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Bend/Central-Eastern Oregon News Releases for Tue. Oct. 20 - 1:39 am
Police & Fire
Outdoor Burning Opening THIS SATURDAY
Bend Fire & Rescue - 10/17/20 10:54 AM

Update Saturday October 17th

Debris burning opened today in Deschutes County Rural Fire Protection District #2. 911 dispatch is receiving many concerned calls from people who are unaware that burning opened. If you would like to get further information on burning we are happy to do an interview. Please call Dan Derlacki at 541-408-2954. 

 

 

Outdoor debris burning within Deschutes County Rural Fire Protection District #2 will open at sunrise on Saturday morning, October 17th. Outdoor burning within the city limits of Bend is prohibited, in accordance with city ordinance 5.30.005.

Campfires, recreational fires, warming fires, and cooking fires may be permitted within the city of Bend and Deschutes County Rural Fire District #2 as long as the proper safety precautions are followed. Debris burning is allowed in Deschutes County Rural Fire Protection District #2.  Regulations and safety precautions are posted on Bend Fire & Rescue website; www.bendoregon.gov/fire.

Bend Fire & Rescue strongly recommends that those who choose to burn debris do so early in the day, prior to winds picking up that could spread a fire to nearby combustibles. Please have burning regulations on hand and always call before you burn.

As an alternative to burning yard debris, residents can dispose of their dead leaves, pine needles, and branches at Deschutes Recycling for half the price starting October 26th until November 7th (closed on Sunday November 1st).  Deschutes Recycling is located at the Knott landfill.  During the twelve days of the Half Price Yard Debris Recycling event brought to you by Deschutes Recycling and FireFree, yard debris will be accepted for half off - just $2 per yard!  Bend area garbage companies also offer curbside pickup of yard debris for a minimal charge. The sale is part of the FireFree awareness campaign to create and maintain a wildfire-defensible space around homes and businesses.

As a reminder, debris burning regulations may vary between governmental jurisdictions within the Central Oregon area.  Please contact your local fire agency for specific requirements and closures.


DUII crash causes power outage
Bend Police Dept. - 10/19/20 10:01 PM

Arrested: 

Abbott, Zachary James Ray       32 year old Bend resident

Charges:

Hit and Run-property, Reckless Driving, DUII, Criminal Mischief I

Narrative:

On 10-19-20 at about 1944 hours, Bend Police Officers were dispatched to a single vehicle crash in the area just north of the Murphy Rd / Brookswood Blvd roundabout.  Witnesses advised the vehicle, a white 2015 Chevrolet Silverado, had struck a power pole causing the power lines to fall to the ground. The sparking power lines then caused fires in the grass area and ultimately started a fence on fire.

As neighbors worked to put the fires out, the suspect fled the area in his truck. A citizen was able to locate the truck and follow it to a residence in Deschutes River Woods, where Bend Police and the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office made contact with the driver.

The driver was identified as Abbott and it was determined alcohol was a primary factor in the crash.  He was subsequently arrested on the above listed charges.

Some residences in the area of the initial crash are currently without power and some traffic control devices are being affected. Pacific Power is currently working to restore services.  A section of Brookswood Blvd remains closed.

The Bend Police Department was assisted by the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office and Bend Fire.  


Woman lights a motor home on fire, assaults another with a bat, then damages a business window and parked car (Photo)
Bend Police Dept. - 10/19/20 6:23 AM
Broken Business Window
Broken Business Window
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Case Number:  2020-00117545

Date and Time of Incident:  Monday, October 19, 2020 at approximately 03:09 AM

Type of Incident:  Assault, Arson, Criminal Mischief by same suspect

Location of Incident:  Transient encampment, Hunnell Road between Loco Road and Cooley Road

Victim of Assault/Arson:  Misty Andresen, 36-year old Bend Resident (transient)

Victim of Criminal Mischief 1: Advanced Commercial Cleaning on Empire Avenue (see photo)

Victim of Criminal Mischief 2:  Brock Olson, 66-year old Bend Resident

Suspect/Arrestee:  Elizabeth Butler, 32-year old Bend Resident (transient)

Victim Vehicle  (Arson):   Winnebago Chieftain Motor Home (total loss) (see photos)

Victim Vehicle (Criminal Mischief):  2014 Audi Q5

Crimes:        Assault in the First Degree

                      Arson in the First Degree

                      Criminal Mischief in the First Degree

                      Criminal Mischief in the Second Degree

                      Unlawful use of a weapon

NARRATIVE:

On Monday, October 19th, 2020 about 0309 hours Deschutes County 9-1-1 dispatch center received a 9-1-1 call from a citizen reporting a woman had come to their motor home at a transient camp on Hunnell Road between Cooley Road and Loco Road within the city of Bend, to report she had been assaulted with a bat and the suspect had lit her motor home on fire.  The suspect had reportedly fled the area on foot.  The female victim had run to a neighboring motor home to get help and to have police contacted.  Bend Police as well as Bend Fire and Rescue and the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office responded immediately.

Upon arrival officers found an older Winnebago Chieftain motor home was fully engulfed with flames.  It was believed all occupants were out of the motor home.  Officers contacted the alleged victim and she was identified as 36-year old Bend resident Misty Andresen.  Andresen told officers she had allowed a neighboring transient, Elizabeth Butler, an acquaintance, to sleep in her motor home for the night because it was going to be cold out and Butler sleeps in a tent.  Andresen slept in the rear of the motor home while Butler slept in the front.  Sometime around 0300 hours Andresen awoke to the smell of smoke.  She looked out to the main cabin of the motor home and found there was a blanket on fire.  She grabbed the blanket and began dragging it out the side door when she was attacked from behind.  Andresen was struck in the back of the head, the back and the left arm multiple times by a metal baseball bat being swung by Butler.  Andresen had no idea as to why Butler was attacking her.  Andresen fell out onto the sidewalk and dropped the burning blanket.  She then ran to a neighboring motor home to get help.  Paramedics responded to treat Andresen.  She was transported by ambulance to St Charles Medical Center in Bend where she is being treated for non-life threatening injuries.

Another Bend Police Officer who was responding to the fire and assault witnessed a female bashing out the window of a business in the area of Empire and Jamison with a baseball bat (Advanced Commercial Cleaning).  As the officer turned around to go contact the female the officer saw the woman begin beating on the window and door of a parked Audi Q5 with the baseball bat (belonging to Olson).  The officer contacted the woman and gave her verbal commands to drop the bat.  Initially the woman did not comply.  She eventually dropped the bat and was taken into custody without incident.  Her clothing was singed, at which time the officer realized the woman with the bat was the suspect from the fire and assault.  Her clothing and the bat were seized as evidence in the crimes.  She was taken to the Deschutes County Adult Jail in Bend, where it was discovered she had superficial burn marks to the backs of her legs.  She was treated by staff at the jail and lodged on the listed charges.

It was later learned that Butler had been given a ride by another neighboring transient to the area of 3rd and Empire.  Butler had told this witness that someone had a gun and she needed help so they dropped her off near the sheriff’s office.  It is believed that drugs are a factor in this incident.

A Bend Fire Arson Investigator responded to the scene.  Their investigation is ongoing.

The Bend Police Department would like to thank Bend Fire and the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office for their assistance in this investigation.




Attached Media Files: Broken Business Window , Inside Motor Home 2 , Inside Motor Home 1 , Motor Home side profile post fire , Motor Home post fire , Motor Home with Flames

Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Search and Rescue assist injured Hiker near Broken Hand (Photo)
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/19/20 11:28 AM
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Released By:  Lt. Bryan Husband, Search and Rescue Coordinator

Date:  October 18, 2020 / 12:03 PM

Location:         North side of Broken Hand Summit

Rescued:         Bailey, Susan - 63 year old female from Hubbard, Or.

 

On 10-18-20, at about 12:03pm, 9-1-1 Dispatch recieved a report of an injured hiker near Broken Hand summit. GPS coordinates were received along with the 9-1-1 call, which placed the injured subject, Susan Bailey, on the trail that edges around the north side of Broken Hand (at about 8,400'). A Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Search and Rescue Deputy immediately called the reporting person, Ms. Dorthy Abbott, who told him Bailey had fallen on the trail and had injured herself while attempting to arrest her fall.  Although Bailey's injury was reportedly not life threatening, she was in a tremendous amount of pain.  Abbott also reported the trail they were on was narrow and on a steep side hill.  Abbott did not think Bailey could be reached with a wheeled litter.  Abbott reported they had a sleeping bag on Bailey to keep her warm, as fog and clouds were rolling in with misting conditions at times.

At 12:12pm, an alert request was sent out for DCSO SAR volunteers to respond, including members of the medical team and members of the mountain rescue team. Initially, 13 DCSO SAR Volunteers responded to DCSO SAR in Bend and gathered the equipment and supplies needed to rescue Bailey from her remote location.  Life Flight agreed to fly two DCSO SAR Volunteers up to the area to reach the patient in a more timely manner. 11 more DCSO SAR Volunteers departed in vehicles, headed for the Broken Top trailhead.  Due to the previously described weather constraints, Life Flight had to drop off the two DCSO SAR Volunteers approximately three miles west of Bailey, at about 1:56pm.  DCSO SAR Volunteers traveling by vehicle, arrived at the Broken Top TH and departed up the trail at about 2:00pm.

The two DCSO SAR Volunteers flown in by Life Flight reached Bailey first, arriving at 3:16pm.  They reported the weather had continued to decline, winds were blowing 30 knots and gusting to 45 knots, and fog was continuing to blow in through the area.  They began to stabilize Bailey and confirmed teams would need to carry her approximately 250' before a wheeled litter option would be available.  DCSO SAR Teams hiking over three miles in from Broken Top TH began arriving at Bailey's location at about 4:15pm.  They had been tasked with carrying an assortment of rescue equipment, including multiple rescue ropes, "rock pro" rescue system equipment wheeled litter and additional patient packaging supplies.

With the potential of a long carry/litter out to the trail head looming, six additional DCSO SAR Volunteers were requested to respond and assist.  As SAR Volunteers began setting up the rigging systems needed to safely begin to move Bailey, they reported it appeared the cloud/fog layer was beginning to dissipate.  Ultimately, rescue teams decided to lower Bailey over 200', where they were able to more easily carry her to an open and likely landing zone location.  Teams further stabilized Bailey and provided additional warming supplies, until Air Link was able to respond and pick her up at approximately 8:36pm.  Air Link then transported Bailey to St. Charles Hospital in Bend for further treatment.

DCSO SAR Volunteers escorted Bailey's three hiking partners down to the Broken Top TH and provided them a courtesy transport back to their vehicles which were parked at the Tam Rim TH, near Three Creeks Lake.  All DCSO SAR Volunteers had returned to DCSO SAR base in Bend by 12:30am.

The Deschutes County Sheriff's Office would like to thank both Life Flight and Air Link for their assistance with this rescue.  We would also like to remind those individuals choosing to recreate in our back country during this time of year, to conduct additional research about the area you want to travel, including trail and forecasted weather conditions.  It is not uncommon at this time of year for weather conditions to be mild in and around town, but extreme in our higher elevations.

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is a full service agency that oversees the adult jail, provides patrol, criminal investigations, civil process and search and rescue operations. Special units include SWAT, Street Crimes, Marine Patrol, ATV Patrol, Forest Patrol, along with six K9 teams. Founded in 1916 and today led by your duly elected Sheriff L. Shane Nelson, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office serves the nearly 190,000 residents in Deschutes County. The agency has 230 authorized and funded personnel, which includes 187 sworn employees who provide services to the 3,055 square miles of Deschutes County.

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/5227/139250/Broken_Hand_3.JPG , 2020-10/5227/139250/Broken_Hand_2.jpg , 2020-10/5227/139250/Broken_Hand_1.jpg

Drug Warrant Leads to Call Out of Bomb Squad (Photo)
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/15/20 8:48 AM
2020-10/5227/139147/bomb_squad_(2).jpg
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Released by: Detective Sergeant Doug Sullivan

Release Date: October 15, 2020 

Location: 51300 block of Huntington Rd La Pine, OR 

Arrested: Sunny Penny-Dunn III, male 29 years of age, La Pine OR

 Charges:  

Unlawful Delivery of Methamphetamine

Unlawful Manufacture of an Explosive Device

Unlawful Possession of an Explosive Device

Theft in the First Degree

Unlawful Manufacture of a Marijuana Extract

 

NARRATIVE: 

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office Street Crimes Unit has been investigating Sunny Penny-Dunn for the sales of controlled substances in Deschutes County.  

On October 14, 2020, Street Crimes detectives conducted a search warrant at Penny-Dunn’s residence and found evidence of the use and sales of Methamphetamine and a BHO lab. In addition, an explosive device was located in the residence which prompted the deployment of the OSP Bomb Squad.  During the removal and safe destruction of the device, three neighboring apartments were evacuated for several hours. Detectives also located several thousand dollars of stolen satellite/dish equipment. 

Penny-Dunn was transported to the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office Jail where he was lodged on the above mentioned charges. 

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office was assisted by the Oregon State Police Bomb Squad Unit and the FBI Bomb Squad Unit. 

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office Street Crimes unit focuses enforcement on street level drug cases and quality of life issues connected to property crimes throughout Deschutes County.  

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is a full service agency that oversees the adult jail, provides patrol, criminal investigations, civil process and search and rescue operations. Special units include SWAT, Street Crimes, Marine Patrol, ATV Patrol, Forest Patrol, along with six K9 teams. Founded in 1916 and today led by your duly elected Sheriff L. Shane Nelson, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office serves the nearly 190,000 residents in Deschutes County. The agency has 230 authorized and funded personnel, which includes 187 sworn employees who provide services to the 3,055 square miles of Deschutes County.

 

## End of Release ##




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/5227/139147/bomb_squad_(2).jpg , 2020-10/5227/139147/dunn_booking_photo.jpg

Update to Fatal Motor Vehicle Crash Near Sisters (Photo)
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 10/14/20 2:11 PM
DCSO graphic
DCSO graphic
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####Update Correction####

Updated by: Sgt. Jayson Janes

Date: October 14, 2020

Correct spelling of name: Geneva Tallman

##End of update##

 

Update Release of Names of Deceased

Updated by: Sgt. Jayson Janes

Date: October, 14, 2020

 

Genevia Tallman, 17 years of age, Sisters

Hannelore “Lala” Debari, 17 years of age, Sisters.

 

This update is to release the names of the juvenile females killed in the car crash in Sisters on October 1, 2020. This crash is still under investigation and there is no other information to release at this time.

 

End of update

 

 

Updated by Lt. William Bailey at 2:50pm

Vehicle: silver 2008 Mercedes SUV

Deceased occupant: 17 year old female from Sisters, Oregon

Deceased occupant: 17 year old female from Sisters, Oregon

Deceased occupant: 18 year old female, Malerva - Locke, Amelie from Sebastopol, California

Investigators are still working to confirm where each occupant was seated at the time of the crash and believe speed was a contributing factor.  The crash remains under investigation.

## End of Update ##

Released by: Lt. William Bailey - Public Information Officer

Release date: October 2, 2020

Narrative:

On October 1, 2020, at about 9:17 p.m., deputies with the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office were dispatched to a single vehicle crash on USFS Road 15 about 1 mile south of Highway 242, near Sisters.  Responding deputies arrived and found the crashed vehicle off the roadway.    Sisters-Camp Sherman Fire Department personnel responded and pronounced all three occupants of the vehicle deceased at the scene.

The initial investigation determined the vehicle was northbound on USFS Road 15.  For unknown reasons, it left the roadway and struck a large tree, ejecting two of the three occupants.  An Oregon State Police Crash Reconstructionist responded to assist with the crash investigation. The roadway was blocked for approximately five hours.

Additional details will be released once we ensure all families have been notified and have time to share this tragic news with their loved ones.  Our thoughts are with the families and the Sisters community during this extremely difficult time.

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is a full service agency that oversees the adult jail, provides patrol, criminal investigations, civil process and search and rescue operations. Special units include SWAT, Street Crimes, Marine Patrol, ATV Patrol, Forest Patrol, along with six K9 teams. Founded in 1916 and today led by your duly elected Sheriff L. Shane Nelson, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office serves the nearly 190,000 residents in Deschutes County. The agency has 230 authorized and funded personnel, which includes 187 sworn employees who provide services to the 3,055 square miles of Deschutes County.

## End of Release ##




Attached Media Files: DCSO graphic

FBI Honors Oregonian with National Award (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 10/16/20 3:54 PM
DCLA Award presentation - SAC Cannon and Antoinette Edwards
DCLA Award presentation - SAC Cannon and Antoinette Edwards
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This week FBI Special Agent in Charge of the Portland Division Renn Cannon presented Antoinette Edwards with the FBI Director’s Community Leadership Award (DCLA) for her service to youth in the Portland community.

