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Bend/Central-Eastern Oregon News Releases for Wed. Jul. 24 - 5:13 am
Police & Fire
Conflagration invoked for Durkee Fire in Baker County
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 07/21/24 1:51 PM

SALEM, Ore. - On Saturday, Oregon Governor Tina Kotek invoked the Emergency Conflagration Act for the Durkee Fire in Baker County. The fire sparked Wednesday and continues to grow, threatening communities. The Baker and Malheur County sheriffs’ offices have levels 2 and 3 evacuation notices in place. 

As of Sunday morning, the fire was estimated to be 116,431 acres and zero percent contained. This fire is managed by the teams assigned to the nearby Cow Valley Fire in Malheur County.

Oregon is expecting another round of lightning and gusty winds over the next 24 hours. Red Flag Warnings extend across much of the state through Sunday. Oregonians are asked to pay extremely close attention to this critical fire danger and take the necessary steps to avoid sparking a fire. As of Sunday morning, there were 81 active fires that burned 504,692 acres in Oregon.

"This latest round of weather is extremely concerning,” Oregon State Fire Marshal Mariana Ruiz-Temple said. “Our firefighters are doing everything thing they can to rise to this immense challenge, but they are taxed, and we need our fellow Oregonians’ help. Please take precautions to avoid sparking a human-caused fire, be familiar with evacuation levels, and have a go-kit ready in case you need to leave your home.”

The OSFM has resources assigned to the following:

  • Lone Rock/Boneyard Fire (Gilliam, Morrow, Grant, and Wheeler counties)
  • Falls Fire (Harney and Grant counties)
  • Durkee Fire (Baker and Malheur counties)
  • Battle Mountain Complex (Grant and Umatilla counties)

Evacuations are ordered through the local sheriff’s offices. For information about updates, please follow the respective agency on social media.

The OSFM is continually monitoring capacity within the Oregon Fire Mutual Aid System to be ready to respond to new fires if resources are needed. The conditions Oregon is seeing are dynamic, complex, and changing. The OSFM cannot thank the Oregon structural fire service enough for the tireless work these firefighters put in over the last two weeks.

While we remain in constant contact with the structural fire service, we are also working in lockstep with the Oregon Department of Forestry, the Bureau of Land Management, tribal partners, and the U.S. Forest Service.

For updates on the fires the OSFM has resources mobilized, visit www.osfminfo.org

Information Resources


OSFM sends firefighters and equipment to Durkee Fire in Baker County, more out-of-state resources arrive
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 07/19/24 3:35 PM

SALEM, Ore. – On Friday, the Oregon State Fire Marshal sent structural protection resources to the Durkee Fire in Baker County through Immediate Response. The fire was reported Wednesday night off Interstate 84 near the community of Durkee. It has grown substantially since it was first ignited, prompting new level 3 evacuation notices.  

As of this morning, the lightning-sparked fire was estimated to be 2,699 acres and zero percent contained. 

On Friday, the Boneyard Fire in Grant County was put under the conflagration declared for the nearby Lone Rock Fire and is being managed by the OSFM’s Red Incident Management Team. The OSFM sent structural task forces to protect homes near the town of Monument. That fire is extremely active and continues to pose a threat to nearby communities. The fire was reported to be 3,123 acres as of Friday mid-day. 

Wildfires continue to tax resources and conditions remain at critical levels without much relief in the forecast. The Oregon State Fire Marshal requested and received three strike teams from California.  

The California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services (Cal OES) sent three strike teams with 15 fire engines and 80 firefighters. These added structural protection resources are assigned to the Falls Fire in Harney County. The firefighters and equipment are from local government fire agencies from Alameda, Calaveras, Kern, Merced, Nevada, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Francisco, and San Joaquin counties. This is made possible through the Emergency Management Assistance Compact.

“Our partnerships with California and Washington are strong,” Oregon State Fire Marshal Mariana Ruiz-Temple said. “Over the years, we’ve worked side-by-side to provide aid in times of need. These partnerships are invaluable. I want to say thank you to both California and Washington. Oregon will have your back if you need support in the future.”  

Since July 9, the Emergency Conflagration Act was invoked for five fires, causing a significant strain on resources. The OSFM is working in lockstep with its wildland partners at the Oregon Department of Forestry, Bureau of Land Management, tribal partners, the U.S. Forest Service, and others.  

The Oregon fire service has been resolute over the past 10 days. They’ve supported 23 task forces consisting of 305 firefighters, 92 engines, and 23 water tenders to protect communities while still maintaining staffing and equipment levels in their home districts. 

"I want to assure Oregonians that we are doing everything we can to respond to this wildfire emergency,” Ruiz-Temple said. “We have been working around the clock to protect communities across the state impacted by these wildfires.” 

The OSFM is asking Oregonians and visitors to pay close attention to the critical fire danger and take steps to avoid sparking another fire. With another round of lightning and gusty winds expected in the coming week, it is more important than ever to take these precautions. 


Conflagration invoked for Umatilla County wildfires, OSFM mobilizing firefighters, incident management team
Oregon State Fire Marshal - 07/17/24 11:17 PM

SALEM, Ore. – On Wednesday night, Oregon Governor Tina Kotek invoked the Emergency Conflagration Act for a series of fires in Umatilla County near Pilot Rock. The OSFM is mobilizing its Green Incident Management Team and three structural task forces from Benton, Marion, and Polk counties. One of those task forces was sent earlier in the afternoon through Immediate Response along with a type 1 helicopter.  

Significant lightning storms moved through Umatilla County Wednesday afternoon and have kept local fire agencies busy responding to wildfires. Gusty winds and dry conditions caused some of these fires to grow exponentially and threaten life and property.  

“The conditions our firefighters are up against are extraordinarily challenging and we are working to provide the needed resources to protect our communities from many wildfires burning across the state,” Oregon State Fire Marshal Mariana Ruiz-Temple said. “I can’t stress enough the importance of preventing any new fires and being prepared in case you need to evacuate.” 

The Umatilla County Sheriff’s Office has Level 3 (Go Now) evacuation notices in place. For the latest on evacuations, please follow the Umatilla County Sheriff on Facebook. Shelters are set up at the Pendleton Convention Center, 1601 Westgate in Pendleton, and Grant Union High School, 911 S Canyon Blvd in John Day.  

For information on being prepared for wildfire visit https://wildfire.oregon.gov/prepare 

The Emergency Conflagration Act allows the state fire marshal to mobilize state resources to protect life and property. Following ORS 476.510-476.610, Governor Kotek determined that threats to life, safety, and property exist because of the fire, and the threats exceed the capabilities of local firefighting personnel and equipment. 


Fatal Crash - Interstate 5 - Linn County
Oregon State Police - 07/22/24 1:22 PM

Linn County, Ore 21 July 24- On Sunday, July 21, 2024, at 2:09 a.m., Oregon State Police responded to a two-vehicle crash on Interstate 5, near milepost 222, in Linn County.

The preliminary investigation indicated a northbound Lexus GS, operated by Isael Garcia (23) of Woodburn, rear-ended a northbound Toyota Camry, operated by Justin Michael Palmer (37) of La Center (WA).

The operator of the Toyota (J. Palmer) suffered reportedly serious injuries and was transported to an area hospital. 

A passenger in the Toyota, Scott Alan Palmer (53) of Camarillo (CA), was declared deceased at the scene.

The operator of the Lexus (Garcia) suffered reportedly minor injuries. Garcia was medically cleared and arrested for DUII.

The highway was impacted for approximately six hours during the on-scene investigation. The investigation is on-going.

OSP was assisted by the Linn County Sheriff's Office and ODOT.

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About the Oregon State Police
Oregon State Police (OSP) is a multi-disciplined organization that is charged with protecting the people, wildlife, and natural resources in Oregon. OSP enforces traffic laws on the state’s roadways, investigates and solves crime, conducts postmortem examinations and forensic analysis, and provides background checks, and law enforcement data. The agency regulates gaming and enforces fish, wildlife, and natural resource laws. OSP is comprised of more than 1,400 staff members – including troopers, investigators, and professional staff – who provide a full range of policing and public safety services to Oregon and other law enforcement agencies throughout Oregon.


Fatal Crash - HWY 730 - Morrow County
Oregon State Police - 07/22/24 11:50 AM

Morrow County, Ore. 19 July 24- On Friday, July 19, 2024, at 3:10 p.m., Oregon State Police responded to a two-vehicle crash on Hwy-730, near milepost 173, in Morrow County,

The preliminary investigation indicated a westbound Jeep Wrangler, operated by Anthony Daulton (41) of Las Vegas (NV), crossed into the eastbound lane for unknown reasons and struck an eastbound Nissan King Cab pickup, operated by Abraham Figuerou-Ayala (51) of Umatilla, head-on.

The operator of the Nissan (Figuerou-Ayala) and passenger, a male juvenile, were declared deceased at the scene.

The operator of the Jeep (Daulton) and passenger, Clarissa Ann Daulton (41) of Las Vegas (NV), suffered reported serious injuries and were transported to a local hospital.

The highway was impacted for approximately five hours during the on-scene investigation. The cause of the crash is under investigation.

OSP was assisted by Boardman Fire, Irrigon Fire, Morrow County Sheriff's Office, and ODOT. 

# # # 

About the Oregon State Police
Oregon State Police (OSP) is a multi-disciplined organization that is charged with protecting the people, wildlife, and natural resources in Oregon. OSP enforces traffic laws on the state’s roadways, investigates and solves crime, conducts postmortem examinations and forensic analysis, and provides background checks, and law enforcement data. The agency regulates gaming and enforces fish, wildlife, and natural resource laws. OSP is comprised of more than 1,400 staff members – including troopers, investigators, and professional staff – who provide a full range of policing and public safety services to Oregon and other law enforcement agencies throughout Oregon.

Contact Info:
Public Information Officer 
Oregon State Police 
Media Email: OSPPIO@osp.oregon.gov 
www.oregon.gov/OSP


Fatal Crash - HWY 26 - Clackamas County
Oregon State Police - 07/22/24 11:31 AM

Clackamas County, Ore. 21 July 24- On Sunday, July 21, 2024, at 1:45 p.m., Oregon State Police responded to a three-vehicle crash on Hwy-26, near milepost 32, in Clackamas County.

