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Bend/Central-Eastern Oregon News Releases for Sun. May. 20 - 4:27 am
Sat. 05/19/18
Injured Skier rescued off South Sister (Photo)
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/19/18 9:51 PM
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Date:  05/19/2018

By:  Deputy Aaron Myers Assistant Search and Rescue Coordinator

Rescued Skier: Nick Economou, 32 year old male, Portland, OR

On 05/19/18, at about 2:24pm, 9-1-1 Dispatch received a report of an injured skier on South Sister. The caller reported 32 year old Nick Economou had suffered a non life threatening injury and was unable to get down South Sister without assistance. Economou was reported to be at approximately 8,250' elevation. 

Eight Volunteers from the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Search and Rescue Unit responded to assist. Air Link flew four DCSO SAR Volunteers to an area as close as possible to where Economou was located. The additional four DCSO SAR Volunteers hiked from the Devil’s Lake Trailhead towards Economou’s location on South Sister. 

DCSO SAR Volunteers made it to Economou's location at approximately 3:18pm, stabilized his injury and transported him back on a rescue sled, approximately 1/2 mile, to the location AirLink was standing by at.  Economou was then transported by AirLink to St. Charles Hospital in Bend for further evaluation.

Skiing South Sister is inherently dangerous, but Economou did several things right to help mitigate the problems he encountered.  Economou was familiar with the area, prepared for the conditions and was traveling with other skiers who were able to contact 911 for assistance.  Those considering recreating in the Cascade Mountains at this time of year should be prepared for anything from bare dirt to deep snow as well as extreme weather pattern swings.




Attached Media Files: 2018-05/5227/114569/air_link.jpg

Oregon National Guard events recognize Armed Forces Day (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 05/19/18 7:25 PM
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180519-Z-OT568-022: Victoria Shine, with the Oregon National Guard Child & Youth Program, runs with children participating in the “Run to Remember” 5-kilometer run/walk event at Salem Riverfront Park, May 19, 2018, in Salem, Oregon. The Oregon National Guard’s Service Member & Family Support Branch hosted the event in honor of Fallen Service Members and Gold Star Families during Armed Forces Day. (Photo by Sgt. 1st Class April Davis, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

180519-Z-OT568-030: Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers with Company B, 141st Brigade Support Battalion, 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team, run through Salem Riverfront Park during the “Run to Remember” 5-kilometer run/walk, May 19, 2018, in Salem, Oregon. The Oregon National Guard’s Service Member & Family Support Branch hosted the event in honor of Fallen Service Members and Gold Star Families during Armed Forces Day. (Photo by Sgt. 1st Class April Davis, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

180519-Z-OT568-040: A young runner speeds his way through Salem Riverfront Park during the “Run to Remember” 5-kilometer run/walk, May 19, 2018, in Salem, Oregon. The Oregon National Guard’s Service Member & Family Support Branch hosted the event in honor of Fallen Service Members and Gold Star Families during Armed Forces Day. (Photo by Sgt. 1st Class April Davis, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

Blacksmith: Gary Lewis, a retired Oregon National Guardsman from Portland, Oregon, works on horseshoes as a blacksmith during Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 19, 2018. The Oregon Military Museum held the 22nd Annual Living History Day as part of Armed Forces Day celebrations throughout the country. (U.S. National Guard photo by John Hughel, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

Artillery Horse Barn: Visitors and military Veterans spend time interacting in the restored Horse Barn at the Oregon Military Museum during Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 19, 2018. The Oregon Military Museum held the 22nd Annual Living History Day as part of Armed Forces Day celebrations throughout the country. (U.S. National Guard photo by John Hughel, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

Living History Day: Ryan McGee, a member of the 1st Infantry Living History Group, shows some of the weapons used during WWII to some young visitors during Living History Day held at Camp Withycombe, in Clackamas, Oregon, May 19, 2018. The Oregon Military Museum held the 22nd Annual Living History Day as part of Armed Forces Day celebrations throughout the country. (U.S. National Guard photo by John Hughel, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)




Attached Media Files: 2018-05/962/114567/180519-Z-OT568-040.JPG , 2018-05/962/114567/180519-Z-OT568-022.JPG , 2018-05/962/114567/180519-Z-OT568-030.JPG , 2018-05/962/114567/Blacksmith.jpg , 2018-05/962/114567/Artillery_Horse_Barn.jpg , 2018-05/962/114567/Living_History_Day.jpg

Update: Fatal stabbing in Selma - person of interest detained
Oregon State Police - 05/19/18 6:59 PM

On May 19, 2018, at approximately 9:18 am, the Josephine County Sheriff’s Office responded to a report of a stabbing in the parking lot of Rays Market in Selma, Oregon.   Upon the deputies arrival, the victim was deceased.

The Josephine County Sheriff’s Office requested the assistance of the Central Point Oregon State Police Criminal Division. Detectives responded and assumed the investigation.

The subsequent investigation revealed a physical altercation occurred in the parking lot between the victim and the suspect.  The victim, 46 year old Frank Norman Chambers of Selma, Oregon  was stabbed during the altercation and died as a result of his injuries.  The suspect, Ramon Eduardo Rodriguez-Acosta, 58 year old also from Selma, Oregon is in custudy and being lodged at the Josephine County Jail on Manslaughter in the first degree.

This is an ongoing investigation and no further details will be released.

 

May 19, 2018 Josephine County Sheriff's Deputies responded to the Rays Food Place in Selma. Upon arrival they located one victim with fatal stab wounds.  JCSO requested Oregon State Police Major Crimes to investigate.  

A person of interest has been detained.

Investigation continuing.


Subject flees Bend Police/ Caputred and faces charges of restraining order violation and unlawful possession of a firearm
Bend Police Dept. - 05/19/18 5:16 PM

 

Date: Saturday, May 19, 2018                         Case # 2018-00144518

 

Date & Time of Incident:  05-19-18 @ 0851

Type of Incident:             Unlawful possession of firearm/ Restraining order violation

Location of Incident:       NE Purcell/ NE Twin Knolls Bend, Or.

 

Suspect Information:

Schlicker, Grant  38 year old Bend resident

 

 

Narrative:

On Saturday, May 19th at 0851 hours, Grant Schlicker fled on foot from a Bend Police Officer in the area of NE Purcell and NE Twin Knolls.   Bend Police had been investigating Schlicker for violation of a no contact order.  Schlicker fled through numerous backyards and business areas in his flight from Officers.

Bend Police Officers set up a perimeter and at 0938 hours, were able to locate him hiding in an undeveloped area near 1900 NE Bear Creek by the Healy Heights apartment complex.  Schlicker was taken into custody without further incident. 

As the investigation unfolded, it was determined Schlicker had left his vehicle at Xcel fitness and fled when a Bend Police Officer attempted contact with him as he was leaving the business.  A firearm was visible inside his vehicle, a 2012 Chevrolet Pick-up.  Officers obtained a search warrant and were able to seize an unloaded revolver from within the vehicle.  Schlicker was charged with unlawful possession of a firearm as he is a convicted felon.  Schlicker was lodged at the Deschutes County Jail on the below listed charges.

 

Charges:

Violation of Restraining order
Unlawful possession of a firearm
Interfering with a Police Officer
Criminal Trespass II (2 counts)

 


Not much flying, but lots of training
Oregon Civil Air Patrol - 05/19/18 12:25 PM

More than 44 members of Civil Air Patrol gathered to practice search and rescue techniques Saturday at three Oregon airports.

 

Low cloud cover kept the blue, white and red CAP fleet grounded in the morning, but work didn’t stop.  A ground team of adults and cadets (youth members) took off in a CAP van to test a portable radio repeater. Other teams focused on training working from Aurora State Airport (UAO), Redmond Municipal Airport (RDM), and Rogue Valley International – Medford Airport (MFR). Civil Air Patrol maintains facilities at all three airports.

 

There were also training classes on various pieces of electronic and photographic equipment used in searches.  CAP performs aerial photography for various agencies including Bonneville Power Administration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and the Oregon Department of Transportation. Photographs can help determine status of roads, bridges, runways, etc.  They can also record high water levels and unusual animal populations.

 

Toward the afternoon the clouds rose high enough to get a few flights off the ground in the single-engine aircraft. CAP flies with a crew of three: the pilot, a mission observer and a mission scanner or airborne photographer.  Each has roles in the safe operation of the flight and in accomplishing search duties or aerial photography.

 

Radio communication is a major part of Civil Air Patrol’s program.  Besides a fleet of single-engine aircraft, its assets include a large network of radio equipment.  CAP can help communicate in emergency situations when everyday communication systems such as telephone and cell phones are not functioning due to power outages.  Therefore, CAP often practices its radio communication skills to be ready to help.  CAP has radio repeaters located throughout the state, and personnel are ready to fill in using mobile radios if repeaters fail.

 

CAP is ready to assist federal, state and local authorities.  They have assisted County Sheriffs in missing hiker searches; helped county governments to practice evacuation exercises and helps with federal and state operations by being the radio link from an operating site deep in a canyon back to a headquarters location elsewhere in Oregon.  This function is often called flying “high bird,” as an airplane flying circles above a canyon can pick up the radio signal that would otherwise never reach its headquarters.

 

Volunteers in Civil Air Patrol constantly train to Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) standards. That training equips CAP volunteers and crews to interconnect with other emergency service agencies in larger incidents.

 

CAP is a Congressionally chartered nonprofit organization and performs services for the federal government as the official civilian auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force.  It is a strategic partner of the Air Force, serving as a member of its Total Force.  CAP has three primary missions: emergency services, cadet (teen) programs and aerospace education.  This year, CAP is celebrating its 70-year association with the Air Force.

 

Redmond Municipal Airport (RDM) Roberts Field

Aurora State Airport (UAO) Wes Lematta Field   

Rogue Valley International-Medford Airport (MFR)

 

www.Gocivilairpatrol.com

 

 

 

 


Passenger killed when vehicle crashes into building near Coos Bay (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 05/19/18 7:09 AM
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On May 18, 2018 at approximately 9:40 PM Oregon State Police Troopers responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 101 near Coos Bay.

A 2018 Jeep, driven by George Reese age 73 from North Bend, was north on 101 when it left the roadway striking a business and a residence before coming to a stop in the front yard of the residence.  The driver was transported to Bay Area Hospital with serious injuries.  The passenger, Sharon Reese age 73 from North Bend, died at the scene.

The structures sustained substantial damage.  No injuries were reported from the occupants of the structures. 

The cause of the crash is still under investigation.

Oregon State Police was assisted by Coos Bay Fire Department, Coos County Sheriff, and ODOT. 




Attached Media Files: 2018-05/1002/114559/DSCN0651.JPG , 2018-05/1002/114559/DSCN0649.JPG , 2018-05/1002/114559/DSCN0469.JPG , 2018-05/1002/114559/DSCN0449.JPG

Fri. 05/18/18
Oregon Heritage Commission to meet June 4
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 05/18/18 1:17 PM

The Oregon Heritage Commission will meet via teleconference at 1 p.m. on June 4. A public listening room will be provided in Room 146 of the North Mall Office Building, 725 Summer St. NE, Salem. Its agenda includes approval of Oregon Museum Grants and other heritage topics.

The Heritage Commission is comprised of nine people representing Oregon's heritage and geographical diversity who have been appointed by the Governor. There are nine advisory representatives from state agencies and statewide organizations. The mission of the Oregon Heritage Commission is to secure, sustain, and enhance Oregon's heritage by ensuring coordination of heritage initiatives by public and private organizations; advocacy on its behalf; education of the public about its extent and value; and promotion and celebration of its diversity. For more information, contact coordinator Beth Dehn at 503-986-0696 or Beth.Dehn@oregon.gov

Commission meetings are open to the public and their agendas include opportunities for public comment. The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. Special accommodations for the meeting – including translation services – may be made by calling (503) 986?0690 at least 72 hours prior to the start of the meeting.

For more information about the commission, visit www.oregonheritage.org


Oregon Farm Bureau seeks photos for calendar contest (Photo)
Oregon Farm Bureau - 05/18/18 12:26 PM
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 18, 2018

Oregon Farm Bureau (OFB) invites all photography enthusiasts to enter their best images of Oregon agriculture to the annual OFB Calendar Contest.

Twelve selected photographers will have their work featured as month images in the 2019 Oregon’s Bounty Calendar.

The award-winning calendar celebrates all aspects of Oregon agriculture: the products, the people, the production, the landscape, the enjoyment, anything that depicts the beauty, technology, culture, enjoyment, or tradition of family farming and ranching.

“Spring is a fantastic time to look for photo opportunities within Oregon agriculture,” said OFB Communications Director Anne Marie Moss. “Farmers markets are in full swing, fields are blooming, farmers are preparing for summer harvest, and young animals abound.” 

Horizontal-format, high-resolution images — both close-ups and panoramic views — are needed of all types of agriculture in all seasons.

Subject ideas include scenes from farmers markets, close-ups of ag products or crops in the field, planting and harvesting crops, panoramic scenes of farmland, people enjoying Oregon-grown ag products, portraits of farmers/ranchers/families, farm animals, state or county fairs, 4-H and FFA events, on-farm festivals, to name just a few.

Photographers with images selected for month pages in Oregon’s Bounty will receive a photo credit in the 2019 calendar, which is mailed to 67,000 Farm Bureau members, and copies of the calendar. Everyone who submits an image will receive a complimentary copy of the calendar ($20 value), provided they include their mailing address.

The deadline for entries is Sept. 15, 2018.

Photographers do not need to be Farm Bureau members to participate and there is no limit to the number of photos that can be submitted.

Find photo specifications and contest rules at www.oregonfb.org/calendar.

The state’s largest general farm organization, Oregon Farm Bureau is a grassroots, nonpartisan, nonprofit organization representing the interests of the state's family farmers and ranchers in the public and policymaking arenas. The calendar is mailed to 67,000 members around the state and thousands more are distributed throughout the year. 

For more information and to see previous years of the Oregon’s Bounty Calendar, visit www.oregonfb.org/calendar.

Project contact is Anne Marie Moss, OFB Communications Director, at ie@oregonfb.org">annemarie@oregonfb.org, 503.399.1701.

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Note to Editors: “Farm Bureau” is a registered trademark; please capitalize in all cases.

The state’s largest general farm organization, Oregon Farm Bureau is a grassroots, nonpartisan, nonprofit organization representing the interests of the state's farmers and ranchers in the public and policymaking arenas.

First established in Oregon in 1919, Farm Bureau is organized in all 36 counties and has nearly 7,000 member families professionally engaged in agriculture. OFB’s 15th President, Barry Bushue, is a thirdgeneration farmer raising a variety of vegetables, berries, and pumpkins at a nearly century-old farm near Boring.




Attached Media Files: 2018-05/5507/114543/OFB_calendar_meme.png , 2018 Oregon's Bounty Calendar

State Library of Oregon Executive Committee meeting May 30th, 2018
State Library of Oregon - 05/18/18 12:05 PM

The Executive Committee of the State Library Board will meet by phone on May 30th, 2018.   Ann Malkin of Bend will chair the meeting, which will begin at 11:30.

Members of the public who wish to attend the meeting may come to Room 205 at the Oregon State Library. To listen to this meeting via telephone, please contact Eva Luna for information 503-378-5015.

Sign language interpretation will be provided for the public if requested prior to 48 hours before the meeting; notice prior to 72 hours before the meeting is preferred.  Handouts of meeting materials may also be requested in alternate formats prior to 72 hours before the meeting.  Requests may be made to Eva Luna at 503-378-5015.

 

-30-

 

STATE LIBRARY OF OREGON BOARD OF TRUSTEES  EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING
May 30, 2018
11:30 a.m.
Phone
Ann Malkin, Chair

 

Agenda

 

11:30 a.m.      Report of the State Librarian                                                                                   Agata

                       

11:45 a.m.      Discussion of the June 19, 2018 Board Meeting agenda                                       Malkin

 

12:00 p.m.      Adjournment                                                                                                           Malkin

                       

 

 

NOTE:  The times of all agenda items are approximate and subject to change.

 

 

 

 


Wild Horse and Burro 'Online Corral' connects Americans with adoptable animals
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 05/18/18 9:57 AM

WASHINGTON — The Bureau of Land Management today announced the launch of the Wild Horse and Burro “Online Corral”—a new website focused on connecting the American public with wild horses and burros available for adoption or purchase.

The BLM also announced the 2018 wild horse and burro event schedule, featuring nearly 70 events nationwide that focus on placing wild horses and burros in good homes. To access the 2018 schedule visit the BLM wild horse and burro adoption events page at:  https://on.doi.gov/2wVItz0. The Online Corral can be accessed at:  https://wildhorsesonline.blm.gov/.

“Wild horses and burros make great companions that are superb at performing a wide variety of tasks,” said Brian Steed, BLM Deputy Director for Policy and Planning. “I urge everyone to attend a wild horse and burro event or visit the new Online Corral to learn how to bring one home,” continued Steed.

The new Online Corral is geared toward increasing the number of wild horses and burros placed into private care each year. The website, which replaces a 10-year-old system, features a modern, streamlined interface that enables users to more easily find their desired wild horse or burro.  It also includes new filtering features and an interactive web map. Users can now submit and track the status of their applications directly through the website. Approved applicants can browse available animals and participate in the competitive bid event that runs May 15 to22.  All animal bids start at $125.

Known for their intelligence, endurance and loyalty, wild horses, with the right training, are outstanding for ranching and trail riding and have successfully competed for awards in numerous fields from endurance riding to dressage.  Wild horses and burros have routinely been adopted for important tasks such as patrolling the border and local policing. Read stories from recent wild horse and burro adopters and purchasers on the BLM’s Flickr page.