Edwards, former director of Portland’s Office of Youth Violence Prevention, is one of 56 recipients from across the country chosen to receive the prestigious award. The FBI established the DCLA in 1990 to publicly acknowledge the achievements of those working to make a difference in their communities through the promotion of education and the prevention of crime and violence. 

Prior to her role with the Office of Youth Violence Prevention, the City of Portland recruited Edwards to become its Director of Public Safety and Peacekeeping. She also served as the first Director of Diversity for the American Red Cross in Oregon and Southwest Washington, as a Parent Coordinator at Self-Enhancement Inc., and as a Family Intervention Specialist with Multnomah County. Edwards has also led bi-monthly meetings of the Community Peace Collaboration, formerly called the Gang Violence Task Force. 

“I am honored to receive this award, especially since it is for the work I have truly loved, supporting both young people and members of our community to find reconciliation and peace. Moving forward I want to remind all of us that there is much work to do. Social justice belongs to us all,” said Edwards.

"It’s an honor for the FBI to recognize the amazing Antoinette Edwards,” said SAC Cannon. “Her relentless efforts to care for Portland’s youth and at-risk population has greatly impacted our community and will continue to do so for years to come.”

For more information on the FBI Director’s Community Leadership Award, go to https://www.fbi.gov/about/community-outreach/dcla.

###

 




Attached Media Files: DCLA Award presentation - SAC Cannon and Antoinette Edwards , Antoinette Edwards

Oregon State Police is Requesting the Public's Assistance with Killing and Waste of Mule Deer - Crook County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 10/19/20 4:08 PM
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The Oregon State Police is requesting the public's assistance in locating the person(s) that shot and killed a doe Mule Deer on Hwy 26 near milepost 46 in Crook County.   

On October 11, 2020 at 7:15 P.M., Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Troopers were notified that an unknown person(s) had shot and left to waste a doe Mule Deer. 

It is believed the shooting took place sometime earlier the same day.  Anyone who may have witnessed it would have been driving on Hwy 26 West of the Ochoco summit approximately one mile West of the Ochoco Christian Camp. 

OSP Fish and Wildlife Troopers request that if you have any information regarding this incident to please contact the TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP(677) or TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)  - Trooper Barr is investigating.

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators 

The TIP program offers preference point rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of big game mammals.

Preference Point Rewards:

5 Points-Bighorn Sheep

5 Points-Rocky Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points-Cougar

Or the Oregon Hunters Association TIP reward fund also offers cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of Bighorn Sheep, Rocky Mountain Goat, Moose, Elk, Deer, Antelope, Bear, Cougar, Wolf, Upland Birds, Waterfowl, Furbearers, Game Fish and Shellfish.  Cash rewards can also be awarded for turning in people who destroy habitat, illegally obtain licenses/tags and for the unlawful lending/borrowing of big game tags.

CASH REWARDS:

$1,000 Bighorn Sheep, Rocky Mountain Goat and Moose 
$500 Elk, Deer and Antelope 
$300 Bear, Cougar and Wolf 
$300 Habitat Destruction

$200 Illegally Obtaining License/Tag(s)

$200 Unlawful Lend/Borrow Big Game Tags(s) 
$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl 
$100 Furbearers 

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish 

How to Report a Wildlife and/or Habitat Law Violation or Suspicious Activity: 

TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP(677)

TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/1002/139278/20201012_112542.jpg

Fatal Crash on Toll Bridge Road - Hood River County
Oregon State Police - 10/17/20 2:47 PM

On Friday, October 16, 2020, at approximately 8:00 P.M., a Hood River County Sheriff’s Office Sergeant attempted to contact a Suzuki motorcycle southbound on Baseline Rd. for a traffic violation.  The motorcycle accelerated, turned northbound onto Toll Bridge Rd. and eluded the sergeant. 

The sergeant, approximately one minute after the attempted initial contact, came upon the motorcycle crashed on Toll Bridge Rd. south of the intersection of Hwy 35.

Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded.

Oregon State Police is investigating the crash and preliminary investigation revealed that the Suzuki, operated by Lyle Halverson (34) of Hood River, was northbound on Toll Bridge Road at a high rate of speed when he failed to negotiate a right hand corner, entered the southbound lane and crashed into a Ford F-150 pickup operated by Guy Wertgen (53) of Parkdale.

Halverson sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Wertgen was not injured.

OSP was assisted by Parkdale Fire and Rescue.  


Fatal Crash on Hwy 101 - Curry County
Oregon State Police - 10/15/20 4:41 PM

On Tuesday, October 13, 2020 at approximately 10:10 P.M., Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a vehicle crash on Hwy 101 near milepost 358.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Toyota Camry, operated by Benjamin Demaris (64) of Crescent City, was southbound when he struck a pedestrian, Michael Christian (32) of Crescent City, as he walked across the highway. 

Christian sustained life threatening injuries and was transported to Sutter Coast Hospital for treatment and then to Rogue Valley Hospital.  

Christian was pronounced deceased at the hospital.

OSP was assisted by Curry County Sheriff's Office, Harbor Fire Department and Cal Ore Ambulance.


Oregon State Police Fish & Wildlife Division is Requesting the Public's Assistance to Identify the person(s) Responsible for Killing a Wolf - Baker County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 10/14/20 1:35 PM
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Oregon State Police are investigating the unlawful killing of a wolf in the Keating Wildlife Management Unit on or about September 24, 2020. 

This incident occurred north west of New Bridge, OR in the Skull Creek drainage of the Wallowa Whitman National Forest.  The United States Forest Service 7741 Road accesses the Skull Creek drainage and the wolf was located off the 125 spur road.   

Anyone with information regarding this case is urged to contact OSP Sergeant Isaac Cyr through the Turn in Poachers (TIP) hotline at 1-800-452-7888 or OSP (mobile).

Report Wildlife and Habitat Law Violators 

The TIP program offers preference point rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of big game mammals.

Preference Point Rewards:

5 Points-Mountain Sheep

5 Points-Mountain Goat

5 Points-Moose

5 Points-Wolf

4 Points-Elk

4 Points-Deer

4 Points-Antelope

4 Points-Bear

4 Points-Cougar

The TIP program also offers cash rewards for information leading to an arrest or issuance of a citation for the unlawful take/possession or waste of Mountain Sheep, Mountain Goat, Moose, Elk, Deer, Antelope, Bear, Cougar, Wolf, Upland Birds, Waterfowl, and Furbearers. Cash rewards can also be awarded for the unlawful take of Game Fish and Shellfish and for Habitat Destruction.

CASH REWARDS:
$1,000 Mountain Sheep, Mountain Goat and Moose 
$500 Elk, Deer and Antelope 
$300 Bear, Cougar and Wolf 
$300 Habitat Destruction 
$100 Upland Birds and Waterfowl 
$100 Furbearers 

$100 Game Fish and Shellfish 

How to Report a Wildlife and/or Habitat Law Violation or Suspicious Activity: 

TIP Hotline: 1-800-452-7888 or OSP(677)

TIP E-Mail: TIP@state.or.us (Monitored M-F 8:00AM - 5:00PM)




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/1002/139127/20200925_111415.jpg

Redmond Police Share Grant Funded Enhanced Patrol Results for September 2020
Redmond Police Dept. - 10/14/20 6:00 PM

REDMOND, OR – During September 2020, the Redmond Police Department conducted grant funded enhanced traffic patrols.  The grants allow the department to deploy additional officers to regular patrol shifts, focused on various locations throughout the city.  RPD officers made a total of 81 motorist contacts, resulting in 50 citations and 49 warnings for speeding, seatbelt, and distracted driving violations. Seven DUII arrests were also made during these grant shifts.

The goal of these increased grant funded patrols is to reduce fatalities and injuries through support of traffic safety law enforcement, training and public education.  Redmond Police will continue enhanced patrols throughout the year.

Distracted Driving Awareness Month is Here!

October is Distracted Drivers Month and enhanced patrols are focused on impaired drivers as well as educating the community on the dangers of distracted driving.

A distraction-affected crash is any crash in which a driver was identified as distracted at the time of the crash.  Distracting tasks can affect drivers in different ways and can be categorized into the following types:

  • Visual Distraction: Tasks that require the driver to look away from the roadway to visually obtain information
  • Manual Distraction: Tasks that require the driver to take a hand off the steering wheel and manipulate a device
  • Cognitive Distraction: The mental workload associated with a task that involves thinking about something other than driving

More than 90% of car crashes involve human error.  Being an attentive and alert driver can help prevent crashes that lead to unintentional injury and death.

The National Safety Council works to promote policies practices and procedures leading to increased safety, protection and health in business and industry, in schools and colleges, on roads and highways, and in homes and communities.

Let’s support Distracted Driving Awareness Month this October 2020, marking it’s 10-year anniversary, by practicing safe driving behaviors and pledging to drive distraction-free.

We all deserve to live in communities that promote safe driving behaviors and healthy lifestyles. So, please:

  • Focus on Your Drive
  • Keep Your Attention on the Road
  • Drive without Distractions

The officers of your Redmond Police Department are committed to making Redmond the safest community in Oregon. Preventing, locating and arresting DUII drivers is one of many ways they are working to accomplish this vision. Funding to support these enhanced speed and seat belt enforcement patrols is provided by a Traffic Safety Grant awarded to the Redmond Police Department from the Oregon Department of Transportation.

Your Redmond Police Department serves you by responding to nearly 25,000 calls for service a year, with a professional staff of 45 sworn officers and 11 support staff.

Source: NSC analysis of NHTSA Fatality Analysis Reporting System (FARS) data.

Prepared By: Sergeant Jonny Dickson


Sunriver Police Seek Public Assistance in Identifying Hit and Run Suspect Vehicle (Photo)
Sunriver Police Dept. - 10/19/20 10:08 AM
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PRESS RELEASE

Date of Occurrence: Saturday, October 10, 2020 at approximately 1721 hours

Location: Spring River road/Lunar drive, Sunriver, OR, 97707

Charges: Failure to perform duties of driver (811.700)

On Saturday, October 10, 2020, at approximately 1721 hours, an officer from the Sunriver Police Department responded to a report of a hit and run motor vehicle accident at the intersection of Spring River road and Lunar drive, Sunriver, Oregon.

The reporting party was driving east bound on Spring River road when a possible green Ford Excursion with gold trim driving west bound on Spring River road attempted to turn left onto Lunar drive cutting off the reporting party. The reporting party’s vehicle contacted the suspect’s vehicle on the rear passenger side of the suspect vehicle. When the vehicles made contact the possible gold Ford Explorer fled from the scene continuing west bound on Spring River road. A witness followed the vehicle. The witness followed the vehicle onto Solar drive until the vehicle turned left onto Indio road. Indio road was the last known location of the suspect vehicle. Video footage of the hit and run was collected from Cannabis Nation located on the corner of Spring River road/Lunar drive. The suspect may live in the area in between Lunar drive and Solar drive.

Description of the vehicle: Possibly a green Ford Excursion with gold trim and black rims. The vehicle has a small black luggage rack on the top of it. The suspect vehicle has rear passenger side damage.

Attached are still images from the video footage collected. If you see a vehicle that matches the suspect vehicle description, please contact Sunriver Police Department at 541-593-1014 or the non-emergency dispatch number at 541-693-6911.

 

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/6143/139252/hit_and_run_3.png , 2020-10/6143/139252/hit_and_run_2.png , 2020-10/6143/139252/hit_and_run_1.png

Utilities
Safety crops up as priority during busy fall harvest season
Pacific Power - 10/15/20 11:18 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Media Hotline: 503-813-6018

 

Safety crops up as priority during busy fall harvest season

Pacific Power helps farmers and ranchers keep safety first and avoid potential electrical hazards

 

PORTLAND, Ore. (Oct. 15, 2020) — Harvests of many kinds are well underway in the many rural communities Pacific Power serves, from apples and pears to peas and pumpkins. The busy fall harvest season is the most highly productive yet most dangerous time of the year for farmers, ranchers and their work crews, according to the National Agricultural Safety Database.

 

“As the Northwest’s largest rural power supplier, we know that fall harvest is a critical time of year. This is when the year’s investment pays off, but only if you take the time to stay safe, which is why we are focused on this season as much as you are,” said Joe Cissna, director of safety for Pacific Power. “Electricity helps with the harvest, but if you take it for granted and try to cut corners, tragedy could result.”

 

Customers and the public can get important safety materials, including Pacific Power’s “Electrical Safety on Your Farm or Ranch” brochure, or “Alerta! Fuera de Casa” brochure in Spanish, and “Look Up and Live” irrigation safety stickers in both English and Spanish – or schedule a free safety presentation – by calling Pacific Power toll free at 1-800-375-7085 or by visiting pacificpower.net/safety.

 

There are three main areas in which to concentrate safety efforts:

 

Power Line Safety

  • Be aware of overhead power lines. Lower augers, harvesters or other equipment to transport level to ensure adequate clearance when near power lines. Know the height of cultivators or planters in the fold-up position; the equipment may be taller than during field use.
  • If a tractor or vehicle comes in contact with a power line, remain seated until help arrives. If there is danger of fire, jump as far away from the tractor as possible and keep your feet together when landing. Do not allow any part of your body to touch the equipment and the ground at the same time. Many injuries have occurred when equipment operators attempted to get back on or touch equipment after dismounting.
  • Never attempt to raise or move a power line.
  • Watch for guy wires, which are attached to and support utility poles and the ground. Striking a guy wire can damage your equipment and weaken a pole or even bring live power lines down, creating an extremely hazardous situation.
  • Do not erect fence wire along the same route as an overhead line and do not string fence wire where it may come into contact with an overhead line.

 

Electrical Safety

  • Make sure all outlets are three-hole, grounded outlets with faceplates.
  • Install a lock-out switch that can turn off all electricity to one area, for fast action in an emergency.
  • If there are any doubts about the state of electrical circuits, wiring or equipment on a farm, have a licensed electrician inspect them.
  • Properly ground the entire electrical system and protect ground wires and rods from damage.

If a line has fallen on the ground or on some other object or piece of equipment, always assume it’s hot, live or energized. Stay clear, keep others away and call 911 and Pacific Power toll free at 1-888-221-7070.

 

Another great source for safety information is the National Agricultural Safety Database. Visit nasdonline.org to find out more.

 

“By being extra careful and refreshing everyone on safety, especially with an expanded workforce on hand, we can all work together and enjoy a safe and bountiful harvest,” said Cissna.
 

# # #

 

About Pacific Power

Pacific Power provides electric service to more than 770,000 customers in Oregon, Washington and California. The company works to meet growing energy demand while protecting and enhancing the environment. Pacific Power is part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity providers in the United States, with almost 2 million customers in six western states. Information about Pacific Power is available on the company’s website, Twitter, Facebook and YouTube pages, which can be accessed via pacificpower.net.


Portland General Electric announces end to coal-fired power generation in Oregon: Reduces emissions, advances journey to clean energy resource mix (Photo)
PGE - 10/15/20 12:32 PM
Portland General Electric's Boardman Generating Station, on Carty Reservoir in Morrow County, Oregon
Portland General Electric's Boardman Generating Station, on Carty Reservoir in Morrow County, Oregon
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/101/139162/thumb_Boardman_aerial_2_wide_shot.JPG

Video b-roll is available online, with scenes of the Boardman Plant’s construction and dedication in 1980, the current interior and exterior of the plant, and the surrounding environment and community. The plant is roughly 11 miles southwest of the City of Boardman and 10 miles from the Columbia River.

PORTLAND, Ore. – Portland General Electric Company (NYSE: POR) today announced it has permanently shuttered its Boardman Generating Station in Eastern Oregon’s Morrow County. The closure fulfills a groundbreaking agreement PGE reached with stakeholders, customer groups and regulators in 2010 to significantly reduce air emissions from power production in Oregon by ending operations at Boardman 20 years ahead of schedule and transitioning to cleaner energy resources. Boardman is the only coal-fired power plant in Oregon. PGE has a 90 percent ownership share of the plant. Idaho Power owns the remaining 10 percent.

“Our customers are counting on us to deliver a clean energy future,” PGE President and CEO Maria Pope said. “PGE’s Boardman closure is a major step on our path to meeting Oregon’s greenhouse gas emissions reduction goals and transforming our system to reliably serve our customers with a cleaner, more sustainable energy mix.

Boardman’s closure has been factored into PGE’s resource plans since 2010, so the company could take steps to ensure there’ll be enough electricity to continue reliable electric service to customers after the plant’s shutdown. No single generator will replace the facility. Instead, a mix of resources including five-year contracts with the Bonneville Power Administration, Washington’s Douglas County PUD, and other independent suppliers has been added to PGE’s energy portfolio to meet near-term needs; a request for proposals for additional long term, non-emitting capacity resources is in the planning stages and is expected to be conducted next year.