The preliminary investigation indicated a westbound Volkswagen Tiguan, operated by a female juvenile, entered the eastbound lanes for unknown reasons and struck an eastbound BMW 540, operated by Matthew Dorsett (32) of Redmond (WA), head on. The BMW spun into the westbound lanes and was struck by a westbound Tesla T3, operated by Renee Ann Dejarnatt (40) of Portland.

The operator of the BMW (M. Dorsett) and passenger, Claire Elise Kidd Dorsett (31) of Redmond (WA), were declared deceased at the scene. 

The operator of the Volkswagen (female juvenile) suffered reported minor injures and was transported to a local medical center.

The operator of the Tesla (Dejarnatt) suffered reported minor injuries and was transported to a local medical center.

The highway was impacted for approximately six hours during the on-scene investigation. The cause of the crash is currently under investigation and no further information is available for release at this time.

OSP was assisted by Hoodland Fire and the Clackamas County Sheriff's Office.

 

# # #

 

About the Oregon State Police
Oregon State Police (OSP) is a multi-disciplined organization that is charged with protecting the people, wildlife, and natural resources in Oregon. OSP enforces traffic laws on the state’s roadways, investigates and solves crime, conducts postmortem examinations and forensic analysis, and provides background checks, and law enforcement data. The agency regulates gaming and enforces fish, wildlife, and natural resource laws. OSP is comprised of more than 1,400 staff members – including troopers, investigators, and professional staff – who provide a full range of policing and public safety services to Oregon and other law enforcement agencies throughout Oregon.


Fatal Crash - Interstate 84 - Hood River County
Oregon State Police - 07/19/24 2:05 PM

Hood River County, Ore. 18 July 24- On Thursday, July 18, 2024, at 12:45 a.m., Oregon State Police responded to a two-vehicle crash on Interstate 84, near milepost 54, in Hood River County.

The preliminary investigation indicated a westbound Ford Econoline AMR Ambulance, operated by Amanda Hancock (42) of Benton City (WA), left the lane of travel and struck a Chevrolet Camaro, operated by Geraldean Edna Martin (55) of Portland, while it was disabled on the side of the roadway with a flat tire. The Chevrolet operator was outside of the vehicle at the time of the collision.

The operator of the Chevrolet (Martin) was declared deceased at the scene.

The operator of the Ford (Hancock) and passengers, Amy Ann Young (28) of Pasco (WA) and Jonathan David Farmer (23) of Pendleton, were not injured during the collision. Farmer was a patient in the ambulance at the time of the crash.

The highway was impacted for approximately four hours during the on-scene investigation. The cause of the crash is under investigation at this time and no further information is available for release.

OSP was assisted by the Hood River County Sheriff's Office and ODOT.

 

# # #

 

About the Oregon State Police
Oregon State Police (OSP) is a multi-disciplined organization that is charged with protecting the people, wildlife, and natural resources in Oregon. OSP enforces traffic laws on the state’s roadways, investigates and solves crime, conducts postmortem examinations and forensic analysis, and provides background checks, and law enforcement data. The agency regulates gaming and enforces fish, wildlife, and natural resource laws. OSP is comprised of more than 1,400 staff members – including troopers, investigators, and professional staff – who provide a full range of policing and public safety services to Oregon and other law enforcement agencies throughout Oregon.


Brush fire on Skyline Ranch Rd 7-22-24 (Photo)
Bend Fire & Rescue - 07/22/24 6:33 PM
2024-07/6802/173995/Skyline_Ranch_Rd_fire_photo_7-22-24.jpeg
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http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/6802/173995/thumb_Skyline_Ranch_Rd_fire_photo_7-22-24.jpeg

Bend Fire Department responded to a fire on Skyline Ranch Rd just west of Awbrey Glen Golf Course this afternoon just before 4pm. A neighbor was returning home and spotted a tree smoldering in the middle of a dry grass field and called 911. As the first arriving crew arrived the fire started to spread into the grass and be carried by the wind. Within minutes the fire had grown to ¼ acre and started spreading fast. The first arriving fire engines were assisted by a water tender from Shevlin Sand and Gravel to stop the fire but not before reaching nearly an acre in size. Strong, variable winds played a factor in the speed of growth of this fire. 

Crews were able to quickly stop the grass fire before it reached any trees or the small barn at the south end of the field. The tree was struck by lightning the nigh before and had been smoldering since then. The tree was not smoking earlier in the day but as the weather warmed up and the winds increased the fire started to spread. 

An earlier smoldering fire was extinguished around 230pm in a large open lot east of Caldera High School. The fire was noted by passerby's and called in. The smoldering area was extinguished before it could spread to any brush and trees near by, keeping it to less than 100 sq. feet, cause unknown. 

 




Attached Media Files: 2024-07/6802/173995/Skyline_Ranch_Rd_fire_photo_7-22-24.jpeg

Bend man arrested for armed robbery of marijuana dispensary
Bend Police Dept. - 07/23/24 8:08 PM

Date: July 23, 2024

Case #: 2024-00042313

Incident: One arrested for armed robbery of marijuana dispensary 

Date / Time of Incident: July 23, 2024 / 4:38 p.m. 

Location: Top Shelf Medicine, 800 block of NE Greenwood Avenue, Bend 

Arrested: Russell Ian Boggess, 41-year-old Bend resident 

Offenses: Attempted Murder, Robbery I, Unlawful Use of a Weapon, Assault IV x2, Assault II, Harassment, Menacing x3, Interference with a 911 call, Felon in Possession of Firearm

A 41-year-old Bend man was arrested after robbing a marijuana dispensary with a handgun on Tuesday, July 23. 

Bend Police responded to Top Shelf Medicine in the 800 block of NE Greenwood Avenue at approximately 4:38 p.m. after an employee called 911 to report that she’d been struck in the face and threatened with a handgun before the suspect took a bag of marijuana and walked out the door. The suspect attempted to fire two shots at the employee, but the handgun malfunctioned.  

Other employees put the suspect, identified as Russell Boggess, into a headlock and held him until officers arrived less than a minute later. Two employees were injured while they restrained Boggess.

Boggess was taken into custody at 4:41 p.m. and officers used a wrap device to restrain him. He was transported to the Bend Police Department, then to St. Charles Bend. When he’s cleared at the hospital, he will be booked into the Deschutes County Jail on suspicion of the above charges. 


Madras Man Arrested By CODE Detectives for Fentanyl and Methamphetamine in Jefferson County (Photo)
Central Oregon Drug Enforcement (CODE) - 07/19/24 9:47 PM
Scene2
Scene2
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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: July 19th, 2024

Released by: Sergeant Kent Vander Kamp 

Madras, OR – 

A Madras man is now facing charges related to the trafficking of controlled substances after the Central Oregon Drug Enforcement Team executed a two search warrants in Jefferson County.

On July 19th, 2024, around 4:30 PM, the Central Oregon Drug Enforcement Team concluded a long-term investigation and surveillance operation with the apprehension of Christopher Crawford, a 34-year-old man from Madras, Oregon.

Christopher Crawford was identified by drug agents as a trafficker of fentanyl and methamphetamine in Jefferson County, Oregon. The initial investigation suggests that Mr. Crawford selling large quantities of fentanyl pills and methamphetamine from his home on the 200 block of SW “C” Street, within the city of Madras.

Following a multi-day surveillance operation, CODE Detectives, in collaboration with Central Oregon Emergency Response Team and the Jefferson County Sheriff deputies, intercepted Mr. Crawford while he was working in a Madras retail store. Minutes later, the CERT Team executed a search warrant at his home. 

CODE detectives located Mr. Crawford's vehicle in front of a retail store as he was working.  CODE narcotics detection K9 “Bonnie” was deployed and signaled her handler to the presence of a controlled substance within the Acura. 

CODE Detectives successfully applied for and obtained a search warrant for Crawford’s Acura and home. 

A subsequent search of Crawford, his home and Acura uncovered a commercial quantity of methamphetamine and counterfeit Oxycodone tablets containing fentanyl, powered fentanyl, a large amount of cash and several knives he is prohibited from carrying.

Mr. Crawford was lodged in the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Jail with the following charges. 

Unlawful Possession of Methamphetamine - Substantial Quantity

Unlawful Manufacture of Methamphetamine - Substantial Quantity

Unlawful Distribution of Methamphetamine - Substantial Quantity

Unlawful Possession of Fentanyl

Felon in Possession of a Restricted Weapon

Unlawful Possession and Attempted Distribution of Methamphetamine

Criminal complaints contain only charges; defendants are presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

CONTACT FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:  Sgt. Kent Vander Kamp, 541-550-4869 or kentv@deschutes.org 

The Central Oregon Drug Enforcement (CODE) team is a multi-jurisdictional narcotics task force supported by the Oregon-Idaho High-Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) program and the following Central Oregon law enforcement agencies: Bend Police Department, Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, Redmond Police Department, Prineville Police Department, Crook County Sheriff’s Office, Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office, Madras Police Department, Oregon State Police, Sunriver Police Department, Black Butte Police Department, United States Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Warm Springs Tribal Police Department, Deschutes, Crook, and Jefferson County District Attorney’s, and the Oregon National Guard.

The CODE team is a multi-jurisdictional narcotics task force that identifies, disrupts, and dismantles local, multi-state, and international drug trafficking organizations using an intelligence-driven, multi-agency prosecutor-supported approach. CODE is supported by the Oregon-Idaho High-Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) which is composed of members from the Oregon-Idaho HIDTA program.

The Oregon-Idaho HIDTA program is an Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) sponsored counterdrug grant program that coordinates with and provides funding resources to multi-agency drug enforcement initiatives, including the CODE.

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Attached Media Files: Scene2 , Scene1

Jackpine Fire (Photo)
Deschutes County Sheriff's Office - 07/23/24 12:41 PM
2024-07/5227/173947/Jackpine_Fire_1.jpeg
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UPDATE July 23, 2024 12:40pm

Released by: Sergeant Nathan Garibay

Release Date: July 23, 2024

Location: Masten Road

After consultation with the Incident Commander of the Jackpine Fire, the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office is lowering all evacuation levels around the Jackpine Fire to Level 1: Be Ready. This includes the area west of Highway 97, south of Masten Rd., east of the Little Deschutes River to the county line.