Wild horses and burros can still be adopted or purchased in-person at one of the nearly 70 BLM-hosted events across the country this year or by visiting one of 17 wild horse and burro off-range corrals. Event locations and dates are subject to change.  Please contact the National Wild Horse and Burro Information Center at 866-468-7826 or se@blm.gov" target="_blank">wildhorse@blm.gov for the most up-to-date information.  Potential adopters and purchasers should visit the BLM website to learn more about the rules and requirements for adopting or purchasing a wild horse or burro. To get started visit the BLM wild horse and burro adoption and sales web pages at:  https://on.doi.gov/2fSrzJi.

Today’s announcements today are part of the BLM’s effort to confront a growing overpopulation of wild horses and burros on public rangelands and in taxpayer-funded off-range facilities. As of March 1, 2018, the wild horse and burro population on public lands was estimated at 82,000 animals, which is more than triple the number that public lands can support along with other legally mandated land uses.

“Finding good homes for horses and burros is a top priority for the BLM as we strive to protect the health of these animals," continued Steed.

BLM

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska.  The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation.  The agency's mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America's public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations.  Diverse activities authorized on these lands generated $75 billion in sales of goods and services throughout the American economy in fiscal year 2016 - more than any other agency in the Department of the Interior.  These activities supported more than 372,000 jobs.

 


Trump-Pence Administration Expected to Introduce Rule that Gags Providers
Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon - 05/18/18 8:27 AM

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Following reports that the Trump-Pence administration intends to introduce a gag rule today that would undermine the nation’s program for affordable birth control and reproductive health care, Planned Parenthood issued the following statement.

This gag rule would do three things:

  1. It would impose new rules that are designed to make it impossible for patients to get birth control or preventive care from reproductive healthcare providers like Planned Parenthood.

  2. Under this rule doctors, nurses, hospitals and community health centers across the country could no longer refer their patients for safe, legal abortion.

  3. It removes the guarantee that you’re getting full and accurate information about your health care from your doctor. For nearly two decades, Title X law has been clear: Healthcare providers cannot withhold information from you about your pregnancy options. This rule means they can.

Statement from Dawn Laguens, Executive Vice President of Planned Parenthood Federation of America:

“This is an attempt to take away women’s basic rights, period. Under this rule, people will not get the health care they need. They won’t get birth control, cancer screenings, STD testing and treatment, or even general women’s health exams.

“Everyone has the right to access information about their health care — including information about safe, legal abortion — and every woman deserves the best medical care and information, no matter how much money she makes or where she lives. No matter what. They won’t get it under this rule.

“Planned Parenthood will not stop fighting for our patients. We will not stand by while our basic health and rights are stripped away.”

For example, under this rule, if a woman is pregnant and wants or needs an abortion, her provider will be prohibited from telling her where she can go to get one. Or if a woman’s pregnancy would severely affect her health — for example, she discovers that she’s pregnant after being diagnosed with cancer — her healthcare provider could refuse to tell her that abortion is even an option.

This is opposed by the medical community, lawmakers and public health experts. Major medical associations like the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American College of Physicians oppose this rule. When a similar version of this rule was introduced in the 1980s, it was met with tremendous outcry and opposition from the medical community. More than 200 members of Congress and 100 public health organizations have come out in opposition to a gag policy.

###

Planned Parenthood is the nation’s leading provider and advocate of high-quality, affordable health care for women, men, and young people, as well as the nation’s largest provider of sex education. With more than 600 health centers across the country, Planned Parenthood organizations serve all patients with care and compassion, with respect and without judgment. Through health centers, programs in schools and communities, and online resources, Planned Parenthood is a trusted source of reliable health information that allows people to make informed health decisions. We do all this because we care passionately about helping people lead healthier lives.


New state forest recreation rules adjust fees, honor veterans, limit stay duration and test reservation system
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 05/18/18 7:30 AM

Salem, Ore. -- Recent rule changes adopted by the Oregon Board of Forestry adjust camping fees in state forests, provide additional benefits to qualifying military veterans and active duty service members, revise overnight stay limits on state forests, and initiate a pilot campsite reservation program at a Clatsop State Forest campground.

Fees: Campsite fees have increased to include two vehicles in the base fee. Drive-in campsites will now cost $20 per night, while walk-in tent sites will be $15 per night. This reflects the reality that many campers are already bringing two vehicles. Fees for group campsites and extra vehicle fees remain the same, as do fees for designated camping areas.

Beginning May 25, ODF will begin charging camping fees at the following designated camping areas in the Tillamook State Forest: Morrison Eddy ($15 per night for up to two vehicles) along with Cedar Creek and North Fork Wilson Designated Campsites ($5 per vehicle per night).

Honoring veterans: Military veterans with a service-connected disability who hold the Veteran’s Special Access Pass issued by Oregon State Parks can now stay in Oregon Department of Forestry campgrounds for free. Additionally, the agency will waive fees for active duty service members on Memorial Day, Independence Day and Veterans Day.

Stay and occupancy limits: The rule changes also address how long campers may stay. Stays on state forestland may be no longer than 14 consecutive days, or more than 42 days over a 12-month period. This change is due to the increasing trend of people who stay for long periods of time and use state forests as their primary residence. While the public is welcomed and encouraged to enjoy Oregon’s state forests, long-term camping restricts availability of camping sites for recreational uses, and creates safety and sanitation challenges.

Additionally, occupancy limits for developed campgrounds will be a maximum of eight people, two tents and two vehicles per campsite unless otherwise posted.

Establishing pilot program for Northrup Creek Horse Camp reservations: Under this pilot program, campers will reserve sites at this campground in the Clatsop State Forest through Reserve America, the same reservation system used by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. All campsites at Northrup Creek Horse Camp will be reservation only; on-site registration at the campground will no longer be offered. The new reservation system provides certainty to horse campers that they have a reserved campsite prior to trailering a horse to the campgrounds.

About State Forests Recreation: Our mission is to create lasting and diverse outdoor recreational experiences, inspiring visitors to enjoy, respect, and connect with Oregon’s state forests. To learn more about recreational opportunities in state forests, visit http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Recreation/Pages/default.aspx.


Thu. 05/17/18
BPSST Police Policy Committee Holds Quarterly Meeting Recommends Actions Against Four Officers
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 05/17/18 3:30 PM

The Police Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training (BPSST) held its quarterly meeting this morning, May 17, 2018.  The meeting was held in the Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem, Oregon. 

To increase the public's trust, the Oregon legislature mandates the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training establish minimum standards that are required to be met and maintained by Oregon's providers of public safety, including police officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, telecommunicators (9-1-1), emergency medical dispatchers, public safety instructors, and OLCC regulatory specialists. The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) is responsible for certifying public safety professionals who meet all of the Board-established intellectual, physical and moral fitness standards, and for denying, suspending or revoking the certification of those who do not meet or fall below these standards. The Police Policy Committee provides input and guidance to the Board on certification and training standards for more than 5,000 men and women who serve as police officers at city, county, state, tribal and university law enforcement agencies. 

Professional Standards Cases Note: The below actions are recommendations that are being made to the BPSST. The BPSST has final authority to affirm or overturn any recommendation. All individuals have the will be afforded due process before any BPSST/DPSST action is final, which includes the ability to request a contested case hearing.

Agenda Items Included

Approval of minutes of February 15, 2018 Meeting

ORS 183.405 – Five-Year Review of Agency Rules Adopted – Informational Update

Proposed Rule Changes for OARs 259-007-0010 and 259-008-0070 – Board Disapproval of a Policy Committee Recommendation - Approved

Administrative Closures - Approved

O’Dea, Lawrence DPSST #18924 – Portland Police Bureau, Basic, Intermediate, Advanced, Management, Supervisory, and Executive Police Certification - The Police Policy Committee is recommending that the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training suspend O'Dea's certification for three years for gross misconduct and revoke his certification for 10 years for dishonesty.

Crosman, Travis DPSST # 51361 – Basic Police Certification; Junction City Police Department - The Police Policy Committee is recommending that no action be taken by the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training.

Wright, Bradley DPSST #42148- Basic, Intermediate and Advanced Police Certifications; Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office - The Police Policy Committee is recommending that the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training revoke his certification for 5 years for gross misconduct.

Hemphill, Rhett DPSST #33695 – Basic, Intermediate and Advanced Police Certifications; Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office (Retired) - The Police Policy Committee is recommending that no action be taken by the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training.

Hosek, Ronald DPSST #05927 – Basic, Intermediate, Advanced, and Supervisory Police Certifications; Oregon State Police (Retired) - The Police Policy Committee is recommending that the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training revoke his certification for 5 years for gross misconduct.

Brandt, Randall DPSST #07626 – Basic, Intermediate and Advanced Police Certifications and Basic Corrections Certification; Portland Police Bureau (Retired) -  The Police Policy Committee is recommending that the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training revoke his certification for 10 years for gross misconduct.

Law Enforcement Memorial Wall Nomination – Officer Malcus Williams (DPSST #33171); City of Ashland Police Department – The Police Policy Committee is recommending that the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training add Officer Williams’ name to the State Memorial.

Next Police Policy Committee Meeting – August 16, 2018 at 10:00 a.m.

 

# Background Information about the Board and Department #

The Board consists of 24 members representing city, county and state public safety professionals representing each of the disciplines (police, fire, 9-1-1, corrections, private security), and a private citizen appointed by the Governor. The current Board Chair is Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff's Office. The Board includes administrators as well as non-management representatives from statewide organizations. The Board represents more than 42,000 public and private safety professionals and establishes minimum standards for the training and certification of city, county and state police officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers, OLCC regulatory specialists, criminal justice instructors and private security providers, private investigators and polygraph examiners. The Board is supported by five policy committees and a number of advisory and sub-committees representing the public and private safety disciplines. These bodies provide technical expertise and serve as vital links to public and private safety organizations. The Board operates in close partnership with the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST).

The DPSST implements minimum standards established by the Board for training and certification of public and private safety providers. DPSST provides training to more than 20,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem and certifies qualified professionals at various levels from basic through executive. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director of DPSST.


Portland Midsummer Festival Designated an Oregon Heritage Tradition
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 05/17/18 3:02 PM

The Portland Midsummer Festival marks its upcoming 90th year with an Oregon Heritage Tradition designation by the Oregon Heritage Commission.

Other Oregon Heritage Traditions include Medford’s Pear Blossom Festival, the Pendleton Round-Up, the Woodburn Fiesta Mexicana, and University of Oregon’s Mother’s Day Powwow.

“The designation recognizes those traditions that have helped define the state,” said Todd Kepple, the commission’s chair. “We are particularly pleased to honor a tradition that has existed for 90 years.” 

The Portland Midsummer Festival began in 1928 by the League of Swedish Societies to celebrate the summer solstice and the traditions of Portland’s immigrants from Nordic countries. During WWII gasoline rationing caused the festival to locate at Oaks Park where attendees could access the event by Portland Street car. Today, the event remains at Oaks Park Amusement Park and is coordinated by Nordic Northwest and a committee of participating Scandinavian organizations.

Over 2,500 people attend the one-day festival annually. Participants are greeted by the Oregon Lucia Court. Activities include raising the Midsummer Pole, floral wreath making, lawn games, a kids craft area, traditional costume, folk music and dancing, and educational opportunities. Attendees can wander through booth of Scandinavian organizations selling locally prepared Nordic foods, crafts, clothing, and household goods. Everyone is invited to participate in traditional dances.

Elsie Lovgren Norby, a long-time attendee of the festival notes, "It was and still is about family, friends and the traditions brought here from Sweden.  I now enjoy seeing the younger generations participating in their heritage as I have done and knowing it will continue on." Elsie was crowned Midsummer Queen in 1941, helped organize the Midsummer Festival in the 80s, received the Scandinavian of the Year award in 2001.

The Portland Midsummer Festival will be held June 9, 2018. More information can be found at: https://www.nordicnorthwest.org/midsummer-festival

An Oregon Heritage Tradition must have been in continuous operation for more than 50 years, demonstrate a public profile and reputation that distinguishes it from more routine events, and add to the livability and identity of the state. A list of Tradition designations is available at http://www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/OHC/pages/oht.aspx .


Museum Opens Historic Douglas DC-3 For Tours In Preparation For Memorial Day Weekend (Photo)
Evergreen Aviation & Space Museum - 05/17/18 1:48 PM
Douglas DC-3A at the Evergreen Aviation & Space Museum (file photo).
Douglas DC-3A at the Evergreen Aviation & Space Museum (file photo).
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-05/5555/114506/thumb_EvergreenMuseum_DC3.jpg

Evergreen Aviation & Space Museum now offers an ongoing docent-led Douglas DC-3 aircraft tour program

McMinnville, Oregon, May 17, 2018 – On Friday, May 18, the Museum opens its historic Douglas DC-3 static display aircraft for ongoing interior tours. Museum docents will share general aircraft details and background information during each tour, in addition to stories about the history of the Museum’s DC-3.

The tours also honor the 100th anniversary of airmail service in the United States by featuring our DC-3, an aircraft that flew US Air Mail in the late 1930’s. Mail flights helped airlines develop the tools necessary to carry passengers profitably. 

Called “the greatest aircraft ever built” by Museum Development Director Julia Cannell, the DC-3 is known as one of the first modern airliners. The DC-3 instantly made every other passenger aircraft obsolete. Curator Terry Juran names the DC-3 “one of the two most versatile airplanes ever created.”

The Museum’s DC-3A—serial number 1910—has a remarkable pedigree: The 33rd DC-3 built, it was delivered to United Air Lines in 1936, and named “Mainliner Reno.” Currently the second-oldest surviving Douglas DC-3, it was also the first to be fitted with Pratt & Whitney supercharged engines. It has flown more than 15 million passenger miles during its lifetime, equivalent to 30 round-trips between the Earth and the moon.

DC-3 tours are free with Museum admission. Tours run daily, and last approximately 10-15 minutes.

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ABOUT EVERGREEN AVIATION & SPACE MUSEUM: 
Evergreen Aviation & Space Museum is open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., except Easter, Thanksgiving, and Christmas. Call 503-434-4180 or visit www.evergreenmuseum.org for more information. 

Evergreen Aviation & Space Museum, a 501(c)3 non-profit organization, is best known as the home of the world's largest wooden aircraft, the Hughes Flying Boat "Spruce Goose." The Museum collection also includes a rare SR-71 "Blackbird," and the Titan II SLV Missile--with its original launch room, and a new full-motion interactive flight simulator ride. Discover more than 150 historic aircraft, spacecraft, and exhibits on display, along with artwork and traveling exhibits. The Museum values its educational partnerships, which include the Academy of Model Aeronautics, the NASA Jet Propulsion Lab, the Oregon Space Consortium and the Civil Air Patrol Cadet Program. The Museum is located at 500 NE Captain Michael King Smith Way, across the highway from the McMinnville Airport and about three miles southeast of McMinnville, Ore., on Highway 18. Follow us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram @evergreenmuseum for the latest updates. 




Attached Media Files: Douglas DC-3A at the Evergreen Aviation & Space Museum (file photo).

New opioid treatment programs to serve rural Oregon
Oregon Health Authority - 05/17/18 12:30 PM

May 17, 2018

SALEM, Ore. – More Oregonians struggling with opioid use disorder will have access to treatment, thanks to Oregon Health Authority’s strategic investments of federal grant dollars in rural Oregon.

With support from grant funding provided by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), a new program opened in Springfield in April, and additional programs will soon open in Coos Bay and Pendleton.

In 2015, only seven counties had at least one opioid treatment program, and six of them were located in the I-5 corridor. Soon, 11 counties will be served by an opioid treatment program.

“Making treatment available to those who need it is an important part of OHA’s overall strategy in combating the opioid crisis,” said Dana Hargunani, MD, OHA chief medical officer. “We are grateful for the partnerships we have with federal and local partners to make a difference in the lives of Oregonians affected by opioid use disorder. While we continue to work on prevention strategies, we recognize that people who are struggling need access to effective treatment.”

Opioid treatment programs are state and federally licensed facilities that provide medication-assisted treatment (MAT) such as methadone, in conjunction with counseling services. MAT treats withdrawal symptoms without giving patients the euphoric high that is associated with heroin and other opioids. Evidence has shown that MAT is highly effective in reducing relapse rates and increasing the likelihood of long-term recovery.

Adapt OTP, which currently operates a clinic in Roseburg, is slated to open the Oregon coast’s first opioid treatment program this summer. Oregon Recovery and Treatment Center, which has locations in Bend and Grants Pass, recently opened a new location in Springfield and is preparing to open another in Pendleton. It also plans to build treatment capacity in Klamath Falls and Newport.

“We often hear from Oregonians affected by the opioid epidemic in rural Oregon, where treatment is not available in many counties,” said Dwight Holton, executive director of Lines for Life, a regional nonprofit dedicated to preventing substance abuse and suicide. “We look forward to being able to tell more people good news – that help is available.”

ORTC has agreed to use the grant funds to engage in outreach work to build capacity in their service areas, including naloxone training and distribution, community outreach and MAT training for health care providers. Adapt’s grant funds are supporting outreach efforts and staffing resources.

 “At a time when so many Oregonians suffer from the ravages of opioid addiction, these new clinics will help provide the treatment proven effective to combat this epidemic devastating families statewide,” Senator Ron Wyden (D-Oregon) said. “Ensuring that people have access to the treatment they need is the smart way to fight this epidemic, and I look forward very much to these clinics playing a key role in this public health battle.”

