Emergency Reports | News Releases | Participants
Sort by: Date | Category
Bend/Central-Eastern Oregon News Releases for Sat. Jul. 23 - 6:03 am
Fri. 07/22/16
Update - Warning shot fired at Eastern Oregon Correctional Institution - Update
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 07/22/16 3:42 PM
UPDATEEOCI IS NOW ON MODIFIED OPERATIONS. VISITING WILL RESUME SATURDAY, JULY 23, 2016.


News Release from Oregon Dept. of Corrections
Posted on FlashAlert: July 21st, 2016 4:33 PM

At approximately 2:30 p.m., Thursday, July 21, several inmates engaged in a series of fights on a recreation yard at Eastern Oregon Correctional Institution (EOCI). The inmates refused verbal directives to stop fighting, at which time staff administered pepper spray. The inmates continued fighting and a warning shot was fired into a designated safe area. Upon the warning shot, the inmates stopped fighting.

A total of 47 inmates were placed in special housing for their involvement in the altercations. There were no injuries reported.

The institution remains on full lockdown, and visiting is canceled until further notice. An ongoing investigation is being conducted to determine the cause of the incident.

EOCI is a medium-security prison in Pendleton that houses over 1,600 male inmates. The institution is known for its Oregon Corrections Enterprises industries, including a garment factory that produces Prison Blues(C), whose products are sold in and outside the United States. Other industries are its embroidery and laundry facilities. EOCI provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, drug and alcohol treatment, mental health treatment, religious services, and inmate work crews. The buildings that make up EOCI were constructed in 1912 and 1913 and were originally used as a state mental hospital. After two years of renovation, EOCI received its first inmates in June 1985.


####
Oregon National Guard Soldiers head to Romania for multinational training exercise (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 07/22/16 3:36 PM
2016-07/962/96321/160707-A-XQ291-791.jpg
2016-07/962/96321/160707-A-XQ291-791.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-07/962/96321/thumb_160707-A-XQ291-791.jpg
SALEM, Oregon -- More than 250 Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers with 3rd Battalion, 116th Cavalry Regiment, are scheduled to mobilize to Romania this week with the 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team (CBCT) to participate in Saber Guardian 2016, a multinational military training exercise.

Exercise Saber Guardian 2016 will be held from July 27 to August 7 at the Romanian Land Forces Combat Training Center in Cincu and will involve approximately 2,800 military personnel from 10 nations. An advanced team of Oregon Soldiers are already in Romania assisting with preparations for the battalion's arrival; receiving supplies and equipment, including M1A2 Abrams tanks and Bradley Fighting Vehicles that were shipped overseas.

Led by U.S. Army Europe, the annual training exercise is part of the European Reassurance Initiative and is designed to promote regional stability and security while strengthening partnerships with NATO allies, fostering trust and improving interoperability between Romania, the U.S., NATO and Partnership for Peace member nations. Personnel from Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bulgaria, Canada, Georgia, Moldova, Poland, Romania, Turkey and Ukraine will also participate.

Activities during Saber Guardian 16 will include a Field Training, Command Post and Combined Live Fire exercises. The 116th CBCT will primarily play opposing forces to enable other units from the U.S. and other countries to conduct training. On a unit level, the exercise is also training to rehearse mobilizing and deploying troops, and moving track and wheeled vehicles by land, rail and sea to an unfamiliar area. The unit will also conduct a river crossing with tanks and set up a bridge during the event.

The 116th CBCT is comprised of personnel from the Idaho, Montana and Oregon Army National Guard and will be augmented by the 125th Multi-role Bridge Company of the South Carolina Army National Guard. More than 1,000 Soldiers from the 116th CBCT will join approximately 1,500 Soldiers from other U.S.-based units to participate in the exercise.

The majority of Oregon Soldiers deploying for the exercise are traditional Guardsmen who drill one weekend a month and two weeks in the summer. Many of them have families, are attending college and work for civilian employers. The 3-116th Cavalry Battalion task force is made up of infantry from Company A (The Dalles) and Company B (Woodburn); mechanics from Detachment 2, Company F (Hood River); and logistics/administrative support from Headquarters and Headquarters Company (La Grande).

"The Oregon National Guard continues to demonstrate our ability to simultaneously support both state and nation on multiple fronts," said Stephen Bomar, director of public affairs, Oregon Military Department. "Whether responding to emergencies here at home, deploying overseas, or partnering in multinational exercises like Saber Guardian, when we are needed, we are there."

PHOTO CAPTIONS:
BCO-3-116:
Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers with Company B, 3rd Battalion, 116th Cavalry Regiment, text with friends and family, July 21, at the armory in Woodburn, Oregon, as they wait to mobilize to Romania in support of Exercise Saber Guardian 2016 as part of the European Reassurance Initiative's (ERI). The 3-116th Cavalry Battalion task force is made up of infantry from Company A (The Dalles) and Company B (Woodburn); mechanics from Detachment 2, Company F (Hood River); and logistics/administrative support from Headquarters and Headquarters Company (La Grande).(Oregon Army National Guard Photo by Staff Sgt. Armondo Borboa, 3-116th Cavalry Battalion)

160625-A-IJ845-001:
CONSTANTA, Romania - An M1A2 Abrams tank is lifted by a mobile harbor crane onto a flatcar at the Port of Constanta, June 25, 2016. The tanks, belonging to the 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team (CBCT), will be transported to Cincu, Romania, via rail to be used in the upcoming Exercise Saber Guardian, scheduled to begin July 27. Saber Guardian is a U.S. Army Europe-led exercise, in the spirit of partnership for peace. It is designed to promote regional stability and security, while strengthening partnership capacity, and fostering trust while improving interoperability between Romania, the U.S., NATO and Partnership for Peace member nations. (U.S. Army photo by Spc. Devone Collins, 24th Press Camp Headquarters)

160628-A-XQ290-001:
CINCU, Romania - A column of M1A2 tanks travel through the streets of Cincusora, Romania, June 28, after being offloaded from the Voila, Romania, railhead earlier that day. The tanks, belonging to the 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team (CBCT), are in Romania to be used in Exercise Saber Guardian 2016, which begins July 27 at the Romanian Land Force Combat Training Center (RLF-CTC) in Cincu. Saber Guardian is a U.S. Army Europe-led exercise, in the spirit of partnership for peace. It is designed to promote regional stability and security, while strengthening partnership capacity, and fostering trust while improving interoperability between Romania, the U.S., NATO and Partnership for Peace member nations. (Photo courtesy 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team)

160707-A-XQ291-791:
CINCU, Romania - Vehicles belonging to the 116th Cavalry Brigade Combat Team (CBCT) are positioned at the Romanian Land Force Combat Training Center (RLF-CTC) in Cincu, July 7, 2016 prior to the start of Exercise Saber Guardian 2016. The vehicles began arriving in Romania, June 19, at the Port of Constanta and were shipped via railhead to Cincu. Saber Guardian is a U.S. Army Europe-led exercise, in the spirit of Partnership for Peace. It is designed to promote regional stability and security, while strengthening partnership capacity, and fostering trust while improving interoperability between Romania, the U.S., NATO and Partnership for Peace member nations. The 116th CBCT is one of the U.S. units participating in the exercise, which will also include forces from other countries. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Corinna Baltos, 24th Press Camp Headquarters)


Attached Media Files: 2016-07/962/96321/160707-A-XQ291-791.jpg , 2016-07/962/96321/160628-A-XQ290-001.jpg , 2016-07/962/96321/160625-A-IJ845-001.jpg , 2016-07/962/96321/BCO-3-116.JPG
Student Lily Sweet Representing Oregon at National Summit
Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council - 07/22/16 11:14 AM
Early on Sunday morning, sixth-grader Lily Sweet leaves Portland for Purdue University in Indiana, where she will represent Oregon at the national Fuel Up to Play 60 Student Ambassador Summit. As Oregon's 2016-2017 Fuel Up to Play 60 State Ambassador, she will attend with students from other states, program advisors and professional athletes from the National Football League.

Inspired and led by youth, Fuel Up to Play 60 is an in-school nutrition and physical activity program created by the National Dairy Council and the NFL, in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, to help encourage today's youth to lead healthier lives. The summit provides leadership, communication and program training to select students who drive the Fuel Up to Play 60 program in their respective schools, communities and states.

Lily just completed fifth grade at Elk Meadow Elementary School, and will go to High Desert Middle School in September. At her school, she has been involved with many events and activities that encourage her fellow students to eat healthy food and exercise more -- like setting up a smoothie booth at school conferences and creating an informational video. "One of my favorite projects that the team and I did was writing and performing our own play to promote wellness," said Sweet.

This is the second year in a row that an Elk Meadow Elementary School student has been selected to represent Oregon at the national level, which is a rare feat. There were only 67 such ambassadors selected from across the country last year. Elk Meadow has reached Fuel Up to Play 60 "Touchdown Status" for two consecutive years with a strong staff and student commitment to wellness, and the school was selected as one of three Oregon Department of Education School Wellness Award recipients in 2015.

"For two state ambassadors to be selected from the same school back-to-back is quite an accomplishment for the school, the students and their advisor, Grant Mattox" said Crista Hawkins, Director of School Programs for the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council.

Fuel Up to Play 60 is active in more than 73,000 schools nationwide and more than half of the public schools in Oregon. The Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council manages Fuel Up to Play 60 grants, supporting school-wide activities in both physical education and better access to nutrition, including school breakfasts. In the latest round, districts and schools will receive nearly $20,000 with a combined reach of more than 340,000 students throughout Oregon.

For more information about Fuel up to Play 60, visit www.fueluptoplay60.com.

# # #

About the Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council:
The Oregon Dairy and Nutrition Council is funded and directed by the Oregon dairy industry, with governance by a ten-member Board of Commissioners and oversight by the Oregon Department of Agriculture. Oregon is home to 240 dairy farm families and 22 dairy processors who provide more than $1 billion in economic impacts annually, along with delicious, award-winning cheeses, ice creams, yogurts, fluid milk and other high quality dairy products.
Free Medicare 101 classes available in eastern Oregon
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 07/22/16 11:08 AM
Oregon SHIBA will deliver unbiased information

(Salem) - Seniors in eastern Oregon with questions about Medicare will be able to get free in-person help this August during Medicare 101 classes hosted by the Oregon Senior Health Insurance Benefits Assistance (SHIBA) program.

One of the most common observations about Medicare is that it is complicated and can be very difficult to navigate. But people like Sally Peatow, a volunteer who helps with the Medicare 101 classes in Hermiston, stresses that help is available.

"We hear from people from many different backgrounds, and about the only thing they all share is the feeling that Medicare is complicated. I always tell people it really has to be. It touches on many different areas of health care and it covers so much. Medicare 101 classes give people a head start learning about the basics, and we can connect folks to additional enrollment help if they would like," she said.

The Medicare 101 classes cover the A, B, C, and D's of Medicare. Participants will find out when and how to enroll in Medicare and will gain an understanding of costs. They will also get information on where to get Medicare help in their community.

The two-week tour is sponsored in part by Libraries of Eastern Oregon.

Advanced registration is recommended to ensure there are enough seats and handouts for everyone. Register by calling 800-722-4134 (toll-free) without entering your ZIP code or email shiba.oregon@oregon.gov.

SHIBA, through a federally funded grant from the Administration for Community Living, provides free, unbiased Medicare information, advocacy, and fraud prevention.

The eastern Oregon presentations are scheduled for the following dates and times:

Wednesday, Aug. 10, 6-8 p.m.
Harney County Senior Center
17 S. Alder Ave, Burns

Thursday, Aug. 11, 6-8 p.m.
Emma Humphrey Library
150 A St. E, Vale

Friday, Aug. 12, 10 a.m. - noon
Ontario Community Library
388 SW 2nd Ave., Ontario

Friday, Aug. 12, 2-4 p.m.
Nyssa Public Library
319 Main St., Nyssa

Saturday, Aug. 13, 10 a.m. - noon
Richland Library
42008 Moody Road, Richland

Saturday, Aug. 13, 2-4 p.m.
Baker City Library
2400 Resort St., Baker City

Monday, Aug. 15, 10 a.m. - noon
Grant Co. Senior Center
142 NE Dayton St., John Day

Monday, Aug. 15, 6-8 p.m.
Misener Conference Room
1007 4th St. (Union Co Courthouse Annex), La Grande

Tuesday, Aug. 16, Noon - 2 p.m.
Community Connection
702 NW 1st St., Enterprise

Tuesday, Aug. 16, 6-8 p.m.
Hermiston Public Library
235 E Gladys Ave., Hermiston

Wednesday, Aug. 17, Noon - 2 p.m.
Milton-Freewater Public Library
8 SW 8th Ave., Milton-Freewater

Wednesday, Aug. 17, 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Pendleton Public Library
502 SW Dorion Ave., Pendleton

Thursday, Aug. 18, 10 a.m. - noon
Stanfield Public Library
180 W Coe Ave., Stanfield

Thursday, Aug. 18, 2:30-4:30 p.m.
Umatilla City Library
911 7th St., Umatilla

More information
SHIBA: To meet with a counselor, contact the toll-free SHIBA Helpline at 1-800-722-4134. You will be asked to enter your ZIP code to be connected to a program in your area. Visit www.oregonshiba.org to find a copy of the 2016 Oregon Guide to Medicare Insurance Plans.

Medicare: Call 1-800-MEDICARE (1-800-633-4227) 24 hours a day, seven days a week to help you understand your coverage options and enroll in a plan.

###

Follow SHIBA's Facebook page for regular updates on Medicare. https://www.facebook.com/OregonSHIBA/
The Senior Health Insurance Benefits Assistance is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov. Follow DCBS on Twitter: http://twitter.com/OregonDCBS. Receive consumer help and information on insurance, mortgages, investments, workplace safety, and more.
Wildfire Prevention is Everyone's Responsibility
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/22/16 10:02 AM
Summer is finally heating up. And while this is great news for outdoor enthusiasts, fire officials want to remind everyone that the summer heat could lead to careless wildfires.

"Preventing wildfires and wildfire safety is everyone's responsibility," said Oregon State Fire Marshal Jim Walker. "I encourage citizens to join their neighbors in reducing the wildfire risk to their communities."

The Pacific Northwest Wildfire Coordination Group (PNWCG), made up of federal and state fire protection and prevention agencies in Oregon and Washington, is spreading the word that fire danger is on the rise. In many areas around the two states, activities like outdoor debris burning and campfires are either prohibited or limited in their use. Other fire prevention requirements now in place in some forests and other wildlands in the Northwest include carrying a fire extinguisher with vehicles traveling off highways and other primary roads, and not using tracer ammunition or exploding targets when using firearms.

"While fire season has been slow to start this summer, we have seen a significant jump in the percentage of human-caused fires," said Kevin Martin, U.S. Forest Service director of Fire and Aviation for the Pacific Northwest. "This year we've had 19 large fires, of which 15--roughly 80 percent--were human-caused. We all need to do our part to prevent unwanted human-caused fires."

Anyone responsible for starting a fire, accidental or not, is potentially responsible for fire suppression costs, plus the civil liability for damages to neighboring property owners. Combined, these costs could run into the millions.

"As temperatures climb around the state, be aware of your surroundings and use extreme caution," says Keep Oregon Green Association President Kristin Babbs. "Mowing dry grass, smoking, idling your car over dry vegetation on the side of the road, fireworks and target shooting are just a few examples of activities that can lead to destructive and costly wildfires."

Be sure and check fire season regulations for where you live or where you may be going. Several resources are on the internet to gain more information and to learn more about fire prevention practices. Keep Oregon Green, Oregon Department of Forestry, Washington Department of Natural Resources and the offices of the state fire marshal for both Oregon and Washington are great places to start.

For more information about preventing wildfires, these online resources are recommended:

Keep Oregon Green Association: www.keeporegongreen.org
Firewise: www.firewise.org
Pacific Northwest Fire-Adapted Communities: www.pnwfac.org
Thu. 07/21/16
Red Cross Responds to Home Fire Affecting Warm Springs Residents
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 07/21/16 9:36 PM
Disaster responders with the American Red Cross Cascades Region responded to a home fire disaster on July 21, 2016 at approximately 5:00 p.m. in the 2300 block of Oitz Loop in Warm Springs, OR. The single-family fire affected four adults. The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits, information about recovery services. Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.

The Red Cross Cascades Region (Oregon and Southwest Washington) responds to an average of two home fires every day. We provide hope and comfort to people affected, helping victims anywhere and anytime. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/CascadesHomeFire to schedule an appointment.
Death Investigation - Highway 101 Near North Bend in Coos County
Oregon State Police - 07/21/16 7:37 PM
Oregon State Police (OSP), with the assistance of the Coos County Medical Examiner and the Coos County Sheriff's Office, is completing an investigation into the death of a Nevada man. He was found deceased Wednesday near his vehicle, at the ODOT wayside along Highway 101, at milepost 230. The initial investigation indicates that the death is from a self-inflicted gunshot wound.

On July 20, 2016, at approximately 6:24 p.m., an OSP Trooper stopped to check a 2015 Jeep Patriot parked at the a wayside between Lakeside and North Bend along Highway 101, at milepost 230. The Trooper reported discovering a deceased adult male sitting in a folding chair adjacent to his vehicle.

The deceased was identified as Mason Larue GEBE, age 75, from Las Vegas, Nevada.

Help is available for community members struggling from a mental health crisis and/or suicidal thoughts. Suicide is preventable. If you or someone you know needs help with suicidal thoughts or is otherwise in an immediate mental health crisis, professionals are on call to handle mental health emergencies 24 hours a day, 365 days a year.

There are several resources available through Coos County Public Health and the Coos County Suicide Prevention Program. More information is available online at:
http://www.preventionlane.org/suicide-links.htm

In addition to local resources in your community, a toll free line is available for Oregon Partnership Lifeline/National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (1-800-273-8255).

###
DCSO SAR Assists With Mountain Bike Crash Rescue Near Phil's Trail Head (Photo)
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/21/16 7:21 PM
2016-07/5227/96299/KGB_Crash_Map.JPG
2016-07/5227/96299/KGB_Crash_Map.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-07/5227/96299/thumb_KGB_Crash_Map.JPG
Reporting party:
Jeff Frechette 46 year old male, Boise ID

Rescued mountain biker:
Hailey Frechette 45 year old female, Boise ID


On July 21st, 2016, at 11:42 hours, Deschutes County 911 received a 911 call from Jeff Frechette in regards to his wife, Hailey Frechette. Jeff reported that Hailey had crashed her mountain bike at the intersection of Kents trail and the KGB trail in the Phil's Trail Complex mountain bike area west of Bend. Jeff reported they could not proceed further on their own and would need medical assistance.

10 Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Search and Rescue Volunteers and two Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Deputies deployed and assisted the Bend Fire Department in accessing and rescuing Hailey, who sustained injuries from her crash. DCSO SAR Teams utilized a wheeled litter to transport Hailey part of the way down the trail at which point she was transferred to an ATV/Ambu-sled and transported the rest of the way to Skyliners Rd. Skyliners Rd was shut down for approximately 30 minutes at the 4610 Forest Rd junction so that Air Link could land and be available for further transport.

Hailey was flown by Air Link to St. Charles Medical Center in Bend OR, to be treated for her injuries. Hailey had been wearing an appropriate bicycle helmet at the time of the crash.


Attached Media Files: 2016-07/5227/96299/KGB_Crash_Map.JPG
OSP Seeking Public's Assistance with Identifying Driver of Crash - Clackamas County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/21/16 2:52 PM
Photo1
Photo1
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-07/1002/96282/thumb_20160718_210429.jpg
The Oregon State Police (OSP) is asking for the public's help to identify the driver of a single vehicle roll over crash that occurred on Monday, July 18, 2016 at approximately 7:44 PM.

OSP's Northern Command Center was advised of a single vehicle crash at the intersection of Highway 212 and Highway 26. Investigation discovered that a white, Ford Escape SUV with Oregon license plate 638 DYB crashed and rolled over after exiting Highway 26, westbound to Highway 212. The vehicle crashed on the off ramp and came to rest on its side. This same vehicle was called in as reckless driving complaint on Highway 26 near milepost 41 at approximately 7:21 PM earlier in the evening of July 18th.

OSP is asking for anyone who witnessed this crash, stopped immediately after the crash or witnessed and/or assisted the occupants in getting out of the vehicle to please contact OSP. Anyone with information can contact Sgt. Scott McLeod at 503-731-3020 (ext. 240) or Sgt. Chris Allori at 503-708-6461.

###


Attached Media Files: Photo1 , Photo2
Health advisory for water contact at D River Beach lifted July 21
Oregon Health Authority - 07/21/16 2:12 PM
July 21, 2016

Testing shows fecal bacteria levels have subsided

The Oregon Health Authority today lifted a public health advisory for contact with marine water at D River Beach, located in Lincoln County. OHA issued the advisory July 19 after water samples showed higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria in ocean waters.

Results from later samples taken by the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) showed contamination had subsided and the water no longer poses a higher-than-normal risk associated with water contact activities. However, officials recommend staying out of large pools on the beach that are frequented by birds, and runoff from those pools, because the water may contain increased bacteria from fecal matter.

State officials continue to encourage other recreational activities at all Oregon beaches, suggesting only that water contact be avoided when advisories are in effect.

Since 2003 state officials have used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. Oregon state agencies participating in this program are OHA, DEQ and the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

For more information, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0400, or call the OHA toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767.

# # #
BPA names Mizumori Cathcart VP of Transmission System Operations (Photo)
Bonneville Power Administration - 07/21/16 11:08 AM
The Bonneville Power Administration has selected Michelle Mizumori Cathcart to be its vice president of Transmission System Operations.
The Bonneville Power Administration has selected Michelle Mizumori Cathcart to be its vice president of Transmission System Operations.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-07/1236/96274/thumb_Michelle-Mizumori-Cathcart.jpg
Portland, Ore. -- The Bonneville Power Administration has selected Michelle Mizumori Cathcart to be its vice president of Transmission System Operations. She will begin her new position Aug. 8.

"Michelle is a results-driven leader with impressive electric power industry experience and academic credentials," said Richard Shaheen, senior vice president for Transmission Services. "She's a great addition to the BPA transmission team, as well as an outstanding talent to oversee the operations of Bonneville's transmission system and tackle all of the complexities of delivering electric power today."

As leader of BPA's Transmission System Operations organization, Mizumori Cathcart will oversee the safe, reliable and open access operation and dispatch of BPA's high-voltage transmission system and interconnected generation. The group also operates and manages BPA's two regional control centers and represents the agency on operations and other coordination issues with the Northwest Power Pool, California Independent System Operator, PacifiCorp and other balancing authorities and system operators. She succeeds Randi Thomas, who has led the organization since 2006 and is retiring this summer.

"I am thrilled to join BPA and lead a team of professionals dedicated to Bonneville's mission of delivering reliable power and services to the customers and communities we serve," Mizumori Cathcart said.

Most recently, Mizumori Cathcart served as the director of strategy and organizational performance at Peak Reliability, a reliability coordinator that provides situational awareness and real-time monitoring of the bulk electric systems of 14 western states, British Columbia, and the northern portion of Baja California, Mexico. Before assuming that role, she oversaw Peak's real-time operations and training as the director of operations.

Prior to arriving at Peak, Mizumori Cathcart served as the managing director of operations and market interface at the Western Electricity Coordinating Council, a regional entity responsible for compliance monitoring of bulk electric system reliability in the Western Interconnection. She spent the early part of her career at Madison Gas and Electric Company where she led the Wisconsin utility's participation in the Midwest Independent System Operator and the Midwest Contingency Reserve Sharing Group, and was responsible for purchased power agreements and operator training.

Mizumori Cathcart has a doctorate of Philosophy in Geography and Environmental Engineering from Johns Hopkins University, a master's of Business Administration from Washington State University and a bachelor's of Science in Engineering from Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania.


Attached Media Files: The Bonneville Power Administration has selected Michelle Mizumori Cathcart to be its vice president of Transmission System Operations.
Tobacco Reduction Advisory Committee to meet July 28
Oregon Health Authority - 07/21/16 8:42 AM
July 21, 2016

What: A public meeting of the Tobacco Reduction Advisory Committee (TRAC). Agenda items include tobacco evaluation updates, communication coordination, and tobacco prevention policy efforts.

When: Thursday, July 28, 1-3 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1C, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland

Who: The Tobacco Reduction Advisory Committee, which is appointed by the Governor, advises the state Tobacco Prevention and Education Program (TPEP) on program and budget matters. Its members come from private organizations and state agencies dedicated to the reduction of the harmful impact of tobacco use on Oregonians.

Details: Please note that space is limited.

The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. To request alternate formats, sign language interpreters, physical accessibility, or other reasonable accommodations, call the Oregon Health Authority at 1-800-282-8096 at least 48 hours before the meeting.

For more information, see the committee's website at https://public.health.oregon.gov/PreventionWellness/TobaccoPrevention/Pages/trac.aspx

# # #
The Kuebler I-5 interchange ramp closures planned this weekend
ODOT: Valley, No. Coast - 07/21/16 7:37 AM
SALEM-- During this weekend, ramp closures are planned at the I-5 Kuebler Interchange in Salem for paving work. The contractor working for the Oregon Department of Transportation will initially close the southbound I-5 off ramp at 9 p.m. on Friday, July 22 to complete the top lift paving. The southbound off ramp will then open and the northbound off ramp will be closed to facilitate paving on Kuebler Boulevard at the Interchange. All work should be completed by 5 a.m. on Monday, July 25.

Travelers should plan on using alternative routes to get around the closures. Options to detour around the closures are to use the I-5 interchanges to the north and south of Kuebler; Mission Street (OR 22/OR 99E Business/Exit 253) to the north, and Delaney Road to the south.

The new southbound off ramp will meet current standards and is a major milestone on the $9.6 million project that will relieve congestion and improve safety at the busy interchange, while also supporting economic development opportunities in the South Salem area.
The project will also add a westbound to southbound I-5 loop on ramp and modify the eastbound to southbound I-5 on ramp. The project is on schedule to be completed by this fall.
Wed. 07/20/16
The Client and Staff Safety Task Force meets August 5 in Salem
Oregon Department of Human Services - 07/20/16 12:26 PM
The Client and Staff Safety Task Force will meet Friday, Aug. 5, 2016 from 2 to 4:30 p.m. at the Oregon State Capitol at 900 Court Street NE in Salem, in Room 350. The meeting is open to the public.