UPDATE July 19, 2024 08:30pm

Avoid Highway 97 north of Highway 31 due to fire activity at the highway. North and southbound lanes are currently closed. Please use alternate routes due to the Jackpine Fire.

Klamath County Sheriff’s Office issued a Level 1: Be Ready for both sides of Hwy 97 south of the Deschutes County line including Long Prairie.

End of Update

Deschutes County Sheriff's Office is on scene monitoring the Jackpine Fire on Masten Road. The following evacuation notice has been issued:

Level 2 Be Set: West of Highway 97 and South of Masten Rd. to the county line.

Find current evacuation areas at: deschutes.org/emergency

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is a full-service agency that oversees the adult jail, provides patrol, criminal investigations, civil process and search and rescue operations. Special units include SWAT, Marine Patrol, ATV Patrol, Forest Patrol, along with five K9 teams. Founded in 1916 and today led by your duly elected Sheriff L. Shane Nelson, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office serves over 200,000 residents in Deschutes County. The agency has 259 authorized and funded personnel, which includes 193 sworn employees who provide services to the 3,055 square miles of Deschutes County.




Attached Media Files: 2024-07/5227/173947/Jackpine_Fire_1.jpeg , 2024-07/5227/173947/Jackpine_Fire_97_Closure.jpeg

Wickiup Fire Update (Photo)
Deschutes County Sheriff's Office - 07/22/24 11:25 AM
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July 22, 2024 Update

After consultation with the Incident Commander of the Wickiup and Round Mountain Fires, the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office is lowering all evacuation levels around the Wickiup Fire to Level 1: Be Ready. This includes the Haner Park area and the Deschutes National Forest between Forest Service Road 4262 and Forest Service Road 44, south of South Century Drive (FS 42) and Burgess Road (FS 43).  

There is a forest closure in effect for that area for community and firefighter safety.

Release Date: July 17, 2024

Location:  National Forest area near Wickiup Reservoir

Deschutes County Sheriff's Office is currently on scene assisting with evacuations near Wickiup Reservoir. The following evacuation levels have been issued: 

Level 3 Go Now: National Forest area north of Wickiup, Forest Service Road 4262 and Forest Service Road 4380 and south of Forest Service Road 42 (South Century Drive)

Level 2 Be Set: National Forest area between Road 4380 and the Deschutes River including Bull Bend and Wyeth Campgrounds and private inholdings along the west side of the river at Haner Park 

Level 1 Be Ready: Haner Park subdivision east of the Deschutes River

Find current evacuation areas at: deschutes.org/emergency

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is a full-service agency that oversees the adult jail, provides patrol, criminal investigations, civil process and search and rescue operations. Special units include SWAT, Marine Patrol, ATV Patrol, Forest Patrol, along with five K9 teams. Founded in 1916 and today led by your duly elected Sheriff L. Shane Nelson, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office serves over 200,000 residents in Deschutes County. The agency has 259 authorized and funded personnel, which includes 193 sworn employees who provide services to the 3,055 square miles of Deschutes County.




Attached Media Files: 2024-07/5227/173894/National_Forest_area_near_Wickiup.jpeg

Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Internet Crimes Against Children Unit Arrest La Pine Man (Photo)
Deschutes County Sheriff's Office - 07/19/24 12:48 PM
Media Release
Media Release
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Released by: Sergeant Thomas Lilienthal

Release Date: July 19, 2024

Location: 52000 Block of Drafter Rd, La Pine, OR

 

Arrested: Richard Jay Jackson, 61-year-old male, La Pine, OR 

Charges: 

  • 10x Encouraging Child Sexual Abuse in the First Degree ORS 163.684
  • 10x Encouraging Child Sexual Abuse in the Second Degree ORS 163.686
  • 1x Unlawful Possession of Methamphetamine ORS 475.894
  • 1x Unlawful Delivery of Methamphetamine ORS 475.890

 

NARRATIVE:

On June 28th, 2024, The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office Internet Crimes Against Children (ICAC) detectives received a Cybertip from the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children (NCMEC) regarding a social media account that was distributing Child Sex Abuse Material (CSAM). A preliminary investigation determined that this account was being operated by Richard Jay Jackson of La Pine. The ICAC unit also learned that the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office Street Crimes Unit was also looking into Jackson on suspicion of drug sales. Search warrants were served to online providers to begin this investigation.

 

On July 8th, 2024, Street Crimes detectives conducted a separate search warrant for their drug investigation at Jackson’s residence. Subsequent to their search warrant, the Street Crimes Unit arrested Jackson for the aforementioned drug crimes and seized drugs, packaging material, and Jackson’s cellular telephone to continue their investigation.

 

On July 12th, 2024, ICAC detectives executed a search warrant for their investigation on Jackson’s seized cellular telephone. This search was conducted by the Bend Police Department Digital Forensics Unit and uncovered a sizable number of videos depicting Child Sex Abuse Material on Jackson’s device. Jackson was still in custody at the Deschutes County Adult Jail on his drug charges. As such, was charged with the aforementioned child sex abuse charges.

 

On July 19th, 2024, ICAC detectives with the assistance of the Criminal Investigations unit and Digital Forensics unit executed a search warrant at Jackson’s trailer and seized additional electronic storage devices capable of storing Child Sex Abuse Material.

 

This investigation is ongoing. Further search warrants will be sought for the analysis of the seized digital devices and data from electronic service providers, which may result in future charges being filed. No further information will be released at this time.

 

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is a full-service agency that oversees the adult jail, provides patrol, criminal investigations, civil process and search and rescue operations. Special units include SWAT, Marine Patrol, ATV Patrol, Forest Patrol, along with five K9 teams. Founded in 1916 and today led by your duly elected Sheriff L. Shane Nelson, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office serves over 200,000 residents in Deschutes County. The agency has 259 authorized and funded personnel, which includes 193 sworn employees who provide services to the 3,055 square miles of Deschutes County.




Attached Media Files: Media Release

Redmond Police Alert Public to Scam Attempts
Redmond Police Dept. - 07/23/24 3:27 PM

The Redmond Police Department (RPD) has fielded multiple calls today from citizens regrading an attempted scam. Each person stated they received a call from the Redmond Police Department’s business phone number. The person on the line represented themselves as a Redmond Police Officer and was attempting to obtain personal information from citizens. The caller is using the guise of a missed jury summons. 

Please know the Redmond Police Department is not calling citizens and soliciting personal information over the phone. NEVER give your banking or other financial information to anyone representing themselves as a Redmond Police Officer. If you have received this call and did give information over the phone, call your bank or financial institution immediately and report suspected fraud. 

If you’re ever skeptical regarding if you are speaking to a member of the Redmond Police Department you can confirm the members identity by calling our business line at 541-504-3400 or non-emergency dispatch at 541-693-6911. 

  

 


Redmond Police Respond to Serious Motorcycle Crash (Photo)
Redmond Police Dept. - 07/23/24 10:57 AM
Motorcycle crash
Motorcycle crash
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Redmond, OR - Tuesday, July 22, at 10:14 p.m., the Redmond Police Department along with Redmond Fire and Rescue responded to a motor vehicle accident near the intersection of NW Maple Avenue and NW 22nd Street. The accident involved a Jeep sports utility vehicle and a Kawasaki motorcycle.  

 

The rider of the motorcycle, a 19-year-old Redmond man, was transported to St. Charles in Bend with life threatening injuries. The driver of the Jeep SUV, a 59-year-old Redmond man called 911 following the crash, remained on scene and was determined to be uninjured. The Oregon State Police also responded to assist by conducting a crash scene reconstruction. 

 

The Redmond Police Department would like to thank the Oregon State Police as well as the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, who responded to Redmond calls for service as the crash was being investigated. The investigation is ongoing as of today, and cause of the accident has not been determined. 




Attached Media Files: Motorcycle crash

Transportation
I-84 closures scheduled in Eastern Oregon starting tonight (Photo)
ODOT: East. Ore. - 07/22/24 8:15 PM
The Durkee Fire burns near I-84 on Monday, July 22.
The Durkee Fire burns near I-84 on Monday, July 22.
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I-84 between Pendleton and Ontario will close for the next three to five nights to manage the Durkee Fire currently burning west of the interstate. 

The closures will begin at 7 p.m. with all lanes open again by 5 a.m. the following day. If other highways need to be closed in the area, they will be closed during the same time.

A full closure will allow fire crews to safely conduct large-scale fuel reduction burnouts.

Travelers are encouraged to delay their trip during these closures until roads are safe. If you must travel, consult Tripcheck.com and check conditions for your route. Plan an alternate route by staying on main highways. Do not follow GPS directions or detour on county or forest roads as these are not suitable for interstate traffic and may have ongoing fire activity.




Attached Media Files: The Durkee Fire burns near I-84 on Monday, July 22.

State
Criminal Justice Moral Fitness Workgroup Meeting Scheduled 08-07-24
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 07/22/24 10:45 AM

CRIMINAL JUSTICE MORAL FITNESS

WORKGROUP MEETING

SCHEDULED

 

Notice of Scheduled Meeting

The DPSST Criminal Justice Moral Fitness Workgroup will meet at 1:00 pm on Wednesday, August 7, 2024, in the Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. For further information, please contact Jennifer Howald at 503-551-3258 or .howald@dpsst.oregon.gov">jennifer.howald@dpsst.oregon.gov.

The meeting will be recorded and posted on the DPSST YouTube page after the meeting: https://www.youtube.com/@DPSST

Agenda Items 

1.   Introductions

2.   Policy Committee Case Review Processes

      Carried over from May 6, 2024, and June 5, 2024

3.   Applicant Review Committee and Pre-employment Standards

      Carried over from June 5, 2024

4.   Follow-up on Pending Action Items or Discussions from Past Meetings

      On-going agenda item

5.   Next Workgroup Meeting: TBD

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law. This meeting will be digitally recorded and posted on the DPSST YouTube page after the meeting. The meeting will also be recorded in the form of written minutes. Discussion of issues will only be conducted by workgroup members. Please be mindful of comments and side conversations.


Telecommunications Policy Committee Meeting Scheduled (08/07/2024)
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 07/18/24 9:58 AM

TELECOMMUNICATIONS POLICY COMMITTEE

MEETING SCHEDULED

 

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Telecommunications Policy Committee of the Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting on August 7, 2024, at 9:00 a.m. in the Governor Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom at the Oregon Public Safety Academy located at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE, Salem, Oregon. For further information, please contact Juan Lopez at (503) 551-3167.