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Multiple arrests for bicycle thefts from Bend Senior High School (Photo)
Bend Police Dept. - 05/17/18 10:01 AM
Media release
Media release
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-05/5593/114499/thumb_press_release.jpg

Date: Tuesday, May 15, 2018                                                                        

Case # Multiple case numbers              

Date & Time of Incident: April 15th through April 24th                                     

Type of Incident:  Bicycle thefts           

Location of Incident:  SE Glenwood area between 9th and 6th Street

Suspect:

Anastacia Marilyn Garcia Egan      23 year old                             Bend resident

Eric Q Fletcher                              23 year old                             Bend resident

Mitchell Travis Charriere                27 year old                                    Transient

Mark Lewis Miltimore                     29 year old                             Bend resident

Eric Ray Spott                               54 year old                             Bend resident

Nicholas Ryan Lopez                    35 year old                             Bend resident

Narrative:

In early April 2018, the Bend Police Department was made aware of multiple bicycle thefts taking place from a storage area at Bend Senior High School (BSHS). The bicycles are a part of an educational program that teaches students to fix and build bicycles. The educators in charge of the program became concerned and notified the School Resource Officer assigned to BSHS.

Working with our patrol officers and Intelligent Led Policing Team, a proactive policing effort was put into place to work on reducing these thefts. Over the period between April 15 and April 24 six people were arrested for possessing stolen bicycles from BSHS.

We found bicycles were mostly stolen in the early morning hours. The following people were contacted and arrested regarding thefts from BSHS:

  • Anastacia Egan was arrested for Theft I and Criminal Trespass II
  • Eric Fletcher was arrested for Theft I and Criminal Trespass II
  • Eric Spott was arrested for Theft I and Criminal Trespass II
  • Mark Miltimore was arrested for Theft I and Criminal Trespass II
  • Mitchell Charriere was arrested for Theft I, Theft II (2 counts), Possession of Methamphetamine and Criminal Trespass II
  • Nicholas Lopez was arrested for Theft I and Criminal Trespass II

All the suspects were transported to the Deschutes County Jail, where they were lodged on the listed crimes.

The Bend Police Department is committed to reducing bicycle thefts throughout our community. We highly encourage all of our residents to record their serial numbers at www.bikeindex.org, take photographs of your bicycle, lock bicycles up using a high-quality bike lock and report if your bicycle has been stolen. Our officers are finding abandoned bicycles every day and our goal is to return stolen property to the rightful owners.

### End of Release###




Attached Media Files: Media release

Mt. St. Helens anniversary, Hawaii eruptions a reminder that Volcanoes are a threat (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 05/17/18 9:12 AM
2018-05/3986/114498/5015865_OEM_Logo_Design_2014-COLOR.jpg
2018-05/3986/114498/5015865_OEM_Logo_Design_2014-COLOR.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-05/3986/114498/thumb_5015865_OEM_Logo_Design_2014-COLOR.jpg

Friday, May 18, is the anniversary of the Mt. St. Helens eruption that, in 1980, unleashed the most devastating eruption in U.S. history. This year’s anniversary is happening as volcanic activity continues to emit dangerous gases and lava in Kilauea, Hawaii, and Oregon Office of Emergency Management Geologic Hazards Coordinator Althea Rizzo says now is great time to remember that it is important learn about volcanoes in Oregon.

“There are lots of places to get good information about volcanoes,” Rizzo said. “We live in a unique area that is geologically active, and understanding hazards posed by volcanoes in the Pacific Northwest is important because volcanoes have potential to cause problems.”

Scientist-in-Charge, Cascades Volcano Observatory Seth Moran also said that it is a good idea to understand what mountains are volcanoes and what the potential hazards associated with those volcanoes are, but said that while the ash clouds in Kilauea are ominous for Hawaiians, that they are small in the grand scheme of things and principally pose a hazard only to the Big Island.

“It's highly unlikely that Kilauea will produce an ash cloud capable of reaching the mainland,” he said.

 The Washington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC) is the agency responsible for monitoring airspace for ash in the Pacific Northwest.  Alerts can be accessed at http://www.ssd.noaa.gov/VAAC/messages.html . For more information on volcanoes visit: https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/index.html

“It is important to know what the hazards are for the areas you work and live in,” Rizzo explains. “We all have hazards to deal with. Once you know the hazard, you can plan.”

For more information on how to get prepared for emergencies go to: http://www.oregon.gov/oem/hazardsprep/Pages/2-Weeks-Ready.aspx

PHOTO CAPTION:

On Sunday, May 18, 1980 at 8:32 a.m., the bulging north flank of Mount St. Helens slid away in a massive landslide -- the largest in recorded history. Seconds later, the uncorked volcano exploded and blasted rocks northward across forest ridges and valleys, destroying everything in its path within minutes. (Photo courtesy of USGS https://www.usgs.gov/media/images/mount-saint-helens-eruption)




Attached Media Files: 2018-05/3986/114498/5015865_OEM_Logo_Design_2014-COLOR.jpg , On Sunday, May 18, 1980 at 8:32 a.m., the bulging north flank of Mount St. Helens slid away in a massive landslide -- the largest in recorded history. Seconds later, the uncorked volcano exploded and blasted rocks northward across forest ridges and valley

Tillamook County Creamery Association Wins National Community Impact Award (Photo)
Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council - 05/17/18 7:30 AM
Sarah Beaubien accepting the Outstanding Community Impact Award
Sarah Beaubien accepting the Outstanding Community Impact Award
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-05/4131/114494/thumb_IMG_4481.JPG

Long-term change comes from 109-year-old dairy co-op rethinking philanthropy

The Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy has announced that the Tillamook County Creamery Association is the winner of the 2018 Community Impact Award. The award was presented during the seventh annual U.S. Dairy Sustainability Awards ceremony on May 16, at the Morton Arboretum in Lisle, Ill., outside of Chicago.

"Tillamook exemplifies devotion to their community," said Barbara O'Brien, president of the Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy. "From working to find the root cause of food insecurity to improving housing access, they are addressing large-scale issues that impact the people and the planet." 

Founded in 1909 as a farmer-owned cooperative on the coast of Oregon, the Tillamook County Creamery Association (Tillamook) prides itself on its commitment to bringing to market the most consistent, best tasting, highest-quality dairy products made as naturally as possible. Guided by the Dairy Done Right philosophy that everyone deserves real food that makes them feel good every day, Tillamook has earned top awards for their cheese, ice cream, yogurt, sour cream and butter made with unwavering values that never sacrifice quality for profit. For Tillamook, Dairy Done Right means more than making delicious product. It means they stand by their guiding principle: consider every stakeholder and always do what’s right for the long term. Always. 

“In Tillamook County, 13.5 percent of the population is food insecure due to inaccessibility to wholesome food and a housing crisis. Too many people have to make the heart-wrenching decision to pay the rent or feed their family,” explained Sarah Beaubien, Tillamook’s senior director of stewardship. “Knowing these circumstances, we wanted to be part of the solution in our community.”

Tillamook engaged with leaders at the Oregon Food Bank to understand and address underlying causes of hunger and access to nutritious foods. Their collaboration led to Tillamook’s purchase of a new distribution truck for the local food bank to improve their distribution capacity. They also funded a full-time position within the Oregon Food Bank to research the root causes of food insecurity issues in Tillamook County, with the goal of eventually addressing solutions at a state-wide level.

To address local housing inequalities – which are often a contributor to food insecurity - Tillamook also worked closely with CARE, a local agency that serves the at-risk population of Tillamook County. When CARE was at risk of losing its headquarters and therefore its ability to provide for community members, Tillamook pledged to help secure a permanent space for the organization.

Tillamook’s approach to community enrichment is multi-pronged which, in addition to food security and housing opportunities, also extends to agricultural advocacy and healthful children. These commitments take shape in various, proactive ways.

In 2017, Tillamook committed $1.5 million to a new food innovation center at Oregon State University, providing an innovative space for research, testing and teaching related to Oregon’s dairy industry. And, in an effort to educate young girls about STEM concepts, farms and food production, a cross-functional Tillamook team collaborated with the Girl Scouts of Oregon and SW Washington to create a first-ever dairy patch in the Northwest. To strengthen partnerships, Tillamook’s farmer-owners and employees also regularly participate in the company’s volunteer program, Tillamook Cares.

Tillamook contributes hundreds of thousands of dollars in cash and product donations each year to nonprofits working to address food security, agricultural advocacy and healthful youth. Still, the cooperative has ambitious plans for the future: to invest at least five percent of their profit back into the community by 2019.

“Tillamook takes a unique approach to problem solving that involves collaboration with key stakeholders, identification of root causes and implementation of socially innovative solutions??-an approach that has resulted in tremendous success and serves as an example for the industry,” said Pete Kent, executive director of the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council.

Further illustrating Tillamook’s collaborative approach to social impact, James Dillard, corporate and community relations manager at the Oregon Food Bank, said, “They push us to find solutions to have as much impact as possible. They are not giving away money just to improve their brand rating. They really are passionate about making a difference in Oregon.”

###

 

About Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council

The Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council (ODNC) works on behalf of all dairy farm families and dairy processors throughout the state of Oregon. Building trust and demand for Oregon dairy products and support for those who make them is accomplished through efforts and involvement in schools, health and wellness, communications and industry development. The ODNC’s origins trace back to as early as 1918, when the Oregon Dairy Council was created to advance the benefits of dairy nutrition. The Oregon Dairy Products Commission was later created by the Oregon Legislature as a commodity commission in 1943.

 

About Tillamook County Creamery Association     

Founded in 1909 as a farmer-owned cooperative, the Tillamook County Creamery Association (TCCA) prides itself on its commitment to bringing to market the most consistent, best tasting, highest quality dairy products made in the most natural way possible. Guided by the belief that everyone deserves real food that makes them feel good every day, Tillamook has earned top awards for their cheese, ice cream, sour cream, butter and yogurt products made with unwavering values that never sacrifice or compromise quality for profit. The TCCA is currently made up of nearly 90 farming families, primarily based in Tillamook County, Oregon. Tillamook operates production facilities in Tillamook and Boardman, Oregon and employs nearly 900 people throughout the state. The Tillamook Creamery Visitors Center is the largest tourist attraction on the coast of Oregon and one of the most popular in the state, attracting more than one million visitors each year. For more information on Tillamook, visit Tillamook.com.

 

About Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy
Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy® is a forum that brings together the dairy community to address the changing needs and expectations of consumers through a framework of shared best practices and accountability. Initiated in 2008 by dairy farmers through the dairy checkoff, we collaborate on efforts that are important both to us and our valued customers – issues like animal care, food safety, nutrition and health, the environment and economics. The Innovation Center is committed to continuous improvement from farm to table, striving to ensure a socially responsible and economically viable dairy community. Visit USDairy.com for more information about the Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy.




Attached Media Files: Sarah Beaubien accepting the Outstanding Community Impact Award , The winners of the 2018 U.S. Dairy Sustainability Awards are, from left to right, Austin Allred of Royal Dairy, Sarah Beaubien of Tillamook County Creamery Association, Brett Reinford of Reinford Farms, Ted Sniegocki and Bob Joblin of Magic Dirt, Mike and

Wed. 05/16/18
BLM recognizes Special Agent and Ranger of the Year
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 05/16/18 4:13 PM

WASHINGTON – The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Office of Law Enforcement Security is pleased to announce the 2017 Law Enforcement Ranger of the Year and Special Agent of the Year. Ranger Carrie Wostal and Special Agent Chip Mican were recognized yesterday at an award ceremony in Washington, D.C.

“I am pleased to recognize two of our agency’s most accomplished and extraordinary law enforcement professionals.  Ranger Wostal and Special Agent Mican are to be commended for embodying true professionalism and exhibiting the highest ethical standards,” said BLM Deputy Director for Policy and Programs Brian Steed.  “Every day, BLM law enforcement personnel nationwide strive to provide a safe environment for the public and employees and work diligently to deter, detect, and investigate illegal activities on our Nation’s incredible public lands.”

The Ranger of the Year award was presented to Carrie Wostal of Kingman, Ariz., who was nominated for her outstanding performance and work protecting public lands, resources and visitors.  In addition to conducting a wide range of investigations last year, Ranger Wostal worked tirelessly to foster strong relationships with many of the BLM’s federal, state, and local partners.  She led the cleanup of a marijuana grow site with the assistance of the Army National Guard and a fellow special agent, as well as successfully prevented many other crimes on public lands.  She has proved herself a true public servant by coming to the aid of an elderly couple after their RV was destroyed by fire. Realizing they had lost everything, Ranger Wostal provided lodging for the couple at her own expense.  Ranger Wostal, who joined the BLM in 2000, also worked as a BLM law enforcement officer in Elko, Nev. and Coos Bay, Oregon.

The Special Agent of the Year award was presented to Charles “Chip” Mican of Roseburg, Ore., who was nominated for his extraordinary professionalism and leadership.  Special Agent Mican is committed to working collaboratively with the BLM’s many partners to promote public safety and further the BLM’s mission.  Last September, Special Agent Mican assembled a team of local and federal law enforcement officers to shut down illegal marijuana production in theCascade-Siskiyou National Monument Soda Mountain Wilderness Area.  Under his supervision, the team seized 700 pounds of the plant, which had already been processed and packaged for distribution.  For this and for other such actions, Special Agent Mican has proven himself deserving of this special award.  Special Agent Mican joined the BLM in 1998, first serving as a law enforcement ranger in 2000 before becoming a special agent in 2009.  Special Agent Mican is a U.S. Army veteran who served as a medic in the Green Berets.

Annually, these awards recognize a BLM ranger for outstanding performance that directly enhances the protection of public lands and visitors, and a BLM special agent for outstanding and effective investigative efforts leading to successful prosecution for significant illegal activities on public lands.  Additionally, awardees are evaluated for: demonstrating outstanding leadership and ethical qualities; fostering outstanding working relationships to promote public safety and the protection of public lands and resources; demonstrating an unusual degree of courage, stamina, or willingness to go above and beyond the call of duty; and exceptional or heroic achievement.

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The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The agency’s mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America’s public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. Diverse activities authorized on these lands generated $75 billion in sales of goods and services throughout the American economy in fiscal year 2016—more than any other agency in the Department of the Interior. These activities supported more than 372,000 jobs.


Public Health Advisory Board Accountability Metrics Subcommittee meets May 23 by webinar
Oregon Health Authority - 05/16/18 3:56 PM

May 16, 2018

Public Health Advisory Board Accountability Metrics Subcommittee meets May 23 by webinar

What: The regular public meeting of the Public Health Advisory Board's Accountability Metrics Subcommittee

Agenda: Approve March 8 meeting minutes; make recommendations for opioid overdose death and active transportation process measures

When: May 23, 1-2 p.m. A public comment period is offered at the end of the meeting.

Where: By webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/5150607625475124481.The public also can attend by conference call at 877-873-8017, access code 767068#.

Oregon’s Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon’s governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon’s State Health Improvement Plan. The Accountability Metrics Subcommittee develops recommendations about public health quality measures for the board's consideration.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact: Sara Beaudrault at 971-645-5766, 711 TTY, or a.beaudrault@state.or.us">sara.beaudrault@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 


Oregon Man Found Guilty of Sexually Abusing Children at Orphanage in Cambodia
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 05/16/18 3:47 PM

EUGENE, Ore. – A federal jury found Daniel Stephen Johnson, 40, of Coos Bay, Oregon, guilty today of repeatedly sexually abusing children who lived at an orphanage operated by the defendant in Cambodia. The verdict marks the end of the second foreign sexual exploitation trial held in the District of Oregon.

Johnson was convicted on six counts of engaging in illicit sexual conduct in a foreign place and one count each of travel with intent to engage in illicit sexual conduct and aggravated sexual assault with children.

“The despicable nature of this defendant’s conduct is beyond understanding. Whether you are abusing children in this country or abroad, you will be pursued and held accountable in a court of law,” said Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon. “The fact that this defendant abused children under the guise of being a missionary and orphanage operator is appalling.”

“Daniel Johnson’s promises of charity and a better life were nothing more than lies as he dragged these children into his dark world of abuse,” said Renn Cannon, Special Agent in Charge of the FBI in Oregon. “This case should serve as a warning to those predators who believe they can hide their crimes – whether here at home or half-a-world-away. We will always stand with the victims, and we will always work to bring justice in their names.”

According to court documents and information shared during trial, between November 2005 and his arrest in December 2013, Johnson systematically and repeatedly molested children who lived at an unlicensed orphanage he operated in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. To date, nine Cambodian victims—who ranged in age from seven to 18 years old at the time of abuse—have disclosed Johnson’s abuse or attempted abuse.

Victims describe a pattern of molestation that includes, among other things, Johnson making them perform oral sex on him and anally raping them. Multiple victims said they were, on numerous occasions, awoken to Johnson abusing them. Following the abuse, Johnson would sometimes provide his impoverished victims with small amounts of money or food. On one occasion, Johnson gave a victim the equivalent of $2.50 in Cambodian currency.

In 2013, a warrant was issued for Johnson’s arrest on an unrelated case by officials in Lincoln County, Oregon. Local law enforcement officers worked with the FBI to locate Johnson overseas. The FBI in turn worked with the U.S. Department of State to revoke Johnson’s passport based on the Oregon warrant. Through the work of the FBI, Action Pour Les Enfants, a non-governmental organization dedicated to ending child sexual abuse and exploitation in Cambodia, and the Cambodian National Police (CNP), Johnson was located in Phnom Penh.