Those who are unable to attend in person can participate by conference call:

Conference Call Number: 1-877-873-8017
Participant Code: 772325#

The task force is directed to make recommendations on staff safety, resident care, and the operation of Stabilization and Crisis Units. The task force will provide a report to the Oregon State Legislature by Sept. 15, 2016.

The task force will consider and make recommendations for:
Ensuring the dignity and self-determination of each resident in a Stabilization and Crisis Unit
Improving the safety of staff employed by a Stabilization and Crisis Unit
Improving training and support for staff
Staffing levels
Reducing incidents of aggressive and assaultive behavior by residents
Reducing the need for staff to work overtime
Improving access to appropriate mental health supports and intervention methods
Ensuring the timely transition of residents in Stabilization and Crisis Units when ready to be placed with a residential service provider in the community, including recommendations for building capacity in community-based care settings.

All meetings of this task force conform to Oregon public meetings laws. Requests for accommodation for a people with disabilities should be made to Angie Allbee and should be made at least 24 hours before the meeting. For more information, contact Angie Allbee, DHS Legislative Coordinator, at 503-689-5034.
Public Safety Memorial Fund Board
Oregon Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 07/20/16 12:18 PM
MEETING NOTICE

For Immediate Release

July 20, 2016

Contact: Linsay Hale
(503) 378-2427


Notice of Meeting

The Public Safety Memorial Fund Board will hold a meeting at 10:00 a.m. on July 28, 2016 at the Public Safety Training Academy in Salem, Oregon.

Teleconference Information: (888) 273-3658; Participant Code: 4711910

The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made as soon as possible by contacting Linsay Hale (503) 378-2427.

Agenda Items:

1. PSMF Overview for New Members

2. Election of PSMF Board Chair

3. Minutes for April 28, 2016
Approve minutes

4. Adoption of PSMF Board Bylaws
Adopt bylaws

5. Next meeting - October 27, 2016

Requires a vote by the Board
Coquille man wins $1 million Powerball prize
Oregon Lottery - 07/20/16 9:00 AM
July 20, 2016 - Salem, Ore. -- Steven Dery of Coquille is well aware that everyone in town already knows he won $1 million playing Powerball.

Dery, who is a regular Powerball player, purchased his ticket at the Coquille Tackle & Smokes Shop. Dery matched five numbers but missed the Powerball number. He said he was two digits away from hitting the grand prize. But noted he was perfectly happy winning $1 million!

When Kathryn Sutphin (SUT-FIN), who owns Coquille Tackle & Smokes Shop, heard Dery had won, she was very pleased that "someone who deserved it" hit a big Powerball prize.

"Steven is a local guy who was born and raised here," Sutphin said. "He is the person everyone wants to win. He is a hard working guy who is close to retirement and this will be a very nice nest egg for him. I wouldn't be surprised if he hasn't worked every day of his life. How perfect can it be that a person like that wins?"

Sutphin, who purchased her shop four years ago, will receive a 1-percent selling bonus for selling the big ticket. She said with the $10,000 bonus she plans on putting a new roof on the business and giving her five employees "a small bonus."

"Now we are going to sell the big one," Sutphin said. "We are having some fun with this."

The overall odds of winning a Powerball prize are one in 24.9. Odds of winning the jackpot are one in 292,201,338. The next Powerball drawing is today at 7:59 p.m. Pacific Standard Time and the jackpot is estimated to be $361 million. Players have until 7 p.m. to purchase tickets on drawing days.

Proceeds from Oregon Lottery sales help fund public education, parks, economic development and watershed projects. For the 2013-15 biennium, Coos County received more than $28.7 million in Oregon Lottery dollars.

The Oregon Lottery reminds players to always sign the back of their Lottery tickets, regardless of the game. In the event of winning a jackpot, they should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 are advised to contact the Lottery office and schedule an appointment to claim their prize.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned nearly $10 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org

###
Tue. 07/19/16
Mission Street on ramp from 12th to close for emergency repairs on Wednesday
ODOT: Valley, No. Coast - 07/19/16 4:50 PM
The Mission Street on-ramp from 12th Street in Salem will be closed between 9 to 11 a.m. on Wednesday so an Oregon Department of Transportation bridge crew can repair a small section of a broken joint.

The work should be completed within the two hours. During the closure, travelers will have to detour using 12th Street to OR 99E.

Travelers should expect short delays.
Northwest Association for Blind Athletes to Host First Camp Abilities on the West Coast for Children and Youth with Visual Impairments Next Week in Salem, Oregon
Northwest Assn. for Blind Athletes - 07/19/16 2:12 PM
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact:
Billy Henry, Founder/Executive Director
Northwest Association for Blind Athletes
311 West Evergreen Blvd, Ste. 200
Vancouver, Washington 98660
Local Phone: 1-360-718-2826
Toll Free: 1-800-880-9837
http://www.nwaba.org
bhenry@nwaba.org

Northwest Association for Blind Athletes to Host First Camp Abilities on the West Coast for Children and Youth with Visual Impairments Next Week in Salem, Oregon

Vancouver, Washington--July 19th, 2016--Northwest Association for Blind Athletes (NWABA) announced today that it will host the first Camp Abilities on the West Coast for children and youth with visual impairments next week, July 24th-30th, 2016 at Willamette University in Salem, Oregon. Camp Abilities is a world-renowned week long comprehensive, developmental sports camp for children and youth with visual impairments between the ages of 8 and 15.

Camp Abilities Oregon will provide opportunities to children and youth from across Washington, Oregon and Montana in its inaugural year. Campers will vary in socioeconomic status, ethnic background and level of skills and abilities. The purpose of Camp Abilities Oregon is to empower blind or visually impaired children to break the cycle of dependence and ill health that is often associated with their disability. Campers will be encouraged to take control of their own quality of life, and will be empowered to use their many talents to actively contribute within their communities. A variety of sports and recreational activities including goalball (a sport specifically developed for individuals with visual impairments), judo, tandem cycling, kayaking and countless other activities will be provided throughout the week.

"We are honored to offer this once-in-a-lifetime transformational program to children and youth with visual impairments. Camp Abilities Oregon will provide benefits that reach far beyond participating in sports, and will help campers gain the confidence, self-esteem, friendships, and independence they need to be successful throughout all areas of life," said Founder and Executive Director Billy Henry

Camp Abilities Oregon is funded in part by the Oregon Blind and Visually Impaired Student Fund, but additional support is still critically needed. Donations are accepted to support Camp Abilities Oregon by mailing a check to PO BOX 65265, Vancouver, WA, 98665 or making an online gift at www.nwaba.org. Please indicate that your donation is to support Camp Abilities Oregon 2016. For more information on the Northwest Association for Blind Athletes, please contact Billy Henry at 1-360-718-2826, or visit www.nwaba.org

About NWABA:
Northwest Association for Blind Athletes (NWABA) provides life-changing opportunities through sports and physical activity to individuals who are blind and visually impaired. Last year, the organization served 1,300 individuals of all ages and abilities. NWABA was formed by a group of visually impaired students in 2007 to ensure that people who are blind were provided opportunities to participate in sports and physical activity.

For information: http://www.nwaba.org or
Contact: bhenry@nwaba.org
Phone: 1-360-718-2826

###
Two-day Conference to Focus on Rural Business Issues (Photo)
Klamath Co. Chamber of Commerce - 07/19/16 1:53 PM
Vince Adams, Extension Educator, Rural Communities Explorer
Vince Adams, Extension Educator, Rural Communities Explorer
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-07/1602/96239/thumb_Vince-Adams-web.jpg
The 2nd Annual Rural Business and Innovation Summit will focus on the challenges and opportunities facing rural businesses. The Summit (RBIS'16) is scheduled for September 14th and 15th at Klamath Community College and is hosted by the Klamath County Chamber of Commerce. Startups, entrepreneurs, corporate business leaders, accelerators, and investors will come together to exchange ideas, share experiences, and discover best practices that provide a competitive edge and lead to thriving business in rural areas. The Summit will inspire entrepreneurs to accelerate innovation, cultivate a successful business ecosystem within their communities, and take advantage of opportunities for growth.

"Business owners and entrepreneurs in a rural area have some unique challenges and opportunities," says Heather Tramp, the Chamber's Program and Marketing Coordinator, "We wanted to give rural business a place to come together, collaborate, and learn from each other as well receive practical tips and ideas from a dynamic group of speakers who understand rural." She also indicated the Chamber invites businesses from around the state and even northern California to attend the event. Tramp says the speakers have been hand-selected for their expertise and knowledge of rural business. The topics will help inspire, motivate, and educate. Topics include:
10 Trends in Rural Favor (presented by Becky McCray, author of the award winning book "Small Town Rules") - All your life, you've been told that small towns are dying, drying up, and disappearing, and that there's nothing you can do to change it. What if, just once, there was some good news about rural? There is! Big trends are moving in our favor: brain gain, changing retail dynamics, new travel motivations, and more! Learn why we have a future and how to shape the future of your town.
Latinos in Oregon: Challenging the American Dream (presented by Vince Adams, Extension Educator, Rural Communities Explorer) - Latinos important force changing the demography and economy of Oregon. Participants will learn about the current state of the Latino population in Oregon, why it's growing so rapidly, and why that change is likely to continue. In this session we will discuss the social and economic challenges facing Latinos. At the same time we will show that Latinos are making growing contributions to the Oregon economy through the labor force and entrepreneurship and are a largely unrecognized asset across the state.
Grand Slam: The Seven Steps to Creating a Winning Team (presented by Steven Kauffman, co-author of The Garbageman's Guide to Life: How to Get Out of the Dumps)

Tickets for the Summit are on sale now and can be purchased through the event's website at www.ruralbizsummit.com or by calling the Chamber at (541) 884-5193. Tickets are $99 for Chamber members, $149 for non-Chamber members. The Klamath County Chamber of Commerce is extending the special Chamber member pricing for those who are members of any Chamber.

The Klamath County Chamber of Commerce has served Klamath County since 1905. It is a member-based association made up of businesses and individuals who work together to advance the civic, economic, industrial, professional, and cultural life of Klamath County and the City of Klamath Falls, through advocacy and broad communication connections. Membership is available to businesses, organizations (including non-profits) and individuals.


Attached Media Files: Vince Adams, Extension Educator, Rural Communities Explorer , Steven Kauffman, co-author of The Garbageman’s Guide to Life: How to Get Out of the Dumps , Author of "Small Town Rules"
State advising travelers on Zika ahead of Olympics, Paralympics
Oregon Health Authority - 07/19/16 1:43 PM
July 19, 2016

Most travelers should take precautions, but pregnant women should not go

The Oregon Health Authority is recommending those traveling to the Olympic and Paralympic Games in Rio de Janeiro take steps during and after travel to prevent Zika infection.

Zika is a virus usually spread through bites from two types of Aedes mosquitoes, but it can spread from infected men to their partners through sexual contact. New evidence suggests that women may be able to transmit Zika to their sexual partners as well. Pregnant women are advised to not travel to the games or any Zika-affected area.

"Pregnant women should not go to any Zika-affected area because of the potential for serious effects on their babies," said Suzanne Zane, maternal and child health epidemiologist in the OHA Public Health Division. Zika can cause birth defects including microcephaly, in which the brain and head of an infant are smaller than usual.

"Even women who are not trying to get pregnant should protect themselves from Zika during travel because half of pregnancies are unplanned," Zane said.

Zika is spreading in Brazil and throughout Latin America, the Caribbean and parts of the South Pacific. Mosquitos known to carry Zika live in the U.S., but not yet in Oregon. It is unknown if the types of mosquito found in Oregon could spread Zika.

People who have a Zika infection often do not show symptoms. Those with Zika symptoms may have rash, fever, joint pain and redness of the eyes. Symptoms are usually mild. See your doctor if you travel to the games or other Zika-affected areas and develop symptoms.

Travelers can prevent Zika and accidental infection of a baby during pregnancy. Those heading to the games should protect themselves from mosquito bites during travel and for three weeks after they return. Women should delay pregnancy for eight weeks after travel, or eight weeks after symptoms start. Men should avoid sex or use a condom for eight weeks after travel, or six months after symptoms start.

All people attending the games who have a pregnant partner should avoid sex or use a condom during any sexual activity for the entire pregnancy. Anyone needing low- to no-cost family planning and birth control services can find information by dialing 211.

# # #

Helpful links:
-- OHA Zika virus updates: http://www.healthoregon.org/zika
-- Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Zika virus page: http://www.cdc.gov/zika/
-- CDC information for specific groups: http://www.cdc.gov/zika/specific-groups.html
-- CDC Zika travel information: http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/page/zika-travel-information
Insight school of Oregon - Painted Hills | Board of Directors Meeting
Insight School of Ore. - Painted Hills - 07/19/16 10:24 AM
Reminder: The ISOR-PH board will hold a regular meeting on July 21th at 4:00 PM.

Insight School of Oregon Painted Hills Board Members are hereby notified that the Meeting of the Board will be held at:

1.Via Teleconference:
Conference Call Number: 1-888-824-5783
Conference Code Number: 54433245# - Note this is a new pass code.

And

2.Via Web Conference
http://tinyurl.com/ISORPH-SchoolBoardMeeting

The Public has been invited to the Board Meeting with notices posted at the following locations:

A.FlashNet Newswire
http://flashalertbend.net/press-releases.html

B.Insight School of Oregon Painted Hills Office
603 NW 3rd Street
Prineville, OR 97754
Employment in Oregon June 2016 News Release
Oregon Employment Dept. - 07/19/16 10:00 AM
Oregon's Unemployment Rate Rises in June, Job Growth Continues

Oregon's unemployment rate was 4.8 percent in June, an increase from May's rate of 4.5 percent. One significant factor in the rise of the unemployment rate was a large increase in Oregon's labor force, which reached an all-time high of 2,053,000. Despite the increase in June, Oregon's unemployment rate remained significantly lower than the June 2015 rate of 5.8 percent.

Oregon's 4.8 percent unemployment rate in June remained close to the national unemployment rate of 4.9 percent. Like Oregon, the U.S. rate also increased in June, rising from 4.7 percent in May.

Oregon's payroll employment added 3,000 jobs in June after a revised gain of 2,500 in May. Private educational services added 1,700 jobs, while professional and business services added 1,400. Meanwhile, several industries each added between 500 and 900: government (+900 jobs), retail trade (+700), construction (+600) and wholesale trade (+500). Leisure and hospitality cut 1,000 jobs in June, while three other industries each cut at least 600 jobs: health care and social assistance (-900 jobs), financial activities (-700) and manufacturing (-600).

Taking a longer-term view, payroll employment grew by 59,500 jobs since June 2015. The resulting over-the-year job growth rate was 3.3 percent in Oregon, much faster than the national job growth rate of 1.7 percent. Oregon's over-the-year job growth has consistently outpaced the nation since 2013.

Next Press Releases
The Oregon Employment Department plans to release the June county and metropolitan area unemployment rates on Tuesday, July 26th, and the next statewide unemployment rate and employment survey data for July on Tuesday, August 16th.??NLG

Notes:
All numbers in the above narrative are seasonally adjusted.

The Oregon Employment Department and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) work cooperatively to develop and publish monthly Oregon payroll employment and labor force data. The estimates of monthly job gains and losses are based on a survey of businesses. The estimates of unemployment are based on a survey of households and other sources.

The Oregon Employment Department publishes payroll employment estimates that are revised quarterly by using employment counts from employer unemployment insurance tax records. All department publications use this Official Oregon Series data unless noted otherwise. This month's release incorporates the October, November and December 2015 tax records data. The department continues to make the original nonfarm payroll employment series available; these data are produced by the BLS.

The pdf version of the news release, including tables and graphs, can be found at www.QualityInfo.org/press-release. To obtain the data in other formats such as in Excel, visit www.QualityInfo.org, then within the top banner, select Economic Data, then choose LAUS or CES. To request the press release as a Word document, contact the person shown at the top of this press release.

For help finding jobs and training resources, visit one of the state's WorkSource Oregon Centers or go to: www.WorkSourceOregon.org.

Equal Opportunity program -- auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For the Deaf and Hard of Hearing population, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.


Attached Media Files: Employment in Oregon June 2016 News Release
Health advisory issued July 19 for water contact at D River Beach
Oregon Health Authority - 07/19/16 9:37 AM
July 19, 2016

The Oregon Health Authority issued a public health advisory today for higher-than-normal levels of bacteria in ocean waters at D River Beach, located in Lincoln County.

Water samples indicate higher-than-normal levels of fecal bacteria, which can result in diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections and other illnesses. Direct contact with the water should be avoided in this area until the advisory is lifted, especially by children and the elderly, who may be more vulnerable to waterborne bacteria.

Increased pathogen and fecal bacteria levels in ocean waters can come from both shore and inland sources such as stormwater runoff, sewer overflows, failing septic systems, and animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.

While this advisory is in effect at D River Beach, visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach, or in discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Even if there is no advisory in effect, officials recommend avoiding swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm.

The status of water contact advisories at beaches is subject to change. For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0400, or 877-290-6767 (toll-free).

Although state officials advise against water contact, they continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on this beach because they pose no health risk even during an advisory. Neighboring beaches are not affected by this advisory.

Since 2003 state officials have used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. State organizations participating in this program are the Oregon Public Health Division, Department of Environmental Quality and Parks and Recreation Department.

# # #
Mon. 07/18/16
Creating a person-centered behavioral health system that delivers better outcomes is cornerstone of OHA Behavioral Health Collaborative
Oregon Health Authority - 07/18/16 4:39 PM
July 18, 2016

On July 14, Oregon Health Authority Director Lynne Saxton convened the first in a series of meetings to be held over the next six months to develop an action plan for improving and strengthening Oregon's behavioral health system in Oregon. A prioritized list of recommendations will go to the Legislature in November.

The collaborative includes 40 leaders in behavioral health from across the state and 10 leaders from state agencies who provide support for Oregonians struggling with mental illness and substance use disorders. Members represent a diverse group of stakeholders, including human services, education, housing, coordinated care organizations, commercial insurers, tribal health representatives, law enforcement and advocacy organizations.

"There is no greater privilege to me than working with this team to create a 21st century integrated behavioral health system for Oregonians," said Saxton. "Our work will be informed by data and best practices, emphasizing cross-agency collaboration and culminate in prioritized recommendations to build an economically sustainable results-driven system for Oregonians."

The collaborative will chart a course for excellence and sustainability in person-centered behavioral health services across systems. Over the past year, the Oregon Health Authority has collected data and engaged the community to build the foundation of information to define the current state of behavioral health services provided to Oregonians.

The next collaborative meeting is scheduled for July 28 in Portland. Because this is a working group, time will not be allocated for public testimony.

More information about the Behavioral Health Collaborative can be found on the OHA website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/amh/Pages/strategic.aspx. Public comment may be submitted by completing the form "Discussion Questions for Public Comment" and emailing it to BH.Collaborative@state.or.us. For more information, contact Sarah Lochner, legislative coordinator for behavioral health programs, at sarah.j.lochner@state.or.us.

# # #
Oregon State Penitentiary reports inmate death (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 07/18/16 4:01 PM
James Howland
James Howland
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-07/1070/96219/thumb_Howland.jpg
An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) inmate died unexpectedly Monday in a local area hospital. As with all unanticipated deaths in state prisons, the Oregon State Police Criminal Investigations Unit is conducting an investigation.

James Howland, 27, was transported off-site for medical care Friday, July 15, 2016. He was pronounced deceased on Monday, July 18, at 3:27 p.m. He had been housed at Oregon State Penitentiary in Salem.

Howland entered Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) custody on August 12, 2014 on four counts of unlawful use of a vehicle in the first degree out of Marion County. His earliest release date was January 23, 2023.

Next of kin has been notified. No other details are available at this time.

OSP is Oregon's only maximum-security prison, located in Salem, and houses over 2,000 male inmates. OSP is surrounded by a 25-foot-high wall with 10 towers. The facility has multiple special housing units including death row, disciplinary segregation, behavioral health, intermediate care housing, and an infirmary (with hospice) with 24-hour nursing care. OSP participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including the furniture factory, laundry, metal shop, and contact center. It provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, work-based education, inmate work crews, and pre-release services. OSP was established in 1866 and, until 1959, was Oregon's only prison.

####


Attached Media Files: James Howland
Two Vehicle Fatal Traffic Crash - Highway 224 - Clackamas County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/18/16 2:49 PM
Photo
Photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-07/1002/96211/thumb_20160716_221321.jpg
On July 16, 2016 at approximately 8:30 p.m., OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a two vehicle head-on crash on Highway 224 near milepost 34 (just east of Estacada).

Preliminary investigation revealed a 2003 Chrysler Sebring was traveling westbound on Highway 224, when it veered off the roadway, over-corrected and crossed into the eastbound lane. The Chrysler struck an eastbound 2008 Dodge Charger head-on.

The driver and sole occupant of the Chrysler, Joshua R. RICHARDS, age 34, of Portland, was transported to Oregon Health Sciences University and was being treated for non-life threatening injuries.

The driver of the Dodge, Keith C. PIERCE, age 35, of Mulino, was transported to Oregon Health Sciences University and was being treated for serious injuries. Two adult passengers, Alex J. DAUL, age 34, of Portland, and Mandy L. ALTON, age 34, of Oregon City, were transported to Oregon Health Sciences University and were being treated for non-life threatening injuries.

A fourth occupant, an eleven year-old male passenger in the Dodge, was found unresponsive and an OSP Trooper arrived and began CPR. He was transported to Oregon Health Sciences University and was being treated for serious injuries.

The fifth occupant of the Dodge, an eight year-old male passenger, succumbed to his injuries at the scene.

The highway was closed for about four hours while investigators completed a reconstruction of the crash scene. ODOT established detours in the area during the closure.

Alcohol consumption is being considered as a contributing factor in the crash. OSP was assisted by Estacada Fire and Rescue, Clackamas County Sheriff's Office, Oregon Department of Transportation and the Multi-Agency Crash Reconstruction and Forensic Team.

###


Attached Media Files: Photo
OSP Seeking Public's Assistance with Assault and Robbery Case - Sauvie Island
Oregon State Police - 07/18/16 1:21 PM
The Oregon State Police (OSP) are investigating an assault and robbery that reportedly occurred on July 13th, 2016, sometime between 7:00 PM and midnight at Walton Beach on the Sauvie Island Wildlife Area. The victim was reportedly held down by two individuals and pepper sprayed while they stole items from a backpack. The suspected assailants are described as follows:

Suspect #1:
White
Male
Adult
In his 20's
Thin
Shaved head
A single cross tattoo under each eye
A large face tattoo, red in color starting at the left brow and running along the left side of his face.
Possible additional tattoos on arms.

Suspect #2:
White
Male
Adult
In his 20's
Approximately 5'11" tall
Husky
Dark hair

Anyone with information regarding this case is asked to contact OSP Trooper Joe Dezso at 503-410-1503 or the OSP Northern Command Center at 800-452-7888. This is an active investigation and no further information is available at this time.

###
Burglary suspects apprehended by K9 (Photo)
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/18/16 12:54 PM
2016-07/5227/96207/20160718_121858.jpg
2016-07/5227/96207/20160718_121858.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-07/5227/96207/thumb_20160718_121858.jpg
MEDIA RELEASE

Burglary Suspects Apprehended by K9

Released by: Aaron Harding, Sgt., (541) 610-7359

Occurred: July 18, 2016 @ 0956 hours

Location: 63531 Gentry Loop, Bend, Oregon

Name: Daniel Joseph Webb
Bend
49

Charges: Burglary I $25,000 bail
Warrant, DWS $5,000
Warrant, PCS Meth $10,000
Warrant, PV $10,000
Warrant, PV $20,000

Name: Charles Anthony Mansfield
La Pine
27

Charges: Burglary I $25,000 bail


NARRATIVE: On July 18, 2016 at about 0841 hours, Deputies were dispatched to a possible Burglary in progress call on Gentry Loop, northeast of Bend. The victim of the burglary reported that upon returning to their home, they could hear subjects inside the residence. Deputies, assisted by the Oregon State Police, responded to the residence, set up a perimeter and checked the residence.

It was determined that the subjects fled prior to the deputies arrival. The subjects were observed by citizens in the area, which led to a K9 search of the area. The suspects were eventually located by Deschutes County Sheriff's Office K9 Ezel, in a shed on a nearby property. The suspects initially refused to come out of the shed, but after the door was breached and pepper spray was deployed into the shed, they cooperated with deputies and were taken into custody without further incident.

The suspects, identified as Daniel Joseph Webb and Charles Anthony Mansfield were lodged at the Deschutes County Jail. Mansfield was evaluated at the scene of the arrest, by paramedics, for exposure to OC (pepper spray).

The Deschutes County Sheriff's Office would like to thank the citizens who reported the suspicious circumstances, which led to the apprehension of the suspects.

The Oregon State Police, Bend Police Department and Bend Fire Department assisted with this call.



###


Attached Media Files: 2016-07/5227/96207/20160718_121858.jpg
Oregon's Health CO-OP individual members can apply their out-of-pocket costs to new plans
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 07/18/16 12:08 PM
Policyholders must choose new plan by July 31

(Salem) -- Starting today, Oregon's Health CO-OP members in the individual market can purchase a plan from a new carrier and get credit for any money they have paid toward their deductibles and out-of-pocket maximums.

The Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services, Division of Financial Regulation placed the financially struggling CO-OP in receivership last week. All CO-OP plans will end Sunday, July 31, and the state will wind down CO-OP operations and liquidate the company. Oregon's Health CO-OP is a nonprofit consumer operated and oriented health insurer (CO-OP) formed under the Affordable Care Act.

"It is unusual for plans to be canceled in the middle of the year, so we have been working hard and thinking creatively about how to better this situation for consumers," said Patrick Allen, DCBS director. "Although CO-OP members will have to switch plans, they will not lose the money they already have paid into their plan for deductibles and other out-of-pocket expenses."

Individual members can go to HealthCare.gov, call the HealthCare.gov call center, or work with their insurance agent to enroll in a new plan that will be effective Aug. 1. DCBS strongly encourages all CO-OP individual members reach out to their local agent or health insurance marketplace call center. Oregon insurers offering plans in the individual market have agreed to honor money already spent toward deductibles and out-of-pocket maximums, so consumers do not have to start over on their new plans.