Effective Jan. 1, 2024, the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training will be live streaming all public meetings via YouTube. Meetings will no longer be streamed on Facebook. To view the Telecommunications Policy Committee's live-stream and other recorded videos, please visit DPSST’s official YouTube page at https://www.youtube.com/@DPSST.

Amended Agenda Items

1. Introductions

2. Approve May 1, 2024, Meeting Minutes

3. Administrative Closures Consent Agenda (The following items to be ratified by one vote)

     Presented by Melissa Lang-Bacho

     a. Tabetha Daugherty; DPSST No. 53558

     Basic Emergency Medical Dispatcher and Basic and Intermediate Telecommunicator Certifications

     b. Cassandra Griffith; DPSST No. 43266

     Basic Emergency Medical Dispatcher and Basic, Intermediate, Advanced and Supervisory Telecommunicator Certifications

4. Agency Updates

5. Next Telecommunications Policy Committee Meeting: November 6, 2024, at 9:00 a.m.

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Telecommunications Policy Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


Aircraft and ground firefighters battle Microwave Tower Fire west of Mosier (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/22/24 6:27 PM
Evacuation map for the Microwave Tower Fire in the Columbia Gorge near Mosier.
Evacuation map for the Microwave Tower Fire in the Columbia Gorge near Mosier.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/1072/173994/thumb_Microwave_Fire_evacuation_map.jpg

THE DALLES, Ore. – Residents west of the Columbia Gorge town of Mosier are being told to evacuate as the fast-moving Microwave Tower Fire burns eastward, driven by strong westerly winds of 30 to 35 miles per hour. 

LEVEL 3 - GO NOW! Evacuate immediately from Hwy 30 south the Proctor Rd., east to Huskey Rd and the border of the City of Mosier and west to the Hood River County line.

LEVEL 2 - GET SET to evacuate from the city of Mosier and from Huskey Rd. east to Mosier Creek Rd., and south to Jasper Lane.

A Red Cross shelter for evacuees has been set up at the Hood River Middle School, 1602 May Street, Hood River, OR 97031

Firefighters from ODF’s Unit Office in The Dalles are being aided by Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area U.S. Forest Service and local fire departments in battling the blaze that started west of Rattler Ridge just west of Mosier in the Columbia Gorge. A very large airtanker has been ordered to help on the fire, which was reported at 4 p.m. this afternoon. A task force of fire engines and a dozer from the Larch Creek Fire in south Wasco County are being diverted to assist on the fire. The I-84 freeway currently remains open. 

The fire is burning in grass and timber, pushed eastwards by strong westerly winds of 30 to 35 miles per hour. Earlier this afternoon it was estimated at 100 to 150 acres. Cause is not known at this time. 

Evacuation levels may change quickly given the spread rate of the fire, with new areas being moved into evacuation status. For the most up-to-date evacuation information, please visit the Wasco County Sheriff’s Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/WascoCountySheriff/

                                                              # # #




Attached Media Files: Evacuation map for the Microwave Tower Fire in the Columbia Gorge near Mosier.

Lightning across Oregon reminds everyone to be informed and prepared
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/22/24 12:32 PM

Salem, Ore – Starting this past Wednesday, July 17, and into Sunday, July 21, Oregon experienced two separate lightning events that resulted in over 2,000 strikes across the state, which primarily affected Southern, Central and Eastern Oregon. With multiple crews engaged in initial attack on new fire starts and all of Oregon’s available incident management teams on assignment, now is the time for Oregonians to be prepared for wildfires and help prevent future ignitions. 

Oregonians are urged to actively practice wildfire prevention, prepare their home and a go-bag for evacuation and know where to sign up for alerts. 

How can people help prevent wildfires?

The Oregon Department of Forestry is urging the public to actively practice wildfire prevention as the state works to control over 20 large fires. Additional human-caused fires on the landscape will draw the firefighting efforts away from the lightning-caused fires and put extra strain on ground and aviation resources, which are already spread thin. YOU can help prevent wildfires by:

  • Checking and following your local fire regulations. The majority of the state is either in high or extreme fire danger right now, meaning even the smallest of sparks could start the next large wildfire.
  • Remember that debris burning is prohibited statewide.
    • Return to check on your burn site if you burned earlier in the year.
  • Make sure your car has been recently serviced to avoid faulty parts throwing sparks.
  • Don't drag tow chains.
  • Avoid parking vehicles on tall, dry grass.
  • Recreate responsibly. Where campfires are allowed, make sure your campfire is DEAD OUT before leaving it by drowning it with water, stirring it with a shovel and repeating that process until it is cold to the touch. If there is heat coming off it, there are still embers that could reignite.

How can I prepare my home to be resilient against fire?

The Oregon State Fire Marshal can help you create defensible space. Defensible space is the area around your home and property that’s maintained to prevent wildfire from spreading. Creating and maintaining defensible space is the best protection you can give your home against wildfire. 

A few ideas to protect the first five feet around your home: 

  • Remove leaves, pine needles, and other debris from the roof, gutters, and on top of and underneath decks.
  • Trim tall plants and bushes growing directly under eaves and make sure trees and plants have adequate space from your home and other vegetation.
  • Remove dead and combustible plants and mulch; replace it with decorative rock or gravel.
  • Cover exterior attic vents, soffit vents, and areas below decks and patios with 1/8" metal wire mesh.

Be cautious with using power tools and other equipment that can throw sparks and don’t operate machinery in the heat of the day. Summer is a great time to plan defensible space projects to start working on in the fall when wildfire season is over.

How can I prepare myself in case I need to evacuate? 

The Oregon Department of Emergency Management (OEM) urges everyone to prepare for wildfires and other emergencies by knowing evacuation levels, staying informed, having a plan, and having a go-kit ready. 

Evacuation Levels

  • Oregon follows a three-level evacuation notification system, each structured around safety threat level.
  • Oregonians should become familiar with "Be Ready, Be Set, Go!" evacuation levels to make informed decisions when receiving evacuation notices.
  • OEM urges people to evacuate whenever they feel unsafe, conditions can change rapidly; individuals should always make the best decision for their safety.
  • Following an evacuation, people should not return to the area until public safety officials state it is safe.

Stay Informed

  • Stay informed sign up to receive evacuation at, ORAlert.gov remember to update information if need be.
  • Find the websites for your county emergency management, sheriff's office, or tribal police and follow them on social media.
  • Check your phone settingsto ensure wireless emergency alerts are turned on. 

Have a Plan

  • Do you know what to do during an evacuation? This evacuation checklist explains what to do before, during, and after an evacuation.
  • Establish a communication plan with a list of important contacts and a safe place for loved ones to meet if they are separated during an emergency. 
  • Identify multiple evacuation routes from home, work, or school and plan for transportation needs. 
  • People with disabilities should consider individual circumstances and specific needs when planning for evacuation, such as special equipment, transportation, and service animals.
  • Have an evacuation plan for pets, make a pet evacuation kit in a tote bag or pet crate, and plan for transportation and sheltering of large animals such as horses and other livestock.

Make a Go-Kit

  • Assemble an emergency kit of essential supplies that can be grabbed quickly.
  • Pack an easy-to-carry backpack or bag for each household member with health and safety items such as food, water, medication, flashlights, phone chargers, clothing, and important documents. Visit American Red Cross to learn more.

Find more information and resources at Wildfire.Oregon.gov.

Recreate Responsibly

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) encourages visitors to know before they go when it comes to campfire restrictions. Due to the continued low humidity and risk of wildfires, OPRD banned campfires at all Oregon State Parks east of the Cascades as well as at parks in high-risk areas around the state until conditions improve. Most Oregon State Parks currently have a campfire ban. Please check park webpages or the wildfire feature story at stateparks.oregon.gov/ before your next visit. Thank you for helping to reduce the risk of wildfires.




Attached Media Files: 2024-07/1072/173983/Joint_Release-_Lightning_reminds_everyone_to_be_informed_and_prepared-FINAL_.pdf

ODF Northeast Oregon District responds to multiple fire starts after lightning storm; ODF IMT 3 deployed to Battle Mountain Complex
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/18/24 2:00 PM

La Grande, OR—The Oregon Department of Forestry’s (ODF) Northeast District has responded to 17 fires in the last 24 hours as a result of the recent lightning event that moved across Oregon. Three large fires of note are the Durkee Fire, the Snake Fire and the NF Owen Fire, all of which started in the late afternoon and evening of July 17, 2024. 

The district has combined the NF Owen Fire (approx. 400 ac.) and the Snake Fire (approx. 1,000 ac.) to create the Battle Mountain Complex near Ukiah, Oregon. ODF’s Incident Management Team 3 has been deployed to the Battle Mountain Complex and will be inbriefed this afternoon. The team will take unified command of the complex with the Oregon State Fire Marshal’s Green Team at 0900 on Friday, July 19, 2024. They will be working in close partnership with the Umatilla National Forest. 

The Durkee Fire is about 2 miles south of Durkee, Oregon and has currently burned approximately 3,000 acres, 800 of which are on ODF-protected land. The fire is in steep, rocky terrain that is difficult to access. NW Team 6 took command of the fire this morning at 0600. 

ODF Northeast District continues to respond to new fire starts as the day continues. Early detection is integral to successfully putting out new starts. Firefighters will be doing patrols of effected areas, and the district will be utilizing its smoke detection cameras as well. If you see a smoke column, call 9-1-1 immediately. 

The Oregon Department of Forestry is urging Oregonians to actively participate in wildfire prevention and avoid bringing fire hazards on the landscape. With resources spread thin, less human-caused fires can make all the difference and allow resources to focus on the new lightning-caused fires. 

ODF’s Northeast Oregon District is currently in Extreme (red) fire danger and there are additional restrictions for industrial forest operations on lands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry in Northeast Oregon. 

Current fire restrictions for forestlands in Northeast Oregon can be found at www.bmidc.org or by calling the Northeast Oregon Fire Prevention line: (541) 975-3027.

http://bluemountainfireinfo.blogspot.com/ is your spot for current fire information in the Blue Mountains. Find us on Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/oregondeptofforestryNEO/

Call Blue Mountain Interagency Dispatch at (541)963-7171 or dial 9-1-1 to report a fire.  