On December 9, 2013, CNP arrested Johnson. Based on disclosures made by children at the orphanage, Cambodian officials charged Johnson and detained him pending trial. In May 2014, Johnson was convicted by a Cambodian judge of performing indecent acts on one or more children at the orphanage and sentenced to a year in prison. Following his release from prison, Johnson was escorted back to the U.S. by the FBI.

Based on the sexual-abuse allegations against him, the FBI undertook a lengthy investigation of Johnson. During the course of their investigation, agents interviewed more than a dozen children and adults who had resided at the orphanage. Many of the interviews were audio- and video-taped and, in several instances, conducted in Cambodia by trained child-forensic interviewers. Some victims were interviewed multiple times before disclosing Johnson’s abuse.

Johnson was indicted by a federal grand jury in Eugene, Oregon on December 20, 2014 on one count of engaging in illicit sexual conduct in a foreign place. Seven additional charges were added by superseding indictment on May 17, 2017.

While in custody awaiting trial, Johnson made multiple efforts to tamper with witnesses and obstruct justice. Johnson contacted his victims online, encouraging them to lie and offering money and gifts. One message, sent via his relative’s Facebook account to an adult in Cambodia, discussed visiting a victim’s family and encouraging them to convince the victim to retract their statement, potentially in exchange for $10,000. Another message explains the need for a victim to say they were under duress and “pushed by police” to thumbprint a document.

Johnson faces a maximum sentence of life in prison and is subject to a 30 year mandatory minimum. He will be sentenced on Wednesday, August 22, 2018 before U.S. District Court Judge Michael J. McShane.

This case was investigated by the FBI. It was prosecuted by Jeffrey S. Sweet and Ravi Sinha, Assistant U.S. Attorneys for the District of Oregon, and Lauren E. Britsch, Trial Attorney for the Justice Department’s Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section. Amy E. Potter, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon, assisted with the prosecution.

This case was brought as part of Project Safe Childhood, a nationwide initiative to combat the growing epidemic of child sexual exploitation and abuse. Launched in May 2006 by the U.S. Department of Justice and led by United States Attorneys’ Offices and the Criminal Division’s Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section (CEOS), Project Safe Childhood marshals federal, state, and local resources to better locate, apprehend, and prosecute individuals who exploit children via the Internet, as well as to identify and rescue victims. For more information about Project Safe Childhood, please visit www.projectsafechildhood.gov.

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Attached Media Files: 2018-05/6325/114472/VERDICT-Johnson-Final.pdf

Oregon State Parks Foundation Announces The Celebration of the Tenth Anniversary of the Kam Wah Chung Museum
Oregon State Parks Foundation - 05/16/18 3:00 PM

PORTLAND, Ore. – May 16, 2018 – The Oregon State Parks Foundation today announced that on June 9th, the Friends of Kam Wah Chung will celebrate the 10th anniversary of the restoration of the Kam Wah Chung dry goods store to become an interpretive center honoring the role that “Doc” Hay and Lung On played in providing alternative medicine, herbs, medications and dry goods to the growing community of John Day during the gold rush.

Kam Wah Chung & Co. has been a presence in John Day for 140 years. The history of Ing Hay and the Chinese community of John Day provide an interesting and rewarding picture of the Chinese immigrants to the mining frontier of Eastern Oregon and Washington.

The Oregon State Parks Foundation, then called the Oregon State Parks Trust, was proud to lead the campaign to raise the funds to convert the old mercantile store to the museum it is today.  The fund-raising campaign was led by former First Lady Mary Oberst.

The celebration dinner will be catered by the Golden Crown Restaurant of Baker City. They will serve a Chinese dinner at 6:00 pm at the Senior Center in John Day. Doors will open at 5:30 pm.

 

Honored speakers will be former First Lady Mary Oberst, Barbara Sidway, former curator Christy Sweet, and Dr. Eric Brand, an expert in Chinese herbal medicines. The Portland Lion Dancers will perform after the dinner. They will also perform earlier in the ’62 Days parade in Canyon City at 11:00 a.m.

Tickets for the dinner are $20. Seating is limited, so please reserve early. The deadline is June 4th.  

 

Reservations may be made  by sending a $20 check to Friends of Kam Wah Chung, PO Box 663, John Day, OR 97845. Or you may drop it off with staff at the Interpretive Center at 125 NW Canton St. John Day.

Or, by calling the Interpretive Center 541 575 2800 and they will take your credit card information over the phone.

Directions: The Senior Center is located at 142 NE Dayton Street. From the light on main street, go east one block, turn north onto Dayton.  Head north about a half block and the Senior Center is on the left hand side just north of the large white building.

 

About the Foundation

The Oregon State Parks Foundation is a state-wide, member-supported, non-profit partner of the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. We are dedicated to raising funds to enhance and preserve special places and experiences in Oregon’s State Parks.

 

You may not know that NOT A SINGLE PENNY of state taxes has gone to support the State Parks since 1998. Instead, user fees cover about 55 percent of the operating costs, and the Oregon Lottery covers about 44 percent.

 

Since 1995, the Foundation has supported many vital projects such as restoring Vista House at Crown Point, helping to renovate five Oregon Lighthouses, preserving the Kam Wah Chung & Co Museum, and putting the first yurts in State Parks anywhere in the country. Most recently, the foundation raised funds to build a residential outdoor school facility at the Cottonwood Canyon State Park.

 

The Foundation strives to connect all Oregonians with their State Parks, to enrich the visitor experience through interpretation and education, and to promote an active and healthy lifestyle.

 

To learn more about the Foundation, or to become a member, go to: www.oregonstateparksfoundation.org.

 


Film about Oregon LGBTQ veterans and service members to be screened this week at QDoc (Photo)
Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs - 05/16/18 1:26 PM
2018-05/1082/114470/BtS_title_card.jpg
2018-05/1082/114470/BtS_title_card.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-05/1082/114470/thumb_BtS_title_card.jpg

The Oregon Department of Veterans’ Affairs is proud to be partnering with 2018 QDoc, the Portland Queer Documentary Film Festival, in showcasing the groundbreaking, ODVA-sponsored film “Breaking the Silence.”

QDoc, the only festival in the United States devoted exclusively to LGBTQ documentaries, will host its screening of “Breaking the Silence” at 4:30 p.m. this Friday, May 18, at the Hollywood Theatre, 4122 N.E. Sandy Blvd., in Portland.

A Q&A will follow, featuring four of the film’s storytellers: Jeralyn Dee O'Brien, Monica Hamm, Lindsay Earl Paulk and Landon Shimek. Tickets are $10 and may be purchased at the door or online at qdocfilmfest.org. Admission will be free for anyone 23 and younger, 75 and older and active military and veterans.

“Breaking the Silence” explores the lives of five Oregon veterans and service members, who not only served their country honorably, but were forced to serve in silence and at great risk to themselves, their careers and their families.

“The power of this film and these stories to my community is immeasurable, with ripples that spread far beyond the LGBTQ military family,” said ODVA’s LGBTQ veterans coordinator Nathaniel Boehme, who was involved in the project from its inception. “This is a film about humanity and how so many brave people served their nation, even in the face of discrimination and outright hatred. We are honored to help bring these stories to a wider audience.”

A trailer for the film can be found at www.youtube.com/watch?v=JeBpkFepTnU&t. If you are an LGBTQ veteran in need of assistance or support or have any questions about the benefits you’ve earned through your service to our nation, please contact Boehme at LGBTQVets@odva.state.or.us">LGBTQVets@odva.state.or.us.




Attached Media Files: 2018-05/1082/114470/BtS_title_card.jpg

26 Oregon artists receive Career Opportunity Grants (Photo)
Oregon Arts Commission - 05/16/18 1:13 PM
An image from Donald Morgan’s solo exhibition, “The Complete Works,” at The Green Gallery in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, up now through June 23.
An image from Donald Morgan’s solo exhibition, “The Complete Works,” at The Green Gallery in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, up now through June 23.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-05/1418/114469/thumb_Donald_Morgan_The_Complete_Works.JPG

Salem, Oregon – In the second of three competitive rounds of FY2018 Career Opportunity Grants, the Oregon Arts Commission, The Ford Family Foundation and The Oregon Community Foundation have collectively awarded $71,676 to 26 artists for career development projects. The awards include $23,676 from the Oregon Arts Commission; $20,000 in supplemental funding for 12 artists through a partnership with The Ford Family Foundation; and $28,000 for nine artists from The Oregon Community Foundation. Individual grants range from $673 to $6,500.

Career Opportunity Grants support individual Oregon artists by enabling them to take advantage of timely opportunities to enhance their artistic careers. The Ford Family Foundation and The Oregon Community Foundation funds are available only to established Oregon artists who are over 30 years of age and actively producing new work. The Ford Family Foundation grants are awarded to artists in the fields of contemporary fine art and craft; The Oregon Community Foundation grants are awarded only to established Oregon artists in the literary and performing arts fields. Most of the grants from both foundations support the artists’ participation in residencies, exhibitions or performance opportunities.

“This grant program invests in the career growth of talented Oregon artists,” said Michael Dalton, the arts commissioner who chaired the review panel. “We also are so proud to support artists in representing Oregon, both here and across the entire nation and world.”

“We are pleased to be able to invest in these artists at such pivotal moments in their careers,” said Anne C. Kubisch, president of The Ford Family Foundation. “We expect these artists to make significant progress on regional, national and international stages.”

“These artists make our communities so much richer. It’s an honor to be able to support them in their work as they continue their creative journeys,” said Max Williams, president and CEO of The Oregon Community Foundation.

This fiscal year a total of $190,000 is available for three rounds of funding.

Career Opportunity Grants were awarded to:

Sofia Acosta, Portland: Arts Commission $1,145

To support Acosta’s trip to Prague, Stockholm and Berlin to perform and teach at the Music Ports conference and Berlin Community Radio, presenting her music to new audiences. She also will collaborate on and record music projects with different artists and instruments.          

Alito Alessi, Eugene: Arts Commission $1,500; Oregon Community Foundation $1,850

To support Alessi’s collaboration as a choreographer for three of the Eugene Symphony’s live community outreach performances in April 2018.

MaryJo Anderson, Nehalem: Ford Family Foundation $2,500

To support the transport of Anderson’s marble sculpture from her studio in Carrara, Italy, to her Nehalem, Oregon, studio for gallery display and sale in the spring of 2018.

Robert Arellano, Talent: Arts Commission $1,500; Oregon Community Foundation $2,600

To support Arellano’s participation in a two-month writing residency at the Asociación Hermanos Saiz in Santa Clara, Cuba.

Linda Austin, Portland: Arts Commission $673

To support Austin’s participation in a one-month choreographic residency at the Ucross Foundation in Wyoming in April 2018.

Anne Baxter, Ashland: Ford Family Foundation $1,500

To support Baxter’s participation in a six-month exhibition in Venice, "Time-Space-Existence," in May 2018, organized by the Global Art Affairs Foundation and hosted by the European Cultural Center as a part of the Venice Architecture Biennale.

David Bithell, Ashland: Oregon Community Foundation $4,500

To support the premiere of Bithell’s new large scale work at the Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity (Canada) in June/July 2018.

Maura Campbell-Balkits, Portland: Arts Commission $1,500

To support Campbell-Balkits’ participation in a two-month artist residency at the Burren College of Art in Ballyvaughan, Ireland, from July 30 to Sept. 21, 2018.

Christopher Corbell, Portland: Oregon Community Foundation $2,800

To support the presentation and sharing of high-quality recordings of Corbell’s original vocal music during a workshop on vocal music composition she will lead at the UUMN annual conference in Portland, Oregon, in August 2018.

Fernanda D'Agostino, Portland: Arts Commission $1,500; Oregon Community Foundation $4,750

To support a national tour of D’Agostino’s interactive video installation “Borderline,” both as a full installation and as individual projections.

Jeff Geiger, Eugene: Oregon Community Foundation $2,350

To support Geiger’s 10-day writing workshop and salon with George Saunders (Man Booker Prize Winner and #1 NYT Bestseller) and Mary Karr (PEN/Faulkner Winner, #1 NYT Bestseller) in July 2018.

Heidi Grew, Salem: Arts Commission $1,500

To support Grew’s participation in the 13th International Symposium of Ceramic Art VOglje in Slovenia from July 1 to 14, 2018.

Rainen Knecht, Portland: Arts Commission $1,500

To support the production of Knecht’s new paintings and her travel to participate in a two-person exhibition with Nicola L at Situations in Manhattan, New York, in March 2018, as well as the release of an accompanying exhibition catalogue with writing by poet Cedar Sigo.

Evan La Londe, Portland: Arts Commission $1,500

To support La Londe’s exhibition and documentation of a new series of four large silver gelatin prints for a two-person exhibition at Ditch Projects (Springfield, Oregon) in April and May 2018.

Sandee McGee, Roseburg: Arts Commission $1,200; Ford Family Foundation $1,000

To support McGee’s participation in a solo exhibition and artist talk in a rural storefront in Roseburg, Oregon, in April 2018.

Jessica Mehta, Hillsboro: Arts Commission $1,500

To support Mehta’s residency at the Kimmel Harding Nelson Center in Nebraska City, Nebraska, as writer-in-residence in March/April 2018, where she completed her eighth book (and sixth collection of poetry). The project, “Savagery,” will be published by Airlie Press in 2019.

Patrick Moran, Portland: Oregon Community Foundation $2,250

To support the development of Moran’s new play in collaboration with Australian playwright Finegan Kruckemeyer.

Donald Morgan, Eugene: Arts Commission $1,500; Ford Family Foundation $3,500

To support Morgan’s solo exhibition at The Green Gallery in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in May 2018.

Eric Nordstrom, Portland: Arts Commission $1,500

To support Nordstrom’s participation in an international dance conference, Dance Studies Association, in Valletta, Malta, in July 2018.      

Kelly Pratt, Portland: Oregon Community Foundation $4,500

To support Pratt’s commission for (and collaboration with) the Camas High School Choir beginning February 2018.

Christopher Rose, Hillsboro: Arts Commission $1,258

To support Rose’s participation in a one-week writing residency for African American poets at the Cave Canem Retreat in Pennsylvania in June 2018.

Tracy Schlapp, Portland: Oregon Community Foundation $2,400

To support publication of Schlapp’s "Searching for Johnny Cash," a catalog of essays and broadsides that expand on her writing with the Folsom50 performances in Oregon prisons from April through the fall of 2018 to commemorate Johnny Cash's "At Folsom Prison" album.

Heidi Schwegler, Portland: Arts Commission $1,500; Ford Family Foundation $5,000

To support Schwegler’s month-long residency and solo exhibition in London in August 2018, followed by a month-long artist residency (Sept.) in Beijing, China.

PM Shore, Portland: Ford Family Foundation $1,500

To support Shore’s creation of and participation in a solo exhibition at Portland's 5 Centers for the Performing Arts’ Antoinette Hatfield Hall in October 2018, introducing a new body of work in abstract acrylic and mixed media painting.

Stephanie Simek, Portland: Arts Commission $1,400

To support Simek’s production of a computational logic installation titled XOR, AND, NOR (or how to process all possible outcomes for a+b=c when a and b equals zero or one) for a three-person exhibition, “Mapping Invisible Systems,” at Oregon State University’s Fairbanks Gallery in April 2018.

Peter Simensky, Portland: Arts Commission $1,500; Ford Family Foundation $5,000

To support the exhibition of Simensky’s new work as part of a solo project at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco in 2018.

                   

 

The Oregon Arts Commission provides leadership, funding and arts programs through its grants, special initiatives and services. Nine commissioners, appointed by the Governor, determine arts needs and establish policies for public support of the arts. The Arts Commission became part of Business Oregon (formerly Oregon Economic and Community Development Department) in 1993, in recognition of the expanding role the arts play in the broader social, economic and educational arenas of Oregon communities. In 2003, the Oregon legislature moved the operations of the Oregon Cultural Trust to the Arts Commission, streamlining operations and making use of the Commission’s expertise in grantmaking, arts and cultural information and community cultural development. 


The Arts Commission is supported with general funds appropriated by the Oregon legislature and with federal funds from the National Endowment for the Arts as well as funds from the Oregon Cultural Trust. More information about the Oregon Arts Commission is available online at:  www.oregonartscommission.org.

 




Attached Media Files: An image from Donald Morgan’s solo exhibition, “The Complete Works,” at The Green Gallery in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, up now through June 23.

Celebrate State Parks Day June 2 with free camping, day-use and special events (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 05/16/18 12:24 PM
Wallowa Lake State Park
Wallowa Lake State Park
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-05/1303/114468/thumb_wallowa-lake-good-shot.jpg

Free camping, free parking and special events highlight State Parks Day Saturday June 2.

More than a dozen state parks are holding free events that day, and camping is free at all tent, RV and horse campsites. Day-use parking will be free June 2 and 3 at the 26 parks that charge a day-use fee.

Fishing is also free June 2 and 3, courtesy of Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW). Several free fishing events will be held that weekend by ODFW and partners. Find out more at https://myodfw.com/articles/2018-free-fishing-days-and-events .

“State Parks Day is our way of thanking Oregonians for their commitment to our state parks,” said Lisa Sumption, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department Director. “We invite people to discover a new park or revisit an old favorite.” 

State Parks Day is organized by Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) and has been held annually since 1997. This year, OPRD partnered with Oregon Lottery to sponsor events at Milo McIver State Park, The Cove Palisades State Park and Wallowa Lake State Park.