"We appreciate the willingness of Oregon's insurance companies to help us protect these policyholders, who have to switch plans through no fault of their own," Allen said.

Members can also buy plans directly from an insurer, but they will not be able to receive tax credits and other financial help unless they purchase a plan through HealthCare.gov. Consumers must pay the premium to their new insurer for the plans to take effect.

For employer groups, they should work with their agent to find a new plan. Group enrollees may have to start over on their deductibles and out-of-pocket costs, depending on the new carrier. New group plans will be effective through Aug. 1, 2017.

"We realize this is a tight timeline for CO-OP members to choose a new plan, so we are prepared to do everything we can to help and ensure there are no gaps in coverage," said Berri Leslie, administrator of the Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace.

The Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace will be calling, emailing, and mailing information to CO-OP members over the next two weeks. Marketplace staff can also connect consumers with insurance agents who can help them choose a new plan. The call center will be staffed from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. weekdays and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on weekends until July 31. Customers can call the Marketplace at 1-855-268-3767 (toll-free) or email info.marketplace@oregon.gov.

More information and questions and answers are available at http://dfr.oregon.gov/public-resources/Pages/co-op.aspx.

Oregon's Health CO-OP has about 22,000 health insurance policyholders in Oregon: 12,000 in the individual market and 10,000 in the small and large group markets.

###

The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov and www.dfr.oregon.gov.
Fatal Traffic Crash - Boyd Loop Road south of The Dalles - Wasco County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/18/16 11:51 AM
Photo3
Photo3
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-07/1002/96199/thumb_100_0543_(1).JPG
Oregon State Police (OSP) is continuing the investigation into Sunday night's single vehicle fatal crash along Boyd Loop Road, about 13 miles south of The Dalles, that resulted in the death of two occupants and injuries to three other occupants.

On July 17, 2016 at approximately 7:30 p.m., a 1994 Chevy 1500 pickup driven by Tamara J. KUCHER, age 40, from Dufur, was traveling east on Boyd Loop Road near Highway 197, when for unknown reasons the driver lost control, traveled off the roadway into a ditch and rolled several times.

The driver, KUCHER, and pickup bed passenger, Hunter W. SPEARS, age 21, from Dufur, were ejected and both succumbed to their injuries at the scene.

The right front passenger, Marshall A. JOHNSON, age 32, from Dufur, was transported to Mid-Columbia Medical Center in The Dalles by ground ambulance with serious injuries. He was later taken by Life Flight to a Portland area hospital for treatment.

Two rear seat passengers, 17 year-old female juvenile and 16 year-old male juvenile, both from Dufur, were transported to Mid-Columbia Medical Center in The Dalles for treatment of minor injuries.

OSP troopers from The Dalles Area Command office are continuing the investigation. Trooper Vadim Bogdanov is the lead investigator.

Alcohol, speed, lane safety and occupant safety are being investigated as possible contributing factors.

OSP was assisted by the Wasco County Sheriff's Office, Dufur Valley Volunteer Fire Department and the Mid-Columbia Fire Department.

Photographs - Oregon State Police

###


Attached Media Files: Photo3 , Photo2 , Photo1
Fri. 07/15/16
Health advisory lifted for Metolius and Crooked River arms of Lake Billy Chinook
Oregon Health Authority - 07/15/16 2:42 PM
July 15, 2016

Reduced blue-green algae levels confirmed; continued caution with pets advised

The Oregon Health Authority has lifted the health advisory issued July 1 and extended July 8 for the Metolius and Crooked River arms of Lake Billy Chinook, located 12 miles west of Madras in Jefferson County.

Water monitoring has confirmed that the level of blue-green algae toxins are below guideline values for human exposure. However, the Oregon Health Authority recommends that people continue to be cautious with their pets in the lake because toxins are still above the very low exposure levels established for dogs.

Oregon health officials advise recreational visitors to always be alert to signs of algae blooms in Oregon waters, because only a fraction of the many lakes in Oregon are monitored for blue-green algae by state and federal agencies. People and their pets should avoid areas where the water is foamy, scummy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish red in color, if a thick mat of blue-green algae is visible in the water, or bright green cells are suspended in the water column. If you observe these signs in the water you are encouraged to avoid activities that cause you to swallow water or inhale droplets, such as swimming or high-speed water activities.

For health information, to report human or pet illnesses due to blooms, or to ask questions about a news release, contact the Oregon Health Authority at 971-673-0400. For information about advisories issued or lifted for the season, contact the Oregon Public Health toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767 or visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website at http://healthoregon.org/hab and select "Algae Bloom Advisories."

# # #
Oregon State Library Board Executive Committee Meeting, 7/26/16
Oregon State Library - 07/15/16 1:49 PM
The Executive Committee of the Oregon State Library Board will meet by phone on Tuesday, July 26. Aletha Bonebrake of Baker City will chair the meeting, which will begin at 4:00 p.m.

Members of the public who wish to attend the meeting may come to Room 205 at the Oregon State Library. To listen to this meeting via telephone, please contact Jessica Rondema for information (503-378-2464, jessica.rondema@state.or.us).

Sign language interpretation will be provided for the public if requested prior to 48 hours before the meeting; notice prior to 72 hours before the meeting is preferred. Handouts of meeting materials may also be requested in alternate formats prior to 72 hours before the meeting. Requests may be made to Jessica Rondema at 503-378-2464.

-30-

??NLG
OREGON STATE LIBRARY BOARD
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETING
July 26, 2016
4:00 p.m.
Oregon State Library Room 205
Aletha Bonebrake, Chair

Agenda

4:00 p.m. Report of the State Librarian Dahlgreen

4:30 Discussion of the Board Meeting scheduled for August 26, 2016 Bonebrake

4:45 Other business Bonebrake

5:00 p.m. Adjournment Bonebrake


NOTE: The times of all agenda items are approximate and subject to change.
VA Schedules 2 Million Appointments Using Veterans Choice Program
VA Portland Health Care System (VAPORHCS) - 07/15/16 1:00 PM
Improvements made in increasing access to Community Care, but more work to be done.

WASHINGTON -- The Department of Veterans Affairs' (VA) Veterans Choice Program (VCP) has reached a key milestone in improving access to health care for Veterans. More than two million appointments have been scheduled through the program.

"While two million appointments have been scheduled using the Choice Program and we are making progress, we will not rest until all Veterans who choose VA to be their healthcare provider are receiving the care they need, when they need it," said VA Secretary Robert McDonald. "We will continue to make strides towards an integrated care network, and I urge Congress to enact our Plan to Consolidate Community Care so we can continue to build upon our progress."

The Choice Act, which included the VCP, was passed in August 2014 to help Veterans access timely health care both within VA and the community. VA was required to implement a new, national program in just 90 days, with new requirements that complicated the way VA provides
community care. VA recognized many of these challenges very early in the implementation of the program and VA and all our stakeholders have been working together to make needed changes while implementing this new nationwide program.

VA has outlined a path to improve community care and create a program that is easy to understand, simple to administer, and meets the needs of Veterans, community providers, and VA staff. VA submitted this plan to Congress in October 2015.

Within the Plan are several legislative proposals that VA and Congress need to work on together to improve the experiences for Veterans and community providers.

- The first proposal would increase Veterans' access to community care providers by allowing VA to enter into agreements with local community providers.
- The second would streamline when and how much VA pays for health care services by having VA be the primary payer.
- The third fix would allow VA to more accurately account for healthcare purchased in the community.
- Finally, the last request is for funding and funding flexibility to improve access to care, reimburse the cost of emergency treatment, and create value-based payment models to best serve Veterans that need community care.

"VA is developing innovative ideas and solutions to enhance the Veterans experience and strengthen partnerships with community providers" said Dr. Baligh Yehia, Assistant Deputy Undersecretary for Health, Community Care. "The Choice Program of today is a very different program than the one rolled out in November 2014. Many improvements have been made and we continue to work to deliver care to Veterans where and when they need it."

VCP PROGRESS TO DATE
- Over 2 million appointments scheduled using the VCP significantly increases Veterans access to care.
- Since the start of VCP we have seen a dramatic increase in utilization. From October 2015 to March 2016 VCP authorizations for care have increased 103 percent.
- Over the course of the last 12 months, the Choice Provider Network has grown by 85 percent. The network now has over 350,000 providers and facilities.
- Improved timeliness of payments to community providers by removing the requirement that VA receive the Veteran's entire medical record prior to payment.
Reduced administrative burden for medical record submission for community providers by streamlining the documentation required.
- To enhance care coordination for Veterans, we have embedded contractor staff with VA staff at select locations.
- Created dedicated teams from across the county to deliver community care improvements.
- VA has also partnered with Congress to change laws to improve the community care experience by:
- Removing the enrollment date requirement for Choice, allowing more Veterans to receive community care.
- Implementing criteria of 40-mile driving distance from medical facility with primary care physician to increase number of Veterans accessing the program Implementing the unusual or excessive burden criteria to increase access for Veterans that do not meet other eligibility criteria.
- Expanding the episode of care authorization from 60 days to up to one year to reduce the administrative burdens of Veterans,community providers, and VA staff.

"VA needs Congress's continued support to keep driving progress forward," added VA Secretary Robert McDonald. "Several legislative barriers remain which inhibit improvements outlined in our Plan to Consolidate Community Care Programs."
(http://www.va.gov/opa/publications/VA_Community_Care_Report_11_03_2015.pdf)
###
Three Portland Men Arrested For Charges Related to Shooting in Columbia River Gorge- Hood River County * Update* (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/15/16 12:38 PM
2016-07/1002/96162/Steed_Photo.JPG
2016-07/1002/96162/Steed_Photo.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-07/1002/96162/thumb_Steed_Photo.JPG
Three Portland men were arrested on Wednesday July 13, 2016 on charges in relation to a shooting that happened on the night of Tuesday July 12, 2016 on Herman Creek Road near I-84 in Hood River County.

The three men, AUSTIN GREGORY STEED age 20, CHANCE COREY PINKARD age 19 and DESHONE JAHEEL BROOKS age 21, all residents from Portland, Oregon were all lodged at the Northern Oregon Regional Correctional Facility (NORCOR) in The Dalles on charges of Attempted Murder, Assault 1st degree and Robbery 1st Degree.

Preliminary investigation revealed that the three men drove to Herman Creek Road, which is near I-84 approximately 4 miles east of Cascade Locks on the night of Tuesday July 12, 2016. While at that location, the three met with CHARLES KANE JR., age 23 and CODY DALE RAU age 21, both from Portland, Oregon. KANE JR. and RAU had drove to the Herman Creek meeting site in separate vehicles. While at the Herman Creek location, KANE JR. was shot in the left arm.
KANE JR. and RAU left the scene in their vehicles and stopped along I-84 near the Wyeth interchange. From there, KANE JR. was transported to the Gresham area by RAU. KANE JR. and RAU were contacted by police in the Gresham area. KANE JR. was transported to Emmanuel Hospital in Portland where he was treated for non-life threatening injuries.

STEED, PICKARD and BROOKS were located in the area of the shooting by troopers from the Oregon State Police The Dalles Area Command and deputies from the Hood River Sheriff's Office.

An investigation into the shooting is ongoing at this time. The Oregon State Police was assisted by deputies and detectives from the Hood River Sheriff's Office and the Wasco County Sheriff's Office as well as the Hood River District Attorney. No further information will be released pending authorization from the Hood River District Attorney.

Photographs provided by Northern Oregon Regional Correctional Facility.

###

Previous Release:

Shooting Investigation - Hood River County - 07/13/16

The Oregon State Police (OSP) is investigating a shooting that occurred along I-84 on Herman Creek Road, in Hood River County.

On July 12, 2016 at approximately 11:30pm, The Skamania County Washington 911 center received a report that a subject had been shot along I-84 west of Hood River. The emergency call was passed onto Hood River 911 center. Officers were able to locate the injured subject and arrange for transport to Legacy Emanuel Medical Center in Portland for treatment of a non-life threatening gunshot wound.

Officers from OSP, the Wasco County Sheriff's Office and the Hood River Sheriff's Office are in the process of conducting an investigation into the shooting. While the investigation is continuing, information gathered indicates that there is no threat to the general public in relation to this incident.

Due to the ongoing nature of the investigation, no further information is available at this time.

###


Attached Media Files: 2016-07/1002/96162/Steed_Photo.JPG , 2016-07/1002/96162/Pinkard_photo.JPG , 2016-07/1002/96162/Brooks_Photo.JPG
ODVA Lowers 20-year Home Loan Rate to 2.50 percent
Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs - 07/15/16 10:06 AM
SALEM -- The Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs (ODVA) has lowered its competitive home loan rates and is now offering a 20-year fixed rate loan starting at 2.50 percent with a 1.375 percent origination fee (2.685 APR).

Additionally, the program's 30-year loan rate is now starting at 2.75 percent with a 1.375 percent origination fee (2.781 APR) or 3.00 percent (3.031 APR) with no origination fee.

The ORVET Home Loan Program is a state of Oregon veteran benefit and is separate from the federal VA home loan guaranty program. Even if a veteran has purchased a home using the federal VA program, they may still be eligible for an ORVET home loan.

"The ORVET Home Loan Program continues to provide veterans one of the lowest home loan interest rates available to qualified home buyers," said Cameron Smith, Director of the Oregon Department of Veterans' Affairs. "Our new rates remain competitive with today's market and continue to provide our veterans a great opportunity to buy a home."

The ORVET Home Loan is a lifetime benefit for eligible veterans with a maximum loan amount of $417,000 for a single family, owner occupied residence.

For more information about eligibility and rate details, contact ODVA's Home Loan Department at 888-673-8387, or visit www.oregon.gov/ODVA/HOMELOANS.

###
Wells Fargo reports $5.6 billion in quarterly net income
Wells Fargo - 07/15/16 7:58 AM
SAN FRANCISCO -- Wells Fargo & Company (NYSE:WFC) reported net income of $5.6 billion, or $1.01 per diluted common share, for second quarter 2016, compared with $5.7 billion, or $1.03 per share, for second quarter 2015, and $5.5 billion, or $0.99 per share, for first quarter 2016.

Chairman and CEO John Stumpf said, "Wells Fargo's second quarter results demonstrated our ability to generate consistent performance during periods of economic, capital markets and interest rate uncertainty. Compared with a year ago, we had solid growth in loans, deposits and customers, which are our fundamental drivers of long-term value. We also improved our efficiency ratio while continuing to reinvest in the franchise. We returned more capital to our shareholders in the quarter and were pleased to have received a non-objection to our 2016 Capital Plan from the Federal Reserve. We remain well positioned to continue to meet the financial needs of our customers."

Chief Financial Officer John Shrewsberry added, "Second quarter results benefited from our diversified business model, as demonstrated by higher linked-quarter net interest income, growth in many of our fee-based businesses and positive operating leverage. Earning assets increased in the second quarter, driven by growth in both loans and investment securities. Investment securities were up $18.5 billion in the second quarter, reflecting gross purchases of approximately $38 billion compared with $5 billion in first quarter. Second quarter purchases were made at interest rate levels above those available late in the quarter, after the 'Brexit' vote. We continue to have capacity for additional deployment of liquidity, but will remain disciplined in our investment approach. Capital remained strong with a net payout ratio of 62 percent in the quarter, as we returned $3.2 billion to shareholders through common stock dividends and net share repurchases."

To read the full earnings news release, go to wellsfargo.com.

# # #
Thu. 07/14/16
The Governor's Commission on Senior Services Executive Committee will meet Thursday, July 28 in Salem
Oregon Department of Human Services - 07/14/16 4:47 PM
The Governor's Commission on Senior Services Executive Committee will meet on Thursday, July 28, 2016 from 1 -- 2:30 p.m. at the Barbara Roberts Human Services Building, 500 Summer St. NE, Room 165, Salem. The meeting is open to the public.

The agenda includes regular commission business, a period for public comment announcements, commission appointments, a report out on the Pendleton Meet and Greet, and the creation of an agenda for August 11 joint meeting with the Oregon Disabilities Commission.

People can also call into the meeting or attend via webinar: Conference line: 888-363-4735; participant code: 3439085.

The meeting location is accessible to people with disabilities. For questions about accessibility or to request an accommodation, please contact Kelsey Gleeson at Kelsey.Gleeson@state.or.us. Requests should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting.

For questions about the meeting, please contact: Rebecca Arce, policy analyst at Rebecca.E.Arce@state.or.us.
Agencies extend deadline for Cleaner Air Oregon Advisory Committee application process to July 21
Oregon Health Authority - 07/14/16 4:40 PM
July 14, 2016

Portland -- The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality and the Oregon Health Authority are extending the deadline to July 21 for accepting applications for community stakeholder positions on the Cleaner Air Oregon Advisory Committee. The agencies have learned that an additional week is important to allow full participation.

The application process is the result of the two agencies' efforts align air toxics regulations with public health, based on community input from a 14-day comment period that closed May 27. That community input helped identify key additional positions on the advisory committee to better ensure representation of diverse community interests. Every public comment was factored into the process.

To fill the 10 open advisory committee positions, DEQ and OHA are seeking applications from qualified parties representing neighborhood groups, small businesses, unions and people with technical or academic expertise in pollution control or toxics.

These additional committee openings, along with 14 committee seats identified by DEQ and OHA, will help advise the agencies on the regulatory reform process. The goal of the advisory committee is to represent a diversity of state perspectives on air quality, including tribal entities health organizations, local government, environmental justice, industry, statewide environmental organizations and other affected groups.

In April Governor Kate Brown announced the launch of Cleaner Air Oregon, a new initiative to reform industrial air toxics regulations and align them with public health. DEQ and OHA have begun the formal rulemaking process to assemble the Cleaner Air Oregon Advisory Committee as part of the effort to engage the public in creating human health risk-based rules for industrial facilities, for consideration by the Environmental Quality Commission.

Those interested in applying for one of the open stakeholder positions on the advisory committee should complete and submit the application, which is available on the DEQ website at https://www.oregon.gov/deq/RulesandRegulations/Pages/Advisory/Acleanerair2017.aspx. The application period closes July 21 at 4 p.m.

To learn more about this rulemaking and the advisory committee you can visit the rulemaking web page at https://www.oregon.gov/deq/RulesandRegulations/Pages/2017/Rcleanerair2017.aspx

# # #
Board on Public Safety Standards and Training - Meeting Announcement
Oregon Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 07/14/16 1:41 PM
Board on Public Safety Standards and Training July 28, 2016 Notice of Regular Meeting

The Board on Public Safety Standards and Training will hold a regular meeting at 9:00 a.m. on Thursday, July 28, 2016 in the Boardroom at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem.

The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the hearing impaired must be made to Theresa Janda at least 48 hours before the meeting at
(503) 373-1553 or theresa.janda@state.or.us.

1. Welcome and Introductions

2. CONSENT AGENDA (The following items to be ratified by one vote)

A. Minutes - Approve minutes from the April 28, 2016 meeting.

B. Examination for Private and Provisional Investigator Applicants -- Approve. Adopt new bank of exam test questions and permission to alter questions. Vote to recommend to the Board by the PSIPC on May 17, 2016.

C. OAR 259-009-0087 -- Proposed Rule Change -- Approve. Accreditation of Fire Service agency training programs. Unanimous vote to recommend to the Board by the FPC on May 25, 2016.

D. OAR 259-009-0070 -- Proposed Rule Change -- Approve. Denial/revocation review process for Fire Service Professionals. Unanimous vote to recommend to the Board by the FPC on May 25, 2016.

E. OARs 259-009-0010 et al -- Proposed Rule Change -- Approve. Fire Service affiliation and Personnel Agency Form submission requirements. Unanimous vote to recommend to the Board by the FPC on May 25, 2016.

F. OARs 259-060-0025, 259-0060-0600, 259-061-0020 -- Proposed Rule Change -- Approve. Updates fingerprint submission process. Unanimous vote to recommend to the Board by the PSIPC on May 17, 2016.

G. OARs 259-060-0015 et al -- Proposed Rule Change and Adoption -- Approve. Responsibilities and compliance regarding use of prohibited business name. Unanimous vote to recommend to the Board by the PSIPC on May 17, 2016.

H. 2016 Corrections Job Task Analysis -- Approve, Unanimous vote to recommend to the Board by the CPC on May 10, 2016.

I. Aaron Bentley DPSST#F22508 (Bay City Fire Dept.) -- Revocation; Not allow re-certification in two years. Unanimous vote to recommend revocation and 6 - 1 vote to not allow application for re-certification in two years to the Board by the FPC on May 25, 2016.

J. Jamus Quintana DPSST#F28458 (Jackson Co Fire Dist. #1) -- Restore eligibility to apply for re-certification. Unanimous vote to recommend to the Board by the FPC on May 25, 2016.

K. Colby McCormick DPSST#F08057 -- Revocation, Unanimous vote to recommend to the Board by the FPC on May 25, 2016.

L. Ryan Heuberger DPSST#46266 (Mill Creek Correctional Inst.) -- Not Revoke; Not deny application for Intermediate Corrections Certification. Unanimous vote, with one recusal, to recommend to the Board by the CPC on May 10, 2016.

M. Whitney Durham DPSST#53595 (Coffee Creek Correctional Inst.) -- Revocation, Unanimous vote to recommend to the Board by the CPC on May 10, 2016.

N. Alonzo Rowell DPSST#36386 (Oregon State Penitentiary) - Not Revoke, Unanimous vote, with one recusal to recommend to the Board by the CPC on May 10, 2016.

O. Marvin Hoover DPSST#16862 (Clatskanie Police Dept.) -- Revocation, Unanimous vote, with two recusals, to recommend to the Board by the PPC on May 19, 2016.

P. Thomas Ammon DPSST#56067 (Salem Police Dept.) -- Not deny application for training and certification. Unanimous vote, with one recusal, to recommend to the Board by the PPC on May 19, 2016.

Q. Shane Beamish DPSST#49072 (Jefferson Co. Sheriff's Office) -- Revocation, Unanimous vote to recommend to the Board by the PPC on May 19, 2016.

R. Henry Filipponi DPSST#49765 (Ontario Police Department) -- Revocation, Unanimous vote to recommend to the Board by the PPC on May 19, 2016.

S. Brian Schmid DPSST#28724 (Washington County Sheriff's Office) -- Revocation, Unanimous vote, with three recusals, to recommend to the Board by the PPC on May 19, 2016.

T. Executive Committee Minutes - Approve Minutes from June 9, 2016.

U. Committee Appointments - Corrections Policy Committee - Carol Dishion -- Appointment to replace Tami Jackson on the CPC; 1st term effective 7/23/16.

3. Add Jason Goodding's name to Memorial Wall at 2017 Fallen Law Enforcement Memorial ceremony -- Approve, Unanimous vote to recommend to the Board by the PPC May 19, 2016.

4. Add Mark James Burns name to Memorial Wall at 2016 Fallen Fire Fighter Memorial ceremony -- Approve, Unanimous vote to recommended to the Board by the FPC May 25, 2016.

5. 2017-2019 Agency Request Budget

6. 2017-2019 5% and 10% Budget Reduction

7. Director's Report - Director Gabliks

8. Policy Committee Update

9. Next Meeting Date: October 27, 2016


Requires a vote by the Board.


# Background Information about the Board and Department #

The Board consists of 24 members representing city, county and state public safety professionals representing each of the disciplines (police, fire, 9-1-1, corrections, private security), and a private citizen appointed by the Governor. The current Board Chair is Sheriff Jason Myers of the Marion County Sheriff's Office. The Board includes administrators as well as non-management representatives from statewide organizations. The Board represents more than 40,000 public safety professionals and establishes minimum standards for the training and certification of city, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security/private investigator providers, and makes determinations on waiver requests. The Board is supported by six policy committees and a number of sub-committees representing the public safety disciplines, which provide technical expertise and serve as vital links to public safety organizations. The Board operates in close partnership with the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST).

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) implements minimum standards established by the Board for training and certification of city, county, tribal and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers. DPSST provides training to more than 20,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director of DPSST.
The Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services Advisory Executive Committee will meet Wednesday, July 27 in Salem
Oregon Department of Human Services - 07/14/16 11:21 AM
The Oregon Deaf and Hard of Hearing Services Advisory Committee will meet on Wednesday, July 27, 2016 from 3:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. at the Barbara Roberts Human Services Building, Room 165, 500 Summer St. NE, Salem. The meeting is open to the public.

The agenda includes regular commission business, election of the co-chair position, and an overview on expenditures from the last fiscal year.

People can also call into the meeting: 1-888-808-6929; participant code: 4517555.

The meeting location is accessible to people with disabilities. For questions about accessibility or to request an accommodation, please contact Kelsey Gleeson at Kelsey.Gleeson@state.or.us. Requests should be made at least 48 hours before the event.

For questions about the meeting, please contact: Theresa Powell, policy analyst at Theresa.A.Powell@state.or.us
Oregon Lottery recognized nationally for responsible gambling program
Oregon Lottery - 07/14/16 10:33 AM
The Oregon Lottery recently took home top honors from the National Council on Problem Gambling and La Fleur's for its on-going efforts to promote responsible gambling and connect problem gamblers to treatment.

Last week the National Council on Problem Gambling recognized the Oregon Lottery with its highest award for corporate citizenship. The council will present its annual Corporate Responsibility Award to the Oregon Lottery at the 30th National Conference on Problem Gambling in Tarrytown, NY Friday, July 15. Acting Director Barry Pack will accept the award for the Lottery. The council's Corporate Responsibility Award recognizes an organization that demonstrates an outstanding commitment to social responsibility as it relates to responsible and problem gambling programs in the past year.

"The Oregon State Lottery is to be commended on being selected as the recipient of the National Council on Problem Gambling Corporate Social Responsibility Award," said Dr. Tom Moore, executive director of the Oregon Council on Problem Gambling. "The Lottery's efforts to successfully integrate responsible gambling strategies at all levels of the organization and to engage in extensive public education regarding responsible gambling along with the availability of treatment for gamblers and their family members is exemplary."

La Fleur's, a trade publication for lotteries worldwide, honored the Oregon Lottery at its June 2016 Global Lottery Forum in Vancouver, B.C. with the La Fleur's Sustainability Award for Corporate Social Responsibility for the agency's responsible gambling efforts.