Draft wildfire hazard maps posted for public comment
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/18/24 9:00 AM

SALEM, Ore. — Draft versions of the statewide wildfire hazard and wildland-urban interface maps are available to the public for review and comment starting today on Oregon State University’s Wildfire Risk Explorer website. 

The wildfire hazard map's purposes are to:

  • Educate Oregon residents and property owners about the level of hazard where they live.
  • Assist in prioritizing fire adaptation and mitigation resources for the most vulnerable locations.
  • Identify where defensible space standards and home hardening codes will apply.

A series of open houses about the state’s new community wildfire risk reduction programs were held from June 3 to July 1 throughout Oregon. It was an opportunity to learn about wildfire hazard assessments, new defensible space and home hardening programs and standards, insurance concerns, and statewide wildfire policy. 

"Defensible space around your home and property is just one of the ways Oregonians can be better prepared for wildfire," Oregon State Fire Marshal Mariana Ruiz-Temple said. "No matter where you live, the simple actions you take to limit where an ember can land and catch fire can make all the difference, saving your home and protecting your community."

“Home hardening standards are extremely important because they help reduce the risk of ignition to the most vulnerable parts of a home by the embers of a wildfire,” said Andrew Stolfi, director of the Department of Consumer and Business Services. “Once the map is finalized, we will then initiate rulemaking to adopt the home hardening standards, which will be followed by a six-month phase-in period for education and outreach. Importantly, the standards will not apply retroactively. They will be required only in new construction, major additions, and such things as replacing a roof or siding if the home is in both a high wildfire hazard zone and the wildland-urban interface.”

Representatives from OSU, ODF, Oregon State Fire Marshal, Department of Consumer and Business Services Building Codes Division and Division of Financial Regulation, and the Wildfire Programs Advisory Council addressed hours of questions at the events and engaged with over 500 community members. 

“The level of engagement at these community meetings was impressive. I attended them all and hundreds of Oregonians had their questions addressed about community wildfire risk reduction programs and how the map supports protecting Oregon’s communities at highest hazard of experiencing wildfire,” said Dave Hunnicutt, Chair of the Wildfire Programs Advisory Council.

At those meetings, early maps depicting wildfire hazard were available, but property tax lot level maps were not yet available. However, draft maps are now ready for Oregonians to see the hazard designation of their specific address, and whether they’re in the wildland-urban interface.

“The maps are still drafts,” said Andy McEvoy, wildfire research scientist at Oregon State University. “The maps won’t become final until we receive input from counties on potential local anomalies, administrative rules are adopted by the Board of Forestry, and we evaluate input from the public.”

The draft maps reflect revisions from the last two years based on input received in 2022 from county governments and the public. Updates include:

  • Adjustments for hay and pasturelands.
  • Adjustments for northwest Oregon forest fuels.
  • Changes based on draft rules to include irrigation of agricultural crops as a mitigating factor in wildfire hazard assessments. Final maps will reflect rules as adopted by the Board of Forestry.

“Work on the wildfire hazard map hasn’t ceased over the last two years,” said Kyle Williams, Deputy Director of Fire Operations at ODF. “ODF and our partners at OSU have worked diligently to evaluate and address concerns about the accuracy of the map. These drafts are still based on the core principles of wildfire science but have been pored through to address expressed concerns. With one more round of public input, we will be well situated to finalize a hazard map that will contribute to advancing wildfire protection in Oregon as the Legislature intended.”

Comments can be sent to dmap@odf.oregon.gov">hazardmap@odf.oregon.govFind more information on ODF’s wildfire hazard web page.


Update: Oregon Department of Human Services announces that Anna Gabriella Villarreal was found
Oregon Dept. of Human Services - 07/23/24 2:07 PM

(Salem) – The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS), Child Welfare Division, is thankful for the community support in finding Anna Gabriella Villarreal. She is a 15-year-old child in foster care who was last seen in Ontario on June 30. She was found July 23. 

Sometimes when a child is missing they may be in significant danger and ODHS may need to locate them to assess and support their safety. As ODHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and assess their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. 


Opioid Settlement Board directs $13 million to substance use disorder treatment infrastructure
Oregon Health Authority - 07/23/24 1:11 PM

July 23, 2024

Media contact: Erica Heartquist, PHD.Communications@oha.oregon.gov

Opioid Settlement Board directs $13 million to substance use disorder treatment infrastructure

State Alcohol and Drug Policy Commission recommended allocation, which OHA will administer

PORTLAND, Ore. – A $13.08 million allocation by the Opioid Settlement Prevention, Treatment & Recovery Board (Settlement Board) will expand and strengthen the state’s access to substance use disorder treatment and services through opioid treatment programs (OTPs) and jails.

The Board approved Alcohol and Drug Policy Commission (ADPC) recommendations July 10. The allocation, which Oregon Health Authority (OHA) will administer, will improve access to medication for opioid use disorder and treatment services by providing:

  • Up to $3.9 million to fund:
    • Two mobile or non-mobile medication units in Clackamas County serving Oregon City and rural Clackamas County.
    • An opioid treatment program or a mobile or non-mobile medication unit in Multnomah County serving the geographic areas of the county with the highest unmet need.
  • Up to $9.1 million to fund a total of seven opioid treatment programs or mobile or non-mobile medication units, specifically:
    • Two in Northeastern Oregon.
    • One in the Mid-Gorge region.
    • One in Klamath County.
    • Two in underserved coastal areas.
    • One in eastern Lane County.

To be eligible for funding, a mobile or non-mobile medication unit or an opioid treatment program must be currently certified by OHA.

  • Up to $250,000 to Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) to provide technical assistance to jails and to foster collaboration between opioid treatment providers and jails.

The funding was awarded to OHA, which will administer the allocations. The Board’s decision can be viewed in a recording of its July 10 meeting here.

Prior to awarding any funding, OHA must engage the partners listed in the ADPC proposal and provide a proposed timeline and implementation plan to the Board for approval no later than Sept. 1, 2024.

Since July 2021, the State of Oregon has reached agreement on national lawsuits against several companies for their role in the opioid crisis. Through these agreements, nearly $600 million will be awarded to Oregon over the course of 18 years. Settlement funds from opioid manufacturers, distributors and pharmacies are divided between the State of Oregon (45%) and local jurisdictions (55%).

The state’s share is deposited as it becomes available into the Opioid Settlement, Prevention, Treatment and Recovery (OSPTR) Fund. This fund is controlled by the 18-member OSPTR Board.

Local jurisdictions receiving settlement funds (those with populations greater than 10,000) decide how their funds are used. Cities and counties are required to report to the Oregon Department of Justice annually on how they have allocated their funds.

For state and local spending details from Fiscal Year 2022-2023, refer to the Oregon Opioid Settlement Spending Report: https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/PREVENTIONWELLNESS/SUBSTANCEUSE/OPIOIDS/Documents/opioid-settlement-report-fy-22-23.pdf.

The OSPTR Board will next consider additional investments in emerging issues.

To learn more about Oregon’s opioid settlement funds, visit oregon.gov/opioidsettlement.

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OHA climate report highlights opportunities to build resilience against wildfires, drought, extreme heat
Oregon Health Authority - 07/19/24 11:18 AM

Link to the report

July 19, 2024

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-246-9139, PHD.Communications@oha.oregon.gov

OHA climate report highlights opportunities to build resilience against wildfires, drought, extreme heat

PORTLAND, Ore.— Communities that have been systemically marginalized continue to bear the brunt of extreme climate effects such as wildfires, drought and heat waves, according to a new Oregon Health Authority (OHA) report. But opportunities abound for building resilience against future disasters.

Publication of the OHA Public Health Division’s annual Climate and Health in Oregon report for 2023 is a stark reminder that as extreme climate effects continue, Oregon must continue to prioritize climate resilience and green infrastructure in communities at greater risk of the health impacts of climate change.

The report says Oregon communities hit hardest by the 2020 wildfires and 2021 heat dome are still recovering. But the report also says local, Tribal and state agencies and community-based organizations are learning from the disasters and have “made investments in strategies to prepare for the uncertain future.”

“The Climate and Health in Oregon report reflects the fact that extreme climate effects are our past, present and future, and we need to accept this reality by better understanding these events and helping communities mitigate the health risks associated with them,” said Cara Biddlecom, OHA’s interim Public Health Division director. “We must support an equitable approach to climate resilience, with community expertise as our guide.”

The Climate and Health in Oregon report shows numerous examples of direct links between heat and wildfire events and heat-related and respiratory illnesses – using emergency department (ED), urgent care, hospitalization and death data, and temperature and air quality data:

  • The number of nights that are warmer than 65 degrees is increasing across Oregon. Warmer nights mean homes without air conditioning do not cool overnight, and people can’t get relief from high daytime temperatures, especially during consecutive days of high heat.
  • OHA is seeing health effects on days when the Heat Index – a measure of how hot it feels when relative humidity is factored in with the actual air temperature – is at or above 80 degrees. In 2023, people sought emergency or urgent care at higher-than-expected levels during high Heat Index days.
  • Although 2021 saw 109 heat-related deaths and 2022 had 22, the eight health-related deaths in 2023 were still more than the annual count of heat-related deaths in the decade before 2021, when the number of heat deaths did not exceed four per year. During 2021-2023, cardiovascular disease was a contributing cause of 25% of heat-related deaths, and people 50 and older accounted for 87% of heat deaths.
  • Levels of particulate matter, or PM2.5, from wildfire smoke are expected to double or triple by the end of the century. The increases in smoke are predicted to cause excess asthma-related ED visits and hospitalizations at a rate of 42 excess asthma events per 10,000 population in 2050. Smoke-related ED visits and hospitalizations for asthma are expected to add nearly $100 million to health care costs in Oregon by that decade.
  • American Indian/Alaska Native, Black/African American and Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander people in Oregon have rates of health care visits for air quality-related respiratory illness that are double or near-double the statewide rate of 22 per 1,000 residents.
  • Twelve counties – Crook, Deschutes, Douglas, Jackson, Jefferson, Josephine, Klamath, Lake, Lane, Linn, Marion and Umatilla – exceed the state average for both air quality days at or above moderate Air Quality Index, or AQI, and heat index above 80 degrees.
  • Nearly 40% of Oregonians (1.7 million) live in the 12 counties that experienced 14 or more days with heat at or above 80 degrees and compromised air quality occurring on the same day during May to September 2023. All these counties are home to Oregonians who report a higher chronic disease burden than the state average.
  • In September 2023, more than half of Oregon’s land area experienced severe drought (52%), while 30% experienced extreme drought.