The company is also bringing online energy storage, new renewable resources, and new distributed resources like demand response (when customers help balance the grid by volunteering to shift energy use during peak times) to create a cleaner, more resilient power system for the future.

One notable new renewable power resource that will help serve PGE customers and contribute to a healthy economy in the Morrow County community going forward is Wheatridge – a facility PGE is building with NextEra Energy Resources just south and east of Boardman, with 300 megawatts of wind and 50 megawatts of solar, augmented by 30 megawatts of battery storage. PGE will own part of the wind resource and purchase the rest of Wheatridge’s output on a long-term contract with NextEra. The Wheatridge wind farm is currently in the final stages of construction and will be online this year. The solar and storage resources will be constructed in 2021 and are expected to be online before the end of next year.

Some Boardman employees will continue with the plant during 2021 to conduct environmental cleanup and ready the facility for demolition and removal beginning in 2022, while others will retire, move to other positions with PGE, or leave the company. The company provided a comprehensive retention and severance plan as well as education and job-training benefits to help employees fulfill their personal goals after the closure.

####

 

About Portland General Electric Company:

Portland General Electric (NYSE: POR) is a fully integrated energy company based in Portland, Oregon, with operations across the state. The company serves 901,000 customers with a service area population of 1.9 million Oregonians in 51 cities. PGE has 16 generation plants in five Oregon counties, and maintains and operates 14 public parks and recreation areas. For over 130 years, PGE has delivered safe, affordable and reliable energy to Oregonians. Together with its customers, PGE has the No. 1 voluntary renewable energy program in the U.S. PGE and its 3,000 employees are working with customers to build a clean energy future. In 2019, PGE, employees, retirees and the PGE Foundation donated $4.7 million and volunteered 32,900 hours with more than 700 nonprofits across Oregon. For more information visit www.PortlandGeneral.com/news.

Safe Harbor Statement:
Statements in this news release that relate to future plans, objectives, expectations, performance, events and the like may constitute “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. Forward-looking statements made in this press release include statements regarding Portland General Electric’s energy strategy for future periods, the implementation and outcome that strategy, and the acquisition of additional resources to meet retail customer demand as well as other statements containing words such as “anticipates,” “believes,” “intends,” “estimates,” “promises,” “expects,” “should,” “conditioned upon,” and similar expressions. Investors are cautioned that any such forward-looking statements are subject to risks and uncertainties, including failure to complete capital projects on schedule or within budget, or the abandonment of capital projects; changes in capital market conditions, which could affect the availability and cost of capital and result in delay or cancellation of capital projects; the outcome of various legal and regulatory proceedings; general economic and financial market conditions; and the cost and availability of products and technology. As a result, actual results may differ materially from those projected in the forward-looking statements. All forward-looking statements included in this news release are based on information available to the company on the date hereof and such statements speak only as of the date hereof. The company expressly disclaims any current intention to update publicly any forward-looking statement after the distribution of this release, whether as a result of new information, future events, changes in assumptions or otherwise. Prospective investors should also review the risks, assumptions and uncertainties listed in the company’s most recent annual report on form 10-K and in other documents that we file with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission, including management’s discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of operations and the risks described therein from time to time.




Attached Media Files: Portland General Electric's Boardman Generating Station, on Carty Reservoir in Morrow County, Oregon

Transportation
I-84 Westbound freeway now open in eastern Oregon (Photo)
ODOT: East. Ore. - 10/13/20 10:17 PM
oil absorbent material applied to roadway
oil absorbent material applied to roadway
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/1204/139098/thumb_CleanUP.jpeg

I-84 WESTBOUND freeway is now open in Ontario, Baker City and La Grande. Expect congestion as traffic gets back onto the freeway. Expect lane restrictions near La Grande Exit 265 to accommodate continuing clean-up operations. The westbound freeway was closed around 4:30 p.m. due to a truck crash that blocked lanes and spilled diesel fuel on the roadway near La Grande Exit 265. The Eastbound freeway was not impacted. Crews have been working for hours to clean up the diesel spill, which was spread along the pavement by rain, creating a slippery, hazardous mess. Absorbent material was used to clean up the fuel and get one lane open. Please continue to check TripCheck.com for update highway information, or call 511 / 800-977-6368. Outside Oregon dial 503-588-2941




Attached Media Files: oil absorbent material applied to roadway

Federal
Representatives Needed for Steens Mountain Advisory Council
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 10/19/20 3:50 PM

HINES, Ore. – Did you know the Bureau of Land Management has Resource Advisory Councils – made up of people just like you – that give citizen-based advice and recommendations on the management of public lands? These groups provide an opportunity for individuals from all backgrounds and interests to have a stronger impact on the decisions made for public lands.

The Steens Mountain Advisory Council (SMAC) currently has five vacant positions and six positions with terms expiring in 2021 open for public nomination:

  • a person interested in fish and recreational fishing in the Steens Mountain Cooperative Management and Protection Area (CMPA);
  • a person who is a grazing permittee on Federal lands in the CMPA;
  • two persons who are recognized environmental representatives, one to represent the State as a whole and one from the local area;
  • a person who has no financial interest in the CMPA to represent statewide interests;
  • a person who participates in mechanized or consumptive recreation in the CMPA, such as hunting, fishing, or off-road driving;
  • a recreation permit holder or representative of a commercial recreation operation in the CMPA;
  • a person who regularly participates in dispersed recreation in the CMPA, such as hiking, camping, nature viewing, nature photography, bird watching, horse back riding, or trail walking;
  • a person to serve as the State government liaison to the Council;
  • a private landowner within the CMPA; and
  • a member of the Burns Paiute Tribe.

If you are interested in public land management on Steens Mountain, this is a great opportunity to share your expertise and work with a collaborative group. The SMAC has been successful in bringing diverse and often competing interests to the table to deal with issues of mutual concern. This inclusive approach has shown great promise as a means to creatively and successfully deal with long-standing problems of public land management. Consensus-driven recommendations often lead to sustainable outcomes that benefit natural resources and have a high level of public support.

"Resource Advisory Councils provide the BLM with vital feedback on current issues, concerns and proposals, and enable us to engage local communities and stakeholders to improve our management of public lands," said BLM Burns District Manager Jeff Rose.

To nominate yourself or someone you know, submit a membership application and supporting letters of recommendation from the groups or interests to be represented to the BLM Burns District Office, 28910 Hwy 20 West, Hines, Oregon. Nominees will be evaluated based on their training, education, and knowledge of the Steens Mountain area.

The application deadline is November 13, 2020. Nomination forms can be picked up at this same location,
by mail or phone request at (541) 573-4400, or online at: https://www.blm.gov/get-involved/resource-advisory-council/apply

The specific category the nominee would like to represent should be identified in the nomination form and letters of reference. The BLM and the Governor of Oregon will review the applications and submit recommended nominees to the Secretary of the Interior, who has the responsibility for making the appointments.

Appointed members must reside in the State of Oregon. The SMAC generally holds quarterly meetings in Hines, Bend and Frenchglen. Although members serve without monetary compensation, travel and per diem expenses are reimbursed at current rates for government employees. SMAC members are normally appointed to three-year terms.
For more information on the SMAC, call Tara Thissell at (541) 573-4400.

- BLM -

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in the 11 Western states and Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. In fiscal year 2018, the diverse activities authorized on BLM-managed lands generated $105 billion in economic output across the country. This economic activity supported 471,000 jobs and contributed substantial revenue to the U.S. Treasury and state governments, mostly through royalties on minerals.


Bureau of Land Management Seeks Nominations to Western Oregon Resource Advisory Committee (Photo)
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 10/16/20 1:47 PM
Western Oregon RAC
Western Oregon RAC
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/5514/139204/thumb_Western_OregonRAC1.jpg

Bureau seeks nominees to help improve public land management in Western Oregon

Portland, Ore.The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) announced that it is seeking public nominations for positions on the Western Oregon Resource Advisory Committee. This citizen-based committee assist in the development of recommendations that address public land management issues.

The BLM maintains RACs chartered under the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA) and the Federal Policy and Land Management Act (FLPMA) across the West. Each RAC consists of 10 to 15 members from interests in local communities.

“The Western Oregon Resource Advisory Committees provide the BLM with vital feedback on current issues, concerns, and proposals, and enable us to engage local communities and stakeholders to improve our management of public lands,” said Elizabeth Burghard, Medford District Manager. “The Western Oregon RAC is responsible for distributing Secure Rural School Title II funding, reviewing recreation fee proposals, and more. Our goal is to ensure that the membership of the Western Oregon RAC encompasses a variety of perspectives and backgrounds to guide our work as effectively as possible.”

The BLM maintains RACs as a means of gaining expert advice, ideas, and diverse opinions on issues including land use planning, fire management, off-highway vehicle use, recreation, timber development, noxious weed management, grazing issues, and wild horse and burro herd management issues. The RACs support the Bureau’s commitment to building a shared conservation stewardship legacy in the communities it serves.   

Individuals may nominate themselves or others to serve on a RAC. Nominees, who must be residents of the state or states where the RAC has jurisdiction, will be reviewed based on their training, education, and knowledge of the RAC’s geographic area. Nominees should also demonstrate a commitment to consensus building and collaborative decision-making. Letters of reference must accompany all nominations from any represented interests or organizations, a completed RAC application, and any other information that speaks to the nominee’s qualifications.

The Western Oregon RAC has different 9 positions open in the following categories:

  • Category One – Representatives of organizations associated with energy/mineral development; Federal grazing permit holders; the timber industry; transportation or rights-of-way; off-highway vehicles users; and commercial and developed outdoor recreation.
  • Category Two – Representatives of archeological and historic organizations; dispersed recreation users; wild horse and burros organizations; and nationally or regionally-recognized environmental organizations. 
  • Category Three – Representatives of state, county, or local elected office; Indian tribes located within or adjacent to the area for which the RAC is organized; academicians employed in natural resource management or natural sciences; employees of a state agency responsible for management of natural resources; and the public at large.

As published in a notice in the Federal Register, the BLM will consider nominations for 30 days until November 13, 2020.  For more information, please contact Kyle Sullivan, (541) 618-2340, ksullivan@blm.gov.  

###

The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land located primarily in the 11 Western states and Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. In fiscal year 2018, the diverse activities authorized on BLM-managed lands generated $105 billion in economic output across the country. This economic activity supported 471,000 jobs and contributed substantial revenue to the U.S. Treasury and state governments, mostly through royalties on minerals.

 

 




Attached Media Files: Western Oregon RAC

United States Attorney Statement Related to November, 2020 General Election
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 10/16/20 2:34 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.— United States Attorney Billy J. Williams announced today that Assistant United States Attorney (AUSA) Austin Rice-Stitt will lead local efforts in connection with the Justice Department’s nationwide Election Day Program for the upcoming November 3, 2020 general election.  AUSA Rice-Stitt has been appointed to serve as the District Election Officer (DEO) for Oregon and in that capacity is responsible for overseeing the District’s handling of complaints of election fraud and voting rights concerns in consultation with Justice Department Headquarters in Washington.

 

          United States Attorney Williams said, “Every citizen must be able to vote without interference or discrimination and to have that vote counted without it being stolen because of fraud.  The Department of Justice will always act appropriately to protect the integrity of the election process.”

 

          The Department of Justice has an important role in deterring election fraud and discrimination at the polls, and combating these violations whenever and wherever they occur.  The Department’s long-standing Election Day Program furthers these goals, and also seeks to ensure public confidence in the integrity of the election process by providing local points of contact within the Department for the public to report possible election fraud and voting rights violations through election day.

 

            Federal law protects against such crimes as intimidating or bribing voters, buying and selling votes, impersonating voters, altering vote tallies, stuffing ballot boxes, and marking ballots for voters against their wishes or without their input.  It also contains special protections for the rights of voters, and provides that they can vote free from acts that intimidate or harass them.  Further, federal law protects the right of voters to mark their own ballot or to be assisted by a person of their choice (where voters need assistance because of disability or illiteracy).   The franchise is the cornerstone of American democracy.  We all must ensure that those who are entitled to the franchise exercise it if they choose, and that those who seek to corrupt it are brought to justice.  In order to respond to complaints of election fraud or voting rights concerns during the voting period that ends on November 3, 2020, and to ensure that such complaints are directed to the appropriate authorities, United States Attorney Williams stated that AUSA/DEO Rice-Stitt will be on duty in this District through election day.  He can be reached by the public at 503-789-4928

 

          In addition, the FBI will have special agents available in each field office and resident agency throughout the country to receive allegations of federal election fraud and other election abuses through election day.  The local FBI field office can be reached by the public at (503) 224-4181.

 

          Complaints about possible violations of the federal voting rights laws can be made directly to the Civil Rights Division in Washington, DC by phone at 800-253-3931 or by complaint form at https://civilrights.justice.gov/ .

 

          Please note, however, in the case of a crime of violence or intimidation, please call 911 immediately and before contacting federal authorities.  State and local police have primary jurisdiction over ballot drop off sites, and almost always have faster reaction capacity in an emergency.

 

          United States Attorney Williams said, “Ensuring free and fair elections depends in large part on the cooperation of the American electorate.  It is imperative that those who have specific information about discrimination or election fraud make that information available to my Office, the FBI, or the Civil Rights Division.”




Attached Media Files: United States Attorney Statement Related to November, 2020 General Election

Former Postal Worker Sentenced to Prison for Stealing Over 400 Mobile Phones out of Packages in the Mail
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 10/14/20 3:04 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—A former U.S. Postal Service employee was sentenced to federal prison today for stealing mobile phones out of packages at the Portland postal sorting facility, announced U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams.

Rico Alvarez, 24, was sentenced to one year and one day in federal prison and three years’ supervised release.

 “It is imperative that the community has confidence and trust in the integrity of the U.S. Postal Service” said United States Attorney Billy J. Williams “Thanks to the dedicated efforts of the U.S. Postal Service Office of Inspector General, this defendant is held to account for violating that trust.”

            U.S. Postal Service Office of Inspector General, Western Area Field Office, Executive Special Agent-in-Charge John D. Masters said, “The U.S. Postal Service has a long and proud history dating back to 1775. The Postal Service employs over 630,000 men and woman who are dedicated public servants. For over two centuries, the Postal Service has honored its fundamental commitment to protect the sanctity of the U.S. Mail.  Mr. Rico Alvarez willfully chose to violate that public trust and his duties. Today’s sentencing of Mr. Alvarez demonstrates that theft of U.S. Mail, committed by a Postal Service employee, will not be tolerated and carries serious consequences. The public we serve can rest assured that the Postal Service Office of Inspector General, U.S. Attorney’s Office, and our partner law enforcement agencies, remain committed to safeguarding the integrity of the U.S. Mail and ensuring the accountability and integrity of U.S. Postal Service employees.”

            According to court documents, beginning in about August, 2019, Alvarez, an employee of the United States Postal Service, began stealing smartphones placed into the mail for delivery to customers.  Over the course of the next three months, Alvarez stole more than 400 phones, by surreptitiously opening the box as it passed his mail sorting station, removing the phone, and then sending the empty package on for delivery to the intended recipient. On the day he was caught by Postal Inspectors, he had over a dozen stolen phones in his possession. When interviewed, Alvarez admitted to stealing high end, recently released, smartphones, which he subsequently sold for his own profit.

On June 25, 2020 Alvarez was charged by criminal information with Theft of Mail. He plead guilty to the charge on July 20, 2020.

            During sentencing, U.S. District Court Judge Michael Simon ordered Alvarez to pay $253,550 in restitution.

            The United States Postal Service Office of Inspector General investigated this case. It was prosecuted by Quinn Harrington, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.




Attached Media Files: Former Postal Worker Sentenced to Prison for Stealing Over 400 Mobile Phones out of Packages in the Mail

State
New Artist Relief Program to provide $1.25 million in relief to Oregon artists (Photo)
Oregon Arts Commission - 10/19/20 9:21 AM
Mobile Projection Unit (Fernanda D’Agostino & Sarah Turner) with musician Crystal Cortez “Springs,” 2020. Photo by Photo Brian Foulkes.
Mobile Projection Unit (Fernanda D’Agostino & Sarah Turner) with musician Crystal Cortez “Springs,” 2020. Photo by Photo Brian Foulkes.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/1418/139249/thumb_Artist_Relief_Fenanda_Sarah.jpg

Oregon artists may now apply to a new Artist Relief Program created by the Oregon Arts Commission in partnership with The Oregon Community Foundation and the James F. and Marion L. Miller Foundation. Awards ranging from $1,000 to $5,000 will be distributed until the program fund, totaling just over $1.25 million, is depleted.