Eighteen state parks will host free events Saturday June 2:

WILLAMETTE VALLEY
—Champoeg State Heritage Area
—Silver Falls State Park
—State Capitol State Park
—Willamette Mission State Park

COAST
—Fort Stevens State Park
—Humbug Mountain State Park
—Jessie M. Honeyman Memorial State Park

CASCADE RANGE AND CENTRAL OREGON
—Detroit Lake State Recreation Area
—LaPine State Park
—Pilot Butte State Scenic Viewpoint
—The Cove Palisades State Park

PORTLAND AND COLUMBIA RIVER GORGE
—Crown Point State Scenic Corridor
—Milo McIver State Park
—Tryon Creek State Natural Area

SOUTHERN AND EASTERN OREGON
—Goose Lake State Recreation Area
—Joseph H. Stewart State Recreation Area
—OC&E Woods Line State Trail
—Wallowa Lake State Park

Events include barbecue picnics, a family safety fair, outdoor concerts, ranger-led hikes and more. Full details about events at each park can be found here: https://oregonstateparks.org/index.cfm?do=v.dsp_featureArticle&articleId=229

To guarantee a campsite for State Parks Day, reserve online at oregonstateparks.org or call (800) 452-5687 8 a.m. – 5 p.m., Monday – Friday.  While campsite rental is free, an $8 non-refundable transaction fee is required at the time of the reservation. Reservations must be made at least 24 hours in advance of your stay. Approximately half of state park campgrounds accept reservations.




Attached Media Files: Wallowa Lake State Park , Humbug Mountain State Park , OC&E trail , Milo McIver State Park , Cape Blanco State Park , Stub Stewart State Park

Bond results mixed, all four school option levies pass
Ore. School Boards Assn. - 05/16/18 11:14 AM

Half of bond elections pass, including Salem-Keizer at $619.7 million.

Voters on Tuesday approved half of school construction bonds statewide – including the third-largest school bond in Oregon history: $619.7 million for the Salem-Keizer School District. Four bonds passed and four were defeated.

Other bonds gaining passage included: Corvallis ($199.9 million), Nestucca Valley ($25.7 million) and Harrisburg ($8.9 million).

Bonds did not pass in Medford, Grants Pass, Oakland and SutherlIn.

Additionally, all four school local option levies, which are used to supplement operating funds, passed easily, averaging about 70 percent of the vote. Winners were Beaverton, Hood River County, Philomath and Sisters.

Jim Green, OSBA’s executive director, said the successful option levy results demonstrate that voters understand the need to invest in public education.

“Oregonians know that we are struggling to meet our short-term needs in schools,” he said. “The next step is to find a long-term and fair way to invest in our students for decades to come.”

See a full listing of the election results: http://www.osba.org/Resources/Article/Bonds/Election-Recent_Bond-Local_Option_Election_Results.aspx?et=1,2,3&dt=3,1,9&d=5/15/2018&dist=&c=&o=&to=&min=&max=&admn=&admx=

OSBA is a member services organization for more than 200 locally elected boards serving school districts, education service districts and community colleges. It also provides services to charter schools and their boards.


Be alert for landslides in Baker, Harney counties - CORRECTION
Oregon Dept. of Geology and Mineral Industries - 05/16/18 10:48 AM

CORRECTION: The flash flood watch is for today, Wednesday May 16 

The National Weather Service has issued a flash flood watch for areas of Baker and Harney counties for Wednesday, from 11 a.m. PDT through the evening.

"Heavy rain can trigger landslides and debris flows in steep terrain, and the risk is higher in burn areas," says Bill Burns, engineering geologist at the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI). "Be aware of the landslide hazard, and avoid burn areas."

Find a map of the watch area and latest information here: https://www.weather.gov/boi/

Debris flows are rapidly moving, extremely destructive landslides. They can contain boulders and logs transported in a fast-moving soil and water slurry down steep hillsides and through narrow canyons. They can easily travel a mile or more. A debris flow moves faster than a person can run. People, structures and roads located below steep slopes in canyons and near the mouths of canyons may be at serious risk.

"With landslides possible in this area, stay alert to weather conditions and to what's happening around you," says Ali Ryan Hansen, DOGAMI communications director. If your home, work, or route is in a watch area:

- Stay alert. Track the flood watch by radio, TV, weather radio or online. If told to evacuate, do so immediately.
- Listen. Unusual sounds might indicate moving debris, such as trees cracking or boulders knocking together. A trickle of falling mud or debris may precede larger landslides. If you think there is danger of a landslide, leave immediately.
- Watch the water. If water in a stream or creek suddenly turns muddy or the amount of water flowing suddenly decreases or increases, this is a warning that the flow has been affected upstream. You should immediately leave the area because a debris flow may soon be coming downstream.
- Travel with extreme caution. Assume roads are not safe. Be alert when driving, especially at night. Embankments along roadsides may fail, sending rock and debris onto the road.

For more landslide and debris flow information: http://bit.ly/landslidehazards


Women's Rights Advocates Call Out Knute Buehler's Record (Photo)
Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon - 05/16/18 10:25 AM
Planned Parenthood PAC of Oregon's Lisa Gardner explains why Knute Buehler can't be trusted to protect women's health and rights.
Planned Parenthood PAC of Oregon's Lisa Gardner explains why Knute Buehler can't be trusted to protect women's health and rights.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-05/3856/114461/thumb_TheTruthAboutKnute_Press_Conference.jpg

A coalition of advocates for women’s health and rights joined forces Wednesday to call out Republican gubernatorial nominee Knute Buehler’s record against access to reproductive health care and other issues that affect women and working families.

"Now more than ever, Oregonians need a women's health champion like Governor Kate Brown," said Lisa Gardner, Board Member for Planned Parenthood PAC of Oregon. "Last year she signed the Reproductive Health Equity Act, the nation’s most comprehensive reproductive rights bill. Thanks to her bold leadership, no-cost contraception is safeguarded in Oregon, despite the ongoing attacks from right-wing politicians in D.C. Knute Buehler has repeatedly played partisan political games with Oregon women's health and rights. In contrast, Kate Brown has shown decades of leadership in standing up for Planned Parenthood and protecting access to health care, even in the toughest of economic and political times. Oregon women will not be fooled."

Grayson Dempsey, Executive Director of Naral Pro-Choice Oregon PAC, added: “Right now in Oregon, we have a Governor who understands that women cannot truly make the best decisions about when and if to become a parent unless they have equitable access to reproductive healthcare services. Knute Buehler claims to be pro-choice, but he continues to attack women’s rights to make the best choices for their own lives and undermine access to reproductive healthcare services for the most vulnerable Oregonians. Kate Brown did not become pro-choice to win public office — she has spent her entire career fighting for the rights of women and has the voting record to prove it. There is only one pro-choice candidate in this race — and it is Governor Kate Brown.”

Andrea Paluso, Director of The Mother PAC, said: “Reproductive justice for women is directly linked to economic justice. Having a choice about whether or when to become a mother is one of the biggest economic decisions a woman can make — especially when we consider how few supports exist for women once they become mothers. Our Governor, Kate Brown, doesn’t just talk about her pro-choice values during election season, she lives them every day. She champions the policies that women and working families need, like access to reproductive health services for all women, paid sick days, raising the minimum wage, and family and medical leave. Since he became a legislator, Knute Buehler has voted against nearly all of the major advances Oregon women and mothers have made. We have no reason to believe he would govern our state any differently. There’s simply no better candidate for Oregon women than Governor Kate Brown.”

Earlier this year, Planned Parenthood PAC of Oregon launched TheTruthAboutKnute.com, which contains a timeline of news items dating back to 2014 that demonstrate why Oregon voters should be alarmed:

  • Votes against safeguarding abortion rights: The Reproductive Health Equity Act was the single most important vote in Knute Buehler's legislative career to protect access to reproductive health care. He voted NO.

  • Opposes patient privacy protections: In 2015, Knute Buehler voted against legislation to ensure confidentiality in insurance communications. Without these protections, some women cannot seek the health care they need for fear of someone else receiving their medical information.

  • Fails to stand up for Planned Parenthood: When asked why he wasn't defending Planned Parenthood in the face of relentless federal attacks - including the health center in his own legislative district - Knute Buehler dodged responsibility. That's not showing leadership. That's playing politics with women's lives.

  • Sides with anti-abortion extremists: In 2014, Knute Buehler met with and earned the "recommendation" of Oregon Right To Life, which means he supports "the majority" of their priorities. This radical organization is determined to restrict birth control and to outlaw all abortion, even in cases of rape and incest.

  • Shames Oregon women: In an interview with right-wing radio host Lars Larson, Knute Buehler shamed Oregon women for making personal medical decisions about their “unborn children.” He said, “We need to convince people in their hearts and minds that abortion is the wrong option.”

  • Discriminates against low-income women: OPB reported that Knute Buehler doesn’t believe low-income Oregon women should have access to safe, legal abortion: “He said he opposed state funding except in cases where it is ‘medically necessary.’” Restrictions on reproductive health coverage can push women deeper into poverty and have profoundly harmful effects on public health.




Attached Media Files: Planned Parenthood PAC of Oregon's Lisa Gardner explains why Knute Buehler can't be trusted to protect women's health and rights.

DPSST Fire Policy Committee Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 05/16/18 9:56 AM

For Immediate Release                                                        

May 16, 2018

Contact:           Mona Riesterer
                        (503) 378-2431

NOTICE OF REGULAR MEETING

The Fire Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting at 9:00 a.m. on May 23, 2018.  The meeting will be held in the Boardroom at the Oregon Public Safety Academy located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon.  The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities.  A request for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

Dial-in number: 888-398-2342 and Participant code: 4256088

If you dial-in for the meeting, please mute your phone unless you are addressing the group.  Doing so will enable you to hear the meeting more effectively.

Agenda items:

1.  Introductions

2.  Minutes 

Approve minutes from the December 5, 2017 Fire Policy Committee meeting

3.  Proposed Rule change OAR 259-009-0090

Presented by Jennifer Howald

4.  Proposed Rule Changes for OAR 259-007-0010 & 259-009-0070

Presented by Jennifer Howald

5.  Proposed Rule Change for OAR 259-009-0065

Presented by Jennifer Howald

6.  Proposed Rule Change for OAR 259-009-0005, 250-009-0062 & 259-009-0080

Presented by Kayla Ballrot

7.  Fincher, David DPSST #19135

Presented by Kayla Ballrot

8.  McEwen, Cheyenne DPSST #36822  Jefferson County RFPD

Presented by Kayla Ballrot

9.  Albright, Jeffrey DPSST #F33547 Hoodland RFPD

Presented by Kayla Ballrot

10. Klope, Andrew DPSST #F36968 Tri city RFPD No. 4

Presented by Kayla Ballrot

11. Harrison, Aron DPSST #22033 Lewis & Clark RFPD

Presented by Kayla Ballrot

12. Dodenhoff, Kyle A.  DPSST #26245 Rogue Valley International Airport Fire District

Presented by Kayla Ballrot

13. Poore, James T. DPSST #16053 Klamath County Fire District # 1

Presented by Kayla Ballrot

14.  Department Update

15.  Next scheduled FPC meeting – August 22, 2018

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Fire Policy Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting

 

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff’s Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.

 


Bend Police investigate shooting at Jack in the Box (Photo)
Bend Police Dept. - 05/16/18 8:46 AM
Media release
Media release
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-05/5593/114419/thumb_press_release.jpg

Update May 16th- identity of people involved

Contacted 1 – Christopher Michael Nolan                            39 year-old                                 transient 

Contacted 2 – Robert Joseph Garris                                    39 year-old                                 Medford resident

During the investigation into the shooting at Jack in the Box restaurant on May 14th, detectives with the Bend Police Department learned Christopher Nolan pulled out a knife and confronted Robert Garris in the area of the drive-through. This confrontation was unprovoked, and the two subjects did not know each other.

During the confrontation with Nolan, Garris pulled out a handgun and shot Nolan multiple times. Garris was possessing and carrying his firearm legally. Bend Fire and Rescue transported Nolan to St. Charles Medical Center with life threatening injuries. Garris has and continues to cooperate with law enforcement with this investigation.

This investigation is ongoing and will be reviewed by the Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office.

End of update

Contacted (1) - 39 year-old white male, transient

Contacted (2) - 39 year-old white male, Medford resident

 

On Monday May 14th at approximately 9:38pm Bend Police Officers responded to a shooting in the drive-through area of the Jack in the Box restaurant at 805 NE 3rd St. in Bend. Officers arrived to find one adult male with multiple gunshot wounds, and another adult male on scene still armed with a handgun.

 

The male with the gunshot wounds was transported by the Bend Fire Department to St. Charles Medical Center in Bend for medical treatment. The male with the handgun was detained and transported to the Bend Police Department for questioning.

 

The investigation continued throughout the night with the assistance from Bend Police Detectives, Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office, and the Oregon State Police Crime lab. All subjects involved in this incident have been contacted and identified. There is no threat to the public regarding this incident. The investigation is ongoing at this time.

 

The Bend Police Department is asking if you witnessed this event or have information related to this investigation, and you were not already contacted, to please contact non-emergency dispatch at 541-693-6911.




Attached Media Files: Media release

DPSST Basic Police Revision Advisory Panel Meeting Scheduled
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 05/16/18 8:32 AM

For Immediate Release      
May 15, 2018
Contact: Staci Yutzie
503-378-2426
 
 Notice of Regular Meeting
 
The Basic Police Revision Advisory Panel for Phase 2 will hold a regular meeting on May 31, 2018 from
11:00a-2:00p.  The meeting will be held in the Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Oregon Public Safety
Academy in Salem, Oregon. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an
interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be
made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above.   
 
Agenda Items:
 
I. Welcome
 
II. Outline Review-
a. Law- Law Overview, Use of Force Law, Criminal Law, Procedural Law, Introduction to the  Criminal Justice System  
b. Mental Health- Crisis Intervention, Trauma
c. Use of Force and Less Lethal Options
d. Defensive Tactics
e. Firearms
f. Building Searches (Tactical Movement)


III. Development Discussion-Course Content

IV. Development Tasks for June

V. Conclusion

 Administrative Announcement
This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Basic Police Revision Advisory Panel members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.

 

## Background Information on the DPSST ##

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) operates the Oregon Public Safety Academy which spans more than 235 acres in Salem. The Academy is nationally recognized for its innovative training programs and active stakeholder involvement. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director, and Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff’s Office serves as the Chair of the Board. The department implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of more than 40,000 city, tribal, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers.

DPSST provides training to more than 25,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board.


Metrics and Scoring Committee to meet May 18 in Wilsonville
Oregon Health Authority - 05/16/18 7:54 AM

Agenda corrected

May 15, 2018

Contact: Heather Johnson, 503-508-8276, .n.johnson@state.or.us">heather.n.johnson@state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

Metrics and Scoring Committee to meet May 18 in Wilsonville

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority Metrics and Scoring Committee

When: May 18, 9 a.m. to noon. Public testimony will be heard at 9:15 a.m.

Where: Clackamas Community College Wilsonville Training Center, Room 210, 29353 SW Town Center Loop E, Wilsonville

Attendees can also follow the presentation by webinar and listen to discussion by phone. Register for the webinar at https://register.gotowebinar.com/rt/7438627555801803523.  Conference line: 888-204-5984, participant code 1277-166. Phone will be unmuted during public testimony.

Agenda: Welcome, consent agenda and updates; public testimony; 2019 prenatal care measure OHA staff recommendation; presentation by Providence CORE on PCORI BHI study; presentation on first Public Health Accountability Report; discussion

For more information, please visit the committee's website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/hpa/analytics/Pages/Metrics-Scoring-Committee.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Heather Johnson at 503-508-8276, 711 TTY, .n.johnson@state.or.us">heather.n.johnson@state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

# # #


Tue. 05/15/18
Climbers Rescued Off Of Monkey Face At Smith Rock State Park (Photo)
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/15/18 8:13 PM
Rescued Climbers On Lower Portion Of Monkey Face
Rescued Climbers On Lower Portion Of Monkey Face
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-05/5227/114447/thumb_Monkey_Face_Mission_2.jpg

Date:  05/15/18

By:  Lt. Bryan Husband, Search and Rescue Coordinator

Rescued Climber:  Joseph Henderson, 37 year old male, Portland, OR

Rescued Climber:  Simuel Dekalita, 21 year old male, Portland, OR

 

On 05/15/18, at about 2:26pm Joseph Henderson called 9-1-1 Dispatch, reporting he and his climbing partner, Simuel Dekalita, had become stuck on a rock ledge while attempting to climb Monkey Face at Smith Rock State Park.  Henderson further reported he and his partner were safely attached to an anchor above the first pitch of the climb, but were unable to move further, due to their rope being stuck.

Nine Mountain Rescue Volunteers from the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Search and Rescue Unit as well as one DCSO Deputy responded to Smith Rock State Park and hiked the Misery Ridge Trail, with additional ropes and rescue gear, to access an area above the climbers.  SAR Volunteers set up a rope system, enabling them to rappel down to the stuck climbers and eventually assisted the climbers to the ground.  The rescued climbers were not injured and did not require medical attention.

Smith Rock State Park and its surrounding area has nearly 2,000 different climbing routes with varying difficulties.  The rescued climbers were not familiar with the park or the route they intended to climb.  They also ran out of water and were extremely thirsty.  As we approach warm summer weather, taking along extra water no matter where you recreate is encouraged.  The Deschutes County Sheriff's Office strongly recommends that those who wish to climb at Smith Rock State Park, do so with experienced climbers who are familiar with the intended climbing routes. 