But the report also points to signs of hope in the form of investments that local, Tribal and state government agencies and nonprofit organizations have made in recent years to help Oregon communities prepare for, better respond to, recover from, and build resilience against future disasters:

  • Oregon public health modernization investments prioritized by Governor’s budgets and legislative appropriations are helping OHA, all local public health authorities, 57 community-based organizations and the nine Federally Recognized Tribes of Oregon identify climate hazards and at-risk populations, and develop and implement protective strategies.
  • OHA’s Public Health Division in 2023 established indicators to measure the public health system’s progress in building community resilience to health effects of climate change, including reducing incidence of heat-related and respiratory illnesses.
  • Also in 2023, state and federal leaders increased investments to protect people in Oregon at highest risk of health effects from climate change-driven risks, to make homes more resilient to extreme weather, and to increase tree canopies statewide to reduce heat island effects.
  • The Oregon Legislature enacted Senate Bill 1536 in 2022, directing OHA to establish an air conditioner and air filter deployment program, which has since provided thousands of devices to low-income households.

The report also spotlights innovative local projects to bolster climate recovery and response, such as Jackson County’s Community Long-Term Recovery Group, which convenes multi-jurisdictional partners to plan post-disaster recovery and resilience operations; an Oregon Resilience Summit to help local agencies and nonprofits share knowledge, gather ideas and showcase local expertise in effective disaster response, recovery and prevention; and Portland Metro Region Heat Mapping Campaign to understand and reduce health impacts of extreme heat by tracking heat distribution patterns. More local projects are highlighted on this page.

“By building resilience to climate change in Oregon communities, we are making significant strides toward our goal of eliminating health inequities in the state by 2030,” Biddlecom said.

For more information, visit www.healthoregon.org/climate.


Recreational use advisory issued for Fairview Lake July 18
Oregon Health Authority - 07/18/24 11:30 AM

July 18, 2024

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, PHD.Communications@oha.oregon.gov

Recreational use advisory issued for Fairview Lake July 18

PORTLAND, Ore.—Oregon Health Authority (OHA) issued a recreational use health advisory today for Fairview Lake due to the presence of a cyanobacteria bloom. The lake is in Multnomah County.

People should avoid swimming and high-speed water activities, such as water skiing or power boating, in areas of the lake where blooms are present, as the major route of exposure is ingestion of water. Toxins are not absorbed through the skin. However, those with skin sensitivities may get a puffy red rash.

OHA encourages people to visit Fairview Lake and enjoy activities such as fishing, camping, hiking, biking, picnicking, bird watching, canoeing and kayaking. Boating is safe as long as speeds do not create excessive water spray. Sprays could lead to the risk of inhaling cyanotoxins.

Drinking water

Drinking water directly from areas of the lake affected by a bloom is especially dangerous. Toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating water with camping-style filters. Contact park management or the local health department with questions about water available at nearby day use areas.

Not all private treatment systems are effective at removing cyanotoxins. People who do not use a well or public water system and draw in-home water directly from an affected area are advised to use an alternative water source.

Children and pets

Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. Dogs can get extremely ill and even die within minutes to hours of exposure to cyanotoxins by drinking the water, licking their fur or eating the toxins from floating mats or dried crust along the shore. This is regardless of a recreational use health advisory in place.

Dogs can become ill and die from water intoxication after drinking excessive amounts of water while swimming or fetching objects for long periods of time. Intoxication is a potentially fatal disturbance in brain function resulting from an imbalance of electrolytes in the body. Water intoxication and heat stroke can cause similar symptoms as exposure to cyanotoxins.

Symptoms

Exposure to cyanotoxins can be serious and cause a range of symptoms. Symptoms may be similar to food poisoning such as stomach cramping, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting. Symptoms may also be more serious, such as numbness, tingling, dizziness and shortness of breath. These symptoms may require medical attention.

Dogs can experience weakness, difficulty walking, seizures, lethargy, loss of appetite and more. If a dog exhibits symptoms, veterinary treatment should be sought as quickly as possible.

Fishing

Fish caught from areas where cyanobacteria blooms are present may pose unknown health risks, so OHA recommends not eating fish from those areas. Those who decide to eat the fish should remove fat, skin and organs before cooking or freezing. Toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water.

For health information or to report an illness, contact OHA at 971-673-0482, or visit OHA’s Cyanobacteria (Harmful Algae) Blooms website.

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Recreational use advisory issued for Turner Lake July 18
Oregon Health Authority - 07/18/24 10:41 AM

July 18, 2024

Media contact: Jonathan Modie, PHD.Communications@oha.oregon.gov

Recreational use advisory issued for Turner Lake July 18

PORTLAND, Ore.—Oregon Health Authority (OHA) issued a recreational use health advisory today for Turner Lake due to the presence of a cyanobacteria bloom. The lake is in Marion County.

People should avoid swimming and high-speed water activities, such as water skiing or power boating, in areas of the lake where blooms are present, as the major route of exposure is ingestion of water. Toxins are not absorbed through the skin. However, those with skin sensitivities may get a puffy red rash.

OHA encourages people to visit Turner Lake and enjoy activities such as fishing, camping, hiking, biking, picnicking, bird watching, canoeing and kayaking. Boating is safe as long as speeds do not create excessive water spray. Sprays could lead to the risk of inhaling cyanotoxins.

Drinking water

Drinking water directly from areas of the lake affected by a bloom is especially dangerous. Toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating water with camping-style filters. Contact campground management or the local health department with questions about water available at nearby campgrounds or day use areas.

Not all private treatment systems are effective at removing cyanotoxins. People who do not use a well or public water system and draw in-home water directly from an affected area are advised to use an alternative water source.

Children and pets

Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. Dogs can get extremely ill and even die within minutes to hours of exposure to cyanotoxins by drinking the water, licking their fur or eating the toxins from floating mats or dried crust along the shore. This is regardless of a recreational use health advisory in place.

Dogs can become ill and die from water intoxication after drinking excessive amounts of water while swimming or fetching objects for long periods of time. Intoxication is a potentially fatal disturbance in brain function resulting from an imbalance of electrolytes in the body. Water intoxication and heat stroke can cause similar symptoms as exposure to cyanotoxins.

Symptoms

Exposure to cyanotoxins can be serious and cause a range of symptoms. Symptoms may be similar to food poisoning such as stomach cramping, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting. Symptoms may also be more serious, such as numbness, tingling, dizziness and shortness of breath. These symptoms may require medical attention.

Dogs can experience weakness, difficulty walking, seizures, lethargy, loss of appetite and more. If a dog exhibits symptoms, veterinary treatment should be sought as quickly as possible.

Fishing

Fish caught from areas where cyanobacteria blooms are present may pose unknown health risks, so OHA recommends not eating fish from those areas. Those who decide to eat the fish should remove fat, skin and organs before cooking or freezing. Toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water.

For health information or to report an illness, contact OHA at 971-673-0482, or visit OHA’s Cyanobacteria (Harmful Algae) Blooms website.

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Oregon Housing and Community Services awarded more than $11 million to increase energy efficiency in affordable housing (Photo)
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 07/22/24 3:48 PM
The Lawrence apartments in Portland, Oregon
The Lawrence apartments in Portland, Oregon
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Part of a nearly $200 million Climate Pollution Reduction Grant awarded to Oregon

SALEM, Ore. —   Oregon Housing and Community Services is set to receive more than $11 million in federal funding to increase energy efficiency in affordable housing. The award is part of a nearly $200 million federal grant Oregon received from the Environmental Protection Agency. 

“This is the largest climate pollution reduction grant Oregon has ever received,” said OHCS Executive Director Andrea Bell. “The effects of climate change are already among us, and we must assess how we do our work to ensure the state we call home is resilient. As climate evolves, so must our technology and policies. We have got to deliver results that people feel are making their lives better, which calls us to center communities that tend to bear the brunt of climate impacts. We appreciate the leadership of our federal delegation for pushing for these resources.”

“Reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is a critical strategy to mitigate the impacts of climate change,” Governor Tina Kotek said. “When I was Speaker of the House, I fought for ambitious GHG reduction goals. This investment is not only an affirmation of Oregon’s collective efforts to combat climate change, but a significant down payment on our ability to meet our reduction goals with a statewide approach. I want to thank Oregon’s congressional delegation for their partnership in making this key investment happen.”

OHCS’ Multifamily Energy Program (OR-MEP) was part of the team applying for the federal grant. OR-MEP allocates funding to owners and developers of OHCS-funded affordable housing, such as The Lawrence in Portland, to increase energy efficiency in multifamily housing.

“Affordable housing isn’t helpful for residents if utility bills are high. At all of our properties, we look to decrease our residents’ energy burden while lowering our carbon footprint and providing welcoming and well-designed living spaces,” said Ben Pray, Chief Executive Officer at Home First Development, the owner of The Lawrence.

By installing various energy-efficient features, including heat pumps, water heaters, insulation, windows, and interior lighting, The Lawrence has developed a space where the residents can live affordably and with minimal energy burden. The multifamily development provides 96 units of affordable, environmentally friendly living for individuals and families with incomes below 60% of the area median, including a large community of refugees from Myanmar, Bangladesh, and India.

For more information or to apply for the program, visit the OR-MEP website. The deadline for submitting applications is Aug. 30, 2024.

el comunicado de prensa en español

About Oregon Housing and Community Services (OHCS)
OHCS is Oregon's housing finance agency. The state agency provides financial and program support to create and preserve opportunities for quality, affordable housing for Oregonians of and moderate income. OHCS administers programs that provide housing stabilization. OHCS delivers these programs primarily through grants, contracts, and loan agreements with local partners and community-based providers. For more information, please visit: oregon.gov/ohcs.