“Without our artists, there would be no art in Oregon,” said Brian Rogers, executive director of the Oregon Arts Commission. “We feel strongly that, in addition to the significant relief we were able to provide to arts and cultural organizations through federal CARES Act funds allocated to the National Endowment for the Arts and the Oregon Cultural Trust, we need to offer relief funding to struggling Oregon artists as well. We are extremely grateful to The Oregon Community Foundation and the Miller Foundation for joining us in that effort.”

The purpose of the Artist Relief Program is to provide relief funding to Oregon artists who have experienced financial hardship during the COVID-19 pandemic due to cancellations of exhibitions, performances, rehearsals or other activities with a stipend, events, teaching opportunities, book signings or other professional presentation opportunities. Guidelines are now posted on the Arts Commission website.

“In times of crisis, artists help us make sense of our world and stay connected to one another,” said Martha Richards, executive director of the Miller Foundation. “The Miller Foundation stands with Oregon artists in this difficult time because we recognize the critical roles they play in our communities and our lives--they are the foundation of our state’s arts ecosystem.”

“Oregon Community Foundation is thrilled to be a partner in this new Artist Relief program,” added Jerry Tischleder, Oregon Community Foundation’s program officer for arts and culture. “We recognize that independent and freelance artists are vital to the recovery of our communities, bringing hope and inspiration to the world while using their creativity to help process the collective trauma, grief and loss we’ve all experienced in these unprecedented times.”

The program supports professional artists from specific disciplines who have experienced or anticipate experiencing loss of revenue of $1,000 or more between March 1 and Dec. 31, 2020.

The artistic disciplines supported are: Literature (creative non-fiction, fiction, play writing and poetry); dance (including choreography); music (composition and music performance); theatre and performance art; folk and traditional arts; visual arts (crafts, drawing, painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, mixed media and new media); design arts; and media arts.

Applications are due by 5 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 10. Awards must be spent by July 31, 2021.

Artists from underserved communities, including (but not limited to) rural communities and communities of color, as well as artists with disabilities, are especially encouraged to apply.

                   

The Oregon Arts Commission provides leadership, funding and arts programs through its grants, special initiatives and services. Nine commissioners, appointed by the Governor, determine arts needs and establish policies for public support of the arts. The Arts Commission became part of Business Oregon (formerly Oregon Economic and Community Development Department) in 1993, in recognition of the expanding role the arts play in the broader social, economic and educational arenas of Oregon communities. In 2003, the Oregon legislature moved the operations of the Oregon Cultural Trust to the Arts Commission, streamlining operations and making use of the Commission’s expertise in grantmaking, arts and cultural information and community cultural development. 

The Arts Commission is supported with general funds appropriated by the Oregon legislature and with federal funds from the National Endowment for the Arts as well as funds from the Oregon Cultural Trust. More information about the Oregon Arts Commission is available online at: www.oregonartscommission.org.

 




Attached Media Files: Mobile Projection Unit (Fernanda D’Agostino & Sarah Turner) with musician Crystal Cortez “Springs,” 2020. Photo by Photo Brian Foulkes.

"Blue Cheese Day" Celebrates America's First Grand Champion Cheese (Photo)
Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council - 10/18/20 2:56 PM
Rogue Creamery in Central Point
Rogue Creamery in Central Point
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/4131/139239/thumb_Rogue_Creamery_in_Central_Point.jpg

It was exactly one year ago today that a small American creamery from Oregon made national and international news.

On October 18, 2019, Rogue Creamery from Central Point, Oregon, earned the title of “best cheese in the world” for their Rogue River Blue Cheese at the World Cheese Awards in Bergamo, Italy. It was the first time in the history of the competition that an American cheese was selected as grand champion.

In honor of Rogue River Blue’s historic win, Oregon Governor Kate Brown issued a proclamation designating October 18 as Blue Cheese Day.

Similar to the “Judgement of Paris” in 1976, when American wines triumphed over the best French vintners in a blind taste test, this was a statement win and a landmark moment for American artisanal and farmstead cheeses.

U.S. Dairy Export Council President, Tom Vilsack said, “This is more than a win for Rogue Creamery of Central Point, Oregon, The ‘Best Cheese’ title creates a halo effect that will cause global customers to look at all U.S. cheeses in a brighter light.”

This was no small feat. An international panel of 260 judges selected Rogue River Blue out of more than 3,800 cheeses from 42 countries.

The judges experienced the signature Rogue Valley terroir captured within each taste of the organic, cave-aged blue cheese wrapped in Syrah grape leaves soaked in pear spirits, with flavors of sweet pine, wild ripened berries, hazelnuts, morels and pears. It earned their high praise and respect.

This special cheese is the product of seventeen years of hard work and refinement by President David Gremmels with support from his dedicated team at Rogue Creamery and their organic herd of Brown Swiss and Holstein cows. Rogue Creamery is a certified B-Corporation that serves as a model for sustainability in dairy, committed to leaving a positive impact on people, animals, and the planet.

“I am humbled and filled with gratitude. This is the greatest distinction a cheese can receive,” said Rogue Creamery President, David Gremmels. “What extraordinary validation of our commitment to quality, of the place that inspires our cheese – Southern Oregon’s Rogue Valley – and of the excellence of the growing American artisan cheese industry.”

Since the 2020 World Cheese Awards were postponed to 2021, Rogue River Blue will have the rare distinction of continuing its reign as “best in the world” for two years running.

###




Attached Media Files: Blue Cheese Day Proclamation , Rogue Creamery in Central Point , World Cheese Awards Grand Champion , Rogue Creamery President David Gremmels 2 , Rogue Creamery President David Gremmels 1 , Rogue Creamery team with President David Gremmels 3 , Rogue Creamery team with President David Gremmels 2 , Rogue Creamery team with President David Gremmels 1

ODHS Announces Disaster Food Benefits (DSNAP) for 8 Counties
Oregon Department of Human Services - 10/17/20 6:44 PM

The Oregon Department of Human Services has received federal approval from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Service to offer the Disaster Supplemental Assistance Program (DSNAP) in eight Oregon counties impacted as a result of the historic wildfires this summer and fall. The eight approved counties are Clackamas, Douglas, Jackson, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, and Marion.

Any person that resided or was employed within one of the designated counties at the time of the September 7 wildfires and suffered disaster losses may be eligible to receive one month of temporary DSNAP assistance. DSNAP benefits are provided via an electronic benefits transfer card (EBT card), similar to a debit card, and can be used to purchase food items at grocery stores and other authorized SNAP retailers.

Oregonians may be eligible for DSNAP if they lived or were employed in any of the designated counties when the wildfires began on Sept. 7, 2020, and experienced at least one of the following conditions because of the wildfires:

  • Damage to or destruction of the home or self-employment business.
  • Loss or inaccessibility of income including a reduction or termination of income or a significant delay in receiving income due to disaster-related problems.
  • Disaster-related expenses (home or business repairs, temporary shelter, evacuation, food loss, etc.) that are not expected to be reimbursed during the disaster benefit period.

Please note that people seeking assistance may pre-register for DSNAP beginning Saturday, Oct. 17, 2020, through Thursday, Oct. 22, 2020. Due to COVID-19, all applications will be completed online. Visit https://www.oregon.gov/dhs/ASSISTANCE/FOOD-BENEFITS/Pages/DSNAP.aspx to apply. If you need assistance, call 2-1-1 or reach out to the Aging and Disability Resource Connection at 1-855-ORE-ADRC.

Pre-Registration and Application Timeline

Oct. 16 to Oct. 22

  • Pre-registration statewide
  • Fill out the pre-registration application

A Self-Sufficiency Programs worker will contact you to complete the application process.

Anyone who misses the pre-registration period will still be to apply until Oct. 28. Please complete and submit your DSNAP application online on the date below that coincides with the first letter of your last name.

Application Date

Last name begins with

Oct. 23

A, B, C, D, E

Oct. 24

F, G, H, I

Oct. 25

J, K, L, M

Oct. 26

N, O, P Q, R

Oct. 27

S, T, U, V, W, X, Y, Z

Oct. 28

Open to all applicants

For local resources in your area, such as food or shelter, please call 2-1-1 or reach out to the state’s Aging and Disability Resource Connection (ADRC) at 1-855-ORE-ADRC or 1-855-673-2372.




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/973/139230/ODHS_Announces_Disaster_Food_Benefits_(DSNAP)_for_8_Counties.pdf

UPDATE -- Clarissa (Chloe) Woodruff Quesinberry found
Oregon Department of Human Services - 10/15/20 12:52 PM

(Salem, Ore.) – Clarissa (Chloe) Woodruff Quesinberry, age 14, a foster child who went missing on Oct. 5, 2020 was found on Oct. 14, 2020. The Oregon Department of Human Services, Child Welfare Division is thankful for the community support to find her.

A small number of children in foster care may be in significant danger when they run away or have gone missing. As DHS works to do everything it can to find these missing children and ensure their safety, media alerts will be issued in some circumstances when it is determined necessary. Sometimes, in these situations, a child may go missing repeatedly, resulting in more than one media alert for the same child.

Report child abuse to the Oregon Child Abuse Hotline by calling 1-855-503-SAFE (7233).  This toll-free number allows you to report abuse of any child or adult to the Oregon Department of Human Services, 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year.

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See how much health coverage may cost at OregonHealthCare.gov/WindowShop (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 10/15/20 3:40 PM
Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace logo
Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/1073/139175/thumb_OHIM_logo-center_text.png

(Salem) – Oregonians are looking for ways to protect their household budgets during the COVID-19 pandemic. Health care needs are not always something people can predict, but unexpected costs for care can cripple a budget. However, a window shopping tool allows Oregonians to see how much they can save on private health insurance coverage through the Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace.

Oregonians can get quality coverage and financial savings through the Marketplace. The window shopping tool is now available at OregonHealthCare.gov/WindowShop for consumers to preview plan options and receive estimates to lower costs for 2021 to prepare for open entollment.

Open enrollment runs from Nov. 1 through Dec. 15 and is the only time of year many people can buy private health insurance. In 2020, more than 70 percent of Oregonians who purchased individual health insurance qualified for financial help, lowering the average premium to just $142 per month.

Visiting OregonHealthCare.gov/WindowShop can help you answer these questions:

  • What coverage do I qualify for?
  • How much financial help can I get?
  • What would my health plan cover?
  • What are my next steps?

“Health insurance through the Marketplace is quality coverage that protects Oregonians from current and future health issues,” said Chiqui Flowers, Marketplace administrator. “The updated tool can help Oregonians find the true cost of coverage available to them.”

For 2021, Oregonians will have more options than they had in the past few years. Regence and BridgeSpan join Providence in providing statewide coverage, and all Oregonians will be able to choose from at least 15 health insurance plans.

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The Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace is the state-level partner to HealthCare.gov and a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS). For more information, visit OregonHealthCare.gov.




Attached Media Files: Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace logo

Medicare open enrollment begins today: Changes are coming and help is available (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 10/15/20 9:30 AM
Oregon SHIBA
Oregon SHIBA
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/1073/139088/thumb_SHIBA_Oregon_MAP.png

(Salem) – People with Medicare have until Dec. 7 to make changes to their health plans and prescription drug coverage to meet their health care needs for 2021. Medicare’s open enrollment period for 2021 benefits started today.

There are several changes for the 2021 plan year. They are:

  • 29 prescription drug plans
  • More than 100 Medicare Advantage (MA) plans, including a new Medicare Medical Savings Account MA option, available in all Oregon counties  
  • Part D senior savings model for diabetic supplies
  • Acupuncture, telehealth, and other virtual services
  • End-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients can enroll in Medicare Advantage plans for 2021

Visit Medicare.gov/Plan-Compare to find 2021 health and drug plans, compare coverage options, or estimate Medicare costs. For more details, check out the 2021 Medicare and You book or Medicare.gov.

The Oregon Senior Health Insurance Benefits Assistance (SHIBA) program is available to help beneficiaries understand their options. To find free, local Medicare counseling help, go to dcbspage.org/SHIBALOCAL or call 800-722-4134 (toll-free) to speak to a state-certified Medicare counselor.

SHIBA counselors can help Oregonians navigate the Medicare.gov Plan Finder tool to enter prescriptions and compare the cost and benefits of individual drug plans, provide enrollment guidance, and answer any other questions related to Medicare benefits. All of these services are available remotely statewide to ensure the safety of both clients and counselors.

Find local help by calling 800-722-4134 (toll-free) or visiting SHIBA.Oregon.gov.

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Oregon SHIBA is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon’s largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit dcbs.oregon.gov. Follow DCBS on Twitter: twitter.com/OregonDCBS. Receive consumer help and information on insurance, mortgages, investments, workplace safety, and more.




Attached Media Files: Oregon SHIBA

DOC announces Assistant Director (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 10/19/20 10:48 AM
Assistant Director Rob Persson
Assistant Director Rob Persson
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/1070/139257/thumb_persson_small.jpg

Colette S. Peters, Director of the Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC), recently announced the appointment of Rob Persson as the agency’s new Assistant Director of Operations, effective December 1. Mr. Persson will step into this role after the retirement of Assistant Director Michael Gower, who has dedicated the past 37 years to law enforcement.

Mr. Persson is a 25-year DOC veteran, beginning his career in 1995 as a Correctional Officer. He promoted through the ranks to Lieutenant at Santiam Correctional Institution and Mill Creek Correctional Facility. Persson served as Prison Term Analyst Manager and then Administrator for the Offender Information and Sentence Computation Unit. He later became Assistant Superintendent at Coffee Creek Correctional Facility (CCCF), promoting to Superintendent at Oregon State Correctional Institution and then Superintendent at CCCF. Currently, Persson serves as the Westside Institutions Administrator for the Operations Division. He holds a Bachelor of Science Degree from Western Oregon University and a Certificate of Public Management from Willamette University, Atkinson Graduate School of Management.

“We are thrilled to welcome Rob to the Executive Team as we continue our great work in these challenging times. Rob’s leadership, experience, and ingenuity – coupled with his relationships both internally and externally – will be invaluable as we persevere and move into the future,” stated Director Peters.

DOC employs 4,600 staff members at 14 institutions, two community corrections offices, and several centralized support facilities throughout the state. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of approximately 14,000 adults sentenced to more than 12 months of incarceration, and direct or indirect supervision of 31,000 offenders on felony supervision in the community. DOC is recognized nationally among correctional agencies for providing adults in custody with the cognitive, education, and job skills needed to become productive citizens when they transition back to their communities.

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Attached Media Files: Assistant Director Rob Persson

Snake River Correctional Institution reports in-custody death
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 10/17/20 3:33 PM

An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) adult in custody (AIC) died October 17, 2020. He was incarcerated at the Snake River Correctional Institution and passed away at a local hospital. He tested positive for COVID-19. He was between 55 and 65 years old. As with all in-custody deaths, the Oregon State Police have been notified, and the Medical Examiner will determine cause of death. Department-wide, this is the fifteenth AIC to die who tested positive for COVID-19.

For more information on COVID-19 cases inside Oregon’s prisons, please visit DOC’s COVID-19 website. The agency is responsible for the care and custody of 14,000 adults in custody who are incarcerated in 14 institutions across the state.

DOC requires employees and AICs to wear masks if they cannot maintain six feet of social distancing. Wearing masks is mandatory at all times in health services areas, some work areas, and in food services areas. Cloth masks have been provided to AICs and staff. If an AIC becomes ill and exhibits flu-like symptoms, CDC and OHA guidance for supportive care are followed.

Institutions continue to clean and disinfect numerous times a day. DOC asks AICs to report symptoms of COVID to medical staff. Posters are in all DOC institutions encouraging individuals to maintain proper hygiene and to uphold appropriate social distancing to the extent possible. Health screening processes are in place before staff are allowed to enter facilities. This screening includes a temperature check and a screening questionnaire. Visiting remains closed until further notice.

Prior to the COVID-19 crisis, DOC issued a press release when an AIC passed away. This notification would include the person’s name, county of conviction, sentence length, and date of death. However, no cause of death would be listed because the Medical Examiner makes that determination. In order to balance the desire for transparency with our legal obligation to protect personal health information, we have changed the AIC death notification process when someone dies who has tested positive for COVID-19. DOC is working with the Oregon Health Authority to publish COVID-19 related data and information on the OHA website.

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Attached Media Files: COVID-19 at ODOC

ODF fire report for Monday, Oct. 19, 2020 (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 10/19/20 1:47 PM
October rains have greatly reduced fire danger across large parts of Oregon after an unprecedented wildfire season that highlighted fire risk across the state.
October rains have greatly reduced fire danger across large parts of Oregon after an unprecedented wildfire season that highlighted fire risk across the state.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2020-10/1072/139269/thumb_2020_09_26-15_43_54_202-CDT.jpg

SALEM, Ore. - Barring significant new wildfires, this will be the last regularly scheduled ODF fire situation report of this year. October rains have allowed the majority of ODF districts and fire protection associations to end fire season. The national fire preparedness level was lowered to 3 last week. With the Holiday Farm Fire now being managed by a Type 3 team, no ODF Incident Management Teams are currently deployed on wildfires.

