was taken into custody without further incident and identified as Harry Clifford Shearer. Bend Fire and Rescue responded and evaluated Shearer. Shearer was transported to St. Charles Medical Center Bend for evaluation. Shearer was issued a citation in lieu of custody and released at St. Charles Medical Center.  

The Bend Police Department was assisted by Bend Fire and Rescue. The Bend Police Department would like to thank the citizens that stopped at the traffic crash and provided aid to the injured female and to the citizens that provided information regarding the suspect that assisted with his capture.

 

END OF RELEASE

 

 


Redmond Police Arrest Drug Suspect, Recover Stolen Property (Photo)
Redmond Police Dept. - 12/06/19 5:00 PM
Heroin
Heroin
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Redmond, OR – On Friday, December 6, 2019, after several weeks of surveillance and investigation, Detectives with the Redmond Street Crimes Unit, Central Oregon Drug Enforcement, and other Redmond Police officers conducted a search warrant at a residence in the 2000 block of SW 21st Street, Redmond.  During the search warrant, officers located a significant amount of heroin, methamphetamine, and stolen property inside the residence.  This location has been the subject of several community complaints involving drug-related activity.   

 

An investigation led to Mr. Mark Peck, a 36-year-old Redmond resident, being arrested for Unlawful Possession of Heroin, Unlawful Manufacture of Heroin, Unlawful Delivery of Heroin, Unlawful Possession of Methamphetamine, and Theft by Receiving (possessing stolen property).  Mr. Peck was lodged at the Deschutes County Adult Jail on the above-listed charges. 

 

While conducting the search warrant at Peck’s residence, Detectives located a recently reported stolen snowblower that was taken from the back of a pickup in Redmond.  The theft significantly impacted the victim who had posted on Facebook and other social media outlets in an attempt to locate her stolen snowblower.  The victim was grateful to have her snowblower returned.  The estimated value of the recovered snowblower was over $400.

 

The Redmond Police Department reminds everyone to secure personal property to reduce the chance of theft and to record serial numbers and make/model information of items of value. Providing this information to law enforcement significantly increases the chances that stolen property can be returned.  Please contact your local law enforcement agency as soon as possible when you believe you are a victim of a crime.

 

To assist people in documenting and recording items of value, the Redmond Police Department has partnered with LeadsOnline to provide Redmond residents with an internet-based inventory tool.  People can go to reportit.leadsonline.com to start their free secure inventory database. 

 

The Redmond Police Department relies on tips and reports from community members regarding suspicious people or drug activity.  Please contact your local law enforcement agency as soon as possible when you believe you see any suspicious activity or drug activity in your neighborhood. 

 

Media release completed by Detective Sergeant April Huey




Attached Media Files: Heroin , Recovered snowblower

Marine Board Seeks Written Comment on Petition for North and South Twin Lakes
Oregon Marine Board - 12/06/19 3:59 PM

The Oregon State Marine Board is soliciting written comments on a petition the agency received on December 5, 2019, for North and South Twin Lakes in Deschutes County. The petitioner is asking the Marine Board to allow the use of electric motors at a slow-no wake speed.

Written public comments will be accepted until 5 p.m. on Wednesday, January 8, and can be submitted via email to osmb.rulemaking@oregon.gov or by U.S. mail to Jennifer Cooper, Administrative Rules Coordinator, Oregon State Marine Board, 435 Commercial Street NE, Suite 400, Salem, OR 97301. Comments via telephone will not be accepted.

To view the petition, visit:

https://www.oregon.gov/osmb/info/Documents/Rulemaking/North_SouthTwinLakesPetition.pdf.

The Board will consider the petition at their January 22, 2020, quarterly meeting being held in Salem.

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Federal changes to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program could affect 19,000 Oregonians
Oregon Department of Human Services - 12/06/19 3:32 PM

(Salem, Ore.) – At least 19,000 Oregonians could lose government food assistance under a new federal rule finalized Thursday, December 5.

The rule will restrict states' ability to allow certain adults to receive benefits for more than three months in a three-year period if they aren't working or training at least 20 hours a week.

The change in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) was approved despite more than 140,000 negative public comments. It is expected to affect 700,000 SNAP recipients nationally once it takes effect in April.

Oregon, like most states, has used waivers to extend benefits for longer than three months to a group of SNAP recipients known as "able-bodied adults without dependents" (ABAWD) if they live in areas with high unemployment and limited job opportunities. This group includes individuals ages 18 through 49 who don't have disabilities, don't have children or other dependents and are considered able to work.

In January 2020, Oregon has approved waivers for 31 counties for ABAWD work requirements, which will now expire on March 31, 2020. Federal changes to eligibility requirements for waivers will limit the areas in Oregon that meet the requirements starting April 1, 2020. As a result, this means only six counties may be eligible to receive the waiver.

“SNAP plays a critical role in addressing hunger and food insecurity,” said Fariborz Pakseresht, Department of Human Services director. “SNAP benefits assist Oregonians during difficult times to help make ends meet, in particular those working low-wage or who are between jobs. For those already facing difficult circumstances, this rule exacerbates those circumstances. It also will result in an increased burden on food banks and other community resources to fill the void.”

Areas requesting federal waivers must have unemployment rates at least 20 percent higher than the national rate but not less than 6 percent. The Bureau of Labor Statistics indicates unemployment rates for people without a high school diploma or GED are often more than double average unemployment rates. Other groups that face additional obstacles when seeking steady employment include agricultural workers, veterans, former foster youth, formerly incarcerated people and rural residents with limited transportation.

In addition to administrating SNAP benefits, the Department of Human Services provides workforce development and training opportunities so Oregonians can secure a living-wage job. More information on those programs can be found here https://www.oregon.gov/DHS/ASSISTANCE/FOOD-BENEFITS/pages/index.aspx.




Attached Media Files: Federal changes to SNAP in Oregon

OHA Approves AllCare, Cascade Health Alliance and Umpqua Health Alliance for Full Five-Year Coordinated Care Contracts
Oregon Health Authority - 12/06/19 12:54 PM

Dec. 6, 2019

OHA Approves AllCare, Cascade Health Alliance and Umpqua Health Alliance for Full Five-Year Coordinated Care Contracts

The Oregon Health Authority is announcing that three CCOs which had received one-year contracts have met the necessary requirements to earn full five-year contracts to serve Oregon Health Plan members for 2020-2024: AllCare CCO, Cascade Health Alliance, and Umpqua Health Alliance. Services for the new CCO contracts begin January 1, 2020. These contracts have been referred to as "CCO 2.0."

In July OHA announced its intent to award 15 organizations with contracts to serve as coordinated care organizations for OHP, four of which were for one year. These four applicants did not show enough evidence in their applications to be awarded full five-year contracts. Instead they initially received a one-year contract. OHA required the four CCOs to show evidence they had policies, procedures and plans in place to meet the goals of CCO 2.0 OHA provided technical support to help the plans.

Yamhill Community Care (YCC), the remaining CCO with a one-year contract, continues to make good progress toward resolving its remediation plan. OHA and YCC are working together to resolve the few remaining items in their remediation plan this month.

Contract awardees had to demonstrate they can meet the goals of CCO 2.0 to improve care coordination, transform service delivery, engage local communities, improve clinical care, have effective and efficient business processes, and demonstrate financial stability.

"I appreciate the steps AllCare, Cascade Health Alliance and Umpqua Health Alliance have taken to show they are ready to meet the higher bar we’ve set in CCO 2.0," OHA Director Patrick Allen said. "We recognize that CCOs play a vital in their communities. We look forward to partnering with these three CCOs over the next five years to improve the lives of OHP members and make health care more affordable in the communities these CCOs serve."

About coordinated care organizations: Oregon first established CCOs in 2012 to transform health care delivery in the state. CCOs bring together physical, behavioral, and oral health providers to coordinate care for people on the Oregon Health Plan. They improve health and reduce costs by providing more coordinated, flexible and innovative services. CCOs are rewarded for achieving specific health outcomes and quality measures.


DPSST Executive Committee Meeting Scheduled *Amended ORS*
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 12/06/19 7:55 AM

For Immediate Release                                        

December 5, 2019

Contact:       Mona Riesterer
                    (503) 378-2431

Notice of Teleconference Meeting

The Executive Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a teleconference meeting at 1:00 p.m. on Tuesday, December 10, 2019

A request for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

The teleconference information is: 

Dial in: (877) 873-8017 Access Code: 8191185

For further information, please contact Mona Riesterer at (503) 373-2431 or at iesterer@state.or.us">MonaRiesterer@state.or.us 

Chair’s Report and Administrative Announcement

“This is a public meeting subject to the public meeting law which will be tape recorded.”

1.  Minutes of February 28, 2018

2.  Executive Session

The Executive Committee will hold an executive session to consider exempt public records. The executive session is  being held pursuant to ORS 162.660(2)(f).

3.  Beers, Tyler DPSST #58455; Department of Corrections

4.  Saulo, Caleb DPSST #59701 – Appeal of Academy Dismissal; Warm Springs Police Department.

5.  Next Meeting – TBD – as needed.

Requires a vote by the Committee


Public comment period opens for updates to administrative rules describing Special Access Pass benefits
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 12/06/19 7:00 AM

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) is accepting public comments on a proposed change to Oregon Administrative Rule language describing how the agency bundles free camping days under their Special Access Pass program. The program is offered to foster and adoptive foster families, and veterans with a service-connected disability. It provides up to 14 days of free overnight camping to passholders at any Oregon State Park.