Attached Media Files: The Lawrence apartments in Portland, Oregon

Public hearing to discuss designation of Aufderheide Scenic Bikeway July 29
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/23/24 8:01 PM

SALEM, Oregon— Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) and Cycle Oregon will host a meeting 11 a.m. July 29 to discuss the proposed designation of the Aufderheide Scenic Bikeway, a 60-mile route that connects Highways 126 (McKenzie River) and 58 (Oakridge).

The meeting is open to the public. The agenda and link for the meeting is posted on the Scenic Bikeways website

Agenda: https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/BWT/Documents/SB-Scenic%20Bikeway%20-%20Public%20Meeting%20Agenda-Aufderheide%20072924.pdf

Meeting registration link: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_h0UZ0HFUSN-ODLTTf0Y3WQ#/registration

The Scenic Bikeways program was established in 2009 by Cycle Oregon, the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, Travel Oregon and the Oregon Department of Transportation. It now includes the state’s best 17 designated mostly-roadway bicycle routes to showcase Oregon’s breathtaking landscapes, cultural treasures and western hospitality. 

The program is currently managed under a partnership agreement between Cycle Oregon and the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. 

The Scenic Bikeways is overseen by the Scenic Bikeway’s committee, an advisory group for the management and designation of routes nominated by the public for state scenic bikeways designation. Its members include citizen representatives, tourism organization, local governments and state agencies involved in bicycle recreation or transportation. 

For more information, contact Steve Schulz, Executive Director of Cycle Oregon at 503-381-4614 or steve@cycleoregon.com.


Campfires temporarily banned at most Oregon State Parks due to dry conditions, nearby wildfires (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/23/24 1:03 PM
Farewell Bend State Recreation Area is closed after a nearby wildfire spread to the park. The park is closed while staff work to remove hazard trees, repair damaged water lines and clear out debris.
Farewell Bend State Recreation Area is closed after a nearby wildfire spread to the park. The park is closed while staff work to remove hazard trees, repair damaged water lines and clear out debris.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/1303/174005/thumb_FarewellBend.jpg

SALEM, Oregon— Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) temporarily banned campfires at most Oregon State Parks due to dry conditions and the strain on firefighting resources from wildfires burning across the state. 

Campfires and open flames are banned at all parks east of the Cascades due to the low humidity and risk of wildfires. They’re also restricted at parks in high-risk areas across the state until conditions improve. Most bans impact parks east of the Cascades and in the valley with some restrictions at select coastal parks.

“We understand that campfires are an important part of the experience at Oregon State Parks. We don’t make the decision lightly to restrict the use of fire, but unfortunately conditions require that response. The decision is made in consultation with our local fire agencies. Thank you for helping us do our part to reduce the risk of any new wildfires,” said JR Collier, OPRD’s deputy of statewide operations.

Campfire restrictions generally ban all “open flame,” but often make exceptions for propane cooking as the flame is contained. Check individual park webpages for details on any restrictions before visiting. Restrictions are listed in alphabetical order in a feature story at stateparks.oregon.gov/ or on the individual park pages. 

OPRD also encourages visitors to know before they go when it comes to the impact of wildfires across the state:

  • Several parks have been closed due to wildfires including Battle Mountain Forest State Scenic Corridor, Farewell Bend State Recreation Area, East and West Hatfield Trailheads on the Columbia River Highway State Trail and Ukiah-Dale Forest State Scenic Corridor. Check park webpages at stateparks.oregon.gov/ and search by park.
  • Some parks have reduced air quality due to wildfire smoke. Check DEQ’s website for air quality information at www.oregonsmoke.org/
  • Several roads and highways have been closed due to wildfires. Please use TripCheck to learn about closures and alternative routes. Relying on GPS might lead drivers into unsafe conditions

For more information about current wildfires around the state, go to the Oregon Department of Forestry’s website: https://www.oregon.gov/odf/fire/pages/firestats.aspx

For more information about wildfire prevention, please visit the Oregon State Fire Marshal’s webpage at https://www.oregon.gov/osfm/education/pages/prevent-wildfires.aspx.




Attached Media Files: Farewell Bend State Recreation Area is closed after a nearby wildfire spread to the park. The park is closed while staff work to remove hazard trees, repair damaged water lines and clear out debris.

Public hearing on application for Ocean Shore Alteration Permit in Depoe Bay
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/23/24 10:50 AM

DEPOE BAY, Oregon— A virtual public hearing will be held 5:30 p.m. Aug. 14 to take public testimony on Ocean Shore Alteration Application number 3051 to build a riprap revetment west of SeaRidge Condominiums in Depoe Bay. 

The permit application requests to construct an approximately 600-foot-long riprap revetment on the Ocean Shore State Recreation Area west of the condominiums at 4175 N. Hwy 101 in Depoe Bay. Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) regulates ocean shore activities including reviewing alteration permits.

The hearing includes an introduction by staff, and then the applicant will be provided an opportunity to clearly identify how the application substantially and factually includes information that demonstrates the proposal meets the review standard set forth in OAR 736-020-0003 through 736-020-0030. 

The public will then be provided an opportunity to present testimony.  Anyone wishing to testify must pre-register, each registered individual will be provided up to 3 minutes to testify. Within 45-days after the hearing, OPRD will make a permit decision. This decision will include consideration of public comment received during the public notice and this hearing.

Following OPRD’s initial evaluation of this application, it is not clear whether the proposal meets the applicable review standards. The Department must “determine if the granting of such permit would in any way be detrimental to the interests and safety of the public and to the preservation of the natural resource, scenic, recreational and economic values of the ocean shore” (OAR 736-020-0003(7)). 

This hearing is an opportunity for the department to further develop a factual basis for a permit decision based on the review standards, including whether the application demonstrates:

  • There are no reasonable alternatives to the proposed design or construction methods that would better protect the ocean shore, including recreation, scenic, and natural resources.
  • The proposed project was designed to avoid and minimize damage to, and retain the scenic attraction of, the known ancient forest remnants.
  • The project avoids impact to properties not owned by the applicant, unless agreed to by the landowner.

The submitted materials for application 3051, can be viewed under the heading of “Pending Applications” at https://www.oregon.gov/oprd/prp/pages/per-ocean-shore.aspx.

Register at https://us06web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_2l_2kNRdR-C0ml4eTYSaaA#/registration to attend the Zoom meeting or call Allison Mangini, 541-220-3786, allison.mangini@oprd.oregon.gov   by noon Aug. 13 to be added to the attendee list.

Following the hearing, registered attendees may provide written testimony until 5 p.m. Aug.  19.  Submit by sending to: 

OREGON PARKS & RECREATION DEPARTMENT 

P.O. Box 2139 

Waldport, OR 97394 

Contact Ocean Shore Permit Coordinator, Tyler Blanchette 503-510-6741, .Blanchette@oprd.oregon.gov">Tyler.Blanchette@oprd.oregon.gov, for questions about permit application process.

The services, programs and activities of the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department are covered by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). If you need special accommodations to participate in this meeting, please contact Allison Mangini at 541-220-3786, allison.mangini@oprd.oregon.gov by 5 p.m. Aug. 8.


Operation Ship Shape Enhanced Patrols, Round II (Photo)
Oregon State Marine Board - 07/18/24 10:00 AM
Expired motorboat registration stickers
Expired motorboat registration stickers
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The Oregon State Marine Board, in partnership with 31 county sheriff’s offices and the Oregon State Police, will be looking for expired boat registrations and required equipment compliance on state waterways as part of a second round of “Operation Ship Shape.” 

“The agency leverages technology to improve boating safety as we can see boater compliance geospatially in real-time where our marine law enforcement partners are patrolling,” says Brian Paulsen, Boating Safety Program Manager for the Marine Board. “This data helps the agency work with our law enforcement partners for enhanced patrols in locations where there’s low compliance. Make sure you’ve renewed your registration and put the decals on your boat correctly, or you could face a $265 citation.” 

Any boat powered by a motor – electric, gas, diesel, and all sailboats 12 feet and longer must be currently registered when on the water, even when docked or moored. This includes any kayaks and drift boats with an electric motor. Paulsen added, “Each current boat registration brings in additional funding beyond the registration dollars which go back to boaters in the form of services such as life jacket loaner stations or boat ramp access improvements.” 

Paddlers with boats 10 feet and longer must carry a Waterway Access Permit. Three permit options are available: One week for $5, one calendar year for $17, and two calendar years for $30. Permit revenue goes into a dedicated fund for grants to eligible applicants to develop or improve nonmotorized access and on-water education programs specific to paddlers’ needs. 

Marine officers will also be looking for the required safety equipment. “Life jackets are the most important safety equipment boaters must carry, and there must be enough on board that properly fit every passenger,” Paulsen adds. “Looking at the boating fatalities so far this year, almost all the victims were not wearing a life jacket. Even though life jackets are required to be worn for kids 12 and younger, if everyone wore one, we’d see significantly fewer recreational boating deaths.” In 2023, 11 out of 13 victims were not wearing a life jacket. 

Boaters can renew their registration or purchase Waterway Access Permits through the agency’s Boat Oregon Store for the fastest service. After completing their online transaction, boaters with motorized boats can print off a temporary permit. Waterway Access Permits can be printed directly after purchase. Multiple purchases can be made under one online transaction. The agency’s online store has a $1.50 portal provider fee. If you need assistance online, please contact the Marine Board at ine.board@boat.oregon.gov">marine.board@boat.oregon.gov or call 503-378-8587. There's also an online help page acclimating new users to the store. 

For any titling and registration questions, visit Boat.Oregon.gov and click on the Title & Registration tab at the top of the page.




Attached Media Files: Expired motorboat registration stickers

State Government Artificial Intelligence Advisory Council Will Meet
State of Oregon - 07/18/24 10:51 AM

Salem, Oregon - The State Government Artificial Intelligence Advisory Council will meet at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, July 24, 2024. The meeting will take place remotely via the internet on Microsoft Teams and is open to the public. The agenda and handouts will be posted on the Council’s website.