Only one wildfire start was reported yesterday in Oregon, with no new acres burned reported.   

Check ODF's online public fire restrictions map to see what if any fire restrictions might still be in force for your area.  

2020 Fire Season On ODF-Protected Lands
This fire season there have been 2,027 fires across all jurisdictions in Oregon and 1,221,324 acres burned. On ODF-protected lands, there have been 912 fires, close to the 10-year average of 918. In the past 10 years the average number of acres burned on lands protected by ODF has been 41,426. More than 13 times that amount - 551,816 acres - has burned this year.  

Closures

Santiam State Forest is still closed to the public. Before heading out to hunt or recreate on other state or federal public lands, please check to see if there are any restrictions or closures due to the recent fires. There are still portions of some highways in wildfire areas that are closed. Use ODOT’s TripCheck to plan your route.

 Fire name

 Acres burned

Containment

 Location

Lionshead

204,469

       46%

20 miles W of Warm Springs

Beachie Creek

193,556

       72%

15 miles N of Detroit

Holiday Farm

173,393

       96%

3 miles W of McKenzie Bridge

Riverside

138,054

       61%

2 miles SE of Estacada

Archie Creek

131,542

       95%

20 miles E of Glide

Slater

44,597 in Oregon

       75%

6 SE of Cave Junction (also in No. California)


More Information




Attached Media Files: October rains have greatly reduced fire danger across large parts of Oregon after an unprecedented wildfire season that highlighted fire risk across the state.

Check your Oregon tax withholding now as the last quarter of 2020 begins
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 10/16/20 12:25 PM

The Department of Revenue is reminding taxpayers that now is the perfect time to review their Oregon tax withholding and payments to avoid a surprise when filing next year.

“We encourage Oregon taxpayers to check their withholding for tax year 2020,” said Personal Tax and Compliance Division Administrator JoAnn Martin. “Not withholding enough during the year could lead to an unexpected tax bill in 2021.”

Oregon’s Form OR-W-4 and Revenue’s online withholding calculator allow taxpayers to determine the correct amount to withhold for Oregon personal income tax. The 2020 Form OR-W-4 and the withholding calculator are available on the department’s website.

Generally, wage earners should periodically review their withholding, especially when they had a recent personal or financial change that may affect their tax situation such as a change in income, filing status, or number of dependents.

This year, thousands of Oregon taxpayers have had to file for unemployment benefits, many of them for the first time. Unemployment compensation is taxable and withholding is not done automatically. If recipients did not elect to have state income tax withheld when applying for benefits, they will need to fill out Form 1040WH from the Oregon Employment Department website and submit it to the OED to authorize withholding.

To get tax forms, check the status of your refund, or make payments, visit www.oregon.gov/dor or email questions.dor@oregon.gov. You can also call 800-356-4222 toll-free from an Oregon prefix (English or Spanish) or 503-378-4988 in Salem and outside Oregon. For TTY (hearing or speech impaired), we accept all relay calls.

 


Third-quarter estimated payments for CAT due October 31
Oregon Dept. of Revenue - 10/15/20 1:50 PM

Third-quarter 2020 estimated payments for Oregon’s new Corporate Activity Tax (CAT) are due by October 31. Taxpayers expecting to owe $10,000 or more of Corporate Activity Tax for the calendar year must make estimated payments.

For businesses negatively affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, the Oregon Department of Revenue will honor a business taxpayer’s good-faith efforts to comply with the CAT and not assess penalties if they document their efforts to comply, including how COVID-19 has impacted their business.

If COVID-19 impacted businesses know they’ll owe $10,000 or more in annual corporate activity tax in 2020 and can pay, they should make estimated quarterly payments and comply with the law to the fullest extent possible.

Guidance about making CAT quarterly payments can be found on the CAT page
of the Department of Revenue website.

Information available by following the Beyond the FAQ link includes answers to the questions:
• How to calculate CAT liability?
• When are estimated payments required?
• How do I pay my estimated taxes?

Registration for the CAT is still required. Businesses must register within 30 days of reaching $750,000 in Oregon commercial activity in the calendar year. Registration is available through Revenue Online, and the department offers a series of online resources to help with registration on the
CAT page
of the Department of Revenue website.

Taxpayers with general questions about the CAT can email cat.help.dor@oregon.gov or call 503-945-8005.

To get tax forms, check the status of your refund, or make tax payments, visit www.oregon.gov/dor or email questions.dor@oregon.gov. You also can call 800-356-4222 toll-free from an Oregon prefix (English or Spanish) or 503-378-4988 in Salem and outside Oregon. For TTY (hearing- or speech-impaired), we accept all relay calls.


Los trabajadores de los condados de Clackamas, Douglas, Jackson, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, y Marion podrían ser elegibles para Asistencia de Desempleo por Desastre
Oregon Employment Department - 10/19/20 10:58 AM

DISASTER FEMA DR-4562-OR

Los trabajadores de los condados de Clackamas, Douglas, Jackson, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, y Marion podrían ser elegibles para Asistencia de Desempleo por Desastre

El Departamento de Empleo de Oregon anunció la disponibilidad de Asistencia de Desempleo por Desastre (DUA, por sus siglas en inglés) el 23 de septiembre de 2020 para personas que se encuentren desempleadas, o hayan rebajado sus horas de trabajo de manera substancial o para personas que trabajan por cuenta propia y se encuentren desempleadas como resultado directo de los incendios forestales y los vientos de dirección directa que ocurrieron el 7 de septiembre de 2020. Estas personas tampoco deben calificar para el desempleo estatal regular, para la compensación de Desempleo de Emergencia por la Pandemia (PEUC), otros programas de extensión, o para beneficios de la Asistencia de Desempleo por la Pandemia (PUA).

La Asistencia de Desempleo por Desastre (DUA) es un programa federal que brinda beneficios de asistencia por desempleo temporal a las personas cuyo empleo o trabajo por cuenta propia se ha perdido o interrumpido o cuyas horas de trabajo se redujeron considerablemente como resultado directo de un desastre mayor. El Departamento de Empleo de Oregon administra el programa DUA para el Departamento de Trabajo, Administración de Empleo y Capacitación de los Estados Unidos, en nombre de la Agencia Federal para el Manejo de Emergencias (FEMA). Las personas elegibles para beneficios de desempleo regulares o Asistencia de Desempleo por la Pandemia (PUA) no son elegibles para DUA.

El DUA está disponible para personas elegibles durante semanas de desempleo a partir del 13 de septiembre de 2020. Los beneficios para este desastre estarán disponibles hasta el 20 de marzo de 2021, siempre y cuando su desempleo continúe siendo un resultado directo del desastre mayor. La fecha límite para presentar un reclamo de DUA relacionado con estos incendios es el 23 de octubre de 2020

Además de las personas que perdieron sus trabajos como resultado directo del desastre mayor, DUA puede incluir personas que:

  • trabajaban por cuenta propia y se les impidió realizar dichos servicios como resultado del desastre y el trabajo o el trabajo por cuenta propia eran su principal fuente de ingresos,
  • no pudieron llegar a su trabajo debido al desastre,
  • estaban programadas y se les impidió comenzar a trabajar o trabajar por cuenta propia en el área del desastre,
  • no pudieron trabajar debido a una lesión como resultado directo del desastre, o
  • se convirtieron en jefe de familia debido a un deceso causado por el desastre,
  • Han solicitado y utilizado todos los beneficios de desempleo regulares de cualquier estado, o no califica para beneficios de desempleo regulares o programas de extensión y siguen desempleadas como resultado directo del desastre.

El desempleo es un resultado directo del desastre mayor si el desempleo se debió a:

  • el daño físico o la destrucción del lugar de trabajo;
  • la inaccesibilidad física del lugar de trabajo debido a su cierre por parte del gobierno federal, estatal o local en respuesta inmediata al desastre; o
  • la falta de trabajo o pérdida de ingresos, si, antes del desastre, el empleador o el negocio autónomo recibió al menos la mayoría de sus ingresos de un negocio en el área de desastre mayor que resultó dañado o destruido en el desastre o una entidad en el área de mayor desastre cerrada por el gobierno federal, estatal o local.

Para recibir los beneficios del DUA, toda la documentación requerida debe entregarse cuando presente la solicitud o dentro de los 21 días posteriores a la fecha en que se presentó su solicitud del DUA. Deberá proporcionar documentación adicional, que incluya, entre otros, prueba de empleo en el momento del desastre o prueba de trabajo por cuenta propia en el momento del desastre e información de ingresos para el año fiscal 2019. Específicamente, la documentación requerida incluye un número de Seguro Social y una copia del formulario de impuestos federales sobre la renta más reciente o talones de cheques, o documentación que demuestre que trabajaba o trabajaba por cuenta propia cuando ocurrió el desastre. La documentación para las personas que trabajan por cuenta propia se puede obtener de bancos o entidades gubernamentales, o declaraciones juradas de personas que tengan conocimiento de su negocio.

Se recomienda a las personas afectadas a solicitar DUA a través del Departamento de Empleo de Oregon (OED), que primero verificará si los solicitantes llenan los requisitos para los beneficios estatales de desempleo, PEUC, otros programas de extensión o beneficios del PUA.

Las solicitudes para el DUA están disponibles en inglés, español, ruso, vietnamita y chino simplificado en línea en www.oregon.gov/EMPLOY/Disaster. Su solicitud puede enviarse por correo a la dirección que se indica a continuación, o puede enviarse en línea en unemployment.oregon.gov/contact-us. Incluya las semanas que le gustaría reclamar en su solicitud inicial. Más información está disponible en nuestro sitio web público y páginas de redes sociales. Si tiene preguntas adicionales o para solicitar una solicitud inicial, llame al: 503-570-5000.

Información de contacto:

Dirección:      Disaster Unemployment Assistance Unit

875 Union Street NE

Salem, OR 97311

 

Peléfono:       

503-570-5000

 

Información adicional:

www.oregon.gov/EMPLOY/Disaster

 

Presente su solicitude n línea:    unemployment.oregon.gov/contact-us




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/930/139259/10.19.20_SECOND_Press_Release_DUA_Wildfires_2020_Spanish__FINAL.pdf

Clackamas, Douglas, Jackson, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, and Marion Counties Workers May Be Eligible for Disaster Unemployment Assistance
Oregon Employment Department - 10/16/20 6:26 PM

DISASTER FEMA DR-4562-OR

Clackamas, Douglas, Jackson, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, and Marion Counties Workers May Be Eligible for Disaster Unemployment Assistance

The Oregon Employment Department announced the availability of Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA) on Sept. 23, 2020 for individuals who became unemployed, had their work hours substantially reduced or are unemployed self-employed individuals as a direct result of the wildfires and straight-line winds that took place since September 7, 2020. They also must not qualify for regular state Unemployment Insurance (UI), Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC), other extension programs, or Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) benefits.

Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA) is a federal program that provides temporary unemployment assistance benefits to individuals whose employment or self-employment has been lost or interrupted or had their work hours greatly reduced as a direct result of a major disaster. The Oregon Employment Department administers the DUA program for the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration, on behalf of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Individuals eligible for regular unemployment benefits or Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) are not eligible for DUA.

DUA is available to eligible individuals for weeks of unemployment beginning September 13, 2020. Benefits for this disaster will be available until March 20, 2021, as long as your unemployment continues to be a direct result of the major disaster. The deadline for filing a DUA claim related to these fires is October 23, 2020

In addition to people who lost their jobs as a direct result of the major disaster, DUA may include individuals who:

  • were self-employed and prevented from performing such services as a result of the disaster and the work or self-employment was their primary source of income,
  • were unable to reach their job because of the disaster,
  • were scheduled to and prevented from beginning work or self-employment in the disaster area,
  • were unable to work due to injury as a direct result of the disaster, or
  • became head of household due a death caused by the disaster,
  •  Have applied for and used all regular unemployment benefits from any state, or do not qualify for regular unemployment benefits, or extension programs and remain unemployed as a direct result of the disaster.

Unemployment is a direct result of the major disaster if the unemployment resulted from:

  • the physical damage or destruction of the place of employment;
  • the physical inaccessibility of the place of employment due to its closure by the federal, state, or local government in immediate response to the disaster; or
  • lack of work, or loss of revenues, if, prior to the disaster, the employer or self-employed business received at least a majority of its revenue or income from an business in the major disaster area that was damaged or destroyed in the disaster or an entity in the major disaster area closed by the federal, state, or local government.

To receive DUA benefits, all required documentation must be turned in when you file or within 21 days from the day your DUA application is filed. You will need to provide supporting documentation, including but not limited to, proof of employment at the time of the disaster, or proof of self-employment at the time of the disaster, and income information for tax year 2019. Specifically, required documentation includes a Social Security number and a copy of the most recent federal income tax form or check stubs, or documentation to support that  you were working or self-employed when the disaster occurred. Documentation for the self-employed can be obtained from banks or government entities, or affidavits from individuals having knowledge of their business.

Affected individuals are encouraged to apply for DUA through the Oregon Employment Department (OED), which will first check if applicants can qualify for state unemployment benefits, PEUC, other extension programs or PUA benefits.

Applications for DUA are available in English, Spanish, Russian, Vietnamese, and Simplified Chinese online at www.oregon.gov/EMPLOY/Disaster. Your application may be mailed to the address listed below, or submitted online at unemployment.oregon.gov/contact-us. Please include the weeks you would like to claim in your initial application. More information is available on our public website and social media pages. For additional questions or to request an initial application, please call: 503-570-5000

 

Contact Information:

Address:        Disaster Unemployment Assistance Unit

875 Union Street NE

Salem, OR 97311

 

Telephone:    

503-570-5000

 

Additional Information:

www.oregon.gov/EMPLOY/Disaster

 

Submit your Application Online:    unemployment.oregon.gov/contact-us

 

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Attached Media Files: 2020-10/930/139209/10.16.20_Press_Release_DUA_Wildfires_2020_English_FINAL.pdf

Oregon Employment Department Expands Website Accessibility; Unemployment.oregon.gov now available in 16 languages
Oregon Employment Department - 10/15/20 4:10 PM

October 14, 2020 (SALEM, ORE.)—Today the Oregon Employment Department announced that its unemployment website (unemployment.oregon.gov) is now available in 15 languages other than English. The agency’s previous COVID-19 site was also available in 16 languages; however this new site, which provides timely information about new unemployment programs, instructions for how to apply for benefits, and answers to frequently asked questions, is easier to navigate and is more accessible for those using a mobile device. Making the newer website available in 16 different languages is part of the agency’s ongoing work towards increasing language access and removing barriers to accessing important information about unemployment benefits online.

“The Oregon Employment Department is an equal opportunity agency. We value equity and inclusivity and we’re committed to ensuring that our Limited English Proficient customers have meaningful access to all of our agency's programs, services, and benefits. We don’t want anyone to miss out on the unemployment benefits they’re eligible for because they weren’t able to access the information they needed from our website. With this significant expansion of services, we’re leveling the playing field so everyone has equal access to information and help.”

Unemployment.oregon.gov is available in the following languages:

  • English
  • Spanish
  • Vietnamese
  • Russian
  • Simplified Chinese
  • Romanian
  • Khmer
  • Korean
  • Arabic
  • Farsi
  • Laotian
  • Somali
  • Hmong
  • Mien
  • Marshallese
  • Chuukese

Some functionalities and external pages, including the Online Claim System, online PUA form, Contact Us form, and chatbot, are currently only available in a limited number of languages. The Employment Department is working to make the online PUA form, currently available in English, Spanish, Vietnamese, Russian, and Korean, available in all 16 languages. The PUA form is expected to soon be available in Simplified Chinese and Arabic. Translated application forms for regular unemployment insurance, PUA, and PEUC are also available on all “Filing a Claim” pages at unemployment.oregon.gov.

Claimants needing additional claim assistance in languages other than English should send their name, requested language, and phone number to OED_LanguageAccess@oregon.gov. They will receive a call back in their requested language.

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Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/930/139172/10_15_website_languages_press_release_FINAL.pdf

El Departamento de Empleo de Oregon expande el acceso a su sitio web; Unemployment.oregon.gov está ahora disponible en 16 idiomas
Oregon Employment Department - 10/15/20 4:09 PM

15 de octubre de 2020 (SALEM, ORE.)— Hoy, el Departamento de Empleo de Oregon anunció que su sitio web del desempleo (unemployment.oregon.gov) ahora está disponible en 15 idiomas además del inglés. El anterior sitio COVID-19 de la agencia también estaba disponible en 16 idiomas; sin embargo, este nuevo sitio, que brinda información oportuna sobre nuevos programas de desempleo, instrucciones sobre cómo solicitar beneficios y respuestas a preguntas frecuentes, es más fácil de navegar y más accesible para quienes usan un dispositivo móvil. Hacer que el sitio web más nuevo esté disponible en 16 idiomas diferentes es parte del trabajo continuo de la agencia para aumentar el acceso a idiomas y eliminar las barreras para acceder a información importante sobre los beneficios de desempleo en línea.  