"Over the past several years, the Oregon Lottery has increased the level of collaboration with the responsible gambling and problem gambling community," said Acting Director Barry Pack. "Working with the Oregon Council on Problem Gambling, the Oregon Health Authority and other key stakeholder groups, together we can help mitigate adverse effects of gambling and create a common agenda of activities to promote responsible gambling."

Helping guide and direct the Lottery's responsible and problem gambling efforts is the agency's Responsible Gambling Code of Practice, which was adopted in 2014. "The code spells out how the Lottery will approach mitigating the potential harm from gambling," said Lottery Responsible Gambling Consultant Stacy Shaw. "Examples include providing information and tools to help players make informed choices and play responsibly and ensuring that players and their families know about free treatment."

Oregon Lottery proceeds provide funding for free, confidential and effective problem gambling treatment programs statewide. Since 1992, over $81 million in Lottery funds has been directed to fund problem gambling treatment. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org

###
Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board to meet July 21 in Salem
Oregon Health Authority - 07/14/16 9:41 AM
July 14, 2016

Program contact: Jacee Vangestel, 503-945-2852, jacee.m.vangestel@state.or.us

What: Public meeting of the Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board

When: Thursday, July 21, 1-5 p.m.

Where: Callan Conference Room, Kirkbride Building, third floor, Oregon State Hospital, 2600 Center Street NE. The public also can attend via toll-free conference line at 1-877-848-7030, participant code 297588.

Agenda: Background check policy for visiting family and friends; peer services; status of superintendent recruitment; Senate Bill 469 on mandatory overtime; board membership and attendance; retreat plans; superintendent's update; public comments

Details: The Oregon State Hospital Advisory Board advises the superintendent, agency director and legislators on issues related to the safety, security and care of patients. Members include consumers, providers, advocates, legislators, community members, consumer families and OSH union members.

The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. To request alternate formats, sign language interpreters, physical accessibility, or other reasonable accommodations, call the Oregon Health Authority at 1-800-282-8096 at least 48 hours before the meeting.

For more information, see the board's website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/osh/Pages/advisory-board.aspx.

# # #
Wells Fargo to Announce Second Quarter 2016 Earnings July 15
Wells Fargo - 07/14/16 8:57 AM
Wells Fargo & Company (NYSE: WFC) is scheduled to announce its second quarter 2016 earnings on Friday, July 15, at 5 a.m. The news release will be available at www.wellsfargo.com.

The company will host a live conference call on Friday, July 15, at 7 a.m. You may participate by dialing (866) 872-5161. The call will also be available at https://www.wellsfargo.com/about/investor-relations/quarterly-earnings/ and at https://engage.vevent.com/rt/wells_fargo_ao~071516

A replay of the conference call will be available beginning at 10 a.m. on July 15 through Friday, July 29. Dial (855) 859-2056 and enter Conference ID #96514871. The replay will also be available at https://www.wellsfargo.com/about/investor-relations/quarterly-earnings/ and at https://engage.vevent.com/rt/wells_fargo_ao~071516.

About Wells Fargo
Wells Fargo & Company is a diversified, community-based financial services company with $1.8 trillion in assets. Founded in 1852 and headquartered in San Francisco, Wells Fargo provides banking, insurance, investments, mortgage, and consumer and commercial finance through 8,800 locations, 13,000 ATMs, the internet (wellsfargo.com) and mobile banking, and has offices in 36 countries to support customers who conduct business in the global economy.

# # #
High Visibility DUII Saturation Event - Oregon Country Fair - Veneta July 8 - 10, 2016 *Update-Results
Oregon State Police - 07/14/16 8:49 AM
The Oregon State Police (OSP) along with Lane County Sheriff's Office, Springfield Police Department, and Eugene Police Department, were out in force this past weekend in Veneta. With the assistance of Lane County District Attorneys, Law Enforcement Officers were cracking down on impaired drivers and today reported the results of its highly effective DUII saturation during the Oregon Country Fair.

A total of fourteen (14) drivers were arrested for Driving Under the Influence of Intoxicants (DUII) during the Country Fair's weekend. Seven of those arrested for DUII were under the influence of Marijuana. The remaining seven arrests were for alcohol. The participating officers focused on extra patrol in Veneta and surrounding towns only. This included Veneta, Elmira, Noti, and Loraine.

Arrests were also made for:

Possession of Methamphetamine (2 counts)
Possession of Cocaine
Arrest warrants (2 counts)

During the Event's saturation times (Friday, July 8th through Sunday, July 10th from 6 pm to 12 am each night), there were two reported crashes on 126W. One collision occurred within the saturation area. The second crash was approximately 10 miles west of the Oregon Country Fair's location. Both crashes were fair related and the drivers were determined not impaired.

###
Cooperation between Forest Service, ODF on Board of Forestry's July 20 meeting agenda
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/14/16 8:44 AM
The Oregon Board of Forestry will receive an update from Regional Forester Jim Pena on topics involving cooperation between the Department of Forestry and the U.S. Forest Service when it meets July 20 in Salem. The top official of the Forest Service's Pacific Northwest Region will discuss Good Neighbor Authority, a provision in the 2014 Farm Bill that allows the Forest Service to authorize state foresters to conduct management activities on federal forestlands. He will also cover preparation for the 2016 fire season.

Other highlight items on the agenda include:

MARBLED MURRELET RULEMAKING PETITION -- The board will review and discuss the Petition to Initiate Rulemaking under specified resource sites for the marbled murrelet, received June 21. Private Forests' staff will outline board options and a timeline for response.

SPECIFIED RESOURCE SITES' RULEMAKING FOR BALD EAGLES -- The board will consider whether continued protection is warranted under the Oregon Forest Practices Act for bald eagle foraging perch, winter roosting, and nesting sites. The eagle is no longer listed as "threatened," so changes to the FPA rules are needed.

RIPARIAN RULE ANALYSIS/SALMON-STEELHEAD-BULL TROUT RULEMAKING -- Private Forests' staff will provide an update on the riparian rulemaking advisory committee's work to date.

UPDATE ON STATE FORESTS' PRIORITIES -- State Forests' staff will provide an update on budget reductions, revisions to implementations plans, and other key work underway in the State Forests Division.

FOREST TRUST LAND ADVISORY COMMITTEE TESTIMONY -- The FTLAC, a group of county commissioners representing the 15 Oregon counties that transferred their lands to the state to become State Forests, will give testimony to the board on matters related to the State Forests, which are managed by ODF.

FEDERAL FORESTS SUBCOMMITTEE DISCUSSION -- The board will receive an update on the work of its subcommittee, which focused on supporting the increased pace, scale and quality of restoration and management of federal forests in Oregon.

2016 FIRE SEASON UPDATE -- ODF Fire Protection staff will provide a status report on the Oregon wildfire season, including fire activity, weather and resource readiness.

2017-19 BIENNIAL BUDGET APPROVAL -- The board will consider for approval ODF's Agency Request Budget for the 2017-19 biennium. If approved, the proposed budget would then be submitted to the Department of Administrative Services.

EXECUTIVE SESSION -- As the last item on the agenda, the board will meet in executive session to consult with legal counsel on topics related to pending litigation. The session will be closed to the public, in accordance with Oregon Revised Statute 192.660(2)(h).

The meeting is open to the public and a public comment period is on the agenda. The meeting will run from 9 a.m. to approximately 4:30 p.m. in the Tillamook Room, Administration Building C, at the Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters, located at 2600 State St., in Salem. Agenda materials will be available prior to the meeting at: www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/BOFMeetings.aspx

Accommodations for people with disabilities, and special materials, services or assistance can be arranged by calling the Department's Public Affairs Office at least 48 hours in advance, at 503-945-7200.

The Board of Forestry consists of seven citizens nominated by the Governor and confirmed by the Oregon Senate. Responsibilities include appointing the State Forester, setting management direction for state-owned forests, adopting rules governing timber harvest and other practices on private forestland, and promoting sustainable management of Oregon's 30 million-acre forestland base.

More information on the Board is available at: www.oregon.gov/ODF/Board/Pages/AboutBOF.aspx
Wed. 07/13/16
More Photos - I-5 truck fire south of Ashland (Photo)
ODOT: SW Oregon - 07/13/16 6:29 PM
2016-07/1202/96108/bananas_4.JPG
2016-07/1202/96108/bananas_4.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-07/1202/96108/thumb_bananas_4.JPG
Interstate 5, MP 10- south of Ashland, NB: Traffic is open again at Exit 1. Slow lane closure in effect from MP 8-10 after a truck fire. Expect delays. Watch for crews working in slow lane and shoulder.
As of 6:30 p.m. July 13, 2016


Attached Media Files: 2016-07/1202/96108/bananas_4.JPG , 2016-07/1202/96108/bananas_3.jpg , 2016-07/1202/96108/Bananas_2.jpg
Regular meeting for Oregon Affordable Housing Assistance Corporation (OAHAC)
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 07/13/16 3:35 PM
Board of Directors of Oregon Affordable Housing Assistance Corporation
Date: July 20, 2016
Time: 3:00 p.m. PDT,
Location: Conference Room 322
Oregon Housing and Community Services Department
725 Summer Street NE, Suite B
Salem, Oregon 97301-1266.
Purpose: To discuss general business matters, program updates, and to take any action related thereto or take such other action that the Board of Directors of the Corporation deem appropriate.
Agenda:
Call to Order
Program Updates
Public Comment
Omnibus Resolution
Adjourn
Oregon Health Policy Board to meet July 15 at OHSU in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 07/13/16 2:13 PM
July 13, 2016

Contact: Jeff Scroggin, 541-999-6983 (meeting information or accommodations)

Includes discussions of HB 3396 (health care provider incentives) and SB 440 (statewide data planning and use)

The Oregon Health Policy Board will hold its monthly meeting July 15 at the OHSU Center for Health and Healing in Portland. The board will hear regular updates, and discuss provider incentives and statewide data planning.

When: Friday, July 15, 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Where: OHSU Center for Health & Healing, 3033 SW Bond Ave., third floor, Room 4. The meeting also will be available via live web stream. A link to the live-stream and a recording of the meeting will be posted on the board's meeting page at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/OHPB/Pages/2016-OHPB-Meetings.aspx. Members of the public also can call in to listen by dialing 1-888-808-6929, participant code 915042#.

Agenda: Welcome; director's report; HB 3396, provider incentives; SB 440, data planning and use

For more information on the meeting, visit the board's meeting page at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/OHPB/Pages/2016-OHPB-Meetings.aspx.

The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. To request alternate formats, sign language interpreters, physical accessibility, or other reasonable accommodations, call the Oregon Health Authority at 1-800-282-8096 at least 48 hours before the meeting.

# # #
Active telephone scammers
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/13/16 1:37 PM
Lt. DeLuca Deschutes County Sheriff's Office

There are still active telephone scammers working the Central Oregon area saying they are calling from the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office or other local law enforcement agency.This person will say that there is a warrant or some kind of fine related to the missed court date.

Most recently victims are instructed to go to Fred Meyer, Wal Mart has also been used in the past, and purchase some type of loadable charge card or debit card, then load that card with a specified amount of money.

The suspect will then instruct the victim to give them the card number over the phone. The suspect using the number alone can withdraw all the money attached to that card almost immediately. The money is generally taken by someone outside of the United States and it is not recoverable by law enforcement.

This is another reminder that NO LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCY WILL CALL YOU ON THE TELEPHONE AND ASK FOR MONEY OR INSTRUCT ANYONE TO LOAD A CREDIT/DEBIT CARD FOR THEM. IF YOU RECEIVE ANY PHONE CALLS REGARDING THIS ISSUE OR HAVE ANY QUESTIONS CALL OUR DISPATCH CENTER (541-693-6911) PRIOR TO FOLLOWING ANY INSTRUCTIONS REGARDING THIS TYPE OF ACTIVITY.
AGC/SAIF program returns $2.5 million to participating businesses
SAIF Corporation - 07/13/16 12:30 PM
SUMMARY: The retro program return amounts to 8.3 percent for 665 Oregon companies in construction and related industries.



Salem, OR -- Oregon businesses that participate in the Associated General Contractors (AGC)/SAIF Workers' Compensation Program will receive a $2.5 million retrospective return on their 2014-15 plan year premium.

Six hundred and sixty-five AGC employers in construction and related industries participate in the joint program with SAIF. The program emphasizes safety awareness and injury prevention to help to make Oregon construction workplaces safer.

At 8.3 percent, this year's retro return is smaller than in previous years due to several serious injuries. The need to stay ever-vigilant about safety is of the utmost concern for AGC, its members, and SAIF. In the program's 24 years of evaluation, returns have totaled more than $169 million.

In total, more than $3.4 million will be returned to members participating in the AGC/SAIF Program. This includes the retro return, medical reimbursements, and credits resulting from adjustments to Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services premium assessments.

"This year's results may not be as strong as in the past, but because of the outstanding collaboration between workers, employers, agents, AGC, and SAIF, we're still able to return $2.5 million to these Oregon companies," said SAIF Marketing and Groups Director Christy Witzke. "We'll continue to look for ways to protect workers and get to our goal of zero injuries."

The return will be distributed in August 2016.

ABOUT SAIF
SAIF is Oregon's not-for-profit workers' compensation insurance company. A lot of life happens at the workplace, and at SAIF we're proud to be a part of it. Learn more at saif.com/about.
Shooting Investigation - Hood River County
Oregon State Police - 07/13/16 11:40 AM
The Oregon State Police (OSP) is investigating a shooting that occurred along I-84 on Herman Creek Road, in Hood River County.

On July 12, 2016 at approximately 11:30pm, The Skamania County Washington 911 center received a report that a subject had been shot along I-84 west of Hood River. The emergency call was passed onto Hood River 911 center. Officers were able to locate the injured subject and arrange for transport to Legacy Emanuel Medical Center in Portland for treatment of a non-life threatening gunshot wound.

Officers from OSP, the Wasco County Sheriff's Office and the Hood River Sheriff's Office are in the process of conducting an investigation into the shooting. While the investigation is continuing, information gathered indicates that there is no threat to the general public in relation to this incident.

Due to the ongoing nature of the investigation, no further information is available at this time.

###
Metrics and Scoring Committee to meet July 15 in Wilsonville
Oregon Health Authority - 07/13/16 9:12 AM
July 13, 2016

Contact: Pamela Naylor, 503-559-2216 (meeting information or accommodations)

What: The regular public meeting of the Oregon Health Authority Metrics and Scoring Committee

When: Friday, July 15, 2016, 9 a.m. to noon. Public testimony will be heard at 10:15 a.m.

Where: Clackamas Community College Wilsonville Training Center, Room 210 29353 SW Town Center Loop E, Wilsonville.

Attendees can also join through a listen-only conference line at 1-888-204-5984, participant code 1277166.

Agenda: Welcome and consent agenda; 2015 Metrics Final Report presentation; public testimony; 2017 measure selection; review 2015 metrics by race and ethnicity.

For more information, please visit the committee's website at http://www.oregon.gov/oha/analytics/Pages/Metrics-Scoring-Committee.aspx.

The meeting site is accessible to people with disabilities. To request alternate formats, sign language interpreters, physical accessibility, or other reasonable accommodations, call the Oregon Health Authority at 1-800-282-8096 at least 48 hours before the meeting.

# # #
Tue. 07/12/16
OSP Seeking Public's Assistance in the Shooting of Livestock - Klamath County
Oregon State Police - 07/12/16 3:33 PM
The Oregon State Police Fish & Wildlife Division is asking for the public's help to identify the person(s) responsible for shooting of livestock in Klamath County.

On Friday, July 8, 2016, a cow was shot on the 106 road near Camp Four in Klamath County. The incident was witnessed by Oregon Department of Forestry personnel. The suspect was described as a white male adult, heavier build, wearing shorts and no shoes. He was operating an older Ford Taurus or Chevy Cavalier, light grey or white in color and with several stickers at the top of the rear window. Evidence was collected at the scene and the investigation is on-going.

On Monday, July 11, 2016, OSP troopers investigated two more deceased cows near the 100 line road at Spencer Creek. Those may have been shot as well and the investigation is on-going.

Anyone with information regarding this case is asked to contact OSP Sergeant Dennis Yaws at (541) 883-5713 extension 321. Information may be kept anonymous.

###
Streamside (Riparian) Rulemaking Advisory Sub-Committee meets July 22
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/12/16 2:22 PM
The Riparian Rulemaking Advisory Committee voted June 21 to assign a subcommittee the task of finalizing rule language for the streamside buffers associated with salmon, steelhead and bull trout streams. The advisory panel to the Board of Forestry will meet 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 22 at Oregon Department of Forestry headquarters, the Santiam Room -- Building D, 2600 State St., in Salem.

The subcommittee plans to discuss elements of administrative rules that need further work, refine the rule language package as it is presented to the subcommittee, and clarify any disagreements. The subcommittee will provide input to ODF for drafting rules that the Board of Forestry will consider as it implements its decision to increase streamside shade buffers along some fish-bearing streams in western Oregon.

This is a public meeting that includes opportunities to provide comment at the beginning and end of the meeting. The meeting is accessible to persons with disabilities. Interpreter requests for the hearing impaired and other accommodations should be made by July 21, 2016. For more information about attending the meeting, please contact Susan Dominique, ODF, 503-945-7502.
***Update 3*** Police Continuing Officer Involved Shooting Investigation - Polk County
Oregon State Police - 07/12/16 1:53 PM
Update #3:

The investigation into the July 5th officer involved shooting in Polk County is continuing.

The involved Polk County Deputy has been identified as Deputy Casey Gibson, age 28. Deputy Gibson has approximately three years of law enforcement service and was uninjured in the incident.

The suspect who was fatally shot in the encounter, has been identified as Joshua Bolster, age 29, of Salem.

No further information to be released at this time.

###

Previously Released:

An Oregon State Trooper arrived on scene in response to requests for assistance by Polk County Deputies after shots had been fired. The arriving Trooper took part in the attempts to take the injured suspect into custody, who was still not complying with officers commands, and employed less lethal means to do so.

###

On the evening of July 5th 2016, the Monmouth Police Department responded to a call for service to an apartment complex regarding a male suspect who was trespassing and harassing an ex-girlfriend at that location. When Monmouth Police Department officers arrived at the scene, they learned that the male suspect had left the scene and had been involved in a confrontation with a male tenant of the apartments in which the suspect pulled out a knife.

The Monmouth Police Department sent an attempt to locate to the local agencies in the area with the suspect's information and a description of his vehicle. The Monmouth Police Department told the local agencies they had probable cause to arrest the suspect for Trespassing and Menacing and the suspect was believed to be armed with a knife.

Polk County Sheriff's Office Deputies set up on Highway 22W near Doaks Ferry Rd. looking for the suspect and his vehicle. Polk County Sheriff's Deputies subsequently stopped the vehicle and began giving commands to the suspect in an attempt effect an arrest. An Oregon State Trooper also responded to the scene to assist. During the confrontation the Trooper deployed less lethal force options. A Deputy fired shots and the suspect was injured. Medical aid was rendered to the suspect and he was transported to the Salem Hospital where he was treated for his injuries. The suspect later succumbs to his injuries at the Salem Hospital.

Following the Polk County Senate Bill 111 Officer Involved Shooting protocols, the Polk County Inter-agency Major Crimes Team was contacted and it was decided the Oregon State Police would be the lead agency for this investigation.

Agencies who assisted on scene were Salem Fire, Falck Ambulance, Polk County District Attorney's Office, Independence Police and Monmouth Police.

This is an ongoing investigation and more information will be released when it becomes available.

###

On July 5, 2016 at about 9:45 p.m., the Polk County Sheriff's Office was on a citizen contact on Highway 22 near milepost 23 (Holman Frontage Road) when they requested backup. Shortly after the deputy advised there had been shots fired and the subject was down.

The adult male was taken to an area hospital where he died from his injuries. Highway 22 was closed for several hours while the investigation was conducted.

The Oregon State Police is the lead investigating agency. More information will be released as it becomes available.

###
Department of Corrections 65-year partnership with Department of Forestry (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 07/12/16 1:42 PM
2016-07/1070/96064/SFFC_2.jpg
2016-07/1070/96064/SFFC_2.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-07/1070/96064/thumb_SFFC_2.jpg
The Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) and the Oregon Department of Forestry (ODF) recently completed their annual fire school for adults in custody assigned to outside fire crews. This year, the two agencies continue a successful partnership into their 65th year; DOC's South Fork Forest Camp (SFFC) in Tillamook has been jointly operating with ODF since 1951. Together the two agencies provide training, skills, and mentorship to adults in custody.

ODF fire personnel joined with DOC staff to conduct week-long training courses for inmates selected through a careful screening process. Inmate crews are provided classroom and field exercises to obtain their nationally-recognized Firefighter II certification -- a certification identical to that of agency and private firefighters. In addition to those working the fire lines, other inmates are specially trained in food service operations to serve meals to thousands of firefighters stationed at fire camps, and to provide equipment repair.

The 2015 wildfire season proved challenging for DOC staff and inmates, who participated in 40 fires around the state, working side-by-side with other agencies and contract firefighters. As this year's fire season gets under way, DOC and ODF are trained and ready to serve. Not only does the fire program save the state millions of dollars, it provides DOC's low-risk offenders with the tools they need for future work opportunities, which helps prepare them for re-entry into the community.

"Forestry considers South Fork Forest Camp an investment and relies on the value of production to be greater than the costs to run the program," said Nathan Seable, ODF Camp Manager. "In a given year, we can produce 28,000 man days of labor in support of reforestation, recreation maintenance, and wildfire suppression on state forest lands."

"We are extremely proud of our long-standing, mutually beneficial partnership with Forestry," said DOC Director Colette S. Peters. "The adults in DOC's custody who participate in fire season gain essential skills and experience, which are vital to successful reintegration from prison to home. ODF gains talented, qualified workers who enhance their workforce while reducing overall costs to taxpayers. Together we accomplish great things and are proud to serve the citizens of Oregon."

SFFC is minimum-security work camp that houses approximately 200 male inmates who are within four years of release. Part of SFFC's mission is to supply a ready work force to combat forest or wild fires throughout the state. Crews provide critical support for statewide fire operations, recreation, and reforestation, as well as provide support for special projects such as sign making, metal fabrication, and tool or equipment repair. SFFC was established in 1951 and is a satellite facility to CRCI and managed jointly with the Oregon Department of Forestry. It is located approximately 28 miles east of Tillamook, just off of Highway 6 along the Wilson River in the Tillamook Forest.



###


Attached Media Files: 2016-07/1070/96064/SFFC_2.jpg , 2016-07/1070/96064/SFFC_1.jpg
Single Vehicle Fatal Crash on Highway 18 - Lincoln County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/12/16 1:06 PM
Photo
Photo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-07/1002/96063/thumb_20160712_041801.jpg
On July 12th, 2016 at about 2:59 a.m., OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a single vehicle crash on Highway 18 near milepost 3.5 (north of Lincoln City).

Preliminary investigation reveals a white in color 15-passenger GMC van, was traveling westbound when it departed the highway and for unknown reasons, striking several large trees and catching fire. The driver was transported to North Lincoln Hospital and immediately flown to Legacy Emmanuel in Portland for treatment of serious injuries. The right front passenger was found deceased in the burnt van. Alcohol may have been a contributing factor.

Highway 18 was closed completely for approximately 8 hours. Traffic was re-routed onto North Bank Road during that time. The highway was opened briefly a few times to let commercial motor vehicles clear.

OSP was assisted by the Oregon Department of Transportation, Lincoln County Sheriff's Office, North Lincoln Fire and Rescue and Pacific West Ambulance.

More information will be released when available as the investigation is continuing and names will be released pending notification to next of kin.

###


Attached Media Files: Photo
Mon. 07/11/16
Oregon Civil Air Patrol to Conduct Search and Rescue Exercise July 15, 16, and 17 (Photo)
Oregon Civil Air Patrol - 07/11/16 7:36 PM
Civil Air Patrol takes to the air in a training exercise that will be evaluated by the U.S. Air Force.
Civil Air Patrol takes to the air in a training exercise that will be evaluated by the U.S. Air Force.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-07/1184/96039/thumb_Airborne-2.jpg
The Oregon wing of the Civil Air Patrol (CAP) will be conducting its annual statewide training exercise, evaluated by the U.S. Air Force, on July 15, 16, and 17. The training will have an incident command post at Aurora airport, with aircrews and aircraft flying out of Aurora, Bend, and Medford airports.

The statewide search and rescue exercise (SAREX) is designed to train for, and test, the preparedness of the Oregon CAP to respond to various emergency incidents. These emergency incidents include: air and ground searches for missing people and/or aircraft, digital photo reconnaissance, emergency medical support flights, transportation of critical supplies, and other tasks that local, state, or federal authorities may request. At this SAREX, U.S. Air Force evaluators will be providing simulated scenarios and problems for the CAP members to respond to and resolve.

While adult members of the Oregon CAP will participate in all aspects of the SAREX, in both air and ground operations, the SAREX also utilizes the CAP's cadet members. The cadets, who range in age from 12 to 21,will participate in much of the support operations during the SAREX. Cadets participate in communications, mission base operations, ground search operations, and flight line crew. All cadets work under the supervision of a qualified adult member.

Civil Air Patrol is the official volunteer auxiliary of the U.S. Air Force, and the newest member of the U.S. Air Force's Total Force. In its search-and-rescue capacity, CAP performs approximately 85% of in-land search missions, as tasked by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center. Approximately 75-100 people are saved each year by CAP members.

In addition to performing search-and-rescue missions, the Civil Air Patrol also performs homeland security, disaster relief, and counter drug missions, when requested to do so by local, state, and federal agencies. CAP also provides aerospace education and leadership mentoring to its cadet members.

For more information on CAP, please visit http://www.gocivilairpatrol.com/


Attached Media Files: Civil Air Patrol takes to the air in a training exercise that will be evaluated by the U.S. Air Force.
Video: Celebrity Athletes, Credit Unions Golf Tournament Raises up to $1 Million for Children's Miracle Network Hospitals
Northwest Credit Union Assn. - 07/11/16 3:18 PM
B roll and interviews are provided for media's unrestricted use.
Video link: (and in attached word doc)
https://www.dropbox.com/s/nsrglhg1e3an6sj/nwcua-davedanVOSOT-v1.mov?dl=0

An all star line up of Hall of Famers, football, basketball and baseball legends partnered with area credit unions to raise an expected $ 1 million for Children's Miracle Network hospitals.