  • What: Meeting of the State Government Artificial Intelligence Advisory Council  
  • When: Wednesday, July 24, 2024, 9:00 – 11:00 a.m.
  • Where: Join a Microsoft Teams Meeting by ID | Microsoft Teams 
  • Meeting ID:292 921 162 985 Passcode:njbMxw
  • Phone: +1 503-446-4951 Phone conference ID: 514 433 257#
  • Who: State Government Artificial Intelligence Advisory Council 

The State Government Artificial Intelligence Advisory Council is established by Governor Kotek’s Executive Order 23-26, Establishing a State Government Artificial Intelligence Advisory Council

The purpose of the Council is to recommend an action plan to guide awareness education, and usage of artificial intelligence in state government that aligns with the State’s policies, goals and values and supports public servants to deliver customer service more efficiently and effectively. The recommended action plan shall include concrete executive actions, policies, and investments needed to leverage artificial intelligence while honoring transparency, privacy, and diversity, equity, and inclusion. 

Meetings of the State Government Artificial Intelligence Advisory Council are open to the public. 

Public comment may be made during the meeting. Sign-up for public comment is required as spots are limited. Sign-up closes Monday, July 22 at 1:00 p.m. Written comment will also be accepted. Written comment can be submitted by mail to the Council Support Office, 550 Airport Rd SE Suite C, Salem, OR 97301 or online via the office form.

Accommodations can be arranged for persons with disabilities, and alternate formats of printed material are available upon request. Please contact Enterprise Information Services at 503-378-3175 at least 72 hours in advance of the meeting to request accommodations. Closed captioning is included on the Microsoft Teams meeting.

 

Links:


Counties/Regional
Benton County Enhances Public Access to County Code with MuniCode Platform (Photo)
Benton Co. Government - 07/23/24 7:53 AM
2024-07/4171/174000/Sub-brand-Community_Development_Department.png
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Benton County is pleased to announce the implementation of a new online platform, MuniCode, which offers improved access to Benton County Code chapters. The MuniCode platform aims to improve the public’s experience navigating the Code in many ways.

MuniCode is an easily searchable tool that houses the entire County Code and County Charter. The public can use it to search for keywords such as floodplain, accessory dwelling unit, solid waste management, food handlers license, vehicle camping, and more.

County Code refers to the collection of laws, regulations, and ordinances enacted by the governing body of a county. These codes govern various aspects of life within the county, including zoning, land use, building standards, public safety, health regulations, and other local administrative procedures. The County Code serves as a legal framework to ensure orderly development, protect public health and safety, and promote general welfare within the county.

“This change is a great enhancement for our community as it provides increased accessibility and transparency and will be a time saver for community members,” said Benton County Commissioner Nancy Wyse."

The MuniCode platform comes standard with Google Translate built-in, enabling instant translation of the Code into 200+ languages, increasing accessibility for non-native English speakers. Following the initial implementation, MuniCode will display the history of code amendments over time. Users can choose to subscribe to be notified of code changes in sections of interest to them.

An additional feature, MuniDocs, is also now available. MuniDocs will house and organize many important County documents. MuniDocs will allow for full searchability within documents uploaded to the platform using keyword searches.

Benton County’s Code officially went live on the MuniCode platform this month, July 2024, joining thousands of other jurisdictions nationwide using this same online tool.

You can access the full Benton County Code directly from the County’s website, from within County Counsel’s page, Community Development’s page, or from the MuniCode Library by selecting the state of Oregon and Benton County from the list. 

Benton County continues to look for ways to increase transparency and improve the public’s experience navigating complex systems. The County made this investment in MuniCode in early 2024 as part of an initiative to enhance website functionality, increase the searchability of Code language, and display Code amendments. Users will no longer need to download individual Code chapters in their search for information. Instead, users can search for terms from within the platform, identify the Code section of interest, share a link directly to specific sections of the Code, print, download, email, compare versions of the Code over time, view recent ordinances, and get technical support – all within one platform. 

“Implementing the MuniCode platform is a significant step forward in making our County Code more accessible and transparent to the public. We are proud to join thousands of other jurisdictions in using this innovative tool,” said Rick Crager, Assistant County Administrator.

This new platform enhances transparency and accessibility, ensuring that Benton County residents can easily access, understand, and stay updated on local regulations and ordinances.

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Benton County is an Equal Opportunity-Affirmative Action employer and does not discriminate on the basis of disability in admission or access to our programs, services, activities, hiring and employment practices. This document is available in alternative formats and languages upon request. Please contact Cory Grogan at 541-745-4468 or pioinfo@bentoncountyor.gov.https://rss.com/podcasts/bentonpublicpodcast




Attached Media Files: 2024-07/4171/174000/Sub-brand-Community_Development_Department.png

Republic Services Submits Conditional Use Permit Application for Coffin Butte Landfill Expansion (Photo)
Benton Co. Government - 07/19/24 3:28 PM
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Today, July 19, 2024, Republic Services has submitted a Conditional Use Permit (CUP) application to expand the Coffin Butte Landfill. The Benton County Community Development Department is currently reviewing the application for completeness.  A Completeness Check is a planning term referring to a quality measure where an application is reviewed to ensure all required and requested information is included, along with any necessary supporting documents.

The review process involves several steps. County staff have a statutory 30-day period to assess whether the application is complete. If the application is deemed complete, the review process will start, and the County will complete the process within 150 days. If the application is incomplete, the applicant will have 30 days to provide the additional information.  

Once the application is complete, the County will conduct public outreach to ensure community engagement and transparency throughout the review process.

For detailed information on the Conditional Use Permit process, please refer to the Land Use Application Process flow chart.

For additional details on solid waste management in Benton County, please refer to the Solid Waste Management FAQ.




Attached Media Files: 2024-07/4171/173940/BC_LUAppProcess-Quasi-judicial_final_06-25-24.png , 2024-07/4171/173940/benton-county-logo-horizontal-full-color-rgb.png

Businesses
City of Prineville announces list of police chief finalists ahead of Wednesday meet-and-greet (Photo)
StingRay Communications - City of Prineville - 07/23/24 7:00 AM
Prineville Police Department
Prineville Police Department
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/6389/173993/thumb_Police.jpg

(PRINEVILLE, Ore)— Today, the City of Prineville announced a list of finalists for Prineville’s next police chief. Community members will have the opportunity to meet the finalists at tomorrow’s meet-and-greet.

Tomorrow, July 24, the City of Prineville will host a public meet-and-greet with three finalists for the city’s next police chief. The informal meet-and-greet will take place from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at Ron’s Comfort Food Café, located at Meadow Lakes Golf Course. Community members can leave feedback on the candidates on comment cards. Refreshments will be provided.

Candidate Biographies (in alphabetical order)

Kenneth Booker is an experienced leader with 32 years of service in the Maricopa County Sheriff’s Office. During his career, he has served in various units, including the Enforcement Bureau Patrol Division and Tactical Operations, and most recently as Deputy Chief for the Bureau of Internal Oversight, Court Compliance & Training. He has also worked as an adjunct professor. He holds a Master of Science in Leadership from Grand Canyon University, a Bachelor's in Public Safety Administration, and numerous certifications in law enforcement instruction.

Thomas Crino began his public service career as a patrol officer with the Beaverton Police Department in 2003. He has spent the last decade in leadership positions, including Training Sergeant, Patrol/Admin Lieutenant, and PS/Training Lieutenant, where he currently serves.  He holds a Bachelor’s in Business Management with a minor in Political Science from Oregon State University and is currently pursuing a Master's in Public Safety from the University of Virginia, as well as holding various certifications.

Chad Davis has almost 30 years of leadership experience in public service. His first position was with the City of Monmouth Police Department as a reserve Police Officer. He then transitioned to Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office, where he’s held positions including Sergeant, Deputy Sheriff, and, for the last 13 years, Lieutenant. He graduated Summa Cum Laude from Western Oregon University with a Bachelor’s in Science and Law Enforcement and holds various professional certificates.

On Thursday, July 25, the candidates will participate in interviews with four panels consisting of regional public safety professionals, community leaders, and members of the Prineville Police Department.

The candidates were chosen through a national search conducted in collaboration with a third-party firm. 

 

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About the City of Prineville:

Located east of the Cascade mountains in Oregon’s high desert, the City of Prineville is a resurgent rural community that has preserved its small-town, ranching roots and Western lifestyle while embracing smart growth in a business-friendly environment. With a population of just over 10,000 residents, the county seat of Crook County attracts a diversity of business and lifestyle interests, including tech giants Meta and Apple, recreational enthusiasts, and a thriving agricultural industry. Incorporated in 1880, City of Prineville operates the oldest continuously running municipal short line railway in the U.S., as well as a public golf course. Prineville boasts numerous recreational assets, including the Ochoco National Forest and Crooked River, and remains a popular destination for anglers and hunters. For more information on City services and programs, visit cityofprineville.com.




Attached Media Files: Prineville Police Department , Chad Davis , Thomas Crino , Kenneth Booker

City of Prineville invites community to meet-and-greet with police chief candidates (Photo)
StingRay Communications - City of Prineville - 07/18/24 11:23 AM
City of Prineville logo
City of Prineville logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2024-07/6389/173912/thumb_City_Of_Prineville_Logo2.jpg

(PRINEVILLE, Ore)— The City of Prineville invites community members to meet three candidates vying to become the city’s next chief of police.

An informal meet-and-greet with the three finalists will provide an opportunity for community members to meet the candidates, ask questions, and submit feedback to city leaders.

The meet-and-greet will be held on Wednesday, July 24, from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at Ron’s Comfort Food Café, located at Meadow Lakes Golf Course. Refreshments will be provided.

Following the community event on Thursday, July 25, the candidates will participate in meetings with four panels consisting of regional public safety professionals, community leaders, and members of the Prineville Police Department.

Information about the candidates will be released on July 23.

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About the City of Prineville:

Located east of the Cascade mountains in Oregon’s high desert, the City of Prineville is a resurgent rural community that has preserved its small-town, ranching roots and Western lifestyle while embracing smart growth in a business-friendly environment. With a population of just over 10,000 residents, the county seat of Crook County attracts a diversity of business and lifestyle interests, including tech giants Meta and Apple, recreational enthusiasts, and a thriving agricultural industry. Incorporated in 1880, City of Prineville operates the oldest continuously running municipal short line railway in the U.S., as well as a public golf course. Prineville boasts numerous recreational assets, including the Ochoco National Forest and Crooked River, and remains a popular destination for anglers and hunters. For more information on City services and programs visit cityofprineville.com.




Attached Media Files: City of Prineville logo , Prineville Police Department logo