“El Departamento de Empleo de Oregon es una agencia que ofrece igualdad de oportunidades. Valoramos la equidad y la inclusión y estamos comprometidos a asegurar que nuestros clientes con dominio limitado del inglés tengan un acceso significativo a todos los programas, servicios y beneficios de nuestra agencia. No queremos que nadie se pierda los beneficios de desempleo para los que son elegibles porque no pudieron acceder a la información que necesitaban de nuestro sitio web. Con esta expansión significativa de servicios, estamos igualando las condiciones para que todos tengan el mismo acceso a la información y la ayuda".

Unemployment.oregon.gov está disponible en los siguientes idiomas:

  • Inglés
  • Español
  • Vietnamita
  • Ruso
  • Chino simplificado
  • Rumano
  • Jemer
  • Coreano
  • Árabe
  • Farsi
  • Laosiano
  • Somalí
  • Hmong
  • Mien
  • Marshalés
  • Chuukese

Algunas funcionalidades y páginas externas, incluyendo el Sistema de Reclamos en Línea, el formulario PUA en línea, el formulario Contáctenos y el chatbot, actualmente solo están disponibles en un número limitado de idiomas. El Departamento de Empleo está trabajando para que el formulario PUA en línea, actualmente disponible en inglés, español, vietnamita, ruso y coreano, esté disponible en los 16 idiomas. Se espera que el formulario PUA esté disponible en chino simplificado y arabé.Los formularios de solicitud traducidos para el desempleo regular, PUA y PEUC también están disponibles en todas las páginas de "Presentación de un reclamo" en unemployment.oregon.gov.

Los reclamantes que necesiten asistencia adicional para reclamos en otros idiomas además del inglés deben enviar su nombre, idioma solicitado y número de teléfono a OED_LanguageAccess@oregon.gov. Recibirán una llamada en el idioma solicitado.

###

El Departamento de Empleo de Oregon es un empleador/programa que respeta la igualdad de oportunidades. Disponemos de servicios o ayudas auxiliares, formatos alternos y asistencia de idiomas para personas con discapacidades o conocimiento limitado del inglés, a pedido y sin costo.

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/930/139173/10_15_Spanishwebsite_lang_press_release_FINAL.pdf

Oregon's Job Growth Slows to 5,100 in September
Oregon Employment Department - 10/14/20 10:00 AM

Oregon’s unemployment rate dropped to 8.0 percent in September from 8.5 percent, as revised, in August. For the past few months, Oregon’s unemployment rate has closely tracked the national unemployment rate which fell to 7.9 percent in September from 8.4 percent in August.

Oregon’s total nonfarm payroll employment rose by 5,100 jobs in September, following a revised gain of 16,200 jobs in August. Over the past three months the rate of job growth slowed, with 39,000 jobs added in that time, following more rapid growth in May and June, when 83,100 jobs were added. Despite the recent slowdown, Oregon employers added jobs in each of the past five months, and the state has recovered 45 percent of the jobs cut in March and April.

Over-the-month job gains in September were largest in leisure and hospitality (+2,600 jobs); financial activities (+1,600); health care and social assistance (+1,600); retail trade (+1,500); and information (+1,200). Two industries cut a substantial number of jobs in September: construction (-2,600 jobs) and private educational services (-1,400).

Leisure and hospitality continues to be the industry most impacted by the economic effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. Its employment bounced back substantially in May and June, but job gains have slowed over the past three months. Employment totaled 163,200 in September, which was down 53,400 jobs, or 24.7%, since its peak month of February.

Manufacturing lost a substantial number of jobs this spring and hasn’t rebounded. Employment stood at 180,000 jobs in September, which was close to its level of the past five months. Since September 2019, manufacturing cut 18,100 jobs with losses widespread throughout most component industries. During that time, primary metals manufacturing dropped the most in percentage terms, shedding 2,600 jobs, or 28 percent. Next in line was transportation equipment manufacturing which cut 19 percent. Two other manufacturing industries dropped at least 10 percent: food manufacturing (-4,200 jobs, or -14%) and electronic instrument manufacturing (-600 jobs, or -11%). None of the published manufacturing industries added a substantial number of jobs over the past 12 months.

In contrast, two major industries rose closer to pre-pandemic employment levels. Retail trade rebounded rapidly, adding 4,700 jobs over the past two months. This left the industry down only 4,800 jobs, or 2.3 percent, since February. Certain retailers responded to strong demand lately, with food and beverage stores up 900 jobs, or 2.1 percent, since last September. Similarly, building material and garden supply stores added 900 jobs, or 5.4 percent in that time, while general merchandise stores added 1,100 jobs or 2.7 percent. Clearly consumer preferences and demands have shifted substantially, as reflected by job losses in several categories including clothing stores, which cut 8,100 jobs, or 51.6 percent, over the year, and miscellaneous store retailers, which shed 2,800 jobs, or 16.5 percent.

Health care and social assistance added 2,300 jobs over the past two months and was only 8,200 jobs, or 3.1 percent, below its recent high in February. Over the past 12 months, social assistance cut 4,900 jobs, or 8.4 percent. However, health care declined only 800 jobs in that time.

Next Press Releases

The Oregon Employment Department plans to release the September county and metropolitan area unemployment rates on Tuesday, October 20th, and the next statewide unemployment rate and employment survey data for October on Tuesday, November 17th.

###

 

The Oregon Employment Department and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) work cooperatively to develop and publish monthly Oregon payroll employment and labor force data. The estimates of monthly job gains and losses are based on a survey of businesses. The estimates of unemployment are based on a survey of households and other sources.

The Oregon Employment Department publishes payroll employment estimates that are revised quarterly by using employment counts from employer unemployment insurance tax records. All department publications use this Official Oregon Series data unless noted otherwise. This month’s release incorporates the January, February and March 2020 tax records data. The department continues to make the original nonfarm payroll employment series available; these data are produced by the BLS.

The PDF version of the news release can be found at QualityInfo.org/press-release. To obtain the data in other formats such as in Excel, visit QualityInfo.org, then within the top banner, select Economic Data, then choose LAUS or CES. To request the press release as a Word document, contact the person shown at the top of this press release.

 

To file a claim for unemployment benefits or get more information about unemployment programs, visit unemployment.oregon.gov.

Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/930/139104/10.14.20_Media_Advisory.pdf

Oregon reports 266 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 8 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 10/19/20 2:19 PM

October 19, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 266 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 8 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed eight more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 627, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 266 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 39,794.

The new cases are in the following counties: Clackamas (24), Coos (8), Crook (2), Deschutes (15), Douglas (1), Jackson (18), Josephine (1), Lane (40), Linn (2), Malheur (5), Marion (39), Multnomah (68), Polk (3), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (9), Washington (25), and Yamhill (5). Updated information is available about Oregon’s 512th COVID-19 death, a 73-year-old woman in Washington County on Sept. 1.

Due to an updated death certificate, COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 is no longer considered as a cause or as a significant condition that contributed to her death. As a result, OHA is re-numbering our reported deaths starting with 620 today.

Oregon’s 620th COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old woman in Lane County who tested positive on Oct.13 and died on Oct. 17, at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center Riverbend. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 621st COVID-19 death is a 61-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on Oct. 11 and died on Oct.16, at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center Riverbend. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 622nd COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old woman in Lane County who tested positive on Oct.11 and died on Oct.17, at McKenzie Willamette Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 623rd COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old woman in Crook County who tested positive on Oct. 12 and died on Oct. 17, at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 624th COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct.11 and died on Oct. 15 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 625th COVID-19 death is 69-year-old woman in Umatilla County who tested positive on Oct. 5 and died on Oct 14, at Good Shepherd Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 626th COVID-19 death is a 71-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Sept. 21 and died on Oct. 12, at Adventist Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 627th COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. 2 and died on Oct. 13, at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.


OHA submits COVID-19 vaccine plan

OHA has submitted its draft plan to the federal government for allocating and distributing a COVID-19 vaccine in Oregon, once a safe and effective vaccine becomes available. The draft plan, sent to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Friday, Oct. 16, is posted on the OHA website.

The plan is centered around equity, reflecting the state’s values of recognizing historical and contemporary injustices toward communities of color and the disproportionate effects that COVID-19 has had on them. The document represents Oregon’s response to the CDC’s Sept. 16 request of all states to describe how they will manage the distribution of a vaccine.

OHA’s plan is intended to understand Oregon’s existing systems and structures for vaccine delivery. The next steps are to understand how those systems and structures need to be rebuilt to meet the needs of disproportionately impacted communities.

The draft plan prioritizes the need for strong community engagement through partnerships with public health, health care and community organizations that reach and support underserved populations, and addresses the roles that power, privilege and race have played in the state’s response to the pandemic.

OHA’s plan follows federal guidance of a phased approach that assumes a COVID-19 vaccine will be, at the outset, in limited supply and should be focused on individuals critical to the pandemic response, provide direct care and maintain societal function, as well as those at highest risk for developing severe illness.

The plan will allow for broadening of the vaccine’s distribution to other high-risk groups and the general population as more doses become available.

The plan OHA submitted Friday is not final. It is expected to evolve in the months ahead as more is learned about likely vaccines, including safety, effectiveness, side effects, storage, supply, distribution and administration.


OHA revises face covering guidance

OHA has revised its guidance on face coverings to include the following new provisions:

The guidance now requires that people wear face coverings in all private and public workplaces including classrooms, offices, meeting rooms and workspaces, unless someone is alone in an office or in a private workspace.

The revised guidance also requires that people wear face coverings in outdoor and indoor markets, street fairs, private career schools and public and private colleges and universities.

Finally, the revised guidance also recommends wearing a face covering instead of a face shield, except in limited situations when a face shield is appropriate such as when communicating with someone who is deaf or hearing impaired and needs to read lips. COVID-19 is surging again. Oregonians can to lower the risk to themselves, their families and their communities by:

  • Wearing a face covering
  • Keeping 6 or more feet away from others
  • Avoiding large gatherings and limiting social gatherings
  • Frequently washing our hands.

For more information about face coverings and face masks visit healthoregon.org/masks.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Oregon reports 220 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 10/18/20 9:54 AM

October 18, 2020

Oregon reports 220 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — The state’s death toll from COVID-19 is unchanged from Saturday, Oct. 17, and remains at 620, Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

OHA reported 220 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 39,532. The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (3), Clackamas (8), Columbia (4), Coos (4), Deschutes (6), Douglas (2), Jackson (21), Josephine (1), Klamath (2), Lane (33), Lincoln (1), Linn (7), Malheur (2), Marion (33), Morrow (1), Multnomah (58), Polk (2), Umatilla (3), Wallowa (1), Washington (22), and Yamhill (6).

 

County

Cases1

Total deaths2

Negative tests3

Baker

112

2

2097

Benton

416

6

16678

Clackamas

2918

65

70862

Clatsop

235

0

6432

Columbia

247

1

8127

Coos

214

0

8243

Crook

81

1

2930

Curry

56

1

2181

Deschutes

1047

13

35847

Douglas

314

4

14593

Gilliam

11

0

346

Grant

10

0

1001

Harney

13

0

907

Hood River

268

1

5651

Jackson

1492

6

39034

Jefferson

593

9

5380

Josephine

256

2

13687

Klamath

397

3

11378

Lake

35

0

1024

Lane

2091

22

74361

Lincoln

508

13

9496

Linn

741

14

19308

Malheur

1842

33

5970

Marion

5470

105

55897

Morrow

540

6

1972

Multnomah

8520

152

165350

Polk

628

15

10884

Sherman

18

0

379

Tillamook

69

0

3429

Umatilla

3258

43

14651

Union

456

2

4854

Wallowa

40

2

1122

Wasco

332

15

5671

Washington

5365

69

105775

Wheeler

1

0

180

Yamhill

938

15

19875

Total

39,532

620

745,572

1This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases.

3This includes cases who test negative and are not epi-linked to a confirmed case.

 

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

# # #


Oregon reports 388 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 10/17/20 11:01 AM

October 17, 2020

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 620, Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

OHA reported 388 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 39,316. The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (1), Benton (2), Clackamas (30), Columbia (4), Coos (5), Crook (5), Deschutes (13), Douglas (7), Jackson (24), Josephine (2), Klamath (1), Lane (48), Linn (8), Malheur (13), Marion (49), Morrow (1), Multnomah (95), Polk (8), Umatilla (13), Union (1), Wallowa (1), Wasco (1), Washington (50), and Yamhill (6).

Oregon’s 618th COVID-19 death is an 83-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. 3 and died Oct. 9 at Portland Adventist Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 619th COVID-19 death is an 83-year-old woman in Wallowa County who tested positive on Sept. 14 and died Sept. 29 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 620th COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Oct. 3 and died Oct. 16 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

 

County

Cases1

Total deaths2

Negative tests3

Baker

112

2

2082

Benton

413

6

16643

Clackamas

2910

65

70580

Clatsop

235

0

6395

Columbia

243

1

8100

Coos

210

0

8176

Crook

81

1

2916

Curry

56

1

2169

Deschutes

1041

13

35646

Douglas

313

4

14519

Gilliam

11

0

341

Grant

10

0

995

Harney

13

0

905

Hood River

268

1

5617

Jackson

1471

6

38772

Jefferson

593

9

5357

Josephine

255

2

13605

Klamath

395

3

11319

Lake

35

0

1021

Lane

2058

22

74100

Lincoln

507

13

9491

Linn

734

14

19276

Malheur

1841

33

5960

Marion

5437

105

55673

Morrow

539

6

1966

Multnomah

8462

152

164602

Polk

626

15

10840

Sherman

18

0

376

Tillamook

69

0

3411

Umatilla

3255

43

14606

Union

456

2

4846

Wallowa

39

2

1121

Wasco

332

15

5643

Washington

5345

69

105296

Wheeler

1

0

177

Yamhill

932

15

19785

Total

39,316

620

742,327

 

1This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

2For additional details on individuals who have died from COVID-19 in Oregon, please refer to our press releases.

3This includes cases who test negative and are not epi-linked to a confirmed case.

 

 

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority and Oregon Office of Emergency Management lead the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.

# # #


All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group meets October 21
Oregon Health Authority - 10/16/20 3:29 PM

October 16, 2020

Contact: Brian Toups, 503-385-6542, rian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us">brian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority’s All Payer All Claims Technical Advisory Group.

When: October 21, 10 a.m. to noon.

Where: By webinar and conference line only. The public may join remotely through a webinar at https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/2239280069326082306 and by conference line at 877-810-9415, public listen-only code 1773452#

Agenda: Rules Advisory Committee – proposed All Payer All Claims data layout changes (10-10:50 a.m.); Technical Advisory Group – introduction, general updates, and public comment (11 a.m. to noon); adjourn.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/HPA/ANALYTICS/Pages/All-Payer-All-Claims-TAG.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Brian Toups at 503-385-6542, 711 TTY, rian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us">brian.m.toups@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 


Oregon reports 418 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 6 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 10/16/20 11:33 AM

October 16, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 418 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 6 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed six more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 617, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 418 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 38,935.

The new cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (2), Clackamas (45), Columbia (3), Coos (5), Crook (1), Curry (1), Deschutes (18), Douglas (5), Jackson (18), Jefferson (3), Klamath (2), Lane (53), Linn (12), Malheur (17), Marion (35), Morrow (5), Multnomah (86), Polk (13), Tillamook (3), Umatilla (17), Wasco (2), Washington (58), and Yamhill (14).

Oregon’s 612th COVID-19 death is a 50-year-old man in Jefferson County who tested positive on Oct. 6 and died on Oct. 14, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 613th COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Sept. 24 and died on Oct. 12, at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 614th COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old woman in Curry County who tested positive on Oct. 5 and died on Oct. 12. Place of death is being confirmed. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 615th COVID-19 death is a 65-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Aug. 7 and died on Sept. 23, at Providence Portland Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 616th COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old woman in Hood River County who tested positive on Oct. 8 and died on Oct. 14. Place of death is being confirmed. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 617th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Sept. 6 and died on Oct. 2, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.


OHA Releases Modeling Update

Today, OHA released its latest update to the modeling projections which show that COVID-19 has continued to spread in Oregon over the past several weeks and has the potential to continue to keep increasing in its spread.