First Tech Federal Credit Union today presented the "Dave & Dan Classic" -- a golf tournament named for NFL Hall of Famers Dave Wilcox and Dan Fouts. The event benefits "Credit Unions for Kids," a national charity formed here in the Northwest 30 years ago.

First Tech President and CEO Greg Mitchell said he expects the final fundraising total today will exceed the $1 million goal and set a tournament record.

Since its inception, Credit Unions for Kids has raised over $150 million for CMN hospitals nationwide. The money supports groundbreaking research, patient and family services, facilities and medical equipment.

The money raised at the Dave and Dan today will benefit six CMN hospitals in Oregon, Washington, California and Colorado, states where First Tech operations are located.
Location:
Pumpkin Ridge Golf Club
North Plains, OR

Sound with:
Greg Mitchell
President & CEO, First Tech Federal Credit Union

Dave Wilcox
San Francisco 49ers Linebacker, 1964-1974

Dan Fouts
San Diego Chargers Quarterback, 1973-1987


Celebrity list attached.

Tournament website:
http://www.daveanddangolf.org/


Attached Media Files: 2016-07/4992/96034/Dave_and_Dan_Program_2016_0616_Bios.pdf , 2016-07/4992/96034/Dave__and__Dan_for_media.docx
Client and Staff Safety Task Force will meet July 11 in Salem
Oregon Department of Human Services - 07/11/16 10:47 AM
The Client and Staff Safety Task Force is meeting Monday, July 11, 2016, 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Oregon State Capitol, Hearing Room 50, 900 Court Street NE, in Salem. This meeting is open to the public.

The conference call number for those who are unable to attend in person is: or by conference call 1-888-636-3807, Participant Code 229664#.

The task force is directed to make recommendations on staff safety, resident care, and the operation of Stabilization and Crisis Units. The task force will meet approximately six times and provide a report to the Legislature by September 15, 2016.
The task force will consider and make recommendations for:
Ensuring the dignity and self-determination of each resident in a Stabilization and Crisis Unit
Improving the safety of staff employed by a Stabilization and Crisis Unit
Improving the training and support for staff
Staffing levels
Reducing incidents of aggressive and assaultive behavior by residents
Reducing the need for staff to work overtime
Improving access to appropriate mental health supports and intervention methods
Ensuring the timely transition of residents in Stabilization and Crisis Units when ready to be placed with a residential service provider in the community, including recommendations for building capacity in community-based care settings.

An agenda is attached.

All meetings of this task force will conform to Oregon public meetings laws. Request for an accommodation for a person with disabilities should be made to Angie Allbee and should be made at least 24 hours in advance of the meeting. For more information, contact Angie Allbee, DHS Legislative Coordinator, at 503-689-5034.
# # #


Attached Media Files: Agenda for July 11, 2016
Sun. 07/10/16
Oregon National Guard participates in patriotic military tribute at KISS concert (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 07/10/16 4:55 PM
2016-07/962/96011/160709-Z-ZJ128-014.JPG
2016-07/962/96011/160709-Z-ZJ128-014.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-07/962/96011/thumb_160709-Z-ZJ128-014.JPG
160709-Z-ZJ128-014: Members of the Oregon Army National Guard prepare to go on stage with the band KISS during the "Freedom to Rock" concert at Matthew Knight Arena in Eugene, Oregon, July 9, 2016. The Oregon National Guard Soldiers displayed the American flag while KISS performed the National Anthem and led the audience in the Pledge of Allegiance during a patriotic tribute to U.S. military and veterans at the concert. From left: Sgt. Jeffrey Cox, of Salem, with Detachment 1, Company A, 1-112th Aviation; Staff Sgt. Valerie Dean, of Salem, with Joint Force Headquarters; Sgt. Jerald Bone, of Newport, with Detachment 1, 224th Engineer Company; and Sgt. Jamie Kisch, of Salem, with Company A, 141st Brigade Support Battalion. (Photo by Maj. W. Chris Clyne, Oregon Army National Guard)

160709-Z-ZJ128-018: Members of the Oregon Army National Guard display the American flag on stage behind Paul Stanley, with the band KISS, as he leads the audience in the Pledge of Allegiance during the "Freedom to Rock" concert at Matthew Knight Arena in Eugene, Oregon, July 9, 2016. The Oregon National Guard Soldiers also displayed the American flag while KISS performed the National Anthem during a patriotic tribute to U.S. military and veterans at the concert. (Photo by Maj. W. Chris Clyne, Oregon Army National Guard)

160709-Z-ZJ128-020: Paul Stanley, with the band KISS, applauds the Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers displaying the American flag on stage during the "Freedom to Rock" concert at Matthew Knight Arena in Eugene, Oregon, July 9, 2016. Oregon National Guard Soldiers provided a color guard while KISS performed the National Anthem and Pledge of Allegiance during a patriotic tribute to U.S. military and veterans at the concert. (Photo by Maj. W. Chris Clyne, Oregon Army National Guard)

160709-Z-ZJ128-021: Members of the Oregon Army National Guard display the American flag on stage while the band KISS performs the National Anthem during the "Freedom to Rock" concert at Matthew Knight Arena in Eugene, Oregon, July 9, 2016. The Oregon National Guard Soldiers provided a color guard for the band's patriotic tribute to U.S. military and veterans at the concert. (Photo by Maj. W. Chris Clyne, Oregon Army National Guard)

160709-Z-ZJ128-024: Members of the Oregon Army National Guard display the American flag on stage while the band KISS performs the National Anthem during the "Freedom to Rock" concert at Matthew Knight Arena in Eugene, Oregon, July 9, 2016. The Oregon National Guard Soldiers provided a color guard for the band's patriotic tribute to U.S. military and veterans at the concert. (Photo by Maj. W. Chris Clyne, Oregon Army National Guard)


Attached Media Files: 2016-07/962/96011/160709-Z-ZJ128-014.JPG , 2016-07/962/96011/160709-Z-ZJ128-018.JPG , 2016-07/962/96011/160709-Z-ZJ128-020.JPG , 2016-07/962/96011/160709-Z-ZJ128-021.JPG , 2016-07/962/96011/160709-Z-ZJ128-024.JPG
Fri. 07/08/16
OSP Senior Trooper Heather Van Meter Recognized as Fish and Wildlife Division's Trooper of the Year for 2015 Accomplishments (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/08/16 5:28 PM
TrooperoftheYear
TrooperoftheYear
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-07/1002/95995/thumb_Trooper_of_the_Year_.jpg
The Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division recently recognized the outstanding work of Senior Trooper Heather Van Meter, from the Marine Fisheries Team - Newport, when Captain Jeff Samuels announced that she was the recipient of the Division's "Trooper of the Year" award for 2015. Senior Trooper Heather Van Meter was presented the award at a special gathering held on July 7, 2016 at the Oregon State Police General Headquarters in Salem. The presentation of the award celebrates and recognizes the outstanding work by an OSP Fish and Wildlife trooper in protecting Oregon's citizens and natural resources.

Prior to being assigned to the Marine Fisheries Team, Senior Trooper Van Meter was a member of the NW Region South Coast Team -- Newport assigned as an Oregon Plan Trooper concentrating on watershed and environmental issues.

Senior Trooper Van Meter has completed several noteworthy investigations this past year to include the following:

Starting in 2012 through 2014, Senior Trooper Van Meter began receiving information and looking into a Depoe Bay fishing charter business for possible angling license violations where the business was charging a license fee to customers but not actually issuing them an ODFW angling license. Through hard work and perseverance, Senior Trooper Van Meter was able to develop enough information in 2015 to apply for search warrants on the business and 11 associated charter vessels. After the search warrants, Senior Trooper Van Meter and the Division detectives worked to compile the evidence, which resulted in Grand Jury indictments for Felony Racketeering. The principle suspects recently pled guilty. The business pled guilty to Racketeering, the principles pled guilty to a Wildlife Misdemeanor, with orders to pay over $115,000 in restitution and to sell the business and not to engage in any Oregon charter fishing business for life.

In 2012, Senior Trooper Van Meter discovered an old bear bait station in east Lincoln County. As part of her tenacity, she checked on this bait site every year since and in the spring of 2015, as she was checking the area on foot she observed an unidentified subject leaving the bait station who had just put out fresh bear bait. The following day, Senior Trooper Van Meter, with the assistance of other team members, re-entered the area to put up video surveillance. As the Troopers were in the area, the suspect arrived at the bait sight and was contacted entering the area with fresh bait, a rifle, bow, tree stand, and a valid tag for another unit. The suspect later pled guilty and received license suspensions, and over $1,000 in fines.

Each of the above cases illustrates Senior Trooper Van Meter's tenacious attitude to keep going where others may have given up or moved on to other tasks. Additionally, Senior Trooper Van Meter was instrumental in two derelict vessels being removed from Yaquina Bay and discovered dozens of commercial fish violations along the coast by pouring over a magnitude of commercial fish landing information from ODFW. She is also is assigned as one of two vessel operators of the Division's 50 foot patrol vessel named the "Guardian".

Senior Trooper Van Meter is well respected by the District Attorney's Office and the local judges which is evident in her ability to build and maintain strong relationships with our partner agencies. She is always willing to tackle any assignment and is involved in the community through the local 4H chapter and Hunter Education.

Senior Trooper Heather Van Meter is to be commended for her dedication and commitment to protecting Oregon's citizens and natural resources. She performs at a high standard, has a great work ethic, strong interpersonal skills and is involved in the community outside of work.

To learn more about the Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division you can follow us on twitter @OSP_Fish or find us on the web at https://www.oregon.gov/OSP/FW/pages/index.aspx.


Attached Media Files: TrooperoftheYear
OSP Mid-Valley Team Recognized as Fish and Wildlife Division's Team of the Year for 2015 Accomplishments (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/08/16 5:06 PM
OSPFWTeamPhoto
OSPFWTeamPhoto
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-07/1002/95990/thumb_OSPFWTeamPhoto.jpg
The Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division recently recognized the outstanding work of troopers from the Mid-Valley (Salem/Albany) Team when Captain Jeff Samuels announced that the team was the recipient of the Division's "Team of the Year" award for 2015 efforts. The team was presented the award at a special gathering of family, friends and peers, held on July 7, 2016 at the Oregon State Police General Headquarters in Salem. The presentation of the award celebrates and recognizes the outstanding teamwork by OSP Fish and Wildlife troopers in protecting Oregon's citizens and natural resources.

The Mid-Valley Team, supervised by Sergeant James Halsey, works out of the Salem and Albany Area Command Offices. Team members during 2015 were as follows:

Sergeant James Halsey
Senior Trooper Casey Hunter
Senior Trooper Kirk Burkholder -- Former OSP member
Senior Trooper Ron Clement
Trooper Brian Glaser
Trooper Steve Kenyon
Trooper Jim Andrews

The Mid-Valley Team is responsible for protecting natural resources spanning Marion, Polk, Linn and Benton counties, and during the past year consisted of a team of five Troopers and a Sergeant. Because of the large area they are responsible for, the team works individually, in pairs, or as an entire group to effectively work their patrol area. Whatever the season or priority, the Mid-Valley Team addresses the task at hand with great enthusiasm and determination to catch violators and educate the public.

The Mid-Valley Team has taken on a number of issues during 2015 and have proven that they are both forward thinking and relentless in their pursuit to not just catch violators, but to offer rule change suggestions, take on additional assignments and use Division resources such as wildlife enforcement decoys (WED) and the Aircraft Program to tackle poaching issues. Two specific examples of this include defining the Team's focus on natural resource protection. In the first; the South Santiam River at Waterloo has historically been the hub of nearly all salmon snagging complaints and social issues for the Albany Troopers. Sergeant Halsey and his Troopers worked with the local ODFW biologist and hatchery manager to recommend a rule change that put anti-snagging regulations into effect. Secondly, and most notably; Sergeant Halsey and the entire Mid-Valley Team redefined the way the aircraft program has been used over the past several years in the NW Region and made some outstanding big game cases. They included the Aircraft Sergeant in team meetings, maintained outstanding lines of communication with him throughout the fall, put a team member in the plane to act as an observer for spot lighters, and adjusted their shifts to have as many team members as possible on the ground to make the aircraft patrol effective. The team went above and beyond to ensure they maximized the aircraft to its fullest potential with great success.

The team also thought outside the box, wanting to obtain more effective equipment to assist in their enforcement of the wildlife laws. The team field tested forward looking infrared (FLIR) units during the fall big game season, and utilized their great relationship with the Oregon Hunter's Association to have a set of FLIR purchased for, and donated to, the Mid-Valley Team.

In regards to excellence and dedication to protecting Oregon's natural resources and citizens, the Mid-Valley Team has been instrumental in protecting fish and wildlife resources in their area of responsibility and made many outstanding cases during 2015. This team is commended for a job well done.

To learn more about the Oregon State Police Fish and Wildlife Division you can follow us on twitter @OSP_Fish or find us on the web at https://www.oregon.gov/OSP/FW/pages/index.aspx.

Team Photograph (left to right: Tpr. Brian Glaser, Tpr. Steve Kenyon, Sr. Tpr. Casey Hunter, Sgt. James Halsey, Sr. Tpr. Ron Clement, Tpr. Jim Andrews, and former member Sr. Tpr. Kirk Burkholder)


Attached Media Files: OSPFWTeamPhoto
Limited moisture not enough to reduce fire danger
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/08/16 5:00 PM
News Release
July 8, 2016

Contact: Christie Shaw, ODF Central Oregon District Public Information Officer
christie.shaw@oregon.gov
541-263-0661


While central Oregon is in a pattern of cooler than normal weather, and has received precipitation over the last twenty-four hours, fire danger remains high. The US Drought Monitor for Oregon issued on July 7, 2016, indicates that most lands within the Central Oregon District (COD) fall into the "abnormally dry" category. This reflects what fire managers are seeing in the forest and current fuel moisture conditions. Now into Oregon's fifth year of drought conditions, we continue to see the long term affects to the down material and live vegetation stressed from limited water.

For the next few days firefighters will benefit from the moisture, because it will be more difficult for a "spark" to ignite a fire and rapidly spread. This is because of the increased moisture in the fine fuels, but these fuels will quickly dry out even with the moderate temperatures expected over the next few days. "The biggest concern for us now, during the heart of fire season, is that someone assumes the rain has made it safe to burn. When surrounding fuels dry out in the days following a debris burn, the remnants of that debris burn rekindle and spread to wildland fuels while no one is watching", states Mike Shaw, Central Oregon District Forester.

Debris burning is not allowed on lands protected by the Central Oregon District of the Oregon Department of Forestry. Contact information for your local ODF Office can be found on ODF's Central Oregon District website: www.ODFcentraloregon.com.
COD remains in a Regulated Use Closure intended to reduce human caused fires. Year to date there have been thirty-six human caused fires within the District, primarily related to debris burning. This number is significantly higher than the ten year average of twenty-eight (for the same time period). These fires are preventable, causing concern for firefighters and fire managers. While fire managers have the ability to use modern technology to track thunderstorms and staff with additional resources, human caused fires do not allow that as they occur at random times.

Please report fires to your local 911 dispatch center.

###
Statement In Response To The Tragic Killing Of Police In Dallas (Photo)
Oregon State Sheriffs' Assoc. - 07/08/16 4:34 PM
2016-07/1230/95991/OSSA.jpg
2016-07/1230/95991/OSSA.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-07/1230/95991/thumb_OSSA.jpg
Contacts:
John Bishop, Executive Director
Oregon State Sheriffs' Association
bishop@oregonsheriffs.org

Chief Geoff Spalding, President
Oregon Association Chiefs of Police
gspalding@beavertonoregon.gov

STATEMENT IN RESPONSE TO THE TRAGIC KILLING OF POLICE IN DALLAS

We are saddened by the horrific events that transpired in Dallas yesterday evening resulting in the deaths of Officer Brent Thompson, Officer Patrick Zamrippa, Officer Michael Krol, Officer Michael Smith, and one more officer who has not yet been publicly identified. Our thoughts and prayers go out to the families of these slain police officers from the Dallas Police Department and the Dallas Area Rapid Transit Police Department.

We also extend our strong concern and unqualified support for the fellow officers and policing leaders from both agencies who now grieve this tragic loss. We understand the risks and challenges faced by law enforcement officers on a daily basis and we laud the bravery and integrity of officers in Dallas who responded to yesterday's attack. In the face of an ambush and unknown assailants, police officers in Dallas continued to protect citizens at great risk to their own lives. These officers were simply doing their jobs by protecting a peaceful demonstration when they were viciously attacked. These events sadly illustrate the challenges that law enforcement face each and every day. Yesterday, these officers left home to make their communities safer and sadly will never return to their loved ones.

These tragic events have deeply affected the law enforcement profession. All Oregon law enforcement officers took an oath to safeguard the citizens of the communities they serve. They are true professionals who will remain vigilant in keeping our communities and their fellow officers safe! We want to thank Oregonians for taking time to express their support for our brave police officers here and around the nation.

We are very aware of the current tensions that exist between police and some members of our communities and we remain resolute in our commitment to continue to build trust and ensure that public confidence in Oregon policing remains strong. As incidents of violence ripple across our nation, we will not be divided or defeated. Our hearts are steeled with a resolve to police justly and thoroughly, remembering both the officers who've gone before us and the good people who depend upon us to step into the gap. We want to thank the citizens of Oregon for working with us in partnership and unity to keep our communities safe. We are all stronger as we work together for a safer Oregon.

We are asking all sworn officers in Oregon to wear their mourning bands on their badges from now until the day of the funeral(s) of the fallen officers, in honor of the lives lost in Dallas.


Attached Media Files: 2016-07/1230/95991/OSSA.jpg , 2016-07/1230/95991/OACP.tif
Update: Health advisory issued for Howards Bay located in Upper Klamath Lake has been updated to include all of Agency and Upper Klamath lakes
Oregon Health Authority - 07/08/16 4:31 PM
High blue-green algae levels found in lakes in Klamath County

The health advisory issued June 24 for Howards Bay in Upper Klamath Lake has been updated to include all of Agency and Upper Klamath lakes. Agency and Upper Klamath lakes are located just north of Klamath Falls along Highway 97 in Klamath County.

Additional samples collected at several locations have confirmed the presence of high levels of blue-green algae that can be associated with toxin concentrations that can be harmful to humans and animals.

Swallowing water while swimming or inhaling water droplets as a result of high-speed water activities, such as water skiing and power boating, should be avoided in areas where blooms are identified. Although toxins are not absorbed through the skin, people who have skin sensitivities may experience a puffy, red rash at the affected area.

Drinking water directly from Agency and Upper Klamath lakes is especially dangerous at this time. Oregon Public Health officials advise campers and other recreational visitors that toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating the water with camping-style filters.

People who may draw in-home water directly from Agency or Upper Klamath lakes are advised to use an alternative water source because private treatment systems are not proven effective at removing algae toxins. However, public drinking water systems can reduce algae toxins through proper filtration and disinfection. If people on public water systems have questions about treatment and testing, they should contact their water supplier. If people have questions about water available at nearby campgrounds they should contact campground management.

Oregon health officials recommend that people who choose to eat fish from waters where algae blooms are present remove all fat, skin and organs before cooking, because toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water. Public health officials also advise people to not eat freshwater clams or mussels from Agency or Upper Klamath lakes and that Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife regulations do not allow the harvest of these shellfish from freshwater sources. Crayfish muscle can be eaten, but internal organs and liquid fat should be discarded.

Exposure to toxins can produce symptoms of numbness, tingling and dizziness that can lead to difficulty breathing or heart problems, and require immediate medical attention. Symptoms of skin irritation, weakness, diarrhea, nausea, cramps and fainting should also receive medical attention if they persist or worsen. Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. People who bring their pets fishing with them should take special precautions to keep them from drinking from or swimming in Agency or Upper Klamath lakes.

The public will be advised when the concern no longer exists.

With proper precautions to avoid water contact, people are encouraged to visit the Agency and Upper Klamath lakes and enjoy activities such as fishing, camping, hiking, biking, picnicking, and bird watching. Boating is safe as long as speeds do not create excessive water spray, which could lead to inhalation risk.

For health information or to report an illness, to include your pet, contact the Oregon Health Authority at 971-673-0400.

OHA maintains an updated list of all health advisories on its website. To find out if an advisory has been issued or lifted for a specific water body, visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website (http://public.health.oregon.gov/HealthyEnvironments/Recreation/HarmfulAlgaeBlooms/Pages/index.aspx) and select "algae bloom advisories," or call the Oregon Public Health Division toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767.

###
DCBS to place Oregon's Health CO-OP in receivership
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 07/08/16 3:04 PM
Consumers must choose new plan by July 31

(Salem) -- The Oregon Department of Consumer and Business Services, Division of Financial Regulation on Monday will file a petition with Marion County Circuit Court to place Oregon's Health CO-OP in receivership in order to protect policyholders.

Oregon's Health CO-OP's board of directors voted today to consent to the receivership order.

As the receiver, the state intends to liquidate the troubled company's assets and help connect policyholders with new health plans.

"We understand changing plans in the middle of the year will be difficult for Oregonians, but this action was necessary given the sudden deterioration of the company's financial position," said Patrick Allen, DCBS director. "We will be working hard over the next few weeks to reach Oregon's Health CO-OP policyholders to ensure they are aware of this change and to help them pick a new plan that best meets their needs."

Oregon's Health CO-OP is a nonprofit consumer operated and oriented health insurer (CO-OP) formed under the Affordable Care Act. The CO-OP lost $18.4 million in 2015, mostly driven by medical claims for individual policies. Last week, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced that the CO-OP owes about $900,000 to the federal risk adjustment program. The CO-OP was expecting to receive about $5 million from the program.

"Unfortunately, as a startup, Oregon's Health CO-OP is not in a position to sustain these losses while meeting its obligations to policyholders," Allen said. "We are working closely with the company on an orderly wind-down of its business."

As of March 31, 2016, Oregon's Health CO-OP has 20,600 health insurance policyholders in Oregon: 11,800 in the individual market and 8,800 in the small and large group markets.

For all of Oregon's Health CO-OP policyholders, plans will end July 31.

Starting Monday, July 11, individual policyholders can enroll through a special enrollment period and choose a new plan that will take effect Monday, Aug. 1. Consumers should enroll by Sunday, July 31 to ensure their new insurance coverage is active on Aug. 1. They can enroll through HealthCare.gov to access financial help or enroll directly through an insurance company or broker.

Consumers must pay the premium to their new insurer for the plans to take effect.

Businesses that provide Oregon's Health CO-OP plans to their employees will need to work with their insurance broker and take immediate action to find a new plan with an Aug. 1 effective date.

Individuals and businesses can choose a new plan from an insurer that offers 2016 plans in their county. However, several insurers are discontinuing coverage in certain counties for 2017, so consumers who choose an insurer that is exiting their county in 2017 will not be able to stay with that insurer next year. To find coverage options for your county in 2016 and 2017, visit dfr.oregon.gov.

"Today's news heightens our concern about limited options for consumers, particularly in rural areas of the state," Allen said. "In the coming months, we will be working with stakeholders to develop both short-term and long-term solutions to make it more feasible for insurers to offer individual plans throughout the state."

For help with this change, consumers can call the Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace at 1-855-268-3767 (toll-free) or email info.marketplace@oregon.gov. More information and questions and answers are available on dfr.oregon.gov.

###

The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit www.dcbs.oregon.gov and www.dfr.oregon.gov.
Oregon Heritage to provide free collection care and preservation workshops this summer
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 07/08/16 2:11 PM
Oregon Heritage will conduct 25 workshops across the state of Oregon this summer related to collection care and preservation.

Workshop topics include Textile Care Basics, Emergency Response and Recovery, Digitization and Digital Preservation, Care and Handling of Photographs, Paper Care and Preservation. All five workshop topics will be presented in five regions of the state.

Oregonians will benefit from these free trainings thanks to a Connecting to Collections grant from the Federal Institute of Museum and Library Services.

The workshops will include lectures, hands-on activities, discussions, and small-group work. They are designed for archives, libraries and museums and will be relevant to people with little collections experience as well those with more significant experience.

For the schedule of workshops and to register, visit the website at http://www.oregon.gov/oprd/HCD/Pages/2016OC2CWorkshops.aspx or contact Katie Henry at katie.henry@oreogn.gov or (503) 986-0671.


Attached Media Files: 2016-07/1303/95981/2016_C2C_Workshops.pdf , Press Release
Update: Health advisory issued for Metolius arm of Lake Billy Chinook extended to include Crooked River arm
Oregon Health Authority - 07/08/16 11:57 AM
High toxin levels found in Jefferson County reservoir

The health advisory issued July 1 for the Metolius arm of Lake Billy Chinook is being extended to include the Crooked River arm. An additional sample collected at Cove Palisades Marina confirmed the presence of blue-green algae and the toxins they produce. These toxin concentrations can be harmful to humans and animals. Lake Billy chinook is located about 12 miles west of Madras in Jefferson County.

The advisory is confined to the Metolius and Crooked River arms. The Deschutes River arm is not affected by this advisory because sampling performed there confirmed that toxins were well below established guideline values.

Swallowing water while swimming or inhaling water droplets as a result of high-speed water activities, such as water skiing and power boating, should be avoided in areas where blooms are identified. Although toxins are not absorbed through the skin, people who have skin sensitivities may experience a puffy, red rash at the affected area.

Drinking water directly from the Metolius or Crooked River arms of Lake Billy Chinook is especially dangerous at this time. Oregon Public Health officials advise campers and other recreational visitors that toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating the water with camping-style filters.

People who may draw in-home water directly from the Metolius or Crooked River arms of Lake Billy Chinook are advised to use an alternative water source because private treatment systems are not proven effective at removing algae toxins. However, public drinking water systems can reduce algae toxins through proper filtration and disinfection. If people on public water systems have questions about treatment and testing, they should contact their water supplier. If people have questions about water available at nearby campgrounds they should contact campground management.

Oregon health officials recommend that people who choose to eat fish from waters where algae blooms are present remove all fat, skin and organs before cooking, because toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water. Public health officials also advise people to not eat freshwater clams or mussels from Metolius or Crooked River arms of Lake Billy Chinook and that Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife regulations do not allow the harvest of these shellfish from freshwater sources. Crayfish muscle can be eaten, but internal organs and liquid fat should be discarded.