  




Attached Media Files: Rescued Climbers On Lower Portion Of Monkey Face , SAR Volunteers Move Into Position , SAR Volunteers Completing Rescue

Forests in Focus: New video showcases people working together to restore forests and build markets (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 05/15/18 4:08 PM
An aerial view of central Oregon forests.
An aerial view of central Oregon forests.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-05/1072/114444/thumb_Forests_in_Focus--Aerial_Bend_.png

News Release                                                             

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 15, 2018

Contact:

Marcus Kauffman, ODF Biomass Resource Specialist, 541-580-7480, marcus.kauffman@oregon.gov

 

Roseburg, Ore. – Restoring central Oregon’s federal forests is a big important job. Too many small trees crowd the landscape, putting homes and property at risk from intense wildfires. But what to do about it?

For decades, finding common ground on forest management has placed competing interests at loggerheads. But in central Oregon, a diverse group of stakeholders are working together to create science-guided solutions that strive for balance, landscape scale and local economic benefits.

“Decades of disagreement by various factions have left us with a forest that is out of whack from its original state,” said David Stowe, an executive committee member of the Sierra Club - Oregon Chapter’s Juniper Group. 

The six-minute video showcases how stakeholders are working to restore central Oregon’s forests and make them more fire-resilient.

“The forests in central Oregon are adapted to fire,” said Pete Caliguiri, a fire ecologist with The Nature Conservancy. “With 450,000 acres of forest in need of restoration, it is important that we learn how to scale up our efforts. Sound science should continue to guide us.”

Forest restoration is expensive and results in a lot of by-products with varying degrees of commercial value. Finding markets for less valuable by-products from restoration projects, such as small trees and brush, would lower costs and create more local jobs.

“Ideally we’d have markets for the small trees and biomass that result from these treatments,” said Nicole Strong, assistant professor at Oregon State University’s College of Forestry.

“There’s a lot of opportunity to create markets for some of these by-products like firewood, post and poles, pellets and wood chips for heat and power,” said Ed Keith, Deschutes County Forester.

“Forest restoration creates a lot of benefits: reduced fire risk to communities, improved economics and utilization of the by-products and improved forest ecology,” Stowe added. “We’ll never get the forest back to where it was before we mucked it up. But we can get it headed in the right direction, and it will be a better forest for everyone.”

The video was produced by the Oregon Department of Forestry with generous funding provided by the USDA Forest Service and is available on YouTube at https://youtu.be/R6DwCfUysak.

###


 




Attached Media Files: An aerial view of central Oregon forests.

La Pine Burglary Interrupted (Photo)
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 05/15/18 2:38 PM
2018-05/5227/114438/18268293_1767177020240023_8745922659740433766_n.jpg
2018-05/5227/114438/18268293_1767177020240023_8745922659740433766_n.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-05/5227/114438/thumb_18268293_1767177020240023_8745922659740433766_n.jpg

Submitted by: Sgt. Kent VanderKamp

Occurred: May 15th, 2018 at 12:33PM

Location: 50000 Block of Ash Rd., La Pine

Arrested: Timothy Ray Paul EVANS, Age 33, of Salem, Oregon

On May 15th, 2018, at approximately 12:33 PM, Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office Deputies responded to a residential burglary in progress. An alert citizen noticed a broken window and saw an unknown person walking around the inside of a residence in the 50000 block of Ash Rd. in La Pine.  The citizen left the immediate area and contacted Deschutes County 911.

DCSO Deputies and K9 “Brolo” responded to the area and set up a perimeter. Once in place, Deputies made several announcements. The unknown man, later identified as Timothy Ray Paul EVANS, responded by attempting to flee from the rear of the home into the woods when he was confronted by Deputies. Evans did not immediately respond to Deputies commands. However, Evans did respond to K9 “Brolo’s” barking commands and surrendered to Deputies.

Evans was taken into custody without further incident. The investigation is on-going.

Evans was later lodged into the Deschutes County Adult jail with the following charges:

Burglary 1, Criminal Mischief  and Theft 3

K9 Brolo is a six year old Belgian Malinois. He has been with the agency since September 2015.

 




Attached Media Files: 2018-05/5227/114438/18268293_1767177020240023_8745922659740433766_n.jpg

First look at 2019 proposed health insurance rates
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 05/15/18 2:08 PM

Salem – Oregon consumers can now get a first look at proposed rates for 2019 individual and small group health insurance plans.

In the individual market, seven companies submitted average rate change requests ranging from a 9.6 percent decrease to a 16.3 percent increase. In the small group market, nine companies submitted average rate change requests ranging from a 4 percent decrease to a 9.4 percent increase. See the attached chart for the full list of rate change requests.

“It’s early in the process, but we are encouraged to see two insurers expanding into new counties,” said Insurance Commissioner Andrew Stolfi. “Now it is time to start our open and thorough review process that allows Oregonians to provide input on the filings that affect them.”

Health insurance companies submitted rate requests to the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Division of Financial Regulation on May 14. Over the next two months, the division will analyze the requested rates to ensure they adequately cover Oregonians’ health care costs. The division must review and approve any rates before they can be charged to policyholders.

The proposed rates are for plans that comply with the Affordable Care Act for small businesses and individuals who buy their own coverage rather than getting it through an employer.

Starting May 23, Oregonians will be able to search rate filings and submit comments at oregonhealthrates.org. Once scheduled, hearing information will be posted to this website.

Oregonians are encouraged to comment on rate change requests during the public comment period, which is open May 23 through July 9. The public can submit comments online and during public rate hearings.

Preliminary decisions are expected to be announced June 29, and final decisions are scheduled for July 19.

###

About DCBS: The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov. 

About Oregon DFR:

The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov and http://dfr.oregon.gov/Pages/index.aspx.




Attached Media Files: Preliminary rate chart

Girl Scout Alums Katie Couric, Queen Latifah, Melinda Gates, Dolores Huerta, Karlie Kloss, and Others Remind the World That Girl Scouts Grows Female Leaders Who Drive Powerful Change (Photo)
Girl Scouts of Ore. and SW Washington - 05/15/18 1:10 PM

Girl Scout Alums Katie Couric, Queen Latifah, Melinda Gates, Dolores Huerta, Karlie Kloss, and Others Remind the World That Girl Scouts Grows Female Leaders Who Drive Powerful Change

“Lifetime of Leadership” PSA premieres at G.I.R.L. Agenda event that celebrates leading positive change through civic action

May 15, 2018—Yesterday, Girl Scouts of the USA (GSUSA) released a new national PSA, “Lifetime of Leadership,” heralding the organization’s legacy of fostering female change-makers and preparing girls for a lifetime of leadership, success, and adventure. Featuring notable Girl Scout alums in fields such as technology, politics, media, and sports, the PSA showcases the positive change these powerful female leaders have created through activism, speaking up, breaking glass ceilings, and more—and illustrates the importance of Girl Scouts in providing girls with the leadership experiences they need to make their voices heard and effect change.

From philanthropist Melinda Gates and athlete Venus Williams, to supermodel and entrepreneur Karlie Kloss, Girl Scout alums highlighted in the PSA have inspired people worldwide. Narrated by Queen Latifah, the PSA also features Dolores Huerta, Barbara Walters, Katie Couric, Senator Tammy Duckworth, Jackie Joyner-Kersee, Ellen Kuras, Dr. N. Jan Davis, Tyra Banks, Sheryl Crow, Céline Dion, Dakota Fanning, Susan Wojcicki, Senator Susan Collins, and Cassandra Levesque, a 19-year-old Girl Scout alum who worked to ban child marriage in New Hampshire.

“Lifetime of Leadership” brings to life what recent studies have shown: Girl Scouts have better life outcomes than their non–Girl Scout peers. They are more confident, seek challenges to a greater degree, are more active decision-makers, and are more proficient problem-solvers in their communities. The PSA also shows how civic engagement is a core part of the Girl Scout DNA—which is why it premiered today at G.I.R.L. Agenda 2018: Leading Change Through Civic Action. This unique event, which took place in Philadelphia, featured a keynote address from educator and former second lady of the United States Dr. Jill Biden, and a panel moderated by writer, professor, and television host Dr. Melissa Harris-Perry. Thousands of girls and those who care about them joined in-person and virtually for a conversation about preparing girls to lead positive change. The PSA brought to life what a Girl Scout’s leadership journey can look like as she grows into a woman, and it inspired all in attendance to take the lead and take action in support of causes they care about.

From Sylvia Acevedo, CEO, Girl Scouts of the USA

“We are proud to premiere our powerful new PSA and showcase the impactful change that Girl Scout alums have created to make the world a better place,” said Sylvia Acevedo, GSUSA CEO. “We know that leadership and meaningful civic action start at a young age—at home, at school, and in local communities. This PSA is a rallying cry for more girls to realize their leadership potential with Girl Scouts. The world is counting on them, and we hope our more than 50 million alums will be inspired to reconnect with us and share their leadership journey with the next generation of girls who will lead our country into the future.”

From Karen Hill, Chief Executive Officer, Girl Scouts of Oregon and SW Washington

“Girl Scouts has been the premier girl leadership development organization and girl expert for over 100 years,” says Karen Hill, Chief Executive Officer for Girl Scouts of Oregon and SW Washington. “There is no organization that more thoroughly understands the value of programming designed specifically for girls. We offer girls the single best leadership experience in the world and help develop girls into strong, confident women.”

From Dr. Jill Biden

“I have no doubt that the girls of today will become the leaders and change-makers of tomorrow. Supporting them, empowering them and ensuring they have the opportunities they deserve is good for all of us,” said Dr. Jill Biden. “My Girl Scout experience taught me confidence, perseverance, and gave me skills that inspired me to pursue public service and helped me become a better leader. Girl Scouts is the preeminent organization that gives girls the place and the opportunity to develop their powerful voices.”

The new Girl Scout PSA was created and written by Girl Scout alum, Rachel Howald, founder and CCO, Invisible Man.

To watch the PSA and for more information about Girl Scouts, visit www.girlscouts.org/leadership. To join or volunteer, visit www.girlscouts.org/join.

###

ABOUT GIRL SCOUTS OF OREGON AND SOUTHWEST WASHINGTON (GSOSW)

Girl Scouting inspires millions of girls and women—including more than 23,000 active members in Oregon and Southwest Washington—with the highest ideals of courage, confidence, and character. Our council serves 13,955 girls in 37 counties with the help of nearly 10,000 volunteers. The Girl Scout mission is to build girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place. Every opportunity in Girl Scouting develops these essential skills in an all-girl, inclusive, safe environment. For information, please visit girlscoutsosw.org.

ABOUT GIRL SCOUTS OF THE USA (GSUSA)
Girl Scouts of the U.S.A. is the preeminent leadership development organization for girls. And with programs from coast to coast and across the globe, Girl Scouts offers every girl a chance to practice a lifetime of leadership, adventure and success. To volunteer, reconnect, donate or join, visit www.girlscouts.org.

NEW GSUSA PSA (Video): Lifetime of Leadership, http://www.girlscouts.org/leadership

About the G.I.R.L. Agenda Powered by Girl Scouts
A nonpartisan initiative to inspire, prepare, and mobilize girls and those who care about them to lead positive change through civic action, the G.I.R.L. Agenda makes expert-curated civic engagement resources, derived from Girl Scouts of the USA’s programming, accessible to all girls, as well as adults. The free tools give hundreds of thousands of girls and adults tangible ways to take civic action on topics of their choosing. To advance the G.I.R.L. Agenda and for tips on leading positive change through civic action, visit www.girlagenda.org.




Attached Media Files: Girl Scouts Leadership for Girls

Talking Book and Braille Library Advisory Council Meeting May 17, 2018
State Library of Oregon - 05/15/18 12:54 PM

The Oregon Talking Book and Braille Library Advisory Council will meet on May 17, 2018 at the State
Library in Room 102 at 10:00 am. The Council will hear reports from the State Librarian and Talking
Books Program Manager and discuss the 2018-19 donation fund expenditures budget.

The Talking Books Advisory Council has the primary responsibility for advising the State Library
Board on the use of Talking Books Expendable Donation Funds, and providing insights and
recommendations for service improvements. The Council is comprised of 11 members who represent
different partnering agencies, advocacy groups, and user groups. Open forum time is 11:30 am, when
any individual may address the Talking Books Advisory Council.

For more information or call in information, contact Susan Westin, Program Manager, (503) 378-5435,
or Joel Henderson, User Accounts Coordinator, (503) 378-5391.

Sign language interpretation will be provided for the public if requested prior to 48 hours before
the meeting; notice prior to 72 hours before the meeting is preferred. Handouts of meeting
materials may also be requested in alternate formats prior to 72 hours before the meeti  g.
Requests may be made to Joel Henderson, User Accounts Coordinator, (503) 378-
5391.

 

Talking Book and Braille Library Advisory Council Meeting
Room 102
250 Winter St NE, Salem, OR 97301
Thursday, May 17, 2018; 10 AM – 12 PM

 

AGENDA

10:00                          Welcome new members; changes to the agenda; approve previous minutes

10:05                          State Librarian, Fund Development, and Program Manager reports

10:45                          Talking Books Advisory Council Orientation Materials Review

11:00                           2018-19 Expendable Donation Fund Budget Discussion

11:30                          Open Forum

12:00                          Adjourn

 

 



 

 


OHA sets listening session on next phase of coordinated care
Oregon Health Authority - 05/15/18 11:20 AM

May 15, 2018

OHA sets listening session on next phase of coordinated care

What: CCO leadership listening session regarding CCO 2.0

When: Thursday, May 17, 12:30 to 1:30 p.m.

Where: Barbara Roberts Human Services Building, Room 137 C-D, 500 Summer St. NE, Salem. Members of the public can call in to listen by dialing 888-363-4735, participant code 1593726#.

Agenda: CCO 2.0 presentation and discussion

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Jeff Scroggin at 541-999-6983, 711 TTY at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 


Kim Stafford named Oregon Poet Laureate (Photo)
Oregon Cultural Trust - 05/15/18 10:27 AM
Stafford at Eagle Creek
Stafford at Eagle Creek
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-05/1171/114428/thumb_Kim_Stafford_at_Eagle_Creek.jpg

Salem, Ore. – Governor Kate Brown has named poet and essayist Kim Stafford, the founding director of The Northwest Writing Institute at Lewis & Clark College, to a two-year appointment as Poet Laureate of Oregon. Stafford will be Oregon’s ninth Poet Laureate since 1921. He succeeds Elizabeth Woody, who has held the post since 2016.

“There are many ways to serve this state and among them is clarity of language and passion of purpose, which may travel from one soul to another through poetry,” said Governor Brown. “Kim Stafford is one of our state’s most generous literary teachers and I am proud to appoint him as our next Poet Laureate.”

Stafford was born and grew up in Oregon. He is the author of a dozen books of poetry and prose, and edited half a dozen others. His book, “Having Everything Right: Essays of Place,” won a citation for excellence from the Western States Book Awards in 1986. Stafford has received creative writing fellowships from the National Endowment for the Arts, a Governor’s Arts Award, and the Steward Holbrook Award from Literary Arts for his contributions to Oregon’s literary culture. His work also has been featured on National Public Radio.

“Generosity of spirit may not be an explicitly stated part of the criteria for Oregon Poet Laureate, but it is a central part of who Kim Stafford is, both in his poetry and in the flesh,” said Adam Davis, executive director of Oregon Humanities, who administers the Poet Laureate program on behalf of the Cultural Trust.

“So it was no surprise to see the statewide selection committee share a deep conviction that Kim has, in many ways, effectively been doing the work that this honor from the Governor will now recognize and further amplify,” Adams added. “Oregon is lucky to have Kim here, and we’re excited about how he’ll build on the work of Elizabeth Woody, Peter Sears, Paulann Petersen, and, of course, his father, William Stafford.”

Stafford’s most recent book, “100 Tricks Every Boy Can Do,” is an account of his brother’s death by suicide, and the struggle of a family to understand and live beyond that event. It is a story where “the writer reaches back through the difficult end to grasp the beautiful beginning, like pulling a venomous serpent inside out.”

“Poetry is our native language,” said Stafford. “We begin with imaginative experiments as children, and lyric language can be a realm of delight throughout life. For adults and communities, poetry can help us be more open to new ideas, emotionally informed, and buoyant in responding to challenges. In a society of diverse backgrounds and perspectives, poetry builds community.”

Stafford holds a Ph.D. in medieval literature from the University of Oregon, and has worked as a printer, photographer, oral historian, editor and visiting writer at a host of colleges and schools, and also offered writing workshops in Italy, Scotland and Bhutan. He lives in Portland, Oregon, with his wife and children.

The Oregon Poet Laureate fosters the art of poetry, encourages literacy and learning, addresses central issues relating to humanities and heritage, and reflects on public life in Oregon. Stafford will provide up to 20 public readings per year in settings across the state to inform community, business and state leaders about the value and importance of poetry and creative expression. The program is funded by the Oregon Cultural Trust.

A 20-person committee of writers, poets and cultural leaders reviewed nominations in February and made its recommendation to the Cultural Trust and its statewide partners - Oregon Arts Commission, Oregon Historical Society, the Oregon Heritage Commission, Oregon Humanities and the State Historic Preservation Office. The Governor approved the committee’s recommendation this week.

Past Oregon Poets Laureate were Edwin Charles Markham (1921–1940), Ben Hur Lampman (1951–1954), Ethel Romig Fuller (1957–1965), William Stafford (Kim Stafford’s father, 1974–1989), Lawson Inada (2006–2010), Paulann Petersen (2010-2014) Peter Sears (2014-2016), and Elizabeth Woody (2016-2018).