The model examined three scenarios:

  • The first scenario is where transmission continues at its current level for the next several weeks, new infections and cases will increase substantially. The model suggests new infections would increase to 2,200 from 1,300 and daily reported cases will increase to 570. Hospitalizations from COVID-19 would increase to 40 a day. The reproductive rate would remain at 1.15
  • The next scenario assumes a 5-percentage point increase in transmission. Daily infections would increase to 3,400 and 740 daily reported cases. Hospitalizations would increase to 48 per day. The reproductive rate would be 1.30.
  • The most optimistic scenario assumes a drop in transmission by 10 percentage points. That would result in 1,400 daily infections amounting to about 290 daily reported cases. Hospitalizations would drop to 20 per day. The reproduction rate would drop to 0.88.

Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Weekly media briefing scheduled for 10:00 a.m. tomorrow
Oregon Health Authority - 10/15/20 3:45 PM

Oct. 15, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Weekly media briefing scheduled for 10:00 a.m. tomorrow

Media are invited to attend a media briefing at 10:00 a.m. tomorrow, Friday, Oct. 16, with OHA director Patrick Allen and State Health Officer Dean Sidelinger MD, MPH. Director Allen and Dr. Sidelinger will give an update on the state of the COVID-19 pandemic in Oregon and the state response along with new data.  Toll-Free: 877-226-8164. Access Code: 9785572


First Oregon State Hospital patient tests positive for COVID-19
Oregon Health Authority - 10/15/20 2:44 PM

October 15, 2020

First Oregon State Hospital patient tests positive for COVID-19

SALEM, Ore. — Oregon State Hospital is reporting its first patient to test positive for COVID-19.

The patient began exhibiting symptoms Oct. 11 and was immediately tested for the virus and moved to the hospital’s quarantine unit. The test results came back late Wednesday, Oct. 14.

Since April 1, 26 OSH staff have reported positive tests; however, this is the first patient case. Medical and clinical staff are working together with the patient to meet both their physical and mental health needs.

"We have been preparing for this eventuality, and we are fortunate to have incredibly dedicated and passionate staff who are skilled at working with this unique population, and we are at our best in times like this," said Dolly Matteucci, Oregon State Hospital superintendent. "Protecting the health, safety and well-being of both our patients and staff remains our top priority."

Staff are working to educate and support all patients, explaining testing procedures and other steps the hospital is taking to prevent the spread of the virus.

As with all the staff cases, the hospital is conducting contact tracing to identify everyone with whom the patient has had close contact. Patients determined to be at risk will be monitored for symptoms, tested and transitioned to the quarantine unit as necessary. At-risk staff will be sent home to self-monitor, with instructions to reach out to their personal health care providers.

Because this case is epidemiologically connected to the three most recent staff cases by location and time, the hospital will quarantine all of the patients on the original unit for a period of 14 days. All patients and staff who worked on the original unit will be tested for COVID-19 and not be allowed to go anywhere else in the hospital.

Since the beginning of the pandemic, Oregon State Hospital has been working with state epidemiologists to take comprehensive precautions to protect the health of both patients and staff. This includes requiring all staff to wear surgical masks, screening everyone who comes into the hospital, encouraging patients to wear masks, testing all new patients before admission and again before they move into the general population, and screening all patients for symptoms twice a day. To learn more about these and other efforts, read our web story on the OSH website.

Due to HIPAA and other health privacy laws, OSH is maintaining the confidentiality of the infected patient and cannot share additional details about their condition.

# # #


Oregon reports 374 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 10/15/20 12:16 PM

October 15, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 374 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 611, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

The Oregon Health Authority reported 374 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 38,525.

The new cases are in the following counties: Benton (15), Clackamas (21), Clatsop (2), Columbia (3), Coos (1), Crook (2), Deschutes (7), Douglas (5), Jackson (17), Josephine (5), Klamath (1), Lane (33), Lincoln (5), Linn (12), Malheur (14), Marion (34), Morrow (1), Multnomah (110), Polk (12), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (17), Union (2), Wallowa (1), Wasco (1), Washington (46), and Yamhill (6).

Oregon’s 609th COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old woman in Lane County who tested positive on Sept. 29 and died on Oct. 10, in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 610th COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Oct. 7 and died on Oct. 10. Place of death is being confirmed. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 611th COVID-19 death is a 60-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Aug. 8 and died on Oct. 13, at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.


Georgia Pacific Workplace Outbreak Reported

An outbreak of 21 cases of COVID-19 has been reported at Georgia Pacific in Linn County. The case count includes all persons linked to the outbreak, which may include household members and other close contacts to an employee.

The outbreak investigation started on Oct. 7, but the initial case count was below the threshold for public disclosure. State and county public health officials are working with the company to address the outbreak and protect the health of workers.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Flu shots more important than ever -- don't wait to vaccinate! (Photo)
Oregon Health Authority - 10/15/20 8:00 AM
2020-10/3687/139140/Flu-SocialCard1.png
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October 15, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Flu shots more important than ever – don't wait to vaccinate!

Especially as COVID-19 continues to spread

PORTLAND, Ore. - Oregon Health Authority (OHA) is urging everyone 6 months and older to get an annual flu shot, especially as COVID-19 cases increase in Oregon, and the pandemic persists.

"Flu vaccines are safe and effective, and with ongoing COVID-19 outbreaks, it is more important than ever to get a flu shot to keep the people around you healthy,” said Paul Cieslak, M.D., medical director for communicable diseases and immunizations at the Oregon Health Authority.  

While it is unclear how the pandemic will affect the flu season, OHA and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are preparing for COVID-19 and seasonal flu to spread at the same time. A “twindemic” of two potentially fatal viruses circulating at the same time could burden the state’s health care system and result in many illnesses, hospitalizations and deaths, Cieslak said. Getting a flu vaccine is something easy people can do to protect themselves and their loved ones and help reduce the spread of flu this fall and winter.

Flu vaccine will not protect against COVID-19. But vaccination has many other benefits and is part of a comprehensive public health strategy to reduce the burden of flu. Here are some additional benefits:

  • The vaccine is proven to help protect pregnant women and people with chronic health conditions while reducing the burden of flu on our communities and health care system.
  • This year, especially, it will be most important to protect those at higher risk for flu complications. Many of these people are also at high risk for COVID-19 illness or serious outcomes.
  • It is also important for caregivers and essential workers to protect themselves and those around them from flu by getting a flu vaccine.

The flu vaccine may take up to two weeks to become effective, so getting it earlier in the season – like now is ideal. That’s why OHA is promoting a “Don’t Wait to Vaccinate” campaign with social media cards and other messaging in multiple languages starting today.

Flu vaccine is available from health care providers, local health departments and many pharmacies. The vaccine is free or low cost with most health insurance plans. To find flu vaccine clinic, visit http://www.flu.oregon.gov/ and use OHA’s flu vaccine locator tool.

Getting vaccinated is the best way to prevent the flu. Additional ways Oregonians can help prevent the spread of flu include:

  • Staying home from work or school when you are sick and limit contact with others.
  • Covering your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze.
  • Washing hands frequently with soap and water. Use an alcohol-based hand rub if soap and water are not available.
  • Avoiding touching your eyes, nose and mouth.
  • Cleaning and disinfecting surfaces and objects that may have flu germs on them.
  • Avoiding getting coughed and sneezed on.

Check out these infographics about flu shots and share them with your friends and family on your Facebook and Instagram accounts.

Note for television and radio media

Please note that B roll of a flu vaccination clinic and short clips of OHA Senior Health Advisors Paul Cieslak and Claire Poche discussing OHA’s the importance of flu shots are available in English and Spanish for you to download and use on our media resources page.



Attached Media Files: 2020-10/3687/139140/Flu-SocialCard1.png

Oregon Health Policy Board meets for educational webinar October 20
Oregon Health Authority - 10/14/20 3:48 PM

October 14, 2020

Contact: Tara Chetock, 971-304-9917, a.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us">tara.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Health Policy Board.

When: October 20, 8-9 a.m.

Where: Virtual meeting only. The public can join remotely via Zoom or a conference line. Join via Zoom at https://www.zoomgov.com/j/1605763358?pwd=S0x4NjV0dXVnakZHT0hOMjFJSWxTZz09. One tap mobile: +16692545252,,1605763358#,,,,,,0#,,246372#

Purpose: A webinar will be presented to the Oregon Health Policy Board and members of the public about Healthier Together Oregon (HTO): the 2020-2024 State Health Improvement Plan (SHIP). OHA recently released HTO as a plan to advance health equity and ensure an equitable recovery from COVID-19. HTO identifies shared priorities, strategies for health improvement, and measures to monitor progress. HTO is intended to be a tool for community health improvement plans and OHA’s cross-sector partnerships as we work toward impact on "upstream determinants of health and equity such as racism, housing, and economic stability. The webinar will provide a high-level overview of the process for development of the 2020-2024 SHIP, select strategies and indicators, and what comes next for implementation. The webinar is informational only. Attendance by board members is optional, and no official business will be conducted. Visit the Healthier Together Oregon website.

For more information and meeting materials, please visit the OHPB meeting webpage at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/OHPB/Pages/index.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written materials in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Tara Chetock at 971-304-9917, 711 TTY, a.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us">tara.a.chetock@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

 


OHA Releases Weekly Report
Oregon Health Authority - 10/14/20 3:27 PM

October 14, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

OHA Releases Weekly Report

Today OHA released its Weekly Report which showed that during the week of Oct. 5 through Oct. 11, OHA recorded 2,418 new cases of COVID-19 infection—up 18% from last week’s tally of 2,055 and the highest weekly total reported in Oregon to date.

The number of Oregonians newly tested rose 26%, to 28,490, and the percentage of tests that were positive rose slightly to 6.4% from 6.3% the prior week. Twenty-seven Oregonians were reported to have died in association with COVID-19—compared to 25 last week. One hundred forty-seven Oregonians were hospitalized, up from 119 in the previous week, and the highest weekly figure since mid-July.


Oregon reports 390 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths
Oregon Health Authority - 10/14/20 12:08 PM

October 14, 2020

Media contact: OHA External Relations 971-673-2097, covid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us">orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 390 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 3 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed three more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 608, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 390 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 38,160. The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (3), Clackamas (27), Clatsop (1), Columbia (1), Coos (3), Crook (2), Deschutes (7), Douglas (8), Jackson (28), Jefferson (2), Josephine (2), Klamath (2), Lane (60), Lincoln (2), Linn (5), Malheur (11), Marion (63), Multnomah (88), Polk (4), Umatilla (14), Wallowa (1), Washington (51), and Yamhill (5).

Oregon’s 606th COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Sept. 18 and died on Oct. 2 at Adventist Health Portland. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 607th COVID-19 death is an 80-year-old woman in Wasco County who tested positive on Sept. 18 and died on Oct. 12 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 608th COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Oct. 5 and died on Oct. 13 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.


Stay informed about COVID-19:

Oregon response: The Oregon Health Authority leads the state response.

United States response: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention leads the U.S. response.

Global response: The World Health Organization guides the global response.


Nurse Staffing Advisory Board quarterly meeting October 28
Oregon Health Authority - 10/14/20 9:28 AM

October 14, 2020

What: The Nurse Staffing Advisory Board is holding its quarterly meeting.

Agenda:

  • Review minutes from July NSAB meeting.
  • Membership updates.
  • Status updates.
  • Committee updates.
  • Open action items.
  • Nurse staffing surveyor discusses survey activities.
  • Emerging issues in nurse staffing.
  • Public comment.

The agenda will be available on the board's webpage at http://www.healthoregon.org/nursestaffing.

When: Oct. 28, 1-5 p.m.

Where: Via Zoom at 669-254-5252, meeting ID 161 886 4089, passcode 680572.

The Nurse Staffing Advisory Board advises the Oregon Health Authority on the administration of Oregon’s nurse staffing laws; identifies trends, opportunities and concerns related to nurse staffing; makes recommendations to OHA based on those trends, opportunities and concerns; and reviews the enforcement powers and processes under Oregon’s nurse staffing laws.

Program contact: Kimberly Voelker, 971-803-0914tel, erly.n.voelker@dhsoha.state.or.us">kimberly.n.voelker@dhsoha.state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters.
  • Written material in other languages.
  • Braille.
  • Large print.
  • Audio and other formats.

If you need help or have questions, please contact Kimberly Voelker at 971-803-0914, 711 TTY or erly.n.voelker@dhsoha.state.or.us">kimberly.n.voelker@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.


Marine Board Meeting Virtually October 21
Oregon Marine Board - 10/14/20 11:30 AM

The Oregon State Marine Board will hold its quarterly meeting on October 21, beginning at 8:30 am via Microsoft Teams and live-streamed from the agency’s office, 435 Commercial Street NE, in Salem.

The Board will consider the following agenda items:

  • Grant Budget Authority for Board approval;
  • 2021-23 Boating Facility Grant Timeline and Document Updates for Board approval;
  • Abandoned and Derelict Vessel Program Update;
  • Possible Rulemaking via Petition to amend OAR 250-020-0073, Prineville Reservoir to consider initiating rulemaking;
  • Consideration for Rulemaking OAR 250-020-0091, Boat Operations in Deschutes County. Amends language to allow the use of electric motors on North and South Twin Lakes for boaters with disabilities. Action: Option to adopt rule;
  • Consideration for Rulemaking OAR 250-020-0280, Boat Operations in Multnomah County. Consideration of data regarding the stretch of the Willamette River between Willamette Falls and the Sellwood Bridge. Action: Option to propose rules; and,
  • Consideration for Rulemaking OAR 250-020-0280, Boat Operations in Multnomah County. Creates additional boating regulations on the Willamette River in the vicinity of Ross Island Action: Option to adopt rule.

All written public comments on agenda items where the comment period has not closed can be submitted by October 18 by 5 pm via U.S. Mail to Jennifer Cooper, Executive Assistant, 435 Commercial St. NE, Salem, OR 97301 or via email to jennifer.cooper@oregon.gov.

The meeting will be live-streamed via the Marine Board’s YouTube Channel. To view the agenda and staff report, visit https://www.oregon.gov/osmb/info/Pages/Board-and-Public-Meetings.aspx.

###


Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update - Oct. 19, 2020 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 10/19/20 9:47 PM
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The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update for Oct. 19, 2020, to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. See today's Wildfire Recovery update here

PHOTO CAPTIONS:

Gates, Ore. - October 1, 2020 - Utility workers working in and around the Gates Oregon area repairing telephone lines and rebuilding the electrical grid. Photo by Patsy Lynch/FEMA
File name:  2020-01-10_4562_ORFires_GatesUtility_PL_03.jpg

Lyons, Ore. - October 16, 2020 - A volunteer at the Mari-Linn School distributes food donated by the Department of Agriculture for families in need in Lyons, Oregon. Photo by Patsy Lynch/FEMA
File name: 2020-16-10_4562_Mari-linnfood_PL_01.jpg

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/3986/139282/2020-01-10_4562_ORFires_GatesUtility_PL_03.jpg , 2020-10/3986/139282/2020-16-10_4562_Mari-linnfood_PL_01.jpg

Media Availability with EPA Incident Commander to discuss launch of household hazardous waste cleanup in Jackson County (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 10/19/20 2:09 PM
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Hazardous materials removal signals start of recovery and rebuilding for people with signed Rights of Entry forms.

(Salem) – EPA cleanup teams are starting to remove household hazardous waste in Jackson County. EPA Incident Commander, Randy Nattis will be available on Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2020 - via Zoom - from 10:00 am to 10:30 am. IC Nattis will provide a brief overview of EPA’s role in Oregon’s fire recovery and describe the launch of the hazardous waste removal (STEP 1) work in southern Oregon. He will also touch on the Safety Protocols in place due to COVID-19.

Public information officers from the Oregon Debris Management Task Force and Jackson County will provide statements and be available for questions.

Available Officials:

  • Randy Nattis,  EPA Incident Commander
  • John Vial, Public Information Officer, Jackson County
  • Lauren Wirtis, Public Information Officer, Oregon Debris Management Task Force

When: Tuesday, Oct. 20, 2020 | 10:00AM to 10:30AM

Link:  Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89105436195?pwd=TERwR1FMem1Ja1F3dDZqRi9nWWFZZz09

Meeting ID: 891 0543 6195
Passcode: 292798

MEDIA CONTACTS

  • EPA: Mark MacIntyre, 206-553-1019
  • DEQ: Lauren Wirtis, 503-568-3295
  • Jackson County: John Vial, 541-621-4641

Background  Information

Removal of hazardous waste is the first step in the wildfire cleanup process and available at no cost to property owners. Prioritized due to the immediate threat to health, safety and the environment, hazardous waste cleanup is funded by the State of Oregon and FEMA in Clackamas, Douglas, Jackson, Klamath, Lane, Lincoln, Linn and Marion counties. Fire-affected Oregon property owners now have a dedicated phone number - 541-225-5549 - to ask questions about EPA’s removal of household hazardous waste at their property or provide additional details about their property that will help speed the EPA removal work. The hotline offers service in both English and Spanish.