Exposure to toxins can produce symptoms of numbness, tingling and dizziness that can lead to difficulty breathing or heart problems, and require immediate medical attention. Symptoms of skin irritation, weakness, diarrhea, nausea, cramps and fainting should also receive medical attention if they persist or worsen. Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. People who bring their pets fishing with them should take special precautions to keep them from drinking from or swimming in the Metolius or Crooked River arms of Lake Billy Chinook.

The public will be advised when the concern no longer exists.

With proper precautions to avoid water contact, people are encouraged to visit the Metolius and Crooked River arms of Lake Billy Chinook and enjoy activities such as fishing, camping, hiking, biking, picnicking, and bird watching. Boating is safe as long as speeds do not create excessive water spray, which could lead to inhalation risk.

For health information or to report an illness, to include your pet, contact the Oregon Health Authority at 971-673-0400.

OHA maintains an updated list of all health advisories on its website. To find out if an advisory has been issued or lifted for a specific water body, visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website (http://public.health.oregon.gov/HealthyEnvironments/Recreation/HarmfulAlgaeBlooms/Pages/index.aspx) and select "algae bloom advisories," or call the Oregon Public Health Division toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767.
Operation Dry Water Yields BUII Arrests (Photo)
Oregon Marine Board - 07/08/16 10:21 AM
Multnomah County Marine Officers arresting a boater for BUII on the Willamette River in 2007.
Multnomah County Marine Officers arresting a boater for BUII on the Willamette River in 2007.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-07/4139/95974/thumb_DanglerBUIIArrest.png
On June 24-26, twenty six county marine patrol units and the Oregon State Police from across the state participated in a nationwide program called "Operation Dry Water" to target enforcement efforts and get impaired boaters off the water.

On June 25, marine officers reported 793 hours on the water and contacted 1084 boats (397 motorized and 687 non-motorized). They issued 81 warnings to motorized boaters and 40 to non-motorized boaters and 63 boating citations (53 motorized, 10 non-motorized). They also conducted 20 standardized field sobriety tests on motorized boat operators, leading to two BUII arrests. Columbia County marine officers arrested one individual for alcohol and marijuana impairment, and a Klamath County marine officer arrested one individual for alcohol impairment.

No significant boating accidents were reported during the operation. Oregon law requires boaters to report boating accidents with property damage exceeding $2000, and any involving an injury, fatality or total loss of a vessel.

"The public is our ally in safe boating, said Randy Henry, Boating Safety Manager for the Marine Board. "If you see an impaired operator or someone who is operating in a way that threatens others' safety, call 911 and report it. The vast majority of marine officer contacts are educational in nature, but if someone is impaired by alcohol, marijuana or any other drug, they will be arrested and will face the consequences. That's how we can all save lives."

Boaters can also report violators directly to the Marine Board using a fillable form that formats for mobile devices at http://www.oregon.gov/OSMB/forms-library/Pages/Report-a-Boater.aspx.

Always boat sober.
###


Attached Media Files: Multnomah County Marine Officers arresting a boater for BUII on the Willamette River in 2007.
$540 million Mega Millions jackpot is third largest ever
Oregon Lottery - 07/08/16 8:47 AM
The $540 million Mega Millions jackpot for tonight's drawing is the third largest Mega Millions jackpot of all time. If there is no Mega Millions jackpot winner tonight, the jackpot for next Tuesday's drawing will grow to an estimated $630 million.

"This is the largest Mega Millions jackpot since Dec. 2013," said Lottery spokesman Chuck Baumann. "The largest Mega Millions jackpot, $656 million, was won in 2012.

"Oregon Lottery players have won nearly $50 million in Mega Millions prizes since the game debuted in Oregon in March 2010. Oregon is anxiously awaiting our first Mega Millions jackpot winner. This jackpot would be a great one start with."

The winner of the jackpot has two options to receive the jackpot prize. They can select the 30-year annuity option that will pay them $12.1 million a year, after taxes. The second, the lump sum option, gives the winner a one-time payment of $254.6 million, after taxes.

Mega Millions is currently played in 46 lottery jurisdictions -- 44 states, including Oregon, and the District of Columbia and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Mega Millions drawings are every Tuesday and Friday night at 7:59 p.m. On days of drawings, players can buy tickets up until 7 p.m.

The Oregon Lottery reminds players to always sign the back of their Lottery tickets, regardless of the game. In the event of winning a jackpot, they should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 should contact the Lottery office to schedule an appointment to claim their prize.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned nearly $10 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org

###
Thu. 07/07/16
Updated telephonic scam alert 07/07/2016
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/07/16 8:57 PM
The Deschutes County Sheriff's Office is still receiving complaints regarding citizens being contacted by subjects stating they work for the Sheriff's Office, requesting money via a pre-paid card to clear warrants. The Sheriff's Office is actively investigating this scam. If you receive any calls regarding this matter, please contact the Sheriff's Office at 541-693-6911.

No law enforcement agency in Central Oregon will call citizens and ask for credit card, pre-paid card, debit card or checking account information. Do not agree to meet this person to make a payment. Do not give out any personal information or wire money to a person under these circumstances.
Burglary investigations lead to search warrants served and arrests made in La Pine
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/07/16 7:31 PM
Released by: Sgt. Deke Demars, Detective Division, Street Crimes Unit

Date of incident: 7/6/16

Time: 8:00 p.m.

Location: 51455 Birch Rd. La Pine, Oregon
53342 Big Timber Drive, La Pine, Oregon

Arrested Person #1: Whitley, Adrion age: 34
La Pine, Oregon

Charges: Burglary I (Five counts)
Attempted Burglary I (one count)
Burglary II (Three counts)
Theft I (Five counts)
Theft II (One count)
Criminal Mischief I (Four counts)
Criminal Mischief II (One count)
Criminal Mischief III (One count)
Delivery of Methamphetamine (One count)
Possession of Methamphetamine (One count)

Total Bail $311,000.00

Arrested Person #2: Stamps, Jakey age: 43
La Pine, Oregon

Charges: Attempted Burglary I (One count)
Burglary II (Two counts)
Theft I (One count)
Theft II (One count)
Criminal Mischief III (One count)
Possession of Methamphetamine (One count)

Total Bail: $61,000.00

Arrested Person #3 Hux, Robert Age: 48
La Pine, Or.

Charges: Possession of Methamphetamine (One Count)
Theft I (One count)
(Cited in lieu of custody)

Narrative:

On 7/6/16, Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Deputies and Detectives with the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Street Crimes Unit conducted search warrants at the above listed locations after a long term burglary and stolen property investigation.

The investigation culminated with search warrants being served at 51455 Birch Road and 53342 Big Timber Drive in La Pine. Deputies and Detectives located and recovered numerous stolen items that Adrion Whitley and Jakey Stamps had stolen and stored at both locations.

The investigation determined both Whitley and Stamps had burglarized several residences near the end of 2015 through June of 2016. These residences spanned the area south of Sunriver and into La Pine. The burglaries included residences, shops and outbuildings and the property stolen ranged from electronics, tools, outdoor equipment and firearms.

In addition to the stolen property, Whitley had street level quantities of Methamphetamine in his possession that he intended to deliver and sell in the La Pine area. Jakey Stamps and Robert Hux also had Methamphetamine in their possession.


Whitley was arrested and lodged at the Deschutes County Adult Jail on the following charges:

Burglary I (Five counts)
Attempted Burglary I (one count)
Burglary II (Three counts)
Theft I (Five counts)
Theft II (One count)
Criminal Mischief I (Four counts)
Criminal Mischief II (One count)
Criminal Mischief III (One count)
Delivery of Methamphetamine (One count)
Possession of Methamphetamine (One count)

Total Bail $311,000.00

Stamps was arrested and lodged at the Deschutes County Adult Jail on the following charges:

Attempted Burglary I (One count)
Burglary II (Two counts)
Theft I (One count)
Theft II (One count)
Criminal Mischief III (One count)
Possession of Methamphetamine (One count)

Total Bail: $61,000.00

Hux was cited and released on the above listed charges.

This investigation is on-going and additional arrests are expected in the near future.

The Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Street Crimes Unit focuses enforcement on street level drug cases and quality of life issues connected to property crimes, such as theft and burglaries throughout Deschutes County.
Workplace safety, health training grants available
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 07/07/16 2:06 PM
(Salem) -- Oregon OSHA is accepting grant applications for the development of innovative workplace safety and health training programs. Applications are due Friday, Oct. 7.

The agency, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, encourages unique projects such as mobile apps, videos, or online educational games to engage workers.

The training grants will focus on programs that target a high-hazard Oregon industry, such as construction or agriculture, or a specific work process to reduce or eliminate hazards. Any employer, labor group, school affiliated with a labor group, or nonprofit organization may apply. Applicants may request up to $40,000 per grant project.

Employers are not allowed to use grants to pay for training for their employees. Materials produced by grant recipients become the property of Oregon OSHA. They are housed in the Oregon OSHA Resource Center and are available to the public for checkout from the library.

Some examples of past grant projects include:
Development of safe-lifting guidelines
Spanish-language flip charts designed to help prevent heat-related illness among forest workers
An educational program for nurses to prevent ergonomic-related injuries

The Oregon Legislature launched the Occupational Safety and Health Education and Training Grant Program in 1990. Award recommendations are made by Oregon OSHA's Safe Employment Education and Training Advisory Committee, a group with members from business, labor, and government.

Grant application information is available at
http://osha.oregon.gov/edu/grants/Pages/default.aspx. For more information, contact Teri Watson at 503-947-7406 or teri.a.watson@oregon.gov.


###

Oregon OSHA, a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the state's workplace safety and health rules and works to improve workplace safety and health for all Oregon workers. For more information, visit www.orosha.org.

The Department of Consumer and Business Services is Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. For more information, go to www.dcbs.oregon.gov. Follow DCBS on Twitter: twitter.com/OregonDCBS. Receive consumer help and information on insurance, mortgages, investments, workplace safety, and more.
358th Basic Police Class to Graduate from Oregon Public Safety Academy
Oregon Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 07/07/16 12:19 PM
The Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) is pleased to announce the graduation of its 358th Basic Police Class.

The Basic Police Class is 16-weeks in length and includes dozens of training areas including survival skills, firearms, emergency vehicle operations, ethics, cultural diversity, problem solving, community policing, elder abuse, drug recognition, and dozens of other subjects.

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training would like to invite you to join us in observing the ceremony and congratulating Basic Police #BP358 on their successful completion of basic training. The graduation will be held at the Oregon Public Safety Academy at 4190 Aumsville Hwy SE in Salem, Oregon on Friday, July 15, 2016 at 11:00 a.m. with a reception immediately following the graduation. Chief Tom Turner, of the Florence Police Department, will be the guest speaker.

The graduating students appreciate the family, friends and guests who make graduation an appropriate conclusion to their basic training at the Oregon Public Safety Academy.
Reception immediately following.

Graduating members of BP358:

Police Officer Robert Adams
Umatilla Police Department

Police Officer Jonathan Adkins
Warm Springs Police Department

Police Officer Brandon Bailey
Florence Police Department

Police Officer Daniel Basaraba
Springfield Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Nathan Burgess
Deschutes County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Joshua Chapman
Lincoln County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Anthony Christensen
Junction City Police Department

Police Officer Roxane Ellis
Hines Police Department

Trooper David Gizzi
Oregon State Police

Police Officer Grant Hedrick
Independence Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Kile Henrich
Josephine County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Wesley Heuston
Forest Grove Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Daniel Jenkins
Harney County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Stephen Johnson
Clatsop County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Jamil Kassab
Gladstone Police Department

Police Officer John Kazmierski
Beaverton Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Christopher Kennedy
Marion County Sheriff's Office

Trooper Dakotah Keys
Oregon State Police

Police Officer Dillon LaGrone
Albany Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Trevor Limburg
Umatilla County Sheriff's Office

Trooper Tara Littleton
Oregon State Police

Police Officer Dominik Luna
Springfield Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Christina McCarty
Marion County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Calvin Meade
Umatilla County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Allen Miller
Polk County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Samuel Northcote
Tigard Police Department

Police Officer Casey Okami-Watanabe
Lake Oswego Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Anibal Resendiz
Multnomah County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Devin Rigo
Hillsboro Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Bradley Rohde
Tillamook County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Sheriff Erica Rush
Union County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Tyler Sanford
Tigard Police Department

Police Officer Nicholas Taresh
Oregon City Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Michelle Vandenburg
Columbia County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Louis Waller
Albany Police Department

Deputy Sheriff Martin Watson
Polk County Sheriff's Office

Police Officer Timothy Wilburn
Beaverton Police Department

Trooper Kyle Winship
Oregon State Police
Public Health Advisory Board meets July 21 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 07/07/16 8:00 AM
July 7, 2016

What: The monthly public meeting of the Public Health Advisory Board

Agenda: Public health modernization updates; Public Health Advisory Board Incentives and Funding Subcommittee report; public health modernization economic and health outcome report; and review and discuss Oregon's State Health Improvement Plan.

When: Thursday, July 21, 2:30-5:30 p.m. A 15-minute public comment period is scheduled at 5:15 pm; comments may be limited to three minutes.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1E, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. The meeting will also be live-streamed through the Public Health Advisory Board website at http://www.healthoregon.org/phab.

Oregon's Public Health Advisory Board provides guidance for Oregon's governmental public health system and oversees the implementation of public health modernization and Oregon's State Health Improvement Plan.

Program contact: Cara Biddlecom, 971-673-2284; cara.m.biddlecom@state.or.us

# # #
Wed. 07/06/16
ODF NW and SW Oregon Regional Forest Practices Committees will meet July 13 in Springfield
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 07/06/16 4:24 PM
The Northwest and Southwest Oregon Regional Forest Practices Committees will meet July 13 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Oregon Department of Forestry Springfield office, located at 3150 Main St. in Springfield.

Regional Forest Practices Committees are panels of citizens -- mandated under Oregon law - that advise the Oregon Board of Forestry on current forestry issues and forest management approaches. Three Regional Forest Practices Committees, serving the Northwest, Southwest and Eastern regions of the state, were created by the 1971 Oregon Forest Practices Act. Members are qualified by education or experience in natural resource management. Under Oregon law, a majority of Regional Forest Practices Committees members must be private forest landowners, timber owners or authorized representatives who regularly engage in forest operations.
The committee's agenda includes:
Review the new riparian rule draft language
A summary of agency budget policy option packages
Planning Northwest Oregon Operator of the Year nominations and tour dates
A summary of topics that will be presented at the July 20 Board of Forestry meeting, including recommendations on bald eagle protections

Members of the public may attend the meeting and an opportunity for public comment will be provided. Questions about accessibility or special accommodations for the meeting can be directed to the Oregon Department of Forestry at 503-945-7427.

Oregon's forests are among one of the state's most valued resources, providing a balanced mix of environmental, economic and social benefits.

Find the meeting agenda and learn more about ODF's Regional Forest Practices Committees here.
Bringing public health protections to every Oregon community: first step in modernizing Oregon's public health system
Oregon Health Authority - 07/06/16 11:36 AM
July 6, 2016

Now that 95 percent of Oregonians have health insurance, the next step in health system transformation is to ensure all Oregon communities have basic public health protections. From Cascadia earthquake preparedness to Zika outbreak containment, public health plays a key role in protecting people in Oregon.

An assessment of public health programs in Oregon found that one-third of communities----or more than one million Oregonians----have limited or minimal access to essential public health programs. The 2016 assessment was required under House Bill 3100, sponsored by Rep. Mitch Greenlick (D-Portland), chairman of the House Health Care Committee.

Today legislators, community partners, local public health officials and the Oregon Health Authority met to discuss this gap in Oregon's public health programs and how best to address it.

"We know that 80 percent of what shapes our health happens outside of the doctor's office," Representative Greenlick said at today's briefing. "Because of this, a modern public health system should protect and help every person in Oregon thrive whether they live in downtown Portland, Enterprise or Coos Bay."

"Across Oregon, counties and community leaders are working hard to protect and promote public health," said Lynne Saxton, Director of the Oregon Health Authority. "Yet today's patchwork of grants and other investments has left gaps in our public health infrastructure. We want to make sure every Oregon community can depend on receiving the same essential public health protections."

Zeke Smith, chairman of the Oregon Health Policy Board, described the importance of investing in a modern public health system.

"Oregon consistently ranks in the bottom half of states in its per capita investment in public health, well below neighbor states like Idaho and Washington," Smith said. For context, Idaho invests $94.70 per capita in public health. Oregon spends $26.60.

"It is time to move beyond health care and into a place where we are really investing in healthy systems and healthy people," Smith said. "Our work toward public health modernization is critical for that shift."

Priorities for a modern health system: charting a blueprint for equity and efficiency

Based on the findings from the public health modernization assessment, the Public Health Advisory Board has recommended the following priorities for the 2017-2019 biennium:

-- Communicable diseases. Detect and respond to traditional and emerging infectious disease.

-- Environmental health. Limit environmental risks to human health.

-- Emergency preparedness. Prepare for and respond to natural disasters and other catastrophic events.

-- Health equity. Ensure that every state and local public health authority has the capacity to engage communities that experience an excess burden of disease.

-- Population health data. Ensure that every state and local public health authority has access to timely, accurate and meaningful data needed to understand the health of the community.

-- Public health modernization planning. Support state and local public health authorities to build an equitable and efficient public health system while developing a workforce equipped to fulfill future needs.

The Public Health Advisory Board recommends an initial investment of $30 million for the 2017-2019 biennium.

For more information, visit the board's website at http://www.healthoregon.org/modernization.

# # #
OHA launches Youth Marijuana Use Prevention Pilot Campaign
Oregon Health Authority - 07/06/16 11:30 AM
July 6, 2016

Evidence-based campaign rolls out first in Portland area, Jackson and Josephine counties before evaluation and possible statewide expansion

PORTLAND -- The Oregon Health Authority today at Oaks Park announced the launch of a youth marijuana use prevention campaign. The campaign's goal is to prevent or delay the initiation of marijuana use among Oregon's 12- to 20-year-old population.

After the legalization and ongoing rollout of recreational marijuana, the Oregon Legislature passed HB 4014 and SB 1597, which provide OHA with $3.97 million to develop, pilot and evaluate a youth marijuana use prevention campaign in a rural and an urban area of the state. Legislative intent guided OHA in choosing the Portland metro area (Washington, Multnomah and Clackamas counties) and Southern Oregon (Josephine and Jackson counties) as the locations for this pilot campaign.

OHA developed the campaign, named "Stay True to You," using extensive audience research and focus groups. Twenty-eight focus groups were conducted in Portland, Bend, Medford and Pendleton featuring 260 youth and young adults between 14 and 20 years old. Participants from the African American, Asian and Pacific Islander, white, American Indian/Alaskan native and Latino communities were included. DHM Research (Davis, Hibbitts, & Midghall, Inc.), contracted by OHA to facilitate all focus groups, conducted groups in English and Spanish between October 2015 and March 2016.

"Young people in our focus groups related to the idea that being a teenager is hard," said Kati Moseley, OHA policy specialist. "Young people recognize that marijuana has the potential to affect their present and their future. We used this insight to develop an approach that speaks to youth on many levels."

As a result of this research, the campaign includes:

-- Thought-provoking testimonials from adults who had experience with marijuana as youth and young adults. (In focus groups, one request was heard more than any other: participants wanted to hear from people who had used marijuana and could talk about their experiences. This campaign includes testimonials from people telling their real stories about using marijuana in the past.)

-- Messaging that informs the audience that younger kids and teens who see their older sisters, brothers and role models using marijuana may be more at risk of using it, too.

-- Facts on brain development and marijuana's effects on learning that are based on reviews of the current science by OHA's Retail Marijuana Scientific Advisory Committee.

-- A Q&A component for youth who have questions.

A sample of the campaign materials can be found at https://www.staytruetoyou.org/materials. The password is 12345.

"Our focus group research showed youth and young adults yearn for more information on the effects of marijuana use," Moseley said. "Though research into marijuana isn't as extensive as that on alcohol or tobacco, there is sufficient evidence that marijuana use can have a significant effect on developing brains."

According to OHA's 2016 report, Marijuana use, attitudes and health effects in Oregon, which can be found at https://public.health.oregon.gov/PreventionWellness/marijuana/Documents/oha-8509-marijuana-report.pdf, about half (51 percent) of Oregon adults had seen marijuana products or store advertising in their community in the past month, but fewer than one-third (29 percent) had seen information about the health effects of using marijuana.

OHA's role in marijuana legalization is to educate the public about the health issues related to marijuana use; prevent youth marijuana use; and monitor marijuana use, attitudes and health effects.

The campaign will advertise across a variety of media, but the bulk of advertising will take place on digital and streaming video to most effectively reach the youth audience. Other campaign elements include mall and movie theater ads, a social media presence (#StayTrueOregon), a website (StayTrueToYou.org), radio advertising, and promotions and outreach to organizations around Portland and Southern Oregon where youth gather.

Secondary audiences include parents, teachers and school administrators. OHA will reach this secondary audience with a fall campaign in English and Spanish.

RMC Research will evaluate the effectiveness of this campaign twice, with a mid-point evaluation in November 2016 and a final evaluation in May 2017. OHA will provide two reports to the Legislature: one in January 2017, and the final report by June 30, 2017.

# # #
DOC seeking to hire 13 Registered Nurses (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 07/06/16 10:11 AM
2016-07/1070/95915/DOC_Health_Services.jpg
2016-07/1070/95915/DOC_Health_Services.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-07/1070/95915/thumb_DOC_Health_Services.jpg
The Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) is hiring Registered Nurses at four locations throughout the state:
Coffee Creek Correctional Facility in Wilsonville (two openings)
Deer Ridge Correctional Institution in Madras (one opening)
Oregon State Penitentiary in Salem (six openings)
Two Rivers Correctional Institution in Umatilla (four openings)

Correctional nurses play a crucial role in promoting wellness, managing treatment plans, and advocating for patients. They are part of a team of 4,500 staff members who are integral in promoting accountability and public safety. In addition to excellent benefits, DOC provides many opportunities for job rotations, promotion, and continuing professional development. Department nurses receive a 4.75 percent pay differential if they possess a bachelor's degree in nursing or a 9.5 percent differential if they hold a master's degree. These positions may be eligible for Police & Fire benefits through PERS, as defined by statute.

To meet minimum qualifications, applicants must possess a current Registered Nurse license issued by the Oregon Board of Nursing or have the ability to obtain a license by the date of appointment. Positions are full-time, part-time, temporary, limited-duration, and float-pool (irregular part-time to fill scheduled or unscheduled vacancies).

The DOC Health Services Unit is responsible for providing health care to over 14,600 adults in custody in 14 prisons across the state. It employs a full suite of certified medical practitioners including doctors, nurses, dentists, and mental health professionals. The department is dedicated to delivering professional, quality health care -- consistent with community standards -- to inmates during their incarceration. DOC focuses on providing necessary services for improving the health and well-being of those in its custody.

Applicants can view the full job description and apply online at: www.governmentjobs.com/careers/oregon/jobs/1328798/institution-registered-nurse

####


Attached Media Files: 2016-07/1070/95915/DOC_Health_Services.jpg
Duii Crash Causes Power Outage (Photo)
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/06/16 3:59 AM
CEC workers
CEC workers
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-07/5227/95906/thumb_Buckingham_Crash_pic.JPG
Update: Two additional Charges are Criminal Mischief I Class C Felony,
Reckless Driving an A Misdemeanor.

Sgt. Vance Lawrence

Driver: Edward Stauder, 57 yrs old, from Mt. Laurel, New Jersey

Vehicle: 1999 Mercedes Benz E320 4dr Silver

On Tuesday July 5, 2016 at about 2256 hours Deschutes County 911 received a report of a possible motor vehicle crash heard, just north of Buckingham Elementary School.

Deschutes County Sheriff's Deputies responded and found that Stauder had been traveling south bound on Hamby Road at a high rate of speed, lost control of his vehicle, went off the roadway on the east side of the road in to a field just north of Buckingham Elementary School. When the vehicle left the roadway it sheared off a Central Electric Company power pole. This caused a power outage to an estimated 100 households. CEC estimated repairs could be done and power restored between 0600 and 0800 on Wednesday July 6, 2016.

Bend Fire Medics arrived and determined that Stauder had very minor injuries and did not need further medical attention. Deputies on scene contacted Stauder and after further investigation developed probable cause that Stauder was driving while impaired. Stauder was arrested for DUII and lodged at the Deschutes County Adult Jail. Stauder had a blood alcohol content of .16.

The Oregon State Police assisted, and The Deschutes County Road Department responded to close Hamby Road between Neff Road and Paloma Drive so CEC workers could repair the damage.

The roadway is still closed at the time of this release.

End


Attached Media Files: CEC workers
Tue. 07/05/16
Red Cross Responds to Home Fire Affecting One Person in Union County
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 07/05/16 4:45 PM
Disaster responders with the American Red Cross Cascades Region responded to a home fire disaster today, July 5, at approximately 1 p.m., in the 62600 block of Bird Lane in La Grande, OR. The fire affected one and four pets. The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits, information about recovery services, and health and mental health services. Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.

The Red Cross Cascades Region (Oregon and Southwest Washington) responds to an average of two home fires every day. We provide hope and comfort to people affected, helping victims anywhere and anytime. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/CascadesHomeFire to schedule an appointment.
Oregon CAP Assists In Search For Missing Aircraft. (Photo)
Oregon Civil Air Patrol - 07/05/16 3:28 PM
Two specially equipped Cessna C-182 search aircraft from the Oregon Civil Air Patrol participate in the search for an aircraft with three persons on board that was reported missing on a flight from Brookings, Oregon to Grants Pass early Tuesday morning.
Two specially equipped Cessna C-182 search aircraft from the Oregon Civil Air Patrol participate in the search for an aircraft with three persons on board that was reported missing on a flight from Brookings, Oregon to Grants Pass early Tuesday morning.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-07/1184/95891/thumb_Airborne-2.jpg
The Oregon Wing of the Civil Air Patrol, at the request of the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center and Oregon Emergency Management, has been participating in a search for a light single engine aircraft reported overdue on a flight from Brookings to Grants Pass since early this morning July 5th. The CAP provided two specially equipped Cessna C-182 search aircraft with three person crews plus base operations staff.
Active air search operations by the CAP was concluded at 3:00 PM this afternoon.

The aircraft, with three persons on board, was reported missing by concerned family members when it failed to arrive at Grants Pass airport as expected.

Updates will be provided as available by local
County Sheriff search and rescue which is the lead agency for the search.


Attached Media Files: Two specially equipped Cessna C-182 search aircraft from the Oregon Civil Air Patrol participate in the search for an aircraft with three persons on board that was reported missing on a flight from Brookings, Oregon to Grants Pass early Tuesday morning.
OR Hwy. 78 (Steens Hwy.) remains closed due to hazardous materials spill 28 miles east of Burns. (Photo)
ODOT: East. Ore. - 07/05/16 2:33 PM
truck crash on OR 78, July 5, 2016
truck crash on OR 78, July 5, 2016
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-07/1204/95887/thumb_Image_(2).png
UPDATE Message: OR 78 (Steens Hwy.) remains closed both directions due to single vehicle truck cash near MP 27 in Harney County involving hazardous materials (sulfuric/battery acid packaged in plastic bags). The crash occurred around 2:08 a.m. The highway is closed southbound near MP 15 (16 miles east of Burns at junction of S. Harney Co. Road) and northbound at mile post 28 (junction of Crane-Buchanan Road). All travelers will need to use alternate routes. The closure is expected to continue throughout today and possibly extend through tomorrow morning. Check www.TripCheck.com or call 511 / 800-977-6368 for update highway conditions. Outside Oregon call 503-588-2941.


Attached Media Files: truck crash on OR 78, July 5, 2016
***Update*** Several Injured In Crash On Highway 101 Near Lincoln City (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/05/16 11:59 AM
2016-07/1002/95878/101_0861.JPG
2016-07/1002/95878/101_0861.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-07/1002/95878/thumb_101_0861.JPG
Initial information was Logan KITZHABER suffered life threatening injuries as a result of the crash. New information is that those injuries were serious but he has been since released from Oregon Health Science University. No further information to be released at this time.
End Update

Previous Release:
On July 4, 2016 at about 1:30PM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a crash involving two vehicles on Highway 101 near Devils Lake Road (just north of Lincoln City).

Preliminary investigation revealed that a 2008 Toyota Prius was traveling southbound on Highway 101 when it crossed the centerline, sideswiping a northbound 1988 motorhome. After the impact, the motorhome rolled onto its side and the Toyota came to rest on the shoulder.

The driver of the Toyota, Logan G KITZHABER, age 18, of Portland, was extricated from the vehicle and taken by air ambulance to Oregon Health Sciences University for life threatening injuries. The drive of the motorhome, Stanley V LYCKMAN, age 67, of Port Angeles, Washington was taken to North Lincoln Hospital for non-life threatening injuries. His passenger, Martha LYCKMAN, age 63, of Port Angeles was also taken to North Lincoln Hospital for minor injuries.

Highway 101 was closed completely for one hour then opened one lane with intermittent closures for over an hour. OSP was assisted by the Oregon Department of Transportation, Lincoln City Police, Lincoln County Sheriff's Office and North Lincoln Fire and Rescue.

OSP is seeking any persons who may have witnessed the Toyota Prius and it's driving behavior prior to the crash to call OSP at 503-375-3555. This is an ongoing investigation. No further information to be released at this time.


Attached Media Files: 2016-07/1002/95878/101_0861.JPG , 2016-07/1002/95878/101_0856.JPG
Weekly Unemployment Benefit Payments Increase
Oregon Employment Dept. - 07/05/16 9:21 AM
The amount paid to people filing for unemployment insurance benefits has increased. The maximum weekly benefit amount someone can receive will increase from $567 to $590, while the minimum amount will increase from $133 to $138.

The change affects new unemployment insurance claims filed on or after July 3, 2016. Those with existing unemployment claims will continue to receive the same weekly amount they have been receiving.

Under Oregon law, each year the Oregon Employment Department recalculates the maximum and minimum amounts of unemployment insurance benefits people can receive each week. The amounts are set as percentages of the average weekly wage earned by Oregonians. The minimum benefit amount is 15% of average weekly wage, and the maximum amount is 64%. Both dollar amounts are rounded down to the nearest dollar as required by law.

Higher wage growth in 2015 resulted in a 3.8% increase to the minimum weekly benefit and a 4.1% increase in the maximum weekly benefit compared to a year ago.


Attached Media Files: 2016-07/930/95873/Weekly_Benefit_Amount.pdf
New study reports prices of medical procedures among Oregon hospitals
Oregon Health Authority - 07/05/16 8:00 AM
For immediate release

July 5, 2016

New study reports prices of medical procedures among Oregon hospitals

Data show variations in costs of procedures

Salem -- A new report issued by the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) details the median amounts paid by commercial insurers for the most common inpatient and outpatient procedures that were performed in Oregon hospitals in 2014. Drawing on data collected in the All Payer All Claims (APAC) database, the report shows variation in prices for the same procedures among hospitals operating in the same region and across the state.

The report, "Oregon Hospital Payment Report 2014," (https://www.oregon.gov/oha/analytics/HospitalReporting/Oregon-Hospital-Payment-Report-2014.pdf) was mandated by Senate Bill 900, which was passed by the Legislature in the 2015 session. The goal is to provide a source of transparency to the public on hospital prices. Inpatient care accounts for as much as 30 percent of health care spending in the state.

"Hospitals perform vital procedures that save lives and improve quality of life for Oregonians," said Lynne Saxton, Director of the Oregon Health Authority. "This report gives patients and policymakers an unprecedented look at the payments hospitals and commercial health plans have negotiated for the procedures Oregonians depend on hospitals to perform."

According to the data provided in the report:

-- Gallbladder surgery was the most expensive outpatient procedure paid for by commercial insurers. The median cost was more than $9,000.
-- Heart valve replacement surgery was the most expensive inpatient procedure insurers paid for in 2014. The median cost was more than $74,000.
-- Mammograms were the most common procedure paid for by commercial insurers. More than 86,000 mammograms were performed in 2014.

The paid amounts reported in the study reflect the charges commercial insurers paid for different procedures at different hospitals. However, these prices do not include all costs. For example, costs to patients in co-pays, deductibles or coinsurance are not contained in the data. Charges for outpatient procedures do not include additional professional fees.

The price of a procedure in a hospital depends on a number of factors. These factors should be taken into account when comparing charges between facilities. Here are some reasons that account for variations:

-- Rate negotiation: Each hospital negotiates with each insurance provider they accept for the reimbursement rate for a procedure. This paid amount will vary depending on the hospital and the insurance company.
-- Case complexity: An insurance company may reimburse a hospital within a range of amounts for a given procedure up to a predetermined maximum. This range is influenced by how sick the patient is, and how many extra services were required in order to perform the procedure.
-- Patient participation: In addition to paid amounts, patient responsibility amounts also vary. Plans that require higher patient paid amounts (copays, deductibles) will have lower paid amounts in comparison to insurance plans with lower patient paid amounts.
-- Geographic factors: A hospital's location influences paid amounts. Communities with higher costs of living have higher salary, lease, and utilities costs. These differences in hospital operating expenses should be considered when comparing paid amounts.
-- Economies of scale: Hospital volume influences the paid amount. Hospitals that perform the procedure hundreds of times will often accept a lower paid amount for each case because they make the difference up in larger volumes.

"Oregon's community hospitals are proud to lead our state toward a more transparent health care system, starting with a clearer picture of prices paid for procedures in their facilities," said Andy Davidson, president and CEO of the Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems, which worked in 2015 to pass the legislation authorizing the report released today. "We commend the OHA for their thoughtful year one report. We believe this report, and the display of the data on our OregonHospitalGuide.org website, will lead the way toward a better grade on the national scorecard on price transparency issued annually by the Catalyst for Payment Reform organization."

"Oregon Hospital Payment Report 2014" is the first of an annual series of reports on health care prices drawing from the APAC database. OHA will continue to report hospital prices and may provide data on other procedures, including procedures performed in non-hospital settings.

# # #

The report is available as a PDF file and as a data file on the OHA Health Analytics website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/analytics/Pages/index.aspx.
Mon. 07/04/16
Oregon National Guard participates in Independence Day celebrations (Photo)
Oregon Military Department - 07/04/16 10:31 PM
2016-07/962/95843/160704-Z-OT568-001.JPG
2016-07/962/95843/160704-Z-OT568-001.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-07/962/95843/thumb_160704-Z-OT568-001.JPG
160704-Z-OT568-001: Oregon Air National Guard F-15 Eagle fighter jets from the 173rd Fighter Wing, based at Kingsley Field in Klamath Falls, Oregon, fly over the parade in Creswell, Oregon, July 4, 2016. The 173rd Fighter Wing conducted flyovers for Independence Day events throughout Oregon and Northern California. (Photo by Sgt. 1st Class April Davis, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

160704-Z-OT568-002: Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers, Pfc.Shelby Dunivin (left), Sgt. Kevin Kildal and Staff Sgt. Clinton Stayton (right), participate in an Independence Day parade in Creswell, Oregon, July 4, 2016. Members of Company G, 141st Brigade Support Battalion, and Company A, 2nd Battalion, 162nd Infantry Regiment, 41st Infantry Brigade Combat Team, drove trucks and Humvees as part of the parade. (Photo by Sgt. 1st Class April Davis, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

160704-Z-OT568-003: Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers with the 234th Army Band wait on the field of Ron Tonkin Stadium in Hillsboro, Oregon, in preparation to play the National Anthem to begin the Hillsboro Hops baseball game, July 4, 2016. Oregon National Guard service members participated in Independence Day activities throughout the state. (Photo by Sgt. 1st Class April Davis, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

160704-Z-OT568-004: Oregon Army National Guard Soldiers with the 234th Army Band play the National Anthem to begin the Hillsboro Hops baseball game, July 4, 2016, at Ron Tonkin Stadium in Hillsboro, Oregon. Oregon National Guard service members participated in Independence Day activities throughout the state. (Photo by Sgt. 1st Class April Davis, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

DSC7275: Nine new recruits enlist into the Oregon National Guard during an enlistment ceremony at the Salem-Keizer Volcanoes Patriotic Celebration in Keizer, Oregon, July 4, 2016. The Patriotic Celebration honored members of the Oregon National Guard and other Veterans for their service to the state and nation. (Photo by Capt. Heather Bashor, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)

DSC7420: Members of the Oregon National Guard Honor Guard post the colors to begin the 2016 Salem-Keizer Volcanoes Patriotic Celebration and baseball game in Keizer, Oregon, July 4, 2016. The Patriotic Celebration honored members of the Oregon National Guard and other Veterans for their service to the state and nation. (Photo by Capt. Heather Bashor, Oregon Military Department Public Affairs)


Attached Media Files: 2016-07/962/95843/160704-Z-OT568-001.JPG , 2016-07/962/95843/160704-Z-OT568-002.JPG , 2016-07/962/95843/160704-Z-OT568-003.JPG , 2016-07/962/95843/160704-Z-OT568-004.JPG , 2016-07/962/95843/DSC7275.jpg , 2016-07/962/95843/DSC7420.jpg
Sun. 07/03/16
The Red Cross Responds to Home Fire Affecting Two Adults in Prineville
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 07/03/16 10:12 PM
Disaster responders with the American Red Cross Cascades Region responded to a home fire disaster on July 3, 2016, at approximately 8:00 p.m. in the 1000 block of SE Lincoln Road in Prineville, Ore. The fire affected two adults.

The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits, information about recovery services, and health and mental health services. Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department.

The Red Cross Cascades Region (Oregon and Southwest Washington) responds to an average of two home fires every day. We provide hope and comfort to people affected, helping victims anywhere and anytime. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/CascadesHomeFire to schedule an appointment.
Man Killed In Motorcycle Crash Near Cottage Grove - Lane County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/03/16 11:49 AM
2016-07/1002/95829/20160702_171224.jpg
2016-07/1002/95829/20160702_171224.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-07/1002/95829/thumb_20160702_171224.jpg
On Saturday July 2nd, 2016 at approximately 4:00 pm, Troopers from the Springfield Area Command responded to a report of a motorcycle versus vehicle crash on London Road near the Cottage Grove Reservoir.

Preliminary investigation revealed a 1999 Honda 900 motorcycle was traveling southbound on London Road at a high rate of speed just as a 2008 Chrysler Sebring was pulling out of a private drive northbound. The motorcycle impacted the driver's side of the Sebring. The rider, identified as Cory Nathan TOCHER, age 33, of Cottage Grove, was thrown from the motorcycle and pronounced deceased at the scene. The driver of the Sebring, Jeremy Paul OWENS, age 41, of Eugene was not injured in the crash.

The roadway was closed for approximately 1 ?1/2 hours for a collision reconstruction to be completed. TOCHER was wearing a motorcycle helmet and speed is believed to be a contributing factor in the crash. OSP was assisted on scene by the Lane County Sheriff's Office, Lane County Medical Examiner and South Lane Fire and Rescue.

More information will be released as it becomes available.


Attached Media Files: 2016-07/1002/95829/20160702_171224.jpg
Two Rivers Correctional Institution reports inmate death (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 07/03/16 9:25 AM
Corona-Avila
Corona-Avila
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-07/1070/95826/thumb_Corona.jpg
An Oregon Department of Corrections (DOC) inmate died unexpectedly Saturday in a local area hospital. As with all unanticipated deaths in state prisons, the Oregon State Police Criminal Investigation Division is conducting an investigation.

Inmate Rigoberto Corono-Avila, 29, was transported off-site for medical care Saturday, July 2, 2016 at approximately 3:00 p.m. He was pronounced deceased on Sunday, July 3, 2016 at 6:32 a.m. He had been housed at Two Rivers Correctional Institution in Umatilla.

Corono-Avila entered DOC custody on December 9, 2010, on one count of sex abuse in the first degree, one count of felony assault in the fourth degree, and one count of sex abuse in the second degree out of Marion County. His earliest release date was January 3, 2017.

Next of kin has been notified. No other details are available at this time.

TRCI is a multi-custody prison in Umatilla that houses approximately 1,800 male inmates. TRCI participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises including institution and industrial laundry, mattress manufacturing, and sewing. Other institution work programs include reparation and cleaning of irrigation ditches, maintenance of local baseball fields, and work with local cities and the Hermiston School District. The facility provides a range of correctional programs and services including education, religious services, and behavioral health services. TRCI opened in 2000.


####


Attached Media Files: Corona-Avila
Sat. 07/02/16
Missing Hiker Found Deceased on Mt. Washington
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/02/16 4:34 PM
Update:

Released by: Sgt. Nathan Garibay

On 07/02/16, combined resources from the Linn County Sheriff's Office, Deschutes County Sheriff's Office, Corvallis Mountain Rescue, and Oregon Army National Guard continued searching the area of Mt. Washington for Brian Robak.

This afternoon, during an air search of the mountain utilizing an Oregon Army National Guard helicopter, searchers located Robak's body. It appears Robak fell a significant distance from near the top of Mt. Washington.

Our thoughts are with Brian's family and friends and we are saddened by this tragic outcome. The responding agencies would like to thank the Big Lake Youth Camp for their assistance in this search.

There will be no further information released at this time.

Original Release:

Missing Hiker: Brian Robak, 28 yom, Hillsboro, OR

On 07/01/16, at about 3:32am, the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office received a call from the Big Lake Youth Camp, reporting one of their contractors was overdue from hiking up nearby Mt. Washington. Brian Robak had left his vehicle at the camp and began his hike by himself at about 12:00pm. At about 4:30pm, Robak took photos from the summit of Mt. Washington, sending them to some of his family and friends. Robak was due back at the camp at 8:00pm, but did not arrive. Staff members from the camp hiked up a portion of the trail in an attempt to locate Robak, but were unsuccessful. Numerous attempts were made to contact Robak via his cell phone without success. Searchers attempted to obtain further location information from Robak's cell phone, without success.

25 Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Search and Rescue Volunteers and three Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Deputies responded to search for Robak. DCSO SAR Mountain Rescue Unit volunteers searched the higher elevations of Mt. Washington, including the summit, while additional DCSO SAR Volunteers searched Big Lake and nearby trails. Numerous campers in the area were contacted, but no one had seen Robak. Lifeflight and AirLink both assisted with aerial searches using their helicopters. DCSO SAR Volunteers accompanied Airlink crew, assisting as observers. A Linn County Sheriff's Office Deputy also assisted as the Deschutes County/Linn County border bisect Mt. Washington.

DCSO SAR Volunteers searched in the Mt. Washington area up until 8:30pm, at which time the search was temporarily suspended overnight. DCSO SAR and Linn County Sheriff's Office SAR will be continuing the search on 07/02/16, in the early morning hours.
Fri. 07/01/16
Search Continues For Missing Mt. Washington Hiker (Photo)
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 07/01/16 10:32 PM
2016-07/5227/95815/Mt_Washington.jpg
2016-07/5227/95815/Mt_Washington.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-07/5227/95815/thumb_Mt_Washington.jpg
Missing Hiker: Brian Robak, 28 yom, Hillsboro, OR

On 07/01/16, at about 3:32am, the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office received a call from the Big Lake Youth Camp, reporting one of their contractors was overdue from hiking up nearby Mt. Washington. Brian Robak had left his vehicle at the camp and began his hike by himself at about 12:00pm. At about 4:30pm, Robak took photos from the summit of Mt. Washington, sending them to some of his family and friends. Robak was due back at the camp at 8:00pm, but did not arrive. Staff members from the camp hiked up a portion of the trail in an attempt to locate Robak, but were unsuccessful. Numerous attempts were made to contact Robak via his cell phone without success. Searchers attempted to obtain further location information from Robak's cell phone, without success.

25 Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Search and Rescue Volunteers and three Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Deputies responded to search for Robak. DCSO SAR Mountain Rescue Unit volunteers searched the higher elevations of Mt. Washington, including the summit, while additional DCSO SAR Volunteers searched Big Lake and nearby trails. Numerous campers in the area were contacted, but no one had seen Robak. Lifeflight and AirLink both assisted with aerial searches using their helicopters. DCSO SAR Volunteers accompanied Airlink crew, assisting as observers. A Linn County Sheriff's Office Deputy also assisted as the Deschutes County/Linn County border bisect Mt. Washington.

DCSO SAR Volunteers searched in the Mt. Washington area up until 8:30pm, at which time the search was temporarily suspended overnight. DCSO SAR and Linn County Sheriff's Office SAR will be continuing the search on 07/02/16, in the early morning hours.


Attached Media Files: 2016-07/5227/95815/Mt_Washington.jpg , 2016-07/5227/95815/Robak.jpg
Red Cross Responds to Multi Family Fire In Sutherlin
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 07/01/16 9:31 PM
On Friday, July 1st, 2016 at 5:00 p.m. red Cross  disaster responders responded to a residential fire disaster that occurred  in the 400 block of Myrtle Street in Sutherlin, OR. This multi-family fire affected seven adults and 6 pets.

The Red Cross provided resources to help address the immediate basic needs of those affected such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits, information about recovery services, and health and mental health services. Additional information about this incident, if available, may be obtained from the local first responding agency/fire department. 

The Red Cross Cascades Region (Oregon and Southwest Washington) responds to an average of two home fires every day. We provide hope and comfort to people affected, helping victims anywhere and anytime. The Red Cross advocates emergency preparedness and offers the installation of free smoke alarms in our community. Residents may call (503) 528-5783 or complete an online form at www.redcross.org/CascadesHomeFire to schedule an appointment.
Health advisory issued for Metolius arm of Lake Billy Chinook
Oregon Health Authority - 07/01/16 4:56 PM
July 1, 2016

High toxin levels found in Jefferson County reservoir

A health advisory is being issued today for the Metolius arm of Lake Billy Chinook from Perry South Campground to and including the area around Three Rivers Marina, located about 12 miles west of Madras in Jefferson County.

Water monitoring has confirmed the presence of blue-green algae and the toxins they produce. These toxin concentrations can be harmful to humans and animals. The advisory is confined to the Metolius arm of the Lake from Perry South Campground up to and including the area around Three Rivers Marina. The area around Cove Palisades State Park is not affected by the bloom and the advisory does not apply to that area.

Swallowing water while swimming or inhaling water droplets as a result of high-speed water activities, such as water skiing and power boating, should be avoided in areas where blooms are identified. Although toxins are not absorbed through the skin, people who have skin sensitivities may experience a puffy, red rash at the affected area.

Drinking water directly from the Metolius arm of Lake Billy Chinook is especially dangerous. Oregon Public Health officials advise campers and other recreational visitors that toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating the water with camping-style filters.

People who may draw in-home water directly from Metolius arm of Lake Billy Chinook are advised to use an alternative water source because private treatment systems are not proven effective at removing algae toxins. However, public drinking water systems can reduce algae toxins through proper filtration and disinfection. If people on public water systems have questions about treatment and testing, they should contact their water supplier. If people have questions about water available at nearby campgrounds they should contact campground management.

Oregon health officials recommend that people who choose to eat fish from waters where algae blooms are present remove all fat, skin and organs before cooking, because toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water. Public health officials also advise people to not eat freshwater clams or mussels from Metolius arm of Lake Billy Chinook and that Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife regulations do not allow the harvest of these shellfish from freshwater sources. Crayfish muscle can be eaten, but internal organs and liquid fat should be discarded.

Exposure to toxins can produce symptoms of numbness, tingling and dizziness that can lead to difficulty breathing or heart problems, and require immediate medical attention. Symptoms of skin irritation, weakness, diarrhea, nausea, cramps and fainting should also receive medical attention if they persist or worsen. Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. People who bring their pets fishing with them should take special precautions to keep them from drinking from or swimming in the Metolius arm of Lake Billy Chinook.

The public will be advised when the concern no longer exists.

With proper precautions to avoid water contact, people are encouraged to visit Metolius arm of Lake Billy Chinook and enjoy activities such as fishing, camping, hiking, biking, picnicking, and bird watching. Boating is safe as long as speeds do not create excessive water spray, which could lead to inhalation risk.

For health information or to report an illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority at 971-673-0400.

OHA maintains an updated list of all health advisories on its website. To find out if an advisory has been issued or lifted for a specific water body, visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website at http://www.healthoregon.org/hab and select "algae bloom advisories," or call the Oregon Public Health Division toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767.

# # #
Expect Short Delays for Paving on U.S. 20 Santiam Pass
ODOT: Valley, No. Coast - 07/01/16 4:29 PM
Travelers should expect delays up to 10 minutes on U.S. 20 Santiam Pass, July 5 through July 7, between 7 a.m. and 7 p.m., as crews are paving. Flaggers will control traffic.
Local Red Cross Responds to 52 Disasters in Past Month
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 07/01/16 3:19 PM
The American Red Cross Cascades Region (Oregon and Southwest Washington) responds to an average of two disasters every day. We provide hope and comfort to people affected by home fires, floods, wildfires and other disasters, helping victims anywhere and anytime.

Between June 1 and June 30, the local Red Cross responded to 52 disasters (specific response locations listed in the attached document) and helped to address the needs of people affected by these disasters in communities spanning from Vancouver, WA to Medford, OR (north to south) and Newport, WA to Elgin, OR (west to east). The Red Cross provided disaster assistance, such as temporary housing, food, clothing, comfort kits, information about recovery services, and health and mental health services for each of the incidents.

About the American Red Cross:
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org.

For local response updates and information, follow us on Twitter @RedCrossCasc.


Attached Media Files: 2016-07/1190/95804/News_Release_-_Local_Red_Cross_Responds_to_52_Disasters_in_Past_Month.pdf
Board on Public Safety Standards and Training Welcomes New Members
Oregon Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 07/01/16 1:46 PM
The Board on Public Safety Standards and Training (BPSST) consists of 24 members representing city, county and state public safety professionals representing each of the disciplines (police, fire, 9-1-1, corrections, private security), and a private citizen appointed by the Governor and confirmed by the Senate. The Board includes administrators and non-management representatives from statewide organizations.

The Board represents more than 40,000 public safety professionals and establishes minimum standards for the training and certification of city, county and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security/private investigator providers, and makes determinations on waiver requests.

The Board is supported by six policy committees and a number of sub-committees representing the public safety disciplines, which provide technical expertise and serve as vital links to public safety organizations. The Board operates in close partnership with the Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) and provides on-going guidance and oversight.

The Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST), recognized as one of the most innovative training academies in North America, implements minimum standards established by the Board for the training and certification of city, county, tribal and state law enforcement officers, corrections officers, parole and probation officers, fire service personnel, telecommunicators, emergency medical dispatchers and private security providers. DPSST provides training to more than 20,000 students each year throughout Oregon and at the Oregon Public Safety Academy in Salem: certifies qualified officers at various levels from basic through executive; certifies qualified instructors; and reviews and accredits training programs throughout the state based on standards established by the Board. Eriks Gabliks serves as the Director of DPSST.

Term limits and retirements have created a number of changes on the Board which take effect on July 1, 2016. The list of changes is as follows.

Chief Kent Barker of the City of Tualatin Police Department retired last week and the Oregon Association of Chiefs of Police submitted Chief John Teague of the City of Keizer Police Department to serve as one of their organization's two representatives on the Board. Chief Teague's nomination was approved by Governor Brown and the Senate Confirmation Committee effective July 1, 2016.

Captain Joe Seibert of the Eugene-Springfield Fire Department served on the Board for six years a representative of the Oregon State Firefighters Council. Captain Seibert's second term on the Board expired on June 30, 2016. Term limits within Oregon Revised Statute limit BPSST members from serving more than two full terms. Captain Trish Connolly of the City of Bend Fire Department was approved by Governor Brown and the Senate Confirmation Committee as the new representative of the Oregon State Firefighters Council as of July 1, 2016.

Chief Scott Stanton of Umatilla County Fire District #1 also completed his second term on the Board as a representative of the Oregon Volunteer Firefighters Association on June 30, 2016. Division Chief James Oeder of the Nestucca Rural Fire Protection District was nominated to take his place and was approved by Governor Brown and the Senate Confirmation Committee.

Special Agent Mike Wells of the Oregon Department of Justice completed his second full term on the Board on June 30, 2016 representing non-management law enforcement officers. Officer Mike Araiza of the City of Woodburn Police Department was approved by Governor Brown and the Senate for the Board effective July 1, 2016. Both Wells and Araiza are Past Presidents of the Oregon Peace Officers Association.

Assistant City Manager Kacey Duncan of the City of Salem was selected to represent the League of Oregon Cities on the Board taking the place of former Newberg City Manager Jacque Betz.

Sheriff Jason Myers of Marion County was approved by the Governor and Senate for a second three-year term on the Board. He was also selected to serve as Board Chair effective July 1, 2016. Patricia Patrick-Joling of Newport, a citizen member on the Board, was selected to serve as the Board's new Vice Chair effective July 1, 2016 taking the place of Fire Chief Scott Stanton who previously had served in this role.

Three vacancies on the Board created by recent retirements are in the process of being filled. Portland's new Fire Chief Mike Myers will take the place of Chief Erin Janssens, Portland's new Police Chief Mike Marshman will take the place of Chief Larry O'Dea, and acting Oregon State Police Superintendent Travis Hampton will take the place of Superintendent Rich Evans once confirmed by the Senate.

BPSST Board Roster http://www.oregon.gov/dpsst/BD/docs/boardroster.pdf
Protect yourself from mosquitoes over holiday weekend (Photo)
Oregon Health Authority - 07/01/16 1:39 PM
Image: Abdul Sayed, Flickr
Image: Abdul Sayed, Flickr
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-07/3687/95799/thumb_mosquito-flickr.jpg
July 1, 2016

As the Fourth of July approaches and Oregonians head outdoors, public health officials are advising people to take general precautions against mosquitoes to avoid a possible risk of West Nile virus infection.

Historically, warm weather leads to elevated mosquito activity and the threat of West Nile virus. So far in 2016, West Nile virus has been detected in southern Washington state adjacent to the Columbia River. No human cases have been reported in Oregon.

West Nile is spread to humans through the bite of an infected mosquito. Most infected people will show little or no signs of disease. About one in five infected people may show signs of West Nile fever. People at risk include individuals 50 and older, people with immune compromising conditions, and those with diabetes and high blood pressure.

West Nile symptoms may include fever above 100 degrees and severe headache, stiff neck, mental confusion, muscle weakness, shaking, paralysis or rash. It is important that you contact your health care provider if you experience any of these symptoms. Rarely, infected individuals may develop neuro-invasive disease (infection of the brain or spinal column) that can be severe or may cause death. This is especially of concern to those who have a compromised immune system and the elderly.

The fever syndrome may last from a few days to several weeks.

"It's very easy for people to prevent bites from mosquitoes that may carry West Nile virus," said Emilio DeBess, DVM, public health veterinarian at the Oregon Health Authority's Public Health Division, who recommends that people and animals be protected against mosquito bites. "Although the risk of contracting West Nile virus is low, people can take simple precautions to keep these insects at bay if they're headed outdoors."

DeBess offers these tips:

-- Eliminate sources of standing water that are a breeding ground for mosquitoes, including watering troughs, bird baths, ornamental ponds, buckets, wading and swimming pools not in use, and old tires.
-- When engaged in outdoor activities at dusk and dawn when mosquitoes are most active, protect yourself by using mosquito repellants containing DEET, oil of lemon eucalyptus or Picardin, and follow the directions on the container.
-- Wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants in mosquito-infested areas.
-- Make sure screen doors and windows are in good repair and fit tightly.

Additional information about West Nile virus is available at:

Oregon Health Authority website: http://public.health.oregon.gov/DiseasesConditions/DiseasesAZ/WestNileVirus/Pages/survey.aspx

U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention with information available in Spanish and English:
http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dvbid/westnile/ index.htm

# # #


Attached Media Files: Image: Abdul Sayed, Flickr
Summer Travel Safety Tips for your Credit, Debit Cards Video, Infographic Provided
Northwest Credit Union Assn. - 07/01/16 1:07 PM
Tigard, OR -- Fifty-nine percent of Americans will travel this summer, according to American Express. Whether you're staying close to home and floating the Deschutes River, or taking a European river cruise, you can use your credit and debit cards with confidence. Simply follow these security safety tips provided by Northwest credit unions:
First, take advantage of your credit union's account monitoring systems that allow you to track your spending. Check daily, and report any suspicious activity immediately.
EMV chip cards provide an extra layer of security when you use them on site (not online). Not all merchants have caught up with this technology trend. If the merchant's chip system isn't operating yet, you can still use your card, but continue to monitor your transactions daily.
If you enter a pin number, use your other hand to shield the number from anyone who may be watching.
Be sure your card is returned following each purchase and that it is indeed your card.
Wait for the receipt. Never leave it at the checkout counter; and keep receipts with you, not in your shopping bags.
Keep a list of your card account numbers and telephone numbers to call if your cards are lost or stolen. Keep that list in a secure place--not in your wallet.
Know that your PIN can be stolen in other ways. There is a heat signature left on non-metal keypads for several minutes after you use it. Infrared cameras installed on Smartphones can be used to measure this heat signature and obtain your PIN. Stop this fraud by resting your fingers on other keys while typing in your PIN.
Unfortunately, thieves can place "skimming" devices on ATMs to steal your card and PIN numbers, so they can make fake cards and steal your money. Look for anything unusual near the speakers and beside the screen. Pull or twist on the device where you insert your card to make sure it's secure. If you find a skimming device has been attached don't use the ATM, and call police immediately.
Finally, let your credit union know that you will be traveling, and the destination. Credit union employees are looking out for you, and they pay attention to your spending patterns so they freeze your card and alert you if there is unusual spending. Letting the credit union know that you are traveling will allow you to continue to use your cards conveniently.
For use on your online channels, we are offering some additional resources your news audiences may find helpful:
An infographic regarding consumers' limited liability if their cards are stolen:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/tp77f1bb5ri4obq/ID-Theft-Liability-Infographic.pdf?dl=0

An animated video helping consumers take the right steps if their credit or debit cards are compromised:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/pjmny6r12st82xk/IDTheftv2.mov?dl=0


Attached Media Files: 2016-07/4992/95798/NWCUA_OR_News_Release_Travel_Card_Tips.docx
Fourth Fatal Motorcycle Crash In Less Than A Week On Oregon's Highways - Lane County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 07/01/16 11:05 AM
2016-07/1002/95794/100_0212.JPG
2016-07/1002/95794/100_0212.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-07/1002/95794/thumb_100_0212.JPG
On June 30, 2016 at approximately 3:30PM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of crash involving a motorcycle and a pickup Hwy 36 near milepost 12 (near Deadwood).

Preliminary investigation indicates a 1992 Harley Davidson motorcycle was traveling westbound on Highway 36 when it failed to negotiate a corner, crossing the centerline and sideswiping an eastbound 2007 Dodge pickup.

The motorcycle and its rider came to rest in the north ditch after the collision. The rider, Richard F ARAUJO, age 68, of Deadwood, was pronounced deceased at the scene. The driver of the Dodge, Elaine R BEERS, age 63, of Swisshome was not injured.

The roadway was restricted to one lane for approximately 3 ?1/2 hours. OSP was assisted on scene by the Oregon Department of Transportation and Western Lane Ambulance. Speed is being investigated as a contributing factor in the crash. More information will be released as it becomes available.

This marks the fourth fatal motorcycle crash on Oregon's highways in less than a week. For information on motorcycle safety, visit the Oregon Department of Transportation's motorcycle safety page at http://www.oregon.gov/ODOT/TS/pages/motorcyclesafety.aspx


OSP Release from June 26, 2016:

JUNE 24 -- LANE COUNTY

On June 24, 2016 at about 5:15PM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a motorcycle versus a pickup on Highway 36 near milepost 7 (near Mapleton).

Preliminary investigation revealed a 2004 Harley Davidson motorcycle was traveling eastbound when it failed to negotiate a corner, crossed the centerline, and struck a 1999 Ford Ranger head-on.

The motorcyclist, Michael R LUCIER, age 56, of Swisshome, Oregon, was pronounced deceased at the scene. The driver of the Ford, Rodney D PRUETT, age 23, of Florence was not injured.

There were intermittent lane closures on Highway 36 while the investigation was conducted. OSP was assisted by the Oregon Department of Transportation and Florence Police.


JUNE 25 -- JOSEPHINE COUNTY

On June 25, 2016 at about 8PM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a single vehicle crash on Highway 46 at milepost 7 (Caves Highway near Cave Junction).

The 911 caller, who was a passing motorist, reporting seeing a motorcycle partially down the embankment. The caller also reported the rider was not breathing. Emergency crews arrived on scene and pronounced the motorcyclist deceased.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a 2001 Triumph motorcycle was eastbound on Highway 46 at milepost 7 when it left the roadway on a corner. The motorcycle struck a tree and the rider, Patrick Michael DALEY, age 57, of Cave Junction, was thrown down the embankment.

Roadway evidence indicates excessive speed was a factor. Highway 46 was closed for approximately 1 hour during the investigation. OSP was assisted by the Illinois Valley Fire Department.


JUNE 26 -- LINN COUNTY

On June 26, 2016 at about 6:45AM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a truck versus motorcycle collision on Interstate 5 at the 235 interchange (just north of Albany). Information received is the truck driver failed to remain at the scene and left the area.

Preliminary information indicates a 1995 Kenworth truck tractor towing a chip trailer had been traveling southbound on Old Salem Road. The truck began to make a left turn onto the Interstate 5 southbound onramp, but turned in front of a northbound 1995 Kawasaki motorcycle.

The motorcyclist crashed as a result of the truck turning into its path. The rider, Kevin R ARGO, age 39, of Lebanon was pronounced deceased at the scene by emergency personnel.

The operator of the truck, Ruben L DEFOOR, age 79, of Albany, was later located and is cooperating with the investigation.

The onramp was closed for several hours as the investigation was conducted. OSP was assisted by Albany Fire, Linn County Sheriff's Office and the Oregon Department of Transportation. This is an ongoing investigation. More information will be released when available.


Attached Media Files: 2016-07/1002/95794/100_0212.JPG , 2016-07/1002/95794/100_0188.JPG
Oregon Youth Marijuana Use Prevention pilot campaign to launch
Oregon Health Authority - 07/01/16 8:08 AM
EDITORS: The soft launch of this campaign goes live today. Full materials including video, radio, digital and social media messages will launch on July 11, and a broad selection will be available for a media preview at an event on July 6.

July 1, 2016

What: Media are invited to Oaks Amusement Park for a preview of the Oregon Health Authority's youth marijuana use prevention pilot campaign.

When: Wednesday, July 6, 11:30 a.m.

Where: Historic Dance Pavilion, Oaks Amusement Park, 7805 SE Oaks Park Way, Portland

Who:
-- Lynne Saxton, Director, Oregon Health Authority
-- Katrina Hedberg, state health officer and epidemiologist, OHA Public Health Division
-- Kati Moseley, policy specialist, Health Promotion and Chronic Disease Prevention Section, OHA Public Health Division

Visuals:
-- Previews of the campaign, including downloadable videos for distribution.
-- Examples of posters, digital ads and other printed materials.
-- Experts from OHA will be available for interviews.

Background: Earlier this year, the Oregon Legislature passed HB 4014 and SB 1597, providing the Oregon Health Authority Public Health Division with $3.97 million to develop, pilot and evaluate a youth marijuana use prevention campaign. The Legislature directed OHA to conduct the pilot in an urban and a rural area of the state. Legislative intent guided OHA in choosing the Portland metro area (Washington, Multnomah and Clackamas counties) and southern Oregon (Josephine and Jackson counties) as the locations for this media campaign.

This campaign is an attempt to increase awareness among those younger than 21 about how recreational marijuana use might affect their health and their life, now and in the future.

# # #
Thu. 06/30/16
Fire Program Review Committee completes work
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/30/16 4:08 PM
The Oregon Department of Forestry has received final recommendations of the 2015-16 Fire Program Review Committee, focused on improving Oregon's "complete and coordinated wildfire protection system."

The recommendations conclude a seven-month process and represent the most comprehensive review of the Department's fire program in over a decade. Made up of forest landowners and operators, legislators, governor's staff and agency partners, the committee proposed changes in three categories: sustainable large fire funding, sustainable wildfire organization, and wildfire policy.

Sustainable large fire funding recommendations included:

Exploring the creation of a trust fund to pay the public share of large wildfire suppression costs on fires within ODF's jurisdiction and for reducing wildland fire risk;
Continuing the purchase of an annual catastrophic wildfire insurance policy to cover firefighting budget overruns in severe seasons, and also examine other insurance products;
Conducting a study of the cost equity of the state's protection of west side Bureau of Land Management lands from wildfire.

Sustainable wildfire organization recommendations included exploring several options to improve the state's "complete and coordinated wildfire protection system" as well as an option to increase "fire severity" funding by $1.5 million. This would add dollars to the Special Purpose Appropriation, spending authority provided by the Legislature to fund additional firefighting resources during severe wildfire seasons.

Wildfire policy improvements concentrated on the agency partnering to conduct new risk analysis studies. Recommended studies include one to determine the potential of wildfire to move across ownership boundaries, used to allow forest managers to prioritize landscape-level fuels treatments; a study to compare the cost of fighting wildfires in the wildland-urban interface vs. pure forestland and a study to improve prescribed forest burning opportunities and efficiencies. Prescribed burning is a proven tool to reduce wildfire hazards by removing excess forest vegetation.

The committee also recommended that the agency continue to foster coordination between Rangeland Fire Protection Associations and the BLM and other partners with the aim to strengthen fire suppression capability on Oregon's rangelands. Privately owned rangelands east of the Cascades do not receive wildfire protection from the state.

The full "2015/2016 Fire Program Review Committee Report to the State Forester" is available on the ODF website, Oregon.gov/odf.
Oregon announces final health insurance rate decisions
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 06/30/16 3:21 PM
Salem -- Today, the state announced its final decisions for 2017 individual and small employer health insurance rates. The proposed rates are for plans that comply with the Affordable Care Act for small businesses and individuals who buy their own coverage rather than getting it through an employer. The Department of Consumer and Business Services must approve any rates before they can be charged to policyholders.

These final decisions are the result of a rigorous and public review process by the DCBS Division of Financial Regulation. This process included public conference calls, public hearings, and public comment. The division published preliminary decisions before the public hearings. These hearings provided an opportunity for the public, health insurance companies, and the division to further review and analyze the preliminary decisions.

Health insurance rates are an estimate of future expenses, including medical and prescription drug claims costs and administrative expenses. These estimates are based on historical data and forecasts of future trends.

The department reviews rates to ensure they are reasonable and actuarially sound -- meaning they are sufficient to cover costs so that health insurance companies can pay claims, but not excessive. This year, the department found that most rates were reasonable based on projected expenses for 2017. However, there were a few exceptions, including:
The department reduced Providence's rate increase for individual plans from 29.6 percent to 24.1 percent. The department made the change because it disagreed with the company's projection for health care utilization and it concluded the profit margin generated in the original request was too high.
The department reduced Moda Health Plan's rate increase for individual plans from 32.3 percent to 29.3 percent because of several errors, one of which was discovered by OSPIRG in its review of the filings on behalf of consumers.
HealthNet's rate for individual plans changed from staying flat to increasing 9.8 percent because the original request was based on data that was not credible, the department found.

In addition, based on data available after the initial submission, ATRIO requested and was able to justify an additional 5 percent increase to its rates.

In the individual market, the division's final rate decisions range from an average rate increase of 9.8 percent to an average rate increase of 32 percent, depending on the insurance company. Under the final decisions, Silver Standard Plan premiums for a 40-year-old in Portland would range from $312 to $442 a month.

In the small group market, the division's final rate decisions range from an average rate decrease of 8.9 percent to an average rate increase of 17 percent. Silver Standard Plan premiums for a 40-year-old in Portland would range from $266 to $362 a month.

Click the following link for a table with company-specific information: http://dfr.oregon.gov/public-resources/healthrates/Documents/2017-final-summary.pdf

"Health insurance rates should generally follow trends in the cost of medical care," said Laura Cali, insurance commissioner and administrator of the Division of Financial Regulation. "However, there are several additional factors -- such as the end of federal programs and the recent losses experienced by insurers -- that make higher increases necessary for insurers to meet their obligations to policyholders in 2017."

The final rate decisions also include plans in 13 additional counties for Moda Health Plan. Moda was one of four statewide carriers that had decided to limit the number of counties in which it sells plans in 2017. One of those carriers, LifeWise Health Plan, opted to leave the Oregon market altogether.

"We were very concerned about limited options for consumers, particularly in rural counties, and worked hard to try to get insurers to reconsider their decisions," said Patrick Allen, DCBS director. "With Moda re-entering 13 counties, Oregonians throughout the state have multiple choices, and we are in a better position in a fast-changing market."

Final rates, a summary of the state of the individual and small group markets, and the final decision information for each carrier can be found at www.oregonhealthrates.org. Statewide premium comparison tables for ages 21, 40, and 60 will be posted online in late July.

###

The Division of Financial Regulation is part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, Oregon's largest business regulatory and consumer protection agency. Visit dcbs.oregon.gov.
Oregon Disabilities Commission to meet July14 in Salem
Oregon Department of Human Services - 06/30/16 3:05 PM
The Oregon Disabilities Commission plans to meet Thursday, July 14, 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. at the Barbara Roberts Human Services Building, Room 166, 500 Summer St. NE, Salem. The meeting is open to the public.

Agenda items include: announcements; liaison reports; commission business; service equity; Department of Labor discussion; and a public forum.

For those who can't attend in person there is a toll-free phone number: 1 888-808-6929; Participant Code: 4517555.

The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. For questions about accessibility or to request an accommodation, please contact Jeffrey Puterbaugh at 503-947-1189 or Jeffrey.L.Puterbaugh@state.or.us. Requests should be made at least 48 hours before the event.
For questions about this meeting, please contact: Jeffrey Puterbaugh, 503-947-1189, Jeffrey.L.Puterbaugh@state.or.us.
# # #
Enjoy Fireworks Safely and Legally (Photo)
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/30/16 1:53 PM
2016-06/5227/95764/Legal_and_Illegal_Fireworks.png
2016-06/5227/95764/Legal_and_Illegal_Fireworks.png
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-06/5227/95764/thumb_Legal_and_Illegal_Fireworks.png
Joint Release by:

Deschutes County Sheriff's Office
Bend Police Department
Black Butte Ranch Police Department
Redmond Police Department
Sunriver Police Department

Central Oregon law enforcement wishes our citizens and visitors a happy and safe Fourth of July. Please only use legal fireworks and do so in a safe and responsible manner. Fireworks, even legal fireworks can be dangerous if used inappropriately. Law enforcement and fire personnel routinely respond to small fires that are sparked by legal and illegal fireworks used during the time around and including the 4th of July. Help us reduce the risk of devastating fires by using fireworks responsibly.

We routinely respond to complaints of illegal fireworks, which includes any fireworks that: explode, eject balls of fire, fly into the air, or travel more than six feet on the ground. Law Enforcement will be on the lookout for illegal fireworks. Possessing illegal fireworks is a Class B Misdemeanor crime.

The Black Butte Ranch and Sunriver Police Departments would like to remind you fireworks of any kind are prohibited inside Black Butte Ranch and Sunriver.

We encourage everyone to have fun and enjoy celebrating, but we ask for voluntary compliance for the safe use of legal fireworks. Your safety is our highest concern.


Attached Media Files: 2016-06/5227/95764/Legal_and_Illegal_Fireworks.png
County advisory group to state forestry will meet July 8
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/30/16 1:20 PM
The Forest Trust Lands Advisory Committee is comprised of seven county commissioners representing 15 Oregon counties where state forestlands are located. The FTLAC is a statutorily established committee that advises the Board of Forestry on matters related to forestland managed by ODF.

The committee will meet July 8 from 9:30 a.m. to noon at the Oregon Department of Forestry's Headquarters, Santiam Room, Building D, 2600 State St., Salem. Items on the Forest Trust Land Advisory Committee agenda include a briefing on the State Forest Division's budget reductions, an update on the division's priority work, and discussion on drafting FTLAC testimony that will be presented to the Board of Forestry at the board's July 20 meeting.

Members of the public may attend the meeting and an opportunity for public comment will be provided. Questions about accessibility or special accommodations for the meeting can be directed to the Oregon Department of Forestry at 503-945-7248.

Find the meeting agenda and learn more about the FTLAC here.
More background on state forest management and county relationships is outlined in the Council of Forest Trust Lands Counties annual report.
BPA selects Javier Fernandez as next chief financial officer (Photo)
Bonneville Power Administration - 06/30/16 12:24 PM
2016-06/1236/95759/Javier-Fernandez-BPA-Chief-Financial-Officer.jpg
2016-06/1236/95759/Javier-Fernandez-BPA-Chief-Financial-Officer.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-06/1236/95759/thumb_Javier-Fernandez-BPA-Chief-Financial-Officer.jpg
Portland, Ore. -- Javier Fernandez has been appointed executive vice president and chief financial officer for the Bonneville Power Administration. Fernandez, currently BPA's deputy chief financial officer, will assume his new role in the next few weeks, taking over for Nancy Mitman, who announced earlier this year that she would retire in July.

As BPA's chief financial officer, Fernandez will oversee capital and debt management, accounting, cash management and budgeting for BPA's $4.3 billion total budget.

"Javier unquestionably brings to this vital position the kind of financial knowledge and real-world experience that will help us meet the many challenges sweeping today's energy industry," said BPA Administrator Elliot Mainzer. "I look forward to working closely with him as we map out our path for lasting success, with an eye toward remaining the Northwest's wholesale energy provider of choice."

Fernandez joined BPA in 2012. In addition to leading the capital portfolio management program, he has served as BPA's treasurer, directing financial planning and investment of funds for BPA and exercising authority for receipt, disbursement, banking, custody of funds and financial instruments.

Before coming to BPA, he served for three years as senior vice president with D.A. Davidson & Co., a financial services firm, and seven years with Seattle-Northwest Securities, performing public finance banking and financial advisory services to municipal jurisdictions primarily in Oregon.

"The energy industry is in a transformative era, and I am very excited to be among those utility professionals who will have a chance to address the challenges and opportunities ahead while continuing our legacy of delivering on our mission to the region," Fernandez said. "At the same time, I look forward to -- and recognize the importance of -- working with our customers and other stakeholders to continue BPA's prudent approach to fiscal management."

Fernandez has a Bachelor of Science in economics from ITAM in Mexico City and a master's in Business Administration from Yale University. He and his wife, Belinda, live in Portland, where earlier this year they welcomed new daughter Emily into their family, joining their 5-year-old daughter, Lucia, and 2-year-old son, Alex.

BPA is a federal agency that markets wholesale electrical power from 31 federal hydroelectric projects in the Northwest and one nonfederal nuclear plant providing about 28 percent of the electric power used in the Northwest. BPA also operates and maintains about three-fourths of the high-voltage transmission in its service territory, which includes Idaho, Oregon, Washington, western Montana and small parts of eastern Montana, California, Nevada, Utah and Wyoming. BPA also funds regional efforts to protect and rebuild fish and wildlife populations affected by hydropower development in the Northwest.


Attached Media Files: 2016-06/1236/95759/Javier-Fernandez-BPA-Chief-Financial-Officer.jpg
Oregon Department of Forestry Fire Update | Thursday, June 30, 2016
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/30/16 11:26 AM
FIRE PREVENTION REMINDER:
Public Use Restrictions are being implemented / increasing on various ODF districts throughout the state, often including restrictions on fireworks on ODF-protected lands. Be sure to know what restrictions are in place where you are working or recreating. Enjoy celebrating our nation's 240th birthday during the upcoming holiday week-end, but please be safe out there.


NEW FIRES (10 acres or larger reported on ODF-protected lands over the past 24 hours):

Ferguson Creek Fire (Western Lane District): The Ferguson Creek Fire was reported on Wednesday, June 29, burning approximately six miles southwest of Monroe. By that late afternoon / early evening, the fire was controlled at 25 acres. Cause of the fire is under investigation. Unless the situation changes, this will be the only report on this fire.

No other fires 10 acres in size or larger were reported yesterday on ODF-protected lands.

FIRE STATISTICS:
Fire statistics are for the current year and the average over the past 10 years for the 16 million acres of private and public forestland protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry.

January 1, 2016, through Today, June 30, 2016:
Lightning-caused fires: 33 fires burned, 2,125 acres
Human-caused fires: 196 fires burned, 322 acres
Total: 229 fires burned 2,447 acres

10-year average (January 1st through the present date in the year):
Lightning-caused fires: 39 fires burned, 155 acres
Human-caused fires: 179 fires burned, 1,344 acres
Total: 218 fires burned, 1,499 acres

###
Coffee Creek Correctional Facility presents children's event (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 06/30/16 10:02 AM
2016-06/1070/95746/TACE.jpg
2016-06/1070/95746/TACE.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-06/1070/95746/thumb_TACE.jpg
Every summer, an event to foster relationships between incarcerated mothers and their children -- called Through a Child's Eyes (TACE) -- is held at Coffee Creek Correctional Facility (CCCF) in Wilsonville. This year the event will be July 9-10.

TACE allows incarcerated mothers to interact with their children outside the confines of the visiting room in a more normalized environment with interactive games and activities, and an outdoor barbecue. The event is a joint project between Wilsonville Rotary International and CCCF, and has been held every year since 2003.

Events of this nature are part of an overall effort to increase visiting and family engagement at all 14 Oregon Department of Corrections prisons. Research shows that those who stay connected, receive visits, and interact with their families while incarcerated are more likely to be successful when they release.

Members of the media wishing to attend TACE must be pre-approved. They may contact Vicki Reynolds at 503-570-6405 to sign up.

CCCF is a multi-custody prison in Wilsonville accommodating all of Oregon's female inmates (approximately 1,260). The prison has cell and dormitory housing, inmate work programs, skills training, treatment programs, health services, religious services, physical plant, a central records unit, and administrative areas. CCCF participates in prison industries with Oregon Corrections Enterprises, including a contact center, auto CAD, and document scanning. In addition, CCCF houses the state's intake center, which provides intake and evaluation of all inmates committed to state custody by the courts. The intake center houses approximately 400 male inmates. CCCF's minimum facility opened in 2001, and the medium facility opened in 2002.

####


Attached Media Files: 2016-06/1070/95746/TACE.jpg
Antelope School listed in the National Register of Historic Places (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 06/30/16 9:59 AM
Antelope School
Antelope School
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-06/1303/95745/thumb_OR_WascoCounty_AntelopeSchool_WEB.jpg
The Antelope School is a significant representative of