Stafford will assume the Poet Laureate role immediately. A public ceremony to welcome him and thank Woody will be announced soon.

To learn more about the Oregon Poet Laureate program, or to schedule an event with Kim Stafford, visit the Poet Laureate website.

VIDEO LINKS:

Kim Stafford speaks on turning errors in the past into a story...

Oregon Art Beat profile of Kim Stafford

­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­_________________

About the Oregon Cultural Trust

The Oregon Cultural Trust is an innovative, statewide private-public program raising significant new funds to support and protect Oregon’s arts, humanities and heritage. In addition to the creation of a permanent endowment, funds are distributed annually through three multifaceted, wide-ranging grant programs. No other state in the nation has a program like the Oregon Cultural Trust, which has been ranked with the bottle bill and the vote-by-mail bill as among Oregon’s most forward-thinking public policy measures. More information at culturaltrust.org.

About Oregon Humanities

Oregon Humanities is an independent, nonprofit affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities and a statewide partner of the Oregon Cultural Trust. Each year through programs and publications—the Conversation Project, Think & Drink, Humanity in Perspective, Idea Lab Summer Institute, Public Program Grants, and Oregon Humanities magazine—Oregon Humanities connects Oregonians to ideas that change lives and transform communities. More information at oregonhumanities.org.

 

 




Attached Media Files: Stafford at Eagle Creek , Kim Stafford by Perrin Kerns

FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against ID Theft (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 05/15/18 10:00 AM
TT - ID Theft graphic
TT - ID Theft graphic
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-05/3585/114319/thumb_TT_-_ID_theft_-_May_15_2018.jpg

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week, building a digital defense against ID theft.

Fraudsters have been trying to steal your identity and personally identifiable information – or PII – for many years. But, the growing number of data breaches at retailers, financial institutions and credit agencies mean that you are more at risk than ever.

Once a criminal organization gets a hold of your name, Social Security number, date of birth, health insurance info, and more – it will likely sell every bit of it on the dark web. Once that happens, the buyer can open credit card or bank accounts, apply for loans, or commit any number of crimes in your name.

You as an average consumer can’t do much about the massive data breaches – but you can take some basic steps to protect your financial future:

  • Watch for phishing attempts – that’s phishing with a “ph”. In this case, a fraudster may send you an email or contact you online. He tries to appear legitimate – perhaps using a logo from a recognized bank or a real-looking website. He offers you money back on a new bank account or a great interest rate on a credit card – if you just supply him with all of your personal info.
  • Another concern – discarding credit card offers or mail with personal info on it in the trash or recycling. Make sure you shred such documents… or better yet, ask to quit receiving credit card and insurance offers all together by going to www.optoutprescreen.com.
  • Watch your credit card and utility bills as well as bank statements for unusual transactions.
  • Enable security functions on your phone and computer – especially if you have passwords stored or apps that link to your financial institutions.
  • Be careful when using a public wifi system and consider using a virtual private network when you can.
  • Never respond to unsolicited requests for your personal info, whether online, by email, by phone or in person.

Next week we will look how your credit report plays into ID theft protection – and how you can make sure you are using it as part of your digital defense.

If you have been victimized by an online scam or any other cyber fraud, be sure to report it to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center at www.ic3.gov or call your local FBI office.




Attached Media Files: TT - ID Theft audio , TT - ID Theft graphic

Salmonberry Trail meeting set for June 1 in Banks
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 05/15/18 10:00 AM

BANKS, Ore. - Salmonberry Trail Intergovernmental Agency (STIA) will meet 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. June 1 to discuss the proposed Salmonberry Trail corridor. The meeting will be held in the Banks Fire District #13, 13430 NW Main St., Banks. The public is invited to attend.

The meeting agenda: an update on fundraising efforts; updates on Valley Segment planning; establishing a review process for right of way use agreements; and assessing a fiber optic lease renewal.

The proposed Salmonberry Trail is an 84-mile corridor connecting eight cities and two counties. The proposed route follows the Port of Tillamook Bay Railway and terminates in Banks.

STIA was established to promote and facilitate coordinated direction and guidance in the planning, development and maintenance of the multi-use trail.

For more information contact Dennis Wiley, Salmonberry Trail project manager, at 503-986-0723 or dennis.wiley@oregon.gov. Individuals needing special accommodations to attend should contact Dennis Wiley at least three days in advance.


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Employment in Oregon April 2018 News Release
Oregon Employment Dept. - 05/15/18 10:00 AM

Oregon’s Low Unemployment Rate Continues in April

Oregon’s unemployment rate was 4.1 percent in March and April. For 16 consecutive months, the rate has been close to 4.1 percent, its lowest level since comparable records began in 1976. The U.S. unemployment rate dropped to 3.9 percent in April, from 4.1 percent in March.

In April, Oregon’s nonfarm payroll employment dropped by 2,900 jobs, following a revised gain of 5,000 jobs in March. This was Oregon’s first monthly job decline in 16 months. The last decline was in December 2016.

In April, three major industries declined by more than 1,000 jobs. Retail trade dropped by 2,500 jobs, following a gain of 2,400 in March. Health care and social assistance cut 1,400 jobs in April following a gain of 800 during the prior two months. Professional and business services declined by 1,100 jobs and is now down 2,200 since its peak of 244,900 jobs in November 2017.

Meanwhile, seven of Oregon’s major industries added jobs in April, led by leisure and hospitality (+600 jobs) and construction (+500).

Over the past few years Oregon’s economy gradually decelerated, from very rapid growth a few years ago, to moderate growth over the past year. In the past 12 months 29,600 jobs were added, which is a gain of 1.6 percent. This rate of growth is a slowdown from the more rapid expansion during the prior few years when Oregon’s job gains peaked in mid-2015 at 3.7 percent.

Oregon’s annual job gains have been above 1.6 percent since March 2013. Oregon had been adding jobs at a faster pace than the U.S., but now is growing jobs at the same pace as the nation, since U.S. jobs also expanded by 1.6 percent during the past 12 months.

Next Press Releases
The Oregon Employment Department plans to release the April county and metropolitan area unemployment rates on Tuesday, May 22nd, and the next statewide unemployment rate and employment survey data for May on Tuesday, June 12th.

Notes:
All numbers in the above narrative are seasonally adjusted.

The Oregon Employment Department and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) work cooperatively to develop and publish monthly Oregon payroll employment and labor force data. The estimates of monthly job gains and losses are based on a survey of businesses. The estimates of unemployment are based on a survey of households and other sources.

The Oregon Employment Department publishes payroll employment estimates that are revised quarterly by using employment counts from employer unemployment insurance tax records. All department publications use this Official Oregon Series data unless noted otherwise. This month’s release incorporates the October, November and December 2017 tax records data. In addition, data for July through September 2017 were revised upward by a total of 500 to 1,300 jobs per month. The department continues to make the original nonfarm payroll employment series available; these data are produced by the BLS.

Effective with the January 2018 data, employment of Oregon’s approximately 17,000 home care workers are counted in private health care and social assistance instead of state government. The change was due to legislative action clarifying that for purposes of workforce and labor market information, home care workers are not employees of state government. The reclassification affects private sector and government monthly change figures for January 2018 and will affect over-the-year change figures through December 2018. It does not affect total payroll employment levels.

The pdf version of the news release, including tables and graphs, can be found at www.QualityInfo.org/press-release. To obtain the data in other formats such as in Excel, visit www.QualityInfo.org, then within the top banner, select Economic Data, then choose LAUS or CES. To request the press release as a Word document, contact the person shown at the top of this press release.

For help finding jobs and training resources, visit one of the state's WorkSource Oregon centers or go to: www.WorkSourceOregon.org.

Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For the Deaf and Hard of Hearing population, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: Employment in Oregon April 2018

Shepherd's House Ministries Grand Re-Opening of our Clothes and Laundry Processing Center
Shepherd's House Ministries - 05/15/18 9:06 AM

Shepherd’s House Ministries is excited to announce a ribbon cutting ceremony to celebrate the grand re-opening of our Clothes and Laundry Processing Center.  Our project was recently completed and is now in full operational mode.  We will hold our ceremony today, Tuesday, May 15th from 4-6 pm at our Men’s Center on 1854 NE Division Street.   This event is open to the public and media.  Come celebrate with us!

 

Shepherds’ House Ministries

1854 NE Division St, Bend, OR 97701

(541) 388-2096

 

# # #


Deer causes fatal motorcycle crash in Jackson County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 05/15/18 7:51 AM
2018-05/1002/114421/SP18-173232_Fatal.jpg
2018-05/1002/114421/SP18-173232_Fatal.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-05/1002/114421/thumb_SP18-173232_Fatal.jpg

On Monday, May 14, 2018, at approximately 10:00AM, Oregon State Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a motorcycle crash on Highway 62 near Prospect in Jackson County.

Investigation revealed a silver Harley Davidson, operated by Gary Yarmie, age 37, of Oshawa, Ottawa, Canada was traveling northbound with 18 other riders when a deer ran into the roadway in the midst of the motorcycle riders.  The deer collided with Mr. Yarmie causing him to lose control of his motorcycle and leave the roadway.  Mr. Yarmie collided with a tree and suffered fatal injuries.  He was pronounced deceased at the scene.

Highway 62 at the scene was reduced to single lane travel for approximately 4.5 hours.  OSP was assisted by ODOT.

 




Attached Media Files: 2018-05/1002/114421/SP18-173232_Fatal.jpg

Mon. 05/14/18
Red Cross & Fire Department Partners Install 1,000+ Free Smoke Alarms in Oregon in Two Weeks
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 05/14/18 4:20 PM

Free smoke alarm installations are part of the Red Cross Sound the Alarm initiative, a nationwide effort to reduce death and injury related to home fires by installing 100,000 smoke alarms across the nation between April 28 and May 13.

PORTLAND, Ore., May 14, 2018 The local American Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington exceeded the goal of installing 1,000 free smoke alarms in homes that needed them as part of the Sound the Alarm initiative. Throughout the initiative 1,266 smoke alarms were installed in homes that needed them, and fire safety education was delivered to 408 households.

Red Cross Sound the Alarm events were conducted in cities throughout the United States between April 28 and May 13. Oregon hosted three Sound the Alarm events in Sutherlin (April 28), Madras (May 5) and Portland (May 12). 

Fire department partners for each event include the Sutherlin Fire Department, Jefferson County Fire District #1 and Portland Fire & Rescue.

“I am extremely grateful to our Red Cross workforce and to our fire department partners for making this campaign such a success,” said Candace Horter, chief executive officer of the Red Cross Cascades Region. “Our work is preventing tragedies and ultimately saving lives.” 

VIEW PHOTOS FROM EACH EVENT:

Sutherlin: https://spaces.hightail.com/space/ggBgmgQmV0

Madras: https://spaces.hightail.com/space/f2C04BexIL

Portland: https://spaces.hightail.com/space/60PaM7x2rJ

 

ABOUT RED CROSS HOME FIRE CAMPAIGN:

The Red Cross responds to nearly 64,000 disasters a year, the majority of which are home fires. Working smoke alarms in a home cut the risk of death by half, and having an escape plan further improves the odds of survival. Across the country, the Red Cross efforts to end home fires are making a difference. As of April 2018, the Red Cross and our partners have saved 416 lives and installed more than 1,103,000 free smoke alarms.

 

About the American Red Cross

The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org/Cascades or find us on Facebook at Red Cross Cascades, Twitter at @RedCrossCasc and on Instagram at @RedCrossCascades.




Attached Media Files: News Release - Red Cross & Fire Department Partners Install 1,000+ Free Smoke Alarms in Oregon in Two Weeks

News release: BPA employees' skills on display at Oregon Tradeswomen's Career Fair
Bonneville Power Administration - 05/14/18 4:05 PM

PR 09-18

BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: May 14, 2018

Portland, Ore. – Bonneville Power Administration employees will participate in the Oregon Tradeswomen’s 2018 Career Fair on May 18 and 19 at National Electrical Contractors Association and International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers training center. BPA representatives will share their experiences and demonstrate some of the skills they use to keep hydropower flowing in the Northwest.

The Oregon Tradeswomen’s Career Fair features workshops and exhibits staffed by volunteers who are successful in their careers and are committed to encouraging women and young girls to explore opportunities in non-traditional fields.

“The career fair is an opportunity for BPA to reach out to women and girls who are interested in vocations vital to the utility industry,” said Janet Herrin, BPA’s chief operating officer. “We strive to promote a diverse, inclusive work environment, and this event gives us the chance to reach out to our future workforce and promote BPA and the Department of Energy as employers of choice.”

Cristi Sawtell has represented BPA at the annual career fair for more than a decade. She says finding success in non-traditional careers takes a tremendous amount of courage, strength and initiative. She believes events such as the Oregon Tradeswomen’s Career Fair are critical to encouraging girls and women to think about their futures in a new way.

“Every year I see participants get involved in activities and I see a spark when they realize these are exciting careers that are within their reach,” said Sawtell, who was BPA’s first female lineworker and is currently a transmission field compliance specialist. “This career fair provides a good variety of hands-on activities, the majority of them being led by women.”

The event takes place at the NECA-IBEW Electrical Training Center at 16021 NE Airport Way, Portland, Oregon. Sawtell and other BPA tradeswomen will be speaking to students attending with their schools on May 18, and to the public May 19 at the Careers for Women Day. They’ll be discussing various opportunities in the trades and demonstrating skills such as surveying and exothermic welding, a process used by BPA’s high voltage electricians and lineworkers.

Bonneville Power Administration is a sponsor of the Oregon Tradeswomen’s 2018 Career Fair. Learn more about the event at www.tradeswomen.net/fair/ or contact Mary Ann Naylor of Oregon Tradeswomen, Inc. at 503-335-8200, extension 26, or 503-819-9201.

About BPA

The Bonneville Power Administration, headquartered in Portland, Oregon, is a nonprofit federal power marketer that sells wholesale electricity from 31 federal dams and one nuclear plant to 142 Northwest electric utilities, serving millions of consumers and businesses in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, western Montana and parts of California, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming. BPA delivers power via more than 15,000 circuit miles of lines and 260 substations to 511 transmission customers. In all, BPA markets about a third of the electricity consumed in the Northwest and operates three-quarters of the region’s high-voltage transmission grid. BPA also funds one of the largest fish and wildlife programs in the nation, and, with its partners, pursues cost-effective energy savings and operational solutions that help maintain affordable, reliable and clean electric power for the Northwest. www.bpa.gov


U.S. Attorney's Office Joins in Recognizing National Police Week, May 13-19, 2018
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 05/14/18 3:42 PM

FBI Releases 2017 Statistics on of Law Enforcement Officers Killed and Assaulted

PORTLAND, Ore. – Attorney General Jeff Sessions and Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon, recognize the service and sacrifice of federal, state, local, and tribal police officers on the occasion of National Police Week, and commented on the FBI's 2017 Law Enforcement Officers Killed and Assaulted report.

“One officer death is too many,” Attorney General Sessions said. “While we are inexpressibly grateful to have had a decrease in the number of officers killed in the line-of-duty last year, the number is still far too high. At the Department of Justice, we honor the memories of the fallen and we pray for their families. We are also following President Trump's Executive Orders to back the women and men in blue, to enhance law enforcement safety, and to reduce violent crime in America. Those priorities will help keep every American safe, including those who risk their lives for us. As always, we have their backs and they have our thanks.”

“Working with federal, state, local, and tribal law enforcement officers in Oregon is a distinct honor and one of the highlights of my job,” said Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon. “During National Police Week, we honor the 93 men and women who lost their lives protecting their communities as well as the countless others who continue to serve with unfailing dedication and an unwavering commitment to excellence. Supporting police and fostering strong relationships between our communities and law enforcement is top priority for the U.S. Attorney’s Office.”

According to statistics collected by the FBI, 93 law enforcement officers were killed in line-of-duty incidents in 2017 – a 21 percent decrease from 2016 when 118 law enforcement officers were killed in line-of-duty incidents.

Additionally, in 2017 there were 46 law enforcement officers killed in line-of-duty incidents as a result of felonious acts – this is a 30 percent decrease from 2016, when 66 law enforcement officer were killed in line-of-duty incidents as a result of felonious acts.

For the full comprehensive data tables about these incidents and brief narratives describing the fatal attacks and selected assaults resulting in injury, please see the 2017 edition of Law Enforcement Officers Killed and Assaulted report, released today.

In October 1962, Congress passed and President Kennedy signed a joint resolution declaring May 15th as National Peace Officers Memorial Day to honor law enforcement officers killed or disabled in the line of duty. The resolution also created National Police Week as an annual tribute to law enforcement service and sacrifice.

During Police Week, which is observed from Sunday, May 13 to Saturday, May 19, 2018, our nation celebrates the contributions of police officers from around the country, recognizing their hard work, dedication, loyalty and commitment in keeping our communities safe.

The names of all 93 fallen officers nationwide were formally dedicated on the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial in Washington, DC, during the 30th Annual Candlelight Vigil on the evening of May 13, 2018. One District of Oregon officer was added this year: John Edward Lawrence, City of Bend Police Department, End of Watch: December 4, 2014.

The Candlelight Vigil is one of many commemorative events taking place in the nation’s capital during National Police Week 2018.

For more information about other National Police Week events, please visit www.policeweek.org.

To access the FBI's 2017 Law Enforcement Officers Killed and Assaulted report, please visit www.fbi.gov.