Each of these counties have begun collecting Right of Entry forms. Right of Entry forms should be submitted as soon as possible so cleanup crews can come to their house. Links to each county’s Right of Entry fillable and/or printable form are available at  wildfire.oregon.gov/cleanup. There is also a Right of Entry helpline with assistance available in English and Spanish at 682-800-5737.

Household hazardous waste can include but is not limited to fuel and petroleum, pool chemicals, car batteries, antifreeze, used oil filters, solvents, fertilizers, pesticides, propane tanks, high pressure cylinders, disinfectants, aerosols, paint, and bleach. Cleanup crews will also identify and dispose of bulk asbestos materials when possible.

The second step in cleanup is ash and debris removal. After this step is complete, property owners will be able to begin rebuilding. State, county and federal partners are developing funding and implementation options for Step 2: Ash and debris removal.  

The State of Oregon’s Debris Management Task Force consists of the Office of Emergency Management, Oregon Department of Transportation and Oregon Department of Environmental Quality and is overseeing a coordinated effort by federal, state and local government agencies to address hazardous waste and debris removal.

#  #  #

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/3986/139264/ODOT.jpg , 2020-10/3986/139264/OEM_logo.jpg , 2020-10/3986/139264/DEQ_logo.png , 2020-10/3986/139264/EPA_logo.jpg

Wildfire Recovery Update 10.16.2020 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 10/16/20 4:27 PM
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The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update for Oct. 16, 2020, to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. See today's Wildfire Recovery update here

PHOTO CAPTIONS: 

Screen shot of the new Wildfire Recovery Dashboard from the Oregon Office of Emergency Management.
File name: Dashboard.png

Marion County, Ore. -- Crews work to clear the road and restore power along OR Highway 22. Photo by Dominick Del Vecchio/FEMA.     

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/3986/139217/Dashboard.png , 2020-10/3986/139217/A7R00958.jpg

Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update - Oct. 14, 2020 (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 10/14/20 5:20 PM
2020-10/3986/139138/2018_Shakeout.jpg
2020-10/3986/139138/2018_Shakeout.jpg
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The Oregon Office of Emergency Management has posted the Oregon Wildfire Recovery Update for Oct. 9, 2020, to the Oregon Wildfire Resources page. See today's Wildfire Recovery update here

PHOTO CAPTIONS:

Portland, Ore. - October 18, 2018 - Students from Rigler Elementary School in Portland, Ore., "Drop, Cover, and Hold On!" during the Great Oregon ShakeOut earthquake drill. Photo by Cory Grogan/OEM. 

File name: 2018 Shakeout.jpg

Blue River, Ore. - September 15, 2020 - The Holiday Farm Fire destroyed businesses, homes and vehicles in Blue River, Ore. Photo by David Yost/FEMA. 

File name: DLY_1307.jpg

 

 




Attached Media Files: 2020-10/3986/139138/2018_Shakeout.jpg , 2020-10/3986/139138/DLY_1307.jpg

Recreational Trails Program Advisory Committee meets October 27-29 to evaluate grant applications
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 10/16/20 3:30 PM

The Recreational Trails Program (RTP) Advisory Committee will meet October 27-29 via web conference to evaluate grant applications from around the state for projects to develop, improve or expand trails and their facilities. Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (OPRD) administers this federally funded grant program.

The meeting is open to the public, but there will not be time for public comments during the meeting. The committee will evaluate 29 applications over the three days.

View the agenda for a list of applicants and project names:  oregon.gov/oprd/GRA/Documents/RTP-Grant-Meeting-Agenda-October-2020.pdf

How to access the meeting:

  • Register online to listen and view the presentations (recommended)
  • Listen only: dial 415-655-0060, access code 883-453-200

The RTP Advisory Committee will submit recommendations to the Oregon State Parks Commission for review and approval at their November meeting. OPRD will then forward approved project proposals to the Federal Highway Administration for final approval. 

The RTP Advisory Committee consists of 10 volunteer members who represent various user groups and land managers. Eligible RTP applicants include state agencies, federal land management agencies, tribal governments, non-profit organizations, cities, counties and park and recreation districts.

RTP is an assistance program of the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Federal Highway Administration. The program provides funds to states to develop and maintain recreational trails and trail-related facilities for both nonmotorized and motorized trail uses, including hiking, bicycling, in-line skating, equestrian use, cross-country skiing, snowmobiling, off-road motorcycling, all-terrain vehicle riding, four-wheel driving, or using other off-road motorized vehicles.

For more information contact Jodi Bellefeuille, Program Coordinator at 503-856-6316 or ellefeuille@oregon.gov">Jodi.bellefeuille@oregon.gov, or visit the RTP webpage on the OPRD website.


Cascade Natural Gas Customers to Pay Slightly Lower Rates Starting November 1
Oregon Public Utility Commission - 10/19/20 1:32 PM

SALEM, Ore. – The Oregon Public Utility Commission (PUC) recently approved a decrease in rates for Cascade Natural Gas customers due to the annual purchased gas adjustment – which goes into effect November 1, 2020.

The PUC approves adjustments annually to the rates of the three regulated natural gas companies, including Avista Utilities, Cascade Natural Gas, and NW Natural, to reflect changes in the actual cost of wholesale priced natural gas, known as the Purchased Gas Adjustment (PGA). This allows companies to pass through their actual cost of purchasing gas to customers without a markup on the price.

The PUC approved an overall decrease of $373,000, or 0.6 percent for Cascade Natural customers for the PGA annual filing when compared to 2019 company gross revenues. This adjustment is effective November 1, 2020. The result of this decision is a decrease in customer rates as indicated below:

  • Residential Customers - The monthly bill of a typical customer using an average of 60 therms per month will decrease by $0.15, or 0.3 percent, from $48.69 to $48.54.
  • Commercial Customers - The monthly bill of a typical customer using an average of 252 therms per month will decrease by$0.54, or 0.3 percent, from $166.11 to $165.57.
  • Industrial Customers - The monthly bill of a typical customer using an average of 4,693 therms per month will decrease by $49.76, or 4.5 percent, from $1,097.30 to $1,047.54.

Cascade Natural Gas has a rate case filed with the PUC seeking additional revenues for non-gas costs. A decision on this filing, which is scheduled for early 2021, will further impact customer rates.

To increase energy efficiency and save on bills, customers are encouraged to:

  • Turn down thermostats to save up to 3 percent for each degree. A programmable thermostat that reduces heat at night or when no one is home can lower heating bills by 5 to 10 percent.
  • Update low-efficiency furnaces and water heaters with higher-efficiency models. 
  • Fully insulate homes to realize up to 30 percent savings on a heating bill. 
  • Clean or change the furnace filter once a month during the heating season. 
  • Conduct an online Home Energy Review through the Energy Trust of Oregon.
  • Ask their natural gas service provider about bill payment assistance programs.

Cascade Natural Gas serves more than 75,000 customers in the Bend region and parts of Northeast Oregon.  

About the PUC
The Public Utility Commission of Oregon (PUC) regulates customer rates and services of the state’s investor-owned electric, natural gas and telephone utilities, as well as select water companies. The PUC’s mission is to ensure Oregon utility customers have access to safe, reliable, and high quality utility services at just and reasonable rates. This is done through robust analysis and independent decision-making conducted in an open and fair process.

# # #


Businesses
Media advisory: Central Oregon Irrigation District Groundbreaking Event for Irrigation Conservation Project, Tuesday, October 20 (Photo)
StingRay Communications - Central Oregon Irrigation Dist. - 10/15/20 12:26 PM
Central Oregon Irrigation District
Central Oregon Irrigation District
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MEDIA ADVISORY:

Central Oregon Irrigation District Hosts Groundbreaking for One of the Largest Irrigation Conservation Projects in Drought-prone Northwest

WHAT:  Central Oregon Irrigation District Groundbreaking:

  • Groundbreaking to kick-off project modernizing Central Oregon Irrigation District's Pilot Butte Canal water delivery system, offering a win for farmers, wildlife, and the Central Oregon economy.
  • The first phase will convert 7.9 miles of canals into pressurized pipe in the Smith Rock area and provides the greatest opportunity to make significant improvements to all facets of COID's irrigation system.
  • When piped, the first phase will immediately conserve 30 cfs while creating on farm operating efficiencies for over 300 patrons and savings of an additional 30-40 cfs over time.
  • Investments in COID’s irrigation infrastructure creates multiple economic, environmental, and resilience-oriented benefits for Central Oregon’s communities.
  • Central Oregon Irrigation District is one of more than 20 Oregon irrigation districts working on irrigation modernization as part of an innovative program created by Farmers Conservation Alliance in partnership with Energy Trust of Oregon.
  • The project represents an innovative collaboration by local, state, and federal governments and tribal and nonprofit organizations.

WHEN:  Tuesday, October 20, 10:30 a.m. PST

WHERE:  DD Ranch 

  • 3836 NE Smith Rock Way Terrebonne, Oregon

WHO:  Featured speakers include:

  • Former State Senator Cliff Bentz
  • Craig Horrell, district manager, Central Oregon Irrigation District
  • Julie O’Shea, executive director, Farmers Conservation Alliance
  • Jay Ward, senior community relations manager, Energy Trust of Oregon

VISUALS & INTERVIEWS         

  • Ceremonial groundbreaking
  • Interview opportunities with COID and officials
  • Onsite b-roll opportunities of the Pilot Butte Canal

BACKGROUND:

Most irrigation districts in Oregon operate aging open canal systems, many more than a century old. By and large, how we divert water from the Deschutes River to irrigate crops in Central Oregon hasn’t changed in more than a century. Despite major technological advances to virtually every other aspect of farming, agricultural water delivery systems remain as they did when farmers were using horse-drawn plows. The problem is these outdated systems waste huge amounts of water and energy -- both of which are in short supply. 

The Pilot Butte Canal piping project is part of COID's System Improvement Plan to implement water conservation practices and support sustainable agriculture. The volcanic nature of the Central Oregon geology results in the propensity for seepage losses in many areas of the COID canal system. During the irrigation season, COID loses up to 50 percent of water to evaporation and seepage from canals and laterals. By piping the Pilot Butte Canal, COID can conserve a significant portion of this water to benefit fish and wildlife in the Deschutes River ecosystem, support sustainable agriculture, save patrons money, and help Central Oregon better manage its water resources for the future.

Piping the entire length of the Pilot Butte Canal will occur in stages over the next 30 years and result in a savings of 158 cfs by eliminating seepage and evaporation and 69 cfs in on-farm efficiencies. Once fully piped, the pressurized water will eliminate the need for 50% of the pumps COID patrons use to irrigate their farms (about 1,000 pumps), saving patrons additional operational costs in the form of new pumps, maintenance, and energy.

Modernized irrigation systems create opportunities for rural communities to:

  • Increase water reliability
  • Improve fish and wildlife habitat by conserving water in rivers and streams

The Pilot Butte Canal piping project is funded through the Watershed Protection and Flood Prevention Program and Oregon Lottery funds.

Further background information is available at www.coidpiping.com.




Attached Media Files: Central Oregon Irrigation District

Organizations & Associations
M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust Awards $3.1 Million to Oregon Nonprofits
M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust - 10/19/20 8:01 AM

The M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust has released its Summer 2020 Grants Report.

  • This report includes 65 grants to nonprofits serving the Pacific Northwest totaling $12.2 million.
  • In total, 20 grants were awarded to organizations serving the state of Oregon totaling $3.1 million.
  • A list of sample grants can be found in the release below or on our website here.
  • The full list of grants can be found here.

October 19, 2020

For Immediate Release

An Optimistic Spirit – Summer 2020 Grants Report

In many ways, it feels like 2020 just will not give us a break.

We’ve all discussed at length the unprecedented challenges this year has brought to our communities. As summer faded to fall, we were struck with yet another once-in-a-generation tragedy as the Pacific Northwest was ravaged by wildfires that caused destruction on a scale we’ve not seen in decades. Lives were lost. Homes and businesses were destroyed. Entire communities were decimated.

Yet in the face of painful moment after painful moment, we find reason for hope and optimism. As every new challenge has arisen, no matter how daunting, we have seen individuals and organizations lining up on the front lines to address it in ways that serve the common good of their community.

  • Fire fighters and first responders rushing into harms way to serve and protect individuals and families.
  • Providing shelter and emergency supplies to those forced to evacuate.
  • Researching new vaccines and treatments for a deadly virus.
  • Safely serving meals and providing to those who are hungry.
  • Putting their own lives at risk to treat the sick.
  • Collecting and sharing food with families who have lost income.
  • Identifying ways to continue to offer safe facilities for vulnerable children and families.
  • Finding innovative ways to keep educating and inspiring children and families in days of social distancing.

The resilient spirit of the Pacific Northwest and the commitment of individuals and families throughout our communities to stand up and contribute to the positive change we so desperately need is heartwarming and inspiring. We see this in innovative collaborations, like the partnership between ecologists and fire practitioners studying firefighting behavior at Sycan Marsh. We see this as communities have rallied to connect and bring resources to families in need through the My NeighbOR effort. We see this as our friends at the Foraker Group bring together business and nonprofit leaders to share strategies to move the nonprofit sector forward.

Our team recently had the opportunity to see this spirit on display as our board reviewed our most recent collection of grant applications, including dozens of incredible nonprofits finding innovative and sustainable ways to serve the diverse needs of our region. At this meeting our Trustees approved 65 grants totalling $12,252,138 to nonprofits serving Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington and across the Pacific Northwest. We have pulled a few example stories below and you can find a full list of these grants here.

As we enter the final weeks of 2020 and prepare for a season of generosity and giving, we are hopeful for the future and eager to see what other ways individuals across our region can help partner and contribute to the common good.

To our newest grantees, our existing partners and all organizations and individuals that are tackling the difficult work of supporting individuals and families throughout our region so that all communities have an opportunity to flourish and thrive, we say THANK YOU!

- Steve Moore

Executive Director, M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust

Alaska

  • Children and adults in Alaska will receive increased mental health support as Alaska Behavioral Health (formerly Anchorage Community Mental Health Services) expands and renovates its facility.
  • The expansion of Camp K by Camp Fire Alaska will increase its ability to serve youth and teens while also improving the camp’s infrastructure to reliably serve future campers for generations to come.
  • The Church of Love, a vibrant community gathering space, will be significantly renovated by Cook Inlet Housing Authority, increasing accessibility and strengthening the space to serve for generations to come.
  • New equipment purchased by University of Alaska Fairbanks will help researchers gain increased precision in their work to better understand oceanic ecosystem productivity.

Idaho

Montana

  • Patients with serious illnesses and their families will have increased access to housing following the construction of the new Harold & Carmen Poulsen Legacy Housing space within the Great Falls medical corridor.
  • Reach Out and Care Wheels will add a new Executive Director, helping expand its efforts to provide wheelchairs to those in need.
  • New staff at Trust Montana will help steward properties and secure affordable housing and community assets for generations to come.

Oregon

  • Camp Ukandu will be able to offer more children diagnosed with cancer and their families a true summer camp experience through the introduction of new staff.
  • More girls will have the opportunity to learn about entrepreneurship as the Girl Scouts of Oregon and SW Washington add new staff.
  • In4All will hire new staff to help serve and support more students of color and students living in poverty.
  • Preteen and teen girls in Lane and Linn Counties struggling with trauma and behavioral health challenges will receive increased support as Ophelia’s Place adds staff.
  • New staff at St. Mary’s Home for Boys will help the organization help prepare young men to flourish and thrive after graduating high school.

Washington

  • Students will have access to new equipment and training programs following a grant to Black Pilots of America.
  • A new gymnasium built by the Boys and Girls Clubs of Snohomish County will provide increased programming offerings for children and teens in Granite Falls.
  • Vulnerable, at-risk and underserved youth will receive increased support as the Center for Children and Youth Justice adds new staff.
  • New administrative technology will help College Success Foundation serve more underrepresented, low-income students as they seek to graduate high school, graduate from college and transition to a successful career.
  • New staff at the Feiro Marine Life Center will help accelerate plans to expand its work and programming.
  • Stolen Youth will add new staff, allowing the organization to increase its programs combatting human trafficking.
  • The Woodland Park Zoo will update and expand their highly popular Northern Trail exhibit, serving more children and families.

Pacific Northwest

  • Interfaith Youth Core will hire new staff to help bring a message of unity and collaboration to the Pacific Northwest.

About M. J. Murdock Charitable Trust

The Murdock Trust, created by the will of the late Melvin J. (Jack) Murdock, provides grants to organizations in five states of the Pacific Northwest—Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon and Washington—that seek to strengthen the region’s educational, spiritual and cultural base in creative and sustainable ways. Since its inception in 1975, the Trust has awarded more than 6,700 grants totaling more than $1 billion. For more information, find the Murdock Trust on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram and on our website.

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