Under the proposed rule change, the free camping days would move from up to 14 days within a rolling 30-day period to up to 14 days within a calendar month. The change is intended to make it easier for passholders to track their available days and plan their camping trips.

OPRD will accept public comments on the proposed change through 5 p.m. Jan. 6, 2020. Comments can be made online, in writing or via email:

After reviewing public comments, OPRD staff will present a final recommended rule for consideration to the Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission at its February 2020 business meeting.

The full text of the proposed change is available online: oregon.gov/oprd/RULES/Pages/Rulemaking%20Notices.aspx

Learn more about the pass program for veterans with a service-connected disability online

Learn more about the pass program for foster and adoptive foster families online.


New Truck Crashes Into a La Pine Storage Building After Losing Wheel (Photo)
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 12/06/19 1:23 AM
Scene Photo
Scene Photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-12/5227/129843/thumb_IMG_6081.jpg

Released by Sgt. Kent Vander Kamp, Deschutes County Sheriff's Office

December 5th, 2019 – For Immediate Release

La Pine, Oregon – On December 5th, 2019 at approximately 9:43PM, Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office Deputies were dispatched to motor vehicle crash into a commerical building. The manager of High Desert Self Storage located at 52620 Pan Lane, in the City of La Pine, told Deschutes County 911 that a truck drove into his employer’s building.

This was the second motor vehicle crash into a building in La Pine today.

DCSO Deputies arrived to find a 2019 Ford F250 had driven off the roadway, through a chain link fence and into a building of storage units. The truck partially penetrated two full storage units. None of the units were occupied by people.

The Deputies’ investigation determined that the 2019 Ford was being driven by 73 year-old, John Roger Pasma, of Bend, Oregon. Mr. Pasma was employed to drive the new truck from a Grants Pass car dealership to a Bend car dealership where it was to be sold the next day.

During Pasma’s drive on Highway 97, the truck's front-right tire separated from the wheel. For reasons unknown, Mr. Pasma continued to drive on the metal wheel for a substantial distance. This caused the front wheel to be ground down to the wheel studs.

When Mr. Pasma arrived in La Pine, he attempted to navigate the truck to a tire repair store before losing control of the truck. It appears Mr. Pasma applied the accelerator rather than the brake. This caused the truck to leave the roadway, through a fence and into two storage units.

No one was injured in the crash. The damage to the new truck was moderate and the metal framed building was substantial. The damage to the storage units contents are unknown since it was unsafe to enter the building. 

The cause remains under investigation. Alcohol and/or drug impairment do not appear to be factors. Although citations have not been issued, reports have been forward to the DMV recommending Mr. Pasma for a driver’s license re-examination.

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is a full-service agency that oversees the adult jail, provides patrol, criminal investigations, civil process and search and rescue operations. Special units include SWAT, Street Crimes Unit, Marine Patrol, ATV Patrol, Forest Patrol, along with four K9 teams. Founded in 1916 and today lead by your duly elected Sheriff L. Shane Nelson, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office serves the nearly 190,000 residents in Deschutes County. The agency has 230 authorized and funded personnel, which includes 187 sworn employees who provide services to the 3,055 square miles of Deschutes County.

## End of Release ##




Attached Media Files: Scene Photo

Thu. 12/05/19
Northwest Regional Newborn Bloodspot Screening Advisory Board Workgroup meets December 12
Oregon Health Authority - 12/05/19 4:13 PM

December 5, 2019

Northwest Regional Newborn Bloodspot Screening Advisory Board Workgroup meets December 12

What: A public meeting of the Northwest Regional Newborn Bloodspot Screening (NWRNBS) Advisory Board Workgroup.

Agenda: Welcome, chair and vice-chair roles and responsibilities, feedback mechanism for board members, wrap-up and next steps.

When: Thursday, Dec. 12, 3-5 p.m.

Where: Oregon State Public Health Laboratory, Suite 100, 7202 NE Evergreen Parkway, Hillsboro. Please check in at the front desk and bring a photo ID. Also available remotely by telephone at 888-337-0215, access code 2001129#.

Background: The Northwest Regional Newborn Bloodspot Screening (NWRNBS) Program screens newborns for endocrine, hemoglobin, cystic fibrosis, immunodeficiency and metabolic disorders that may not be clinically evident in the first few days or weeks of life. Detecting these conditions early allows the infant to be referred for diagnosis and appropriate treatment to prevent death or disability. For more information, visit the program's webpage at http://www.healthoregon.org/nbs.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Christianne Biggs at 503-693-4172, 711 TTY or istianne.BIGGS@dhsoha.state.or.us">christianne.biggs@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, PHD.Communications@state.or.us


Oregon State Police Fish & Wildlife Troopers Requesting Public's Assistance with Killing and Waste of Bull and Cow Elk in Tillamook County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 12/05/19 3:17 PM
2019-12/1002/129834/7443.jpeg
2019-12/1002/129834/7443.jpeg
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The Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division is asking for the public's help in locating the person(s) responsible for the unlawful killing and waste of a 4X5 bull elk and a cow elk in Tillamook County.

On Wednesday, December 4, 2019, Tillamook OSP Fish and Wildlife Troopers were dispatched to a report of a deceased bull elk. The deceased bull elk was located approximately 3 miles up Kansas Creek Road in an area known as Hembre Ridge.  

The bull elk was killed using a rifle and left to waste with no meat removed.  Further investigation led to the discovery of a deceased cow elk nearby.  Neither elk was salvageable and it appeared both elk had been shot within the past few days.

OSP is asking anyone who was in the area or anyone who may have information on the person(s) responsible to call the TIP line at 1-800-452-7888, or OSP (677) and refer information to Trooper Charles Reeder.  Information can also be sent by email to TIP@state.or.us.

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators 

The TIP program offers preference point rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of big game mammals.

Preference Point Rewards:

5 Points-Bighorn Sheep

5 Points-Rocky Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points-Cougar

Or the Oregon Hunters Association TIP reward fund also offers cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of Bighorn Sheep, Rocky Mountain Goat, Moose, Elk, Deer, Antelope, Bear, Cougar, Wolf, Upland Birds, Waterfowl, Furbearers, Game Fish and Shellfish.  Cash rewards can also be awarded for turning in people who destroy habitat, illegally obtain licenses/tags and for the unlawful lending/borrowing of big game tags.

CASH REWARDS:

$1,000 Bighorn Sheep, Rocky Mountain Goat and Moose 
$500 Elk, Deer and Antelope 
$300 Bear, Cougar and Wolf 
$300 Habitat Destruction

$200 Illegally Obtaining License/Tag(s)

$200 Unlawful Lend/Borrow Big Game Tags(s) 
$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl 
$100 Furbearers 

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish 

How to Report a Wildlife and/or Habitat Law Violation or Suspicious Activity: 

TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP(677)

TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)

 

 

 

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-12/1002/129834/7443.jpeg , 2019-12/1002/129834/7440.jpeg

United States Wildland Fire Personnel Called to Assist with Australia Wildfires 
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 12/05/19 12:30 PM

Boise, Idaho – The United States is sending 21 wildland fire personnel from the Bureau of Land Management, National Park Service, Bureau of Indian Affairs, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and U.S. Forest Service to assist with ongoing wildfire suppression efforts in Australia. Australia is experiencing early and significant fire activity, particularly in the states of New South Wales, Queensland and Victoria. Extended drought combined with hot and dry weather conditions have elevated wildfire risk, and fire activity is expected to continue for the next several months.

“This exchange demonstrates the value of our arrangement for mutual wildland fire support with Australia.  It’s a valuable tool for both countries as we face increasingly complex and challenging fires,” said Department of the Interior’s Office of Wildland Fire Director Jeff Rupert. “The interagency team of professionals will share expertise from managing wildland fire under a variety of locations and conditions in the U.S., many of which are similar to what they’ll encounter in Australia.”

Based on the current situation in Australia, the Australasian Fire and Emergency Service Authorities Council is requesting 21 qualified U.S. fire personnel to assist with wildfire and aviation management. The BLM is sending six personnel, including two interagency resource representatives on behalf of the National Interagency Fire Center located in Boise, Idaho. The NPS is sending two people, the BIA is sending one person, the FWS is sending one person, and the USFS is sending 11 personnel. The employees, coming from Alaska, Nevada, Montana, Colorado, Arizona, Idaho, Utah, California, Oregon, Hawaii, and Virginia, will be departing for Australia from the San Francisco International Airport on Thursday, December 5. 

Fires that started to burn in August have continued uninterrupted with large areas of both New South Wales and Queensland burned, multiple property losses, and, sadly, fatalities. Fire conditions continue to challenge in New South Wales and Queensland, while new fires are causing concern further south in Victoria. Fire conditions in Australia are extreme due to an extended drought, hot temperatures, and relative humidity in the single digits. 

“We’re sending a contingent from several federal agencies that reflects decades of fire management experience,” said U.S. Forest Service Fire Director Shawna Legarza. “We face many of the same firefighting challenges in each country. We’ve utilized their expertise in the past and welcome the opportunity to reciprocate.”

The last fire assistance between the two countries was in August of 2018 when 138 Australian and New Zealand wildfire management personnel were sent to the U.S. for almost 30 days to assist with wildfire suppression efforts in Northern California and the Northwest. The Australian and New Zealand personnel filled critical needs during the peak of the western fire season for mid-level fireline management, heavy equipment, helicopter operations, and structure protection. 

 The National Multi-Agency Coordinating Group is working with the National Interagency Coordination Center to mobilize resources and distribute the request across interagency partners. The last time the U.S sent firefighters to Australia was in 2010.  

###

The National Interagency Fire Center (NIFC), located in Boise, Idaho, is the nation's support center for wildland firefighting. Eight different agencies and organizations are part of NIFC including, the Bureau of Land Management, Bureau of Indian Affairs, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, National Weather Service, U.S. Fire Administration, and the National Association of State Foresters.


Recognize Klamath's Outstanding Businesses at Gala 2020
Klamath Co. Chamber of Commerce - 12/05/19 12:12 PM

Want to give your favorite businesses and individuals a chance to be honored for their impact on our community? At the Klamath County Chamber of Commerce’s 99th Annual Awards Gala, you can!   Nominations are currently open for Gala 2020. This Hollywood-style awards show is scheduled for January 11th, 2020 at the Ross Ragland Theater.

Nominations: bit.ly/Gala2020N

Tickets & Event Info: bit.ly/Gala2020T

We are currently accepting nominations for the following awards:

  • Big Idea Innovation Award (sponsored by Klamath Community College Small Business Development Center)
  • Environmental Leadership Award (sponsored by Waste Management)
  • Commitment to Community Award (sponsored by Ken’s Body and Paint)
  • Best Place to Work (2 Categories) (sponsored by Klamath Basin Home Builders Association)
  • Spirit of Entrepreneurism (For Profit Business & Civil/Social categories) (sponsored by Klamath IDEA)
  • Lifetime Achievement
  • Pathfinder Award

Each year the Chamber presents awards at the annual gala including the Big Idea Innovation Award, awarded to an organization in any industry that employs new ideas or approaches to doing business; the Commitment to Community Award, awarded to any organization in any industry that demonstrates a successful approach to corporate social responsibility and can show a positive impact on the community; Lifetime Achievement, awarded to an individual who has demonstrated exceptional business achievement and outstanding commitment to Klamath’s business community over their lifetime; and the Pathfinder Award, awarded to presidents, principals or chief executive officers for devoting time and energy to strengthen and transform the organization that they lead. For full information about all awards and to make nominations, please give us a call or visit bit.ly/Gala2020N

Nominate now and help give your favorite business or community leader the recognition they deserve.

The fun doesn’t end with awards! Following the awards ceremony, the Chamber will be hosting a Casino Night! This afterparty will be complete with Blackjack, professional dealers, food, drinks and much more. Stay afterwards and have some fun with your local business community.

For more information and to purchase tickets, please call us at (541) 884-5193 or visit the event page at bit.ly/Gala2020T.

Nominations can be submitted electronically by visiting bit.ly/Gala2020N, via email at: reception@klamath.org, or via mail at 205 Riverside Drive, Suite A, Klamath Falls, OR 97601.

The deadline for nominations is December 31st, 2019. Tickets to the event are on sale now.


PacificSource Foundation Commits $262k to Nine Regional Nonprofits
PacificSource Health Plans - 12/05/19 11:30 AM

(Springfield, Ore.) Dec. 5, 2019 The PacificSource Foundation for Health Improvement recently committed $262,000 in grant funding to support nine nonprofit organizations based in Oregon, Montana, Washington, and Idaho.

“Working in partnership to improve community health is a shared mission of PacificSource and our Foundation, and we are pleased to announce this latest round of funding to these deserving nonprofits,” said Marian Blankenship, executive director of PacificSource’s Foundation for Health Improvement.

The funding will span from one to two years for the following nonprofits:

Oregon:

  • Compass House Inc. - One-year grant of $10,000 in support of their Wellness Program, a holistic non-clinical program aimed at improving the quality of life and combating early mortality rates in adults living with mental illness.

 

  • SPOON – One-year grant of $25,000 in support of the Nourishing Oregon’s Foster Children project, which provides trauma-informed training and resources for foster parents and child welfare workers so that they can support the complex nutritional and feeding needs of the foster children in their care.

 

  • HIV Alliance – Two-year grant of $50,000 in support of a comprehensive opioid response in Lane, Douglas, Marion, and Josephine counties. This work will focus on at-risk populations including LGBTQ+ identified people, people with disabilities, people experiencing poverty, and rural populations with less access to support services.

 

  • Daisy CHAIN –Two-year grant of $50,000 to support the expansion and training of a team that is serving a growing number of culturally specific families throughout their programs, including the home visiting program, nursing nook, prenatal services and more.

 

Montana:

 

  • Missoula Aging Services – One-year grant of $25,000 in support of their Care Transitions Program, an innovative healthcare model that works with local hospitals and clinics to prevent high utilization by older adults through evidence-based interventions that ensure a successful transition from hospitals to home.

 

  • Ronan School District – One year grant of $5000 to support a Native Plant Garden, which aims to build food sovereignty, positive relationships, and improved communication between a highly diverse student and parent population and the educators.

 

Idaho:

 

  • Family Advocates – Two-year grant of $60,000 to support their Family Strengthening Programs, which aims to prevent child abuse and neglect while mitigating the impacts of adverse childhood experiences.

 

  • Interlink Volunteer Caregivers – One-year grant of $7749 to help provide transportation to and from medical appointments for individuals facing transportation as a barrier to receiving vital healthcare.

 

Washington:

 

  • Free Clinic of Southwest Washington – One-year grant of $30,000 in support of Community Health Workers as care extenders for diabetic patients. This CHW position will help to foster trust between patients and the medical providers as they learn about and manage their diabetes.

 

In addition to these new grants, the PacificSource Foundation made multi-year installments for Adelante Mujeres, Children’s Home Society, and all of the clinics participating in the Healthcare Access Partner’s Program (HcAP).

 

About PacificSource Foundation for Health Improvement 

Founded in 1992, the PacficSource Foundation for Health Improvement is an expression of our commitment to our communities. Its mission is to improve community health through the touchstones of better health, better care, and lower healthcare costs. The Foundation’s grants and partnerships focus on improving access to healthcare for vulnerable populations and promoting health excellence via innovative care and community health and wellness programs. For more information, visit http://bit.ly/2yK92qF

 

About PacificSource Health Plans 

PacificSource Health Plans is an independent, regional, not-for-profit community health plan serving the Northwest. Founded in 1933, PacificSource is based in Springfield with local offices throughout Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and Montana. The PacificSource family of companies employs 1,100 people, serves more than 320,000 individuals, and has 3,900 employer clients throughout the Northwest. For more information visit PacificSource.com.

 

 


Five tips for the final 10 days to sign up for health insurance (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 12/05/19 11:26 AM
The Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace is online at OregonHealthCare.gov
The Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace is online at OregonHealthCare.gov
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-12/1073/129820/thumb_Marketplace_Logo.jpg

(Salem) – Time is running out for people who want health insurance in 2020 but do not get coverage through their job or the Oregon Health Plan. Sunday, Dec. 15, is the last day to enroll in a health plan through the Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace, our state’s pathway to subsidized coverage.

About 100,000 uninsured Oregonians may be eligible for help paying for their health insurance, but signups in Oregon are lagging so far this year. To get coverage or re-enroll in a plan, follow these five tips:

Tip No. 1: Get a quick estimate of your subsidy and bottom-line cost of coverage. Go to OregonHealthCare.gov/windowshop to see the size of the subsidy you may qualify for, and what your plan may cost once that financial assistance is factored in. People whose incomes are just above the limit for the Oregon Health Plan can find plans costing them as little as $1 per month, when they meet all eligibility requirements.

Tip No. 2: Get free, local help enrolling. Licensed insurance agents and certified community partners are ready to help you complete the application for subsidies, and sort through plan options. Choose an agent or partner in the directory at OregonHealthCare.gov/gethelp, or call the Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace at 1-855-268-3767 (toll-free).

Tip No. 3: Get to know the new benefits in some plans. Consumers have reported that large deductibles on the lowest-priced plans sometimes keep them from getting care. In response, the state redesigned some plans to allow more services before the plan’s deductible is met. For the first time, plans with the words "standard bronze" in their name all cover primary care office visits for a flat $45 co-pay, even when the plan's $7,900 deductible has not been met. This plan type is among the options with a net cost of $1 per month for single people making about $19,000 a year and meeting a few other qualifications.

Tip No. 4: Hear from people who have gotten subsidies through the Marketplace. Health plan specifics matter, but so does the human impact of having coverage you can afford. If you need a two-minute break from insurance details, listen online to other Oregonians describe their experience with subsidized coverage at http://bit.ly/subsidy-testimonials.
 
Tip No. 5: Don’t miss the deadline. The deadline to enroll is Sunday, Dec. 15. If you miss it, you may go a year without health insurance. Avoid the risk and get started at OregonHealthCare.gov.

###

The Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace, a part of state government, helps people get health insurance when they do not have job-based coverage, and do not qualify for the Oregon Health Plan or another program. The Marketplace is the state-level partner to HealthCare.gov, and a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS). For more information, go to OregonHealthCare.gov.




Attached Media Files: The Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace is online at OregonHealthCare.gov , Insurance agents and community partners provide enrollment help at no charge to the consumer. , Insurance agents and community partners provide enrollment help at no charge to the consumer.

Revenue encourages taxpayers to protect their data and money
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 12/05/19 9:35 AM

It’s National Tax Security Awareness Week and the Oregon Department of Revenue and the IRS are reminding taxpayers to be on the lookout for money scams and identity theft.

Phishing scams

As the holiday season approaches, taxpayers need to watch out for phishing scams in the deluge of holiday email messages coming from retailers and others. According to the IRS, more than 90 percent of all data thefts begin with an email phishing scam.

Here’s what you need to know to protect yourself from phishing scams:

  • First, the most common way thieves steal identities is simply by asking for it. Their favorite tactic is a phishing email. Phishing emails “bait” users into opening them. They pose as a trusted company such as a bank, a favorite retailer, or even a tax professional.
  • Second, learn to recognize and avoid these phishing emails. The scams tell an urgent story—like there’s a problem with your account or your order. The message then instructs the receiver to open an embedded link or download an attachment.
  • Third, don’t take the bait. The email link may send users to a familiar website to log in, but the username and password goes to the thieves. Or, the scam suggests users open an attachment, which secretly downloads malicious software. Either method works for identity thieves.

These scam emails can show up in personal inboxes or even a work inbox, endangering the entire organization. Mobile phone users are especially prone to responding more than those working on a laptop or desktop computer. If at home, just delete the email. If at work, follow your organization’s guidance on handling the email.

Identity theft

With millions of people logging in to websites and online accounts this holiday season, Revenue and the IRS remind taxpayers that common mistakes can increase their risk of having sensitive financial and tax data stolen by identity thieves.

Using strong passwords and keeping them secure are critical steps to preventing thieves from stealing identities, money, or other information to file a fraudulent tax return.

In recent years, cybersecurity experts’ recommendations on what constitutes a strong password have changed. They now suggest people use word phrases that are easy to remember rather than random letters, characters, and numbers that can’t be easily recalled.

For example, experts previously suggested something like “PXro#)30” but now suggest a longer phrase, such as “SomethingYouCanRemember@30.” By using a phrase, users don’t have to write down their password and expose it to additional risk. Also, people may be more willing to use strong, longer passwords if it’s a phrase, rather than random characters that are harder to remember.

Protecting access to digital devices is so critical that some now feature fingerprint or facial recognition technology, but passwords remain common for many people.

Given the sensitivity of many of these online accounts, people should consider these password tips to protect devices or online accounts:

  • Use a minimum of eight characters; longer is better.
  • Use a combination of letters, numbers, and symbols in password phrases, i.e., UsePasswordPhrase@30.
  • Avoid personal information or common passwords; use phrases instead.
  • Change default or temporary passwords that come with accounts or devices.
  • Don’t reuse or update passwords. For example, changing Bgood!17 to Bgood!18 is not good enough; use unique usernames and passwords for accounts and devices.
  • Don’t use email addresses as usernames if that is an option.
  • Store any password list in a secure location, such as a safe or locked file cabinet.
  • Don’t disclose passwords to anyone for any reason.
  • When available, a password manager program can help track passwords for numerous accounts.

Whenever it’s an option for a password-protected account, users also should opt for a multi-factor authentication process. Many email providers, financial institutions, and social media sites now offer customers two-factor authentication protections.

Two-factor authentication helps by adding an extra layer of protection. Often this means the user must enter their credentials (username and password) plus another step, such as entering a security code sent via text to a mobile phone. Another example is confirming “yes” to a text to the phone that users are accessing the account on.

The idea behind multi-factor authentication is that a thief may be able to steal usernames and passwords, but it’s highly unlikely they also would have access to the mobile phone to receive a security code or confirmation to complete the log-in process.

For more information on protecting yourself or what to do if you’re a victim of identity theft, visit:

Visit www.oregon.gov/dor to get tax forms, check the status of your refund, or make tax payments. For other information or questions, call 800-356-4222 toll-free from an Oregon prefix (English or Spanish), 503-378-4988 in Salem and outside Oregon, or email questions.dor@oregon.gov. For TTY (hearing or speech impaired), call 800-886-7204.

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Fatal Crash on Hwy 730 - Umatilla County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 12/05/19 9:09 AM
2019-12/1002/129813/Hwy730.jpg
2019-12/1002/129813/Hwy730.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-12/1002/129813/thumb_Hwy730.jpg

On Wednesday, December 4, 2019 at approximately 8:40 P.M. Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 730 near milepost 202.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a 1999 Ford F-150 PU was westbound on Hwy 730 when for unknown reasons crossed into the eastbound lane and collided with a 2011 Volvo Semi Truck with flatbed trailer loaded with metal products, operated by Steven Unruh (64) from Nampa. ID.

The operator of the Ford F-150 sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased. Name will be released after next of kin has been notified.

Unruh was transported to Good Shepherd Medical Center in Hermiston.

Hwy 730 was closed for approximately 4 hours.

OSP was assisted by Umatilla Fire District #1 and ODOT




Attached Media Files: 2019-12/1002/129813/Hwy730.jpg

First Day Hikes event returns to state parks Jan. 1, 2020 (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 12/05/19 7:00 AM
Tryon Creek State Natural Area
Tryon Creek State Natural Area
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-12/1303/129789/thumb_First_Day_Hike_3.JPG

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) invites Oregonians outdoors on New Year’s Day for the annual First Day Hikes event. Visitors can choose from 37 hikes in 31 parks across the state. All hikes will be guided by a park ranger or volunteer who will share stories about the park’s history, geology, wildlife and plants. 

All hikes are free and day-use parking fees will be waived at all participating parks Jan. 1 only.

Hikers can register for specific hikes online at the Oregon State Parks Store: bit.ly/ParkStoreEvents. While online registration isn’t required for participation, visitors are encouraged to register. It helps park staff plan the hike and provides them with participant contact information should hike details change.

OPRD advises visitors to plan for inclement weather, dress in layers, wear sturdy shoes, bring water and remember to carry binoculars for viewing wildlife.

OPRD has sponsored First Day Hikes annually since 2012, part of a larger national event organized by America’s State Parks.

Participating parks and meeting areas are below. Full details for each hike are also on bit.ly/ParkStoreEvents.

PORTLAND

  • L.L. Stub Stewart State Park: 10 a.m., meet at Clayhill horse staging area.
  • Milo McIver State Park: 10 a.m., meet at the Maple Ridge Trailhead in the Lower Boat Launch parking lot.
  • Tryon Creek State Park: 9 a.m., meet at the nature center.

COLUMBIA RIVER GORGE

  • Deschutes River State Recreation Area: 9 a.m., meet at Oregon Trail kiosk.
  • Historic Columbia River Highway State Trail: 1 p.m., meet at the Mark O. Hatfield East trailhead in the Mossier Twin Tunnels parking lot.

WILLAMETTE VALLEY/CASCADES

  • Champoeg State Heritage Area: 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., meet at the visitor center.
  • Dexter State Recreation Site: 9 a.m., meet at the Dexter Disc Golf course.
  • Elijah Bristow State Park: noon, meet at the equestrian parking area for horse riding (bring your own horse.)
  • Silver Falls State Park: 9 a.m., 10 a.m., 1 p.m. and 2 p.m., meet at South Falls Lodge porch.
  • Willamette Mission State Park: 10 a.m., meet at the Wheatland Ferry.

COAST

  • Bullards Beach State Park: 1 p.m., meet at the meeting hall.
  • Cape Meares State Scenic Viewpoint: noon, meet in the Cape Meares parking lot.
  • Crissey Field State Recreation Site: 11 a.m., meet at the welcome center.
  • Fort Stevens State Park: 10 a.m., meet in the Battery Russell parking lot.
  • Humbug Mountain State Park: 10 a.m., meet at the Humbug Mountain trailhead.
  • Jessie M. Honeyman Memorial State Park: 10 a.m., meet in the group camp parking lot.
  • Oswald West State Park: 8 a.m., meet at the Cape Falcon trailhead.
  • Seal Rock State Recreation Site: 9:30 a.m., meet in the Seal Rock parking lot.
  • Umpqua Lighthouse State Park: 1 p.m., meet at Lake Marie Day-use area.
  • William M. Tugman State Park: 10 a.m., meet at the Eel Lake boat ramp.

SOUTHERN OREGON

  • Collier Memorial State Park: 9 a.m., meet at the Logging Museum.
  • Golden State Heritage Site: 1 p.m., meet in the Historic Church.
  • Illinois River Forks State Park: 11 a.m., meet at the West Fork trailhead.
  • Joseph H. Stewart State Recreation Area: 9 a.m., meet at the group camp.
  • TouVelle State Park: 11 a.m., meet at the day-use area.
  • Valley of the Rogue State Park: 1 p.m., meet at the amphitheater. 1 p.m., meet at Del Rio Vineyards (bring your own bike.) 1 p.m., meet at Rogue River Bridge in the city of Rogue River (bring your own bike.)

EASTERN/CENTRAL OREGON

  • Cottonwood Canyon State Park: 10 a.m., meet at the experience center.
  • Emigrant Springs State Heritage Area: 11 a.m., meet at the interpretive kiosk (bring your own snowshoes).
  • LaPine State Park: 11 a.m., meet at the meeting hall in the south loop.
  • Smith Rock State Park: 10 a.m., meet at the welcome center.
  • Wallowa Lake State Park: 10 a.m., meet in the Group Camp A parking lot.

More information about participating parks, including maps and directions, is on oregonstateparks.org.




Attached Media Files: Tryon Creek State Natural Area

Wed. 12/04/19
Justice Department Announces More Than $376 Million in Awards to Promote Public Safety
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 12/04/19 1:57 PM

More than $3.35 million will support crime-fighting efforts in the District of Oregon

WASHINGTON—The Department of Justice today announced that it has awarded more than $376 million in grant funding to enhance state, local and tribal law enforcement operations and reinforce public safety efforts in jurisdictions across the United States. $3,350,381 will support public safety activities in the District of Oregon. The awards were made by the Department’s Office of Justice Programs.

“Crime and violence hold families, friends and neighborhoods hostage, and they rip communities apart,” said OJP Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Katharine T. Sullivan. “These programs help restore the health and safety of crime-ravaged communities by supporting prevention activities, aiding in the apprehension and prosecution of perpetrators, facilitating appropriate sentencing and adjudication, and providing communities and their residents the means for recovery and healing.”

“Protecting public safety and the fair administration of justice requires steadfast partnership among local, state, tribal, and federal law enforcement agencies. I’m thankful for the culture of collaboration and teamwork that have come to define Oregon’s law enforcement community,” said Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon. “My sincere hope is that these awards will support and further the tremendous work being done by law enforcement agencies across the state. As an Oregonian, I’m proud of your efforts.”

The awards announced today support an array of crime-fighting initiatives, including the quarter-billion dollar Edward Byrne Justice Assistance Grants Program, which funds public safety efforts in 929 state, local and tribal jurisdictions. Funding also supports sex offender registration and notification, law enforcement-based victim services, the testing of sexual assault kits, and programs designed to address youth with sexual behavioral problems. Other awards will focus on wrongful convictions, intellectual property enforcement, innovative prosecution strategies and the safety and effectiveness of corrections systems.

The following awards were made to organizations in the District of Oregon:

Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) Edward Byrne Justice Assistance Grant Program

City of Beaverton $15,273
City of Grants Pass $14,338
City of Portland $377,097
City of Redmond $10,575
City of Salem $87,139
City of Springfield $24,712
City of Tigard $10,650
Deschutes County $28,452
Jackson County $77,209
Lane County $127,703
State of Oregon $1,997,319
Total: $2,770,467

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Office of Justice Programs (OJP), Office of Sex Offender Sentencing, Monitoring, Apprehending, Registering, and Tracking (SMART) Support for Adam Walsh Act Implementation Grant Program

Purpose Area 1: Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act Implementation in States, the District of Columbia, principal U.S. Territories, and Federally Recognized Indiana Tribes

Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs $348,088
Oregon State Police $231,826
Total $579,914

Information about the programs and awards announced today is available here. For more information about OJP awards, visit the OJP Awards Data webpage.

The Office of Justice Programs, directed by Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Katharine T. Sullivan, provides federal leadership, grants, training and technical assistance, and other resources to improve the nation’s capacity to prevent and reduce crime, assist victims and enhance the rule of law by strengthening the criminal and juvenile justice systems. More information about OJP and its components can be found at www.ojp.gov.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Oregon State Penitentiary reports in-custody death (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 12/04/19 1:57 PM
Donald Hull
Donald Hull
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-12/1070/129802/thumb_Hull_D.jpg

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody, Donald Douglas Hull, died the morning of December 4, 2019. Hull was incarcerated at Oregon State Penitentiary and passed away in the infirmary while on hospice. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified.

Hull entered DOC custody on January 24, 1977, from Baker County and was serving a life sentence. Hull was 79 years old. Next of kin has been notified.                                                                              

DOC takes all in-custody deaths seriously. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,700 individuals who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state. While crime information is public record, DOC elects to disclose only upon request out of respect for any family or victims.

 

OSP is Oregon's only maximum-security prison, located in Salem, and houses over 2,000 individuals. OSP is surrounded by a 25-foot-high wall with 10 towers. The facility has multiple special housing units including death row, disciplinary segregation, behavioral health, intermediate care housing, and an infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care. OSP participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including the furniture factory, laundry, metal shop, and contact center. It provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, work-based education, inmate work crews, and pre-release services. OSP was established in 1866 and, until 1959, was Oregon's only prison.

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Attached Media Files: Donald Hull

Corporate Activity Tax registration now open through Revenue Online
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 12/04/19 1:56 PM

Salem, OR— Registration for Oregon’s new Corporate Activity Tax (CAT) is now open through the Departmentof Revenue’s Revenue Online system found at www.oregon.gov/dor.

The new law requires businesses with Oregon commercial activity in excess of $750,000 to register for the Corporate Activity Tax. Once they reach that threshold businesses must register within 30 days. Some businesses could reach the threshold early in January, while others might not top that mark until much later in the year.

Department officials said, however, that numerous participants in the agency’s 12-meeting statewide stakeholder input tour in September and October indicated a desire to register as soon as possible.

“Business taxpayers and tax preparers have told us they are eager to take the first step of compliance and register for the CAT,” said Nia Ray, director of the Oregon Department of Revenue. “We believe opening registration early will help with a smooth implementation.”

To register, individuals doing business in Oregon will need their name, and their social security number or individual taxpayer identification number. Businesses will need their legal name and federal employer identification number.

Businesses and individuals will need:

  • Their mailing address;
  • The date they exceeded or expect to exceed $750,000 in Oregon commercial activity;
  • A valid email address or current Revenue Online login, and;
  • Their Business Activity Code (Refer to the current list of North American Industry Classification System codes found with their federal income tax return instructions.)

The Oregon Legislature created the Corporate Activity Tax in House Bills 3427 and 2164 during the 2019 session.

The CAT is imposed on businesses for the privilege of doing business in Oregon. It applies to all business entities including those located inside and outside of Oregon. The CAT is not an income tax or a transactional tax, such as a retail sales tax. It is measured on a business’s commercial activity—the total amount a business realizes from transactions and activity in Oregon.

Businesses with taxable commercial activity in excess of $1 million must pay the Corporate Activity Tax. The tax is $250 plus 0.57 percent of gross receipts greater than $1 million after subtractions.

More information about the Corporate Activity Tax is available on the Department of Revenue’s website. It includes a list of frequently asked questions and a form to sign-up for email updates on the CAT. Stakeholders can direct questions or comments about the CAT via email to cat.help.dor@oregon.gov or call 503-945-8005.

Visit www.oregon.gov/dor to get tax forms, check the status of your refund, or make tax payments; call 800-356-4222 toll-free from an Oregon prefix (English or Spanish); 503-378-4988 in Salem and outside Oregon; or email questions.dor@oregon.gov. For TTY (hearing or speech impaired), call 800-886-7204.

 


Advance Directive Adoption Committee Meets December 16
Oregon Health Authority - 12/04/19 12:20 PM

December 4, 2019

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Advance Directive Adoption Committee Meets December 16

What: The Advance Directive Adoption Committee will hold a meeting.

Agenda: Finalize the first draft of the Advance Directive Form. Discuss Introduction/FAQs to accompany form.

When: Monday, December 16, 2019 from 8:30am-11:30 am. The meeting is open to the public. A public comment period will be held at the end of the meeting.

Where: Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St., Conference Room 177, Portland, OR 97232.

The Advance Directive Adoption Committee provides guidance to the Oregon Health Authority on necessary revisions to Oregon’s Advance Directive form.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Kati Moseley at 971-673-2284, 711 TTY or ina.moseley@dhsoha.state.or.us">katarina.moseley@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


New video explains how ODF can help private landowners restore their forest after wildfire (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 12/04/19 10:30 AM
In a new video produced by ODF, Stewardship Forester Jana Peterson shares the steps forest landowners can take to recover from a wildfire.
In a new video produced by ODF, Stewardship Forester Jana Peterson shares the steps forest landowners can take to recover from a wildfire.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-12/1072/129772/thumb_Jana_Peterson_still_from_Replanting_AFter_Fire.png

SALEM, Ore. – A new video produced by the Oregon Department of Forestry aims to help family forest landowners learn what to do to reforest their property after a wildfire. The 7-minute video draws on the experience of ODF Stewardship Forester Jana Peterson and private Forestry Consultant Lane Parry in helping Baker County forest landowners after the Cornet-Windy Ridge Fire of 2015. The video can be viewed at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CT0qoYmBdK0&t=139s

That fire was one of 7,436 that have burned on lands protected by ODF over the past seven years. Since 2013, wildfires have burned almost 34,000 acres of non-industrial, privately owned forestland in Oregon protected by ODF.

“A wildfire can be devastating to landowners both emotionally and economically,” according to Family Forestland Coordinator Ryan Gordon with ODF. “When trees burn, beloved forest scenery around a home can turn to charred snags. Typically, those burned trees also represent a loss of income a landowner was depending on for retirement or to send kids or grandkids to college.”

Gordon said the video explains how local ODF stewardship foresters can help landowners find the resources and answers about what to do after a wildfire.

“It usually starts with helping landowners develop a restoration plan to achieve their goals,” said Gordon.

He said salvage logging should be carefully planned so it not only meets landowner objectives and helps restore water quality, and fish and wildlife habitat but also fulfills legal requirements. For example Oregon Forest Practices Act requires notification, reforestation, tree retention, and stream and wetland protection on all salvage operations.

If timber is salvaged after a wildfire, landowners normally have to replant within two years, said Gordon. “However, reforestation is not required on lands with unproductive soils,” said Gordon. “These are defined as those not capable of growing at least 20 cubic feet of wood per acre each year.”

Gordon said that if a large wildfire makes seedlings scarce, ODF may be able to extend the replanting deadline for impacted landowners or approve modified stocking levels. “Always check with your local ODF stewardship forester to see if and how rules are being modified or if natural regeneration may be allowed to meet reforestation requirements.

Gordon gives these other simple tips to forest landowners looking to recover after a wildfire.

  • Assess damage. Smaller fires, burning only brush and small trees, may not require restoration. More intense fires that consume larger trees and underbrush, and damage soil may require restoring soil, grass, and trees.
  • Create a restoration plan. Determine short-term and long-term goals for restoring your property and make plans to achieve them. A local ODF stewardship forester can provide information about:
  • Salvage harvesting and clean-up
  • Timber production
  • Grazing land
  • Stream health
  • Soil productivity
  • Fish and wildlife habitat
  • Look into assistance grants. Find out if your planned timber salvage is eligible for financial assistance before starting work. Financial assistance is limited and not all salvage operations are eligible. The process is often time consuming, so don’t delay.
  • Act quickly on your plan. Action right after a fire can help you better achieve your goals. For example, quickly establishing grasses and trees will help prevent unwanted weeds and brush.

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Attached Media Files: In a new video produced by ODF, Stewardship Forester Jana Peterson shares the steps forest landowners can take to recover from a wildfire.

OnPoint Community Credit Union Celebrates New Vancouver Waterfront Branch
OnPoint Community Credit Union - 12/04/19 9:51 AM

PORTLAND, Ore., December 4, 2019 — OnPoint Community Credit Union will host a community celebration marking the opening of its Vancouver Waterfront branch on Saturday, December 7, 2019.

OnPoint’s event comes just over one year after thousands of people attended the grand opening for the Vancouver Waterfront development. Since then, the area has seen continued growth, adding wineries and restaurants. The new branch will broaden the scope of services available to those working and living in the area. 

Grand Opening Event Details:

WHAT: Community celebration and open house for OnPoint Community Credit Union’s new waterfront branch featuring giveaways, a food truck, new member enrollment and a check presentation to local nonprofit Innovative Services.

WHO: OnPoint leaders and employees, the public, OnPoint members, neighboring businesses and individuals, and local supporters, as well as Gramor Development leadership who is leading the waterfront revitalization effort.

WHEN: Saturday, December 7, 2019, 9:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. 

WHERE: 611 W. Columbia Way Vancouver, WA 98660

OnPoint will make a $2,500 to Innovative Services, which serves children and adults with disabilities, as well as low-income children and families. OnPoint chose Innovative Services for the donation because of the quality of its programs and its mission to build self-reliant children and adults.  Services include:

  • Employment opportunities and job training for individuals with developmental disabilities
  • Janitorial services that serve as a community rehabilitation program for people with disabilities or other disadvantages
  • Pediatric therapy and early intervention for special needs children
  • Early learning and childcare programs, including free preschool for eligible children

OnPoint’s donation will support Innovative Service’s growing pediatric speech therapy program, which serves 80 children per month.

Media Availability: OnPoint’s check presentation will take place at 10:15 a.m. and interview opportunities are available from 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. with the individuals listed below.  Please call Shannon Berg at 503-347-8822 if you plan to attend.

  • OnPoint’s SW Washington Area Manager, Amy Reeves
  • OnPoint’s Branch Operations Supervisor, April Weissert
  • Gramor Development President, Barry Cain
  • Innovative Services representatives

ABOUT ONPOINT COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION

OnPoint Community Credit Union is the largest credit union in Oregon, serving more than 385,000 members and with assets of $6.1 billion. Founded in 1932, OnPoint Community Credit Union's membership is available to anyone who lives or works in one of 13 Oregon counties (Benton, Clackamas, Columbia, Crook, Deschutes, Jefferson, Lane, Linn, Marion, Multnomah, Polk, Washington and Yamhill) and two Washington counties (Skamania and Clark) and their immediate family members. More information is available at www.onpointcu.com or 503-228-7077 or 800-527-3932.

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5 surprising safety lessons from 'It's a Wonderful Life'  (Photo)
SAIF - 12/04/19 9:35 AM
Learn from the Bailey family.
Learn from the Bailey family.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-12/5162/129780/thumb_Wonderful-life_Baily_Family.jpg

It may be a beloved classic movie, but “It’s a Wonderful Life” also shows what can go wrong over the holidays. Look closely, and you′ll see it contains potential hazards to its characters’ safety and well-being. It's no wonder George Bailey needs a guardian angel. 

Follow these five tips to make sure your holidays are happy and safe. 

1. Parties, presents, and expectations of perfection can take its toll. 

As George Bailey discovers, holidays can be stressful. Remember to take care of your mental and emotional health—and get help when you need it. Learn more at saif.com/relax

2. Choose the right ladder for the job. Never use a chair. 

Peter Bailey could have a nasty fall if he slips off that chair. If you’re decorating a tree or putting up holiday lights, stay safe by using a ladder. Keep cords out of the way so you don’t trip over them, and make sure your tree is well-watered and doesn’t become a fire hazard. Learn more at saif.com/ladders

3. Injuries happen when you're distracted. 

George and Mary don’t notice the dance floor open to a swimming pool, showing how easy it is to fall for distracted walking, driving ... or dancing. Learn more at saif.com/falls

4. Slow down for snow and ice.  

Winter weather transforms everyday scenes into a beautiful snow globe. But George finds out the hard way that snowy roads can create hazardous driving conditions. Learn more at saif.com/drivesafely

5. No one wants the gift of germs. 

Little Zuzu Bailey has a fever, so George wisely tucks her up in bed to recover. If you’re sick, stay home. Learn more at saif.com/flu

Learn more from the Bailey family at saif.com/news.

About SAIF

SAIF is Oregon's not-for-profit workers' compensation insurance company. For more than 100 years, we've been taking care of injured workers, helping people get back to work, and striving to make Oregon the safest and healthiest place to work. For more information, visit the About SAIF page on saif.com. 




Attached Media Files: Learn from the Bailey family. , No one wants the gift of germs. , Slow down for snow and ice. , Injuries happen when you're distracted , Choose the right ladder for the job. , Holidays can be stressful.

Tue. 12/03/19
Commission Approves Reduction of Meter Reading Fees to Benefit Pacific Power Customers
Oregon Public Utility Commission - 12/03/19 2:27 PM

SALEM, Ore. – Today the Oregon Public Utility Commission (PUC) reviewed Pacific Power’s filing to reduce the monthly meter reading fee for customers who have opted out of using smart meter technology at a public meeting in Salem and made a decision to reduce meter reading fees for all opt-out customers.

Pacific Power’s filing recommended moving all opt-out customers to a $10 monthly meter reading fee, a decrease of $26 a month for most opt-out customers. Pacific Power’s request would have discontinued the triannual meter reading program, under which opt-out customers had been offered a lower monthly fee ($9 a month) for having their meters read manually three times a year and paying estimated monthly bills. Customers with smart meter technology do not pay a monthly meter reading fee.

Today, Commissioners decided the following:

  • To approve Pacific Power’s request to reduce the meter reading fee from $36 to $10 each month for smart meter opt-out customers on a monthly meter reading program, effective December 4, 2019.
  • To decline Pacific Power’s request to eliminate the triannual meter reading option for opt-out customers and direct Pacific Power to reduce the cost of that option from $9 to $3 per month, effective December 4, 2019.
  • To direct Pacific Power to submit a more developed proposal to the PUC to consider transitioning opt-out customers away from the triannual meter reading option.

“We value the public comments we continue to receive on this topic and the engagement of the Citizens’ Utility Board of Oregon, which give us the customer perspective on these important decisions,” said Megan Decker, PUC Chair. “Today’s decisions will benefit Pacific Power customers who have opted not to use smart meter technology, but recognize that a considered transition may be possible in the future.”

In November 2018, the PUC requested alternatives to Pacific Power’s recommended $36 monthly meter reading fee for all smart meter opt-out customers. A pilot program was approved by Commissioners in March 2019 that decreased the number of meter reads to three annually for smart meter opt-out customers, reducing the monthly meter reading fee from $36 to $9.

If customers have questions about their monthly fees, please contact Pacific Power at 888-221-7070.


Land Board to hear Elliott State Forest update on Dec. 10 in Salem
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 12/03/19 1:15 PM

SALEM, Ore. – The State Land Board will hear an update on ongoing exploration of a potential Elliott State Research Forest during its Dec. 10 meeting in Salem.

The Board in December 2018 directed the Department of State Lands (DSL) to work collaboratively with Oregon State University (OSU) to develop a plan for transforming the Elliott into a research forest. During next week’s meeting, DSL and OSU will provide updates on the research forest exploratory process and ask the Land Board to provide guidance on next steps.

The Board will also consider adopting permanent use restrictions for the state-owned banks and islands of the Willamette River within the city of Eugene and in the Swan Island area of Portland, and sale of a portion of the Stevens Road property in Bend.

The meeting will be held:
Tuesday, Dec. 10
10 a.m.
Department of State Lands
Land Board Room
775 Summer St. NE, Salem

Meeting agenda and materials are availlable on the DSL website. To live stream the meeting, go to the State Lands YouTube channel.

This meeting will be held in a facility that is accessible for persons with disabilities.  If you need assistance to participate in the meeting due to a disability, please notify Arin Smith at 503-986-5224 or in.n.smith@state.or.us">arin.n.smith@state.or.us at least two working days prior to the meeting.

Visitors are not permitted to bring backpacks, bags, or large purses into the Department of State Lands building prior to, during, or following Land Board meetings. Purses, medical bags, and diaper bags are permitted, but may be subject to inspection by the Oregon State Police.

About the State Land Board and the Department of State Lands: The State Land Board consists of Governor Kate Brown, Secretary of State Bev Clarno and State Treasurer Tobias Read. The Department of State Lands administers diverse natural and fiscal resources. Many of the resources generate revenue for the Common School Fund, such as state-owned rangelands and timberlands, waterway leases, estates for which no will or heirs exist, and unclaimed property. Twice a year, the agency distributes fund investment earnings to support K-12 public schools. The agency also administers Oregon’s Removal-Fill Law, which requires people removing or filling certain amounts of material in waters of the state to obtain a permit.


Mark Renard of Lake Oswego appointed to Cultural Trust Board of Directors (Photo)
Oregon Cultural Trust - 12/03/19 1:10 PM
Mark Renard
Mark Renard
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-12/1171/129760/thumb_Renard.jpg

Salem, Oregon – Mark Renard, the executive vice president of Johnstone Financial Advisors in Lake Oswego, has been appointed to the Oregon Cultural Trust Board of Directors by Gov. Kate Brown. The appointment was confirmed by the Oregon Senate on Nov. 19. He fills a position vacated by Carole Morse, who completed a second four-year term at the end of October.

Renard’s responsibilities at Johnstone Financial Advisors include managing the advisory department and trading. In addition, he serves as the personal financial advisor to individuals and families throughout the United States, assisting them in the areas of financial planning and insurance, investments, retirement plans and estate and tax planning. 

For several years Renard has applied his financial acumen to advocating on behalf of the Cultural Trust, authoring opinion pieces and founding AccessArt, a co-op marketing and art exhibition program. AccessArt connects business, the community and artists at quarterly events hosted at Johnstone’s historic building in downtown Lake Oswego. The events raise money for the Cultural Trust both through sales of art and a direct appeal to existing arts, culture and heritage donors to become Cultural Trust donors.

“Mark has been a great champion of the Cultural Trust for years,” said Charles Sams III, chair of the Cultural Trust Board. “We are extremely fortunate that he has agreed to make his passion for our work official by joining the Board of Directors. His expertise and energy will be great assets in growing our base of support for the cultural tax credit.”

“It’s a great honor for me to join this talented team of arts, heritage and cultural leaders from around the state,” said Renard. “I’m looking forward to increasing capacity for cultural activities in the great state of Oregon.”

Renard previously served as president of the Ice Age Floods Institute, where he worked closely with the Pacific Northwest Congressional Delegation to pass the Ice Age Floods National Geologic Trail Act.

In addition to a bachelor’s in marine engineering from the California Maritime Academy, Renard is accredited as an asset management specialist by the College of Financial Planning and earned an executive certificate in financial planning from the University of Portland. He also holds a certificate in investment management and theory practice from the Yale School of Management.

Renard also is an Iron Man, having completed one of the most difficult long-distance triathlon races organized by the World Triathlon Corporation. He has a daughter attending Portland State University and a son attending University of Puget Sound. He enjoys studying, surfing, hiking, swimming, running and yoga.

Renard begins his four-year term immediately.

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# # #

Created in 2001 by the Oregon Legislature, the Oregon Cultural Trust is a testimony to how much Oregonians value culture. No other state provides a 100 percent tax credit to inspire cultural giving. As uniquely Oregonian as public beaches and the bottle bill, the Oregon Cultural Trust was established 18 years ago by the Oregon Legislature as an ongoing funding engine for arts and culture across the state. Oregonians fund the Cultural Trust. We, in turn, fund the artists, potters, rappers, acrobats and dreamers who make Oregon, Oregon. In 2017 Oregonians gave $4.9 million to the Cultural Trust, our all-time record. Sixty percent of that went straight back to the field. The remaining 40 percent helped grow our permanent fund. Our three grant programs fund our five Statewide Partners, 45 County and Tribal Coalitions and qualified cultural nonprofits through competitive Cultural Development Grants.

 




Attached Media Files: Mark Renard

Oregon Lottery Holiday Reminder: Lottery Tickets are not for Minors (Photo)
Oregon Lottery - 12/03/19 12:30 PM
Vertical logo
Vertical logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-12/4939/129758/thumb_OL-Logo_Vertical_Black-Text_With-Tagline.png

The message is simple – don’t give Oregon Lottery tickets to minors during the holidays, or anytime, for that matter.

Traditionally, each holiday season sees a big spike in Lottery ticket sales as people buy tickets as stocking stuffers, gift tags and easy-to-give gifts. Reminders of how old you must be to play Oregon Lottery games are clearly posted at all Oregon Lottery retail locations. The holiday gift-giving season provides an opportune time for the Lottery to share the message that if the gift is a Lottery ticket, be sure the gift’s recipient is at least 18-years-old.

“In previous years, the Lottery has created a separate version of their holiday campaign with the responsible giving message,” said Stacy Shaw, Oregon Lottery Senior Marketing Product Manager and board member of the Oregon Council on Problem Gambling. “This year, that message has been integrated into all our advertising, because it’s simply part of how we promote our games – we believe that responsible gaming is for all customers, all the time.”

This marks the 12th year that the National Council on Problem Gambling and the International Centre for Youth Gambling Problems and High-Risk Behaviors at Canada’s McGill University have partnered with lotteries around the world, including the Oregon Lottery, to promote giving lottery tickets responsibly.

Oregon Lottery proceeds provide funding for free, confidential and effective problem gambling treatment programs statewide. Since 1992, nearly $100 million in Lottery dollars has been directed to fund problem gambling treatment in Oregon.

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Attached Media Files: Vertical logo , Horizontal logo

Marine Board Seeks Written Public Comment on Two Proposed Rules
Oregon Marine Board - 12/03/19 11:47 AM

The Oregon State Marine Board seeks written public comment on two proposed rulemaking notices.

The first notice seeks to gather public comment on removing per-page public record request fees and instead, refer to the Department of Administrative Services policy. The second notice seeks to gather public comment on a rule that would allow for independent operation of personal watercraft by youth age 12-15 when competing in or training for a Marine Board-sanctioned competition/event. 

Written public comments will be accepted until 5 p.m. on Friday, January 6, 2020, and can be submitted via email to .rulemaking@oregon.gov">osmb.rulemaking@oregon.gov or by U.S. Mail to Jennifer Cooper, Administrative Rules Coordinator, Oregon State Marine Board, 435 Commercial Street NE, Suite 400, Salem, OR 97301.  Comments via telephone will not be accepted.

To view the proposed rule language visit https://www.oregon.gov/osmb/info/Documents/Rulemaking/PublicRecordsNoticePubCom.pdf

https://www.oregon.gov/osmb/info/Documents/Rulemaking/YouthPWCNoticePubCom.PDF.

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Oregon tribal health center gets national recognition for preventing HPV cancers (Photo)
Oregon Health Authority - 12/03/19 10:02 AM
2019-12/3687/129751/Warm-Springs-Medical-Community-Healthcare-Network-teams.jpg
2019-12/3687/129751/Warm-Springs-Medical-Community-Healthcare-Network-teams.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-12/3687/129751/thumb_Warm-Springs-Medical-Community-Healthcare-Network-teams.jpg

December 3, 2019

Media contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon tribal health center gets national recognition for preventing HPV cancers

OHA Immunization Program Manager Aaron Dunn discusses recognition

Warm Springs Health and Wellness Center has been named the HPV Vaccine Is Cancer Prevention Champion for outstanding efforts to protect adolescents from cancers caused by HPV in Oregon.

Tribal and Indian Health Service (IHS) clinic staff serving members of the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs thoroughly examine each patient vaccination record before their appointment and recommend the HPV vaccine. The clinic also partners with the on-site dental clinic to vaccinate patients as they come in for routine dental care.

“Warm Springs Health and Wellness is a leader among clinics in Oregon with an HPV vaccine completion rate of more than 73 percent among adolescents,” said Aaron Dunn, manager of the Immunization Program at the Oregon Health Authority Public Health Division. The health center was nominated for this award by the Immunization Program.

This award program recognizes clinicians, clinics, practices, groups, and health systems that are going above and beyond to foster HPV vaccination in their community. This year the award program is honoring champions from 25 states.

HPV vaccine is important because it protects against cancers caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Every year in the United States, nearly 35,000 women and men are estimated to be diagnosed with a cancer caused by HPV infection. HPV vaccination could prevent more than 90 percent of these cancers from ever developing. Both boys and girls should get two doses of the HPV vaccine series when they are 11 or 12 years old. The HPV vaccine series can be started as early as age 9.

To read Warm Springs Health and Wellness Center’s profile on the CDC’s website, and to learn more about HPV Vaccine Is Cancer Prevention Champion Award program, please visit https://www.cdc.gov/hpv/champions/winner-spotlights.html.




Attached Media Files: 2019-12/3687/129751/Warm-Springs-Medical-Community-Healthcare-Network-teams.jpg

Tech Tuesday -- IoT (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 12/03/19 9:00 AM
IOT Info Slide
IOT Info Slide
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-11/3585/129451/thumb_TT_-_IOT_-_December_3_2019_-_GRAPHIC.jpg

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. Today: Building a digital defense in your Internet of Things.

Last week we talked about smart TV’s – and how that built-in internet connection can allow manufacturers, streaming services, and even hackers an open door into your home.

This week, we are looking at the larger Internet of Things (IoT). Basically, this means everything else in your home that connects to the world wide web. If you look at the holiday wish lists that your kids, spouse, and parents conveniently dropped on you last week at Thanksgiving – most everything on there probably makes the cut.

Digital assistants, smart watches, fitness trackers, home security devices, thermostats, refrigerators, and even light bulbs are all on the list. Add to that all of the fun stuff: remote-controlled robots; games and gaming systems; interactive dolls; and talking stuffed animals … well, the list seems endless.

What these all have in common is that send and receive data. But do you know how that data is collected? And where it is going?

Another concern is that hackers can use that innocent device to do a virtual drive-by of your digital life. Unsecured devices can allow hackers a path into your router – giving the bad guy access to everything else on your home network that you thought was secure. Private pictures and passwords safely stored on your computer? Don’t be so sure.

Here’s what you can do to build that digital defense:

  • Change the device’s factory settings from the default password. A simple internet search should tell you how – and if you can’t find the info, consider moving on to another product.
  • Passwords should be as long as possible and unique for IoT devices.
  • Many connected devices are supported by mobile apps on your phone. These apps could be running in the background and using default permissions that you never realized you approved. Know what kind of personal info those apps are collecting, and say “no” to privilege requests that don’t make sense.
  • Secure your network. Your fridge and your laptop should not be on the same network. Keep your most private, sensitive data on a separate system from your other IoT devices.
  • Make sure all of your devices are updated regularly. If automatic updates are available for software, hardware, and operating systems – turn them on.

As always, if you have been victimized by a cyber fraud, be sure to report it to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.IC3.gov or call your local FBI office. 




Attached Media Files: IOT Audio File , IOT Info Slide

OnPoint Community Credit Union Employees Donate over $73,000 to Local Nonprofits for the Holidays (Photo)
OnPoint Community Credit Union - 12/03/19 7:58 AM
Chris Chiacchierini, Executive Director of Neighborhood House and Steve Leugers, Senior Vice President/Chief Credit Officer at OnPoint
Chris Chiacchierini, Executive Director of Neighborhood House and Steve Leugers, Senior Vice President/Chief Credit Officer at OnPoint
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-12/963/129746/thumb_Employee_Giving_2019.JPG

PORTLAND, Ore., December 3, 2019—Continuing its annual holiday tradition, OnPoint Community Credit Union employees directed donations of over $73,000 to JOIN, Meals on Wheels People, and Neighborhood House. To broaden its impact across the region, OnPoint also allocated $5,000 to be distributed among additional nonprofit organizations, including Looking Glass Community Services in Eugene, Yamhill Community Action Partnership in McMinnville, and Bethlehem Inn and St. Vincent de Paul of Redmond in Central Oregon.

“Volunteering, donating and serving our community is part of what drives our employees at OnPoint. This is why we wanted to help them make an even bigger impact this holiday season,” said Rob Stuart, President and Chief Executive Officer, OnPoint Community Credit Union. “Thanks to our dedicated nonprofit partners, our employees’ gifts will stretch further to help our most vulnerable neighbors have a more comfortable holiday season.” 

For three consecutive years, OnPoint has made donations on behalf of each of its employees to select organizations that make a difference in the community. This year, employees directed $100 to three different organizations—with many opting to split their donation—resulting in gifts of $32,520 to Meals on Wheels People, $20,437 to JOIN, and $20,370 to Neighborhood House.   

Through the delivery of 5,000 nutritious meals each weekday, Meals on Wheels People alleviates hunger and social isolation, and allows seniors to live independently. “OnPoint’s generosity will provide an entire day of meals to the 5,000 seniors we serve,” said Julie Piper Finley, Director of Marketing & Communications at Meals on Wheels People. “We are honored OnPoint employees chose us as recipients of this tremendous gift. On behalf of those we serve, we thank them for their continued support of our community.”

JOIN partners with individuals and families who are experiencing homelessness to identify a path to housing that opens the doors to stability, opportunity and community. “JOIN's mission is to transition people out of homelessness into permanent housing,” said Sophie Jaggi, Development Director at JOIN. “We transition 25-30 people per week into permanent housing and support others through our Day Center. As the weather gets colder and the holidays draw near, OnPoint’s continued generosity will help us as we make sure more people have a place to call home.”  

For nearly 115 years, Neighborhood House has provided emergency food services, early childhood and school-age education, housing support, senior services, and more. “Neighborhood House is so grateful to OnPoint for this gift. This is truly an example of extraordinary community partnership and generosity,” said Mari Yerger, Neighborhood House’s Deputy Director. 

The conclusion of OnPoint’s annual employee giving campaign signals the start of its social giving campaign where its Facebook, Twitter and Instagram followers will be able to select six organizations to receive donations from OnPoint. OnPoint followers are encouraged to follow/like and share the non-profit to which they’d want OnPoint to donate. Participants can vote through OnPoint’s social media channels by tagging OnPoint and using the #OnPointGiving hashtag, or by commenting on a promotional post. The social giving campaign kicks off today, December 3, which is Giving Tuesday and will run until December 13. 

ABOUT ONPOINT COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION

OnPoint Community Credit Union is the largest credit union in Oregon, serving more than 385,000 members and with assets of $6.1 billion. Founded in 1932, OnPoint Community Credit Union’s membership is available to anyone who lives or works in one of 13 Oregon counties (Benton, Clackamas, Columbia, Crook, Deschutes, Jefferson, Lane, Linn, Marion, Multnomah, Polk, Washington and Yamhill) and two Washington counties (Skamania and Clark) and their immediate family members. More information is available at: 503-228-7077 or 800-527-3932.

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Attached Media Files: Chris Chiacchierini, Executive Director of Neighborhood House and Steve Leugers, Senior Vice President/Chief Credit Officer at OnPoint

OnPoint Community Credit Union Employees Donate over $73,000 to Local Nonprofits for the Holidays (Photo)
OnPoint Community Credit Union - 12/03/19 7:58 AM
Chris Chiacchierini, Executive Director of Neighborhood House and Steve Leugers, Senior Vice President/Chief Credit Officer at OnPoint
Chris Chiacchierini, Executive Director of Neighborhood House and Steve Leugers, Senior Vice President/Chief Credit Officer at OnPoint
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-12/963/129745/thumb_Employee_Giving_2019.JPG

PORTLAND, Ore., December 3, 2019—Continuing its annual holiday tradition, OnPoint Community Credit Union employees directed donations of over $73,000 to JOIN, Meals on Wheels People, and Neighborhood House. To broaden its impact across the region, OnPoint also allocated $5,000 to be distributed among additional nonprofit organizations, including Looking Glass Community Services in Eugene, Yamhill Community Action Partnership in McMinnville, and Bethlehem Inn and St. Vincent de Paul of Redmond in Central Oregon.

“Volunteering, donating and serving our community is part of what drives our employees at OnPoint. This is why we wanted to help them make an even bigger impact this holiday season,” said Rob Stuart, President and Chief Executive Officer, OnPoint Community Credit Union. “Thanks to our dedicated nonprofit partners, our employees’ gifts will stretch further to help our most vulnerable neighbors have a more comfortable holiday season.” 

For three consecutive years, OnPoint has made donations on behalf of each of its employees to select organizations that make a difference in the community. This year, employees directed $100 to three different organizations—with many opting to split their donation—resulting in gifts of $32,520 to Meals on Wheels People, $20,437 to JOIN, and $20,370 to Neighborhood House.   

Through the delivery of 5,000 nutritious meals each weekday, Meals on Wheels People alleviates hunger and social isolation, and allows seniors to live independently. “OnPoint’s generosity will provide an entire day of meals to the 5,000 seniors we serve,” said Julie Piper Finley, Director of Marketing & Communications at Meals on Wheels People. “We are honored OnPoint employees chose us as recipients of this tremendous gift. On behalf of those we serve, we thank them for their continued support of our community.”

JOIN partners with individuals and families who are experiencing homelessness to identify a path to housing that opens the doors to stability, opportunity and community. “JOIN's mission is to transition people out of homelessness into permanent housing,” said Sophie Jaggi, Development Director at JOIN. “We transition 25-30 people per week into permanent housing and support others through our Day Center. As the weather gets colder and the holidays draw near, OnPoint’s continued generosity will help us as we make sure more people have a place to call home.”  

For nearly 115 years, Neighborhood House has provided emergency food services, early childhood and school-age education, housing support, senior services, and more. “Neighborhood House is so grateful to OnPoint for this gift. This is truly an example of extraordinary community partnership and generosity,” said Mari Yerger, Neighborhood House’s Deputy Director. 

The conclusion of OnPoint’s annual employee giving campaign signals the start of its social giving campaign where its Facebook, Twitter and Instagram followers will be able to select six organizations to receive donations from OnPoint. OnPoint followers are encouraged to follow/like and share the non-profit to which they’d want OnPoint to donate. Participants can vote through OnPoint’s social media channels by tagging OnPoint and using the #OnPointGiving hashtag, or by commenting on a promotional post. The social giving campaign kicks off today, December 3, which is Giving Tuesday and will run until December 13. 

ABOUT ONPOINT COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION

OnPoint Community Credit Union is the largest credit union in Oregon, serving more than 385,000 members and with assets of $6.1 billion. Founded in 1932, OnPoint Community Credit Union’s membership is available to anyone who lives or works in one of 13 Oregon counties (Benton, Clackamas, Columbia, Crook, Deschutes, Jefferson, Lane, Linn, Marion, Multnomah, Polk, Washington and Yamhill) and two Washington counties (Skamania and Clark) and their immediate family members. More information is available at: 503-228-7077 or 800-527-3932.

###

 




Attached Media Files: Chris Chiacchierini, Executive Director of Neighborhood House and Steve Leugers, Senior Vice President/Chief Credit Officer at OnPoint