# # #




Attached Media Files: 2018-05/6325/114401/ANNOUNCEMENT-Police_Week-Final.pdf

Burn backyard debris safely (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 05/14/18 2:32 PM
Debris burns should always be attended by a person with a working water hose and shovel at the ready. Constant attention is the key to preventing debris burns from escaping.
Debris burns should always be attended by a person with a working water hose and shovel at the ready. Constant attention is the key to preventing debris burns from escaping.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-05/1072/114404/thumb_Debris_burning.gif

SALEM, Ore. – May is Wildfire Awareness Month in Oregon and the ideal time to trim back trees and shrubs from around your home that could pose a wildfire threat.

As you begin spring clean-up, Keep Oregon Green, the Oregon Department of Forestry and the Oregon Office of State Fire Marshal urge you to chip or recycle yard debris. If burning is the only option to dispose of woody material, follow safe burning practices.

“If you burn debris, use common sense and follow safety rules,” said Oregon’s State Fire Marshal Jim Walker. “This can prevent most wildfires caused by burning debris and keep lives and property safe.”

Escaped debris burns are the leading human cause of wildfire in Oregon, particularly in the spring and fall when people think it is safe and permissible to burn. In 2017, backyard debris burns that escaped control resulted in 149 wildfires burning 334 acres at a cost of $183,000 to suppress.

A burn pile is less likely to escape control if these simple safety tips are followed:

  • Call before you burn – Burning regulations are not the same in all areas and can vary with weather and fuel conditions. If you’re planning to burn, check with your local ODF district, fire protective association, or air protection authority to learn if there are any current burning restrictions in effect, and whether a permit is required.
  • Know the weather forecast– Never burn on dry or windy days. These conditions make it easy for an open burn to spread out of control.
  • Clear a 10-foot radius around your pile– Also make sure there are no tree branches or power lines above.
  • Keep your burn pile small - A large burn may cast hot embers long distances. Small piles, 4 x 4 feet, are recommended. Add debris in small amounts as existing material is consumed.
  • Always have water and fire tools on site – When burning, have a charged water hose, bucket of water, and shovel and dirt nearby to extinguish the fire. Drown the pile with water, stir the coals, and drown again, repeating till the fire is DEAD out.
  • Stay with the fire until it is completely out – Monitoring a debris burn from start to finish until dead out is required by state law to ensure that any escaped sparks or embers can be extinguished quickly. Go back and recheck old burn piles, as they can retain heat for several weeks and then rekindle when the weather warms and wind begins to blow.
  • Never use gasoline or other accelerants (flammable or combustible liquids) to start or increase your open fire. Every year, 10 to 15 percent of all burn injuries treated at the Oregon Burn Center in Portland are the result of backyard debris burning.
  • Burn only yard debris – State regulations prohibit the open burning of any material that creates dense smoke or noxious odors.
  • Escaped debris burns are costly– State law requires the proper clearing, building, attending and extinguishing of open fires any time of year. A first-time citation carries a $110 fine. If your debris burn spreads out of control, you are responsible for the cost of fire suppression and very likely the damage to neighboring properties. This can range from a few hundred to tens of thousands of dollars.             

More tips on wildfire prevention, including campfire safety, use of motorized equipment, and fire-resistant landscaping can be found on the Keep Oregon Green site, www.keeporegongreen.org

                                                                                                 # # #




Attached Media Files: Debris burns should always be attended by a person with a working water hose and shovel at the ready. Constant attention is the key to preventing debris burns from escaping.

Girl Scouts of Oregon and SW Washington Offer Civic Engagement Opportunities for Girls Throughout Region (Photo)
Girl Scouts of Ore. and SW Washington - 05/14/18 2:30 PM
Girl Scouts MultCo Elections
Girl Scouts MultCo Elections
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2018-04/6250/113939/thumb_DSC_2053.jpg

Girl Scouts of Oregon and SW Washington Offer Civic Engagement Opportunities for Girls Throughout Region

G.I.R.L. Agenda Inspires, Prepares and Mobilize Girls to Lead Positive Change Through Civic Action

PORTLAND, OR. – May 14, 2018 – The May Primary Election has arrived and Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington (GSOSW) has created a multitude of civic engagement opportunities for Girl Scouts throughout the region. The events are part of a larger initiative called G.I.R.L. Agenda, a nonpartisan initiative to inspire, prepare and mobilize girls to lead positive change through civic action.

“This initiative is all about connecting girls to their role as citizens and getting them excited and engaged today,” said Sarah Shipe, Director of Communications for Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington. “They don’t have to wait until they’re adults to learn about the voting process, make their voice heard at a city council meeting, or improve their community. We want them to see that they can make a difference now.”

The events began on April 30 and run through mid-May. Girl Scouts have opportunities to learn about municipal management; how to become advocates for change; and, how local elections and voting works.

G.I.R.L. AGENDA 2018: LEADING CHANGE THROUGH CIVIC ACTION (LIVE now!)—Facebook livestream on May 14 with panel discussions from G.I.R.L. Agenda 2018: Leading Change Through Civic Action. Dr. Jill Biden is the keynote speaker, and discussions are being led by other change-makers who have taken action locally, nationally, and globally to make the world a better place. https://www.facebook.com/GirlScoutsUSA/videos/10160803657575393/?notif_id=1526328023486677¬if_t=live_video

GIRL SCOUTS TO TOUR ELECTIONS OFFICES THROUGHOUT OREGON

Oregon is a "vote-by-mail" state. Every registered voter can mail in or drop off their ballot instead of standing in line at a polling place. But then what? On the night before the May primary election, Girl Scouts will get an up-close look at how ballots are processed in their county at their local elections office. Senior-level Girl Scouts can complete a step toward earning the “Behind the Ballot” badge and Junior-level Girl Scouts can complete a step toward earning the “Inside Government” ba

Deschutes County Elections
1300 NW Wall Street, Suite 202, Bend, OR 97703
May 15, 2018, 5:30 - 6:30 p.m.

  • # girls: 1-2
  • Age ranges: Grade 4
  • School districts: Sisters School District

Multnomah County Elections

1040 SE Morrison St, Portland, OR 97214
May 15, 2018, 6 - 7 p.m.

  • # girls: 15
  • Age ranges: Grades K-3
  • School districts: Portland Public Schools, North Clackamas SD

Jackson County Elections

1101 W Main St #201, Medford, OR 97501
May 14, 2018, 4 - 5 p.m.

  • # girls: 3
  • Age ranges: Grades K-6
  • School districts: Homeschooled, Charter School

Benton County Elections

120 NW 4th St #13, Corvallis, OR 97330
May 15, 2018, 6 - 7 p.m.

  • # girls: 15
  • Age ranges: Grades 1-6
  • School districts: Lincoln County SD/Siletz Valley Schools, Corvallis SD, Junction City SD

Marion County Elections

555 Court St NE, Salem, OR, 97301
May 15, 2018, 6 - 7 p.m.

  • # girls: 11
  • Age ranges: Grades 3-7
  • School districts: Salem-Keizer Public Schools, Greater Albany SD, Silver Falls SD, Private Schools, Homeschools, Charter School

“Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington is thrilled to have so many girls interested in getting a close up look at how our democracy functions,” says Lisa Gilham-Luginbill, Program Manager for GSOSW. “Our hope is that, as we make it more accessible, girls will see themselves as participants and be inspired to create positive change in their own communities.”

NEW GSOSW G.I.R.L. Agenda VIDEO: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fo485Avw1kg

PREVIOUS G.I.R.L. AGENDA ACTIVITIES

AFTERNOON AT THE MAYOR’S OFFICE WITH THE BUS PROJECT—On April 30, Girl Scouts met the Mayor of Portland for a Q & A, and get a backstage look at what it takes to run a city.

GIRL SCOUT LEADERSHIP DAY AT OREGON’S STATE CAPITOL

To help mark the 106th birthday of Girl Scouts, Gov. Kate Brown proclaimed March 12, 2018 to be Girl Scout Leadership Day. "Girl Scouts empower generations of girls and women, showing you are never too young to get involved, make a difference, and have your voice heard," Governor Brown said. Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington inducted Governor Kate Brown as an honorary lifetime member of Girl Scouts at a ceremony in the State Capitol on March 12, 2018. "It's my hope that as women take on leadership roles in their communities, in the Capitol, and in service organizations like Girl Scouts, that more girls grow up knowing that women can change the world." Governor Kate Brown now joins the nation's five currently serving women governors who are also Girl Scouts. To learn more, please see: http://www.girlscoutsosw.org/content/dam/oregon-sw-washington-/forms/Press%20Release_GS%20Leadership%20Day%20at%20OR%20Capitol_FINAL_03%2005%202018%209PM.pdf

VIDEO: Girl Scout Leadership Day with Governor Kate Brown and Girl Scouts of Oregon and Southwest Washington, March 12, 2018 #GIRLagenda [Video Credit: Video courtesy of Dick Hughes | Hughesisms LLChttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UGfCNncHLx8

OREGON HOUSE BILL 2732

Members of Girl Scout Troop 10037 in the Salem area supported legislation that became House Bill (HB) 2732, signed into law on June 22, 2017. The law provides that a person who enters a motor vehicle to remove a child or domestic animal in imminent danger of suffering harm is not subject to criminal or civil liability. To learn more, please see: http://www.girlscoutsosw.org/content/dam/oregon-sw-washington/forms/Press_Release_Good_Samaritan_Law.pdf.

GIRL SCOUTS’ HISTORY OF CIVIC ENGAGEMENT

Since its founding in 1912, Girl Scouts has emphasized the importance of being civically engaged, by teaching and encouraging girls to create positive change in their communities through advocacy and action. Girl Scouts learn to stand up for what they believe in, identify issues they care about, and develop leadership skills to make the world a better place. Girl Scouts has a century of success which is reflected in the realm of public service by the fact that 76 percent of female U.S. Senators and 100 percent of female U.S. Secretaries of State are Girl Scout alumnae.

ABOUT GIRL SCOUTS OF OREGON AND SOUTHWEST WASHINGTON (GSOSW)

Girl Scouting inspires millions of girls and women—including more than 23,000 active members in Oregon and Southwest Washington—with the highest ideals of courage, confidence, and character. Our council serves 13,955 girls in 37 counties with the help of nearly 10,000 volunteers. The Girl Scout mission is to build girls of courage, confidence, and character, who make the world a better place. Every opportunity in Girl Scouting develops these essential skills in an all-girl, inclusive, safe environment. For information, please visit girlscoutsosw.org.

ABOUT GIRL SCOUTS OF THE USA (GSUSA)
Girl Scouts of the U.S.A. is the preeminent leadership development organization for girls. And with programs from coast to coast and across the globe, Girl Scouts offers every girl a chance to practice a lifetime of leadership, adventure and success. To volunteer, reconnect, donate or join, visit www.girlscouts.org.

NEW GSUSA PSA (Video): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=clD3ggLLHyQ&feature=em-uploademail

ABOUT G.I.R.L. Agenda Powered by Girl Scouts
G.I.R.L. Agenda is a nonpartisan initiative to inspire, prepare, and mobilize girls and those who care about them to lead positive change through civic action. To learn more, visit www.girlagenda.org.

###




Attached Media Files: Girl Scouts MultCo Elections , Girl Scouts at MultCo Elections , Girl Scouts Learning About WashCo Elections , Girl Scouts Observing WashCo Elections , Girl Scouts Touring WashCo Elections , G.I.R.L. Agenda Definition , G.I.R.L. Agenda Prepare Girl Advocates , G.I.R.L. Agenda Mobilize Communities

Unseatbelted Florence woman killed in single vehicle crash
Oregon State Police - 05/14/18 12:28 PM

On May 12, 2018 at about 2:40am, Reedsport PD received a report that a motorist had seen taillights in a ditch on Hwy 138W near Elkton. Police, Fire, and Medical personnel were dispatched to the area to investigate.

A 2002 Nissan SUV was located approximately 150 feet off the roadway.  The operator and lone occupant of the vehicle, Leona Robb 67 years of age from Florence, was not wearing a seat belt and was ejected from the vehicle.

Preliminary investigation indicates that the driver was not conscious when the vehicle left the roadway.


Suspected Arsonist arrested for 11 Cave Junction fires
Oregon State Police - 05/14/18 12:08 PM

On the evening of May 10, 2018, eleven fires were set in the Cave Junction area of Josephine County. 

Illinois Valley Fire Department, Oregon State Police Arson Detectives, and the Josephine County Sheriff’s Department worked together during the investigation to establish a suspect.

The suspect Evelyn Barrera was located by an OSP Patrol Trooper and taken into custody on May 11, 2018. Barrera was lodged at the Josephine County Jail.

http://jailviewer.co.josephine.or.us/Home/BookingSearchDetail?BookingNumber=B18016052

Detectives are continuing the investigation.


UPDATE!! 173rd FW postpones ribbon cutting ceremony for new recruiting office in Klamath Falls
Oregon Military Department - 05/14/18 11:55 AM

This event has been POSTPONED until a later date.  We will update you when a new date has been set.

KLAMATH FALLS, Ore. – There will be a ribbon cutting ceremony Wednesday, May 16 at 11:45 a.m. for the new 173rd Fighter Wing recruiting center office, located at the Recruiting Career Center in Klamath Falls, Oregon.  Media are invited to attend.

The office opened in April, and Master Sgt. Darren Bennett, 173rd FW Recruiting Manager, said they have already increased the number of walk-in leads by nearly 75%.

 “This is a fantastic opportunity for the recruiters to connect with the Klamath Falls community and reach our manning goals for the Oregon Air National Guard,” added Bennett.

U.S. Air Force Major General Michael Stencel, the Adjutant General for Oregon, will lead the event.  Following the ribbon cutting ceremony, Stencel will enlist the newest member to the Oregon Air National Guard.

What: 173rd FW Recruiting Office ribbon cutting ceremony

When:  Wednesday, May 16 at 11:45 a.m. (please arrive no later than 10 minutes prior)

Where:  Klamath Falls Recruiting Career Center, 3160 South 6th St. Klamath Falls, Ore. 97603

Note:  Please contact the wing’s public affairs office at 541-885-6677 to coordinate coverage of the event.

-30-


Conference of Local Health Officials meets May 17 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 05/14/18 9:27 AM

May 14, 2018

Conference of Local Health Officials meets May 17 in Portland

What: The monthly conference meeting of the Conference of Local Health Officials (CLHO)

Agenda: Committee appointments; OHA organizational realignment; public health accountability process measures; public health modernization funding formula; tobacco prevention and education program element; CDC health promotion and chronic disease prevention funding opportunities; tuberculosis funding formula; marijuana tax distribution to counties; reactivation of Public Health Nursing Supervisors Caucus. The meeting agenda and related materials are posted on the CLHO website at https://oregonclho.org/about/clho-meetings/.

When: May 17, 9:30-11:30 a.m. The meeting is open to the public. No conference call option is available for the public.

Where: Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St., Room 1E, Portland.

The Conference of Local Health Officials provides recommendations to the Oregon Health Authority on the foundational capabilities and programs, and any other public health program or activity under ORS 431.147 (ORS 431.340).

Program contact: Danna Drum, 971-673-1223, um@state.or.us">danna.k.drum@state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sing language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Danna Drum at 971-673-1223, 711 TTY or um@state.or.us">danna.k.drum@state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 


Motorcyclist dies in crash on Hwy 223
Oregon State Police - 05/14/18 8:11 AM

On Sunday May 13, 2018 around 4:30pm, Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Highway 223 near Dallas.

Preliminary investigation shows a 2009 Harley-Davidson motorcycle, operated by Shawn Berry, age 43, of Nevada was travelling EB on Hwy 223 when a 2017 Toyota Sienna Van operated by Kathleen Teal, age 67, of Dallas entered Hwy 223 from a private driveway in the motorcycles path.  Berry suffered fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene.

Highway 223 was closed in both direction for four hours following the crash.  OSP was assisted by the Polk County Sheriff Office, City of Dallas Fire and ODOT.

 


Sun. 05/13/18
DUII Crash into a Power Pole (Photo)
Bend Police Dept. - 05/13/18 8:44 PM
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Date: Sunday, May 13, 2018

Case #2018-137943

 

Date and Time of Incident: May 13, 2018 at 5:41 PM

 

Type of Incident: Motor Vehicle Crash into a Power Pole/DUII Arrest

Location of Incident: Boyd Acres Rd/Lamoine Ln, Bend.

Suspect: Nicholas Fortin, 27 year old Bend resident.

Suspect vehicle: 2008 Ford F150

Charge: Driving While Under the Influence, Reckless Driving, Criminal Mischief II

 

On May 13, 2018, the Bend Police responded to a reported hit and run to a power pole at Boyd Acres Rd near Lamoine Ln.  Officers arrived on scene and located the vehicle and single occupant, uninjured, a short distance away from the motor vehicle crash.  The driver, Nicholas Fortin, was traveling south bound on Boyd Acres Rd near Lamoine Lane where he was traveling too fast to negotiate the curve.  He lost control of the vehicle, striking landscaping rocks and then a power pole, snapping it in half. 

The road was was closed to a single lane of travel during the time the power lines were down on the roadway.  Pacific Power is still on scene restoring power to the residents.   

The driver of the truck Nicholas Fortin was arrested for driving while under the influence, reckless driving, and criminal mischief II.  He was lodged at the Deschutes County Jail.

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2018-05/5593/114378/Boyd_Acres_Crash.png , 2018-05/5593/114378/Boyd_Acres_Crash_of_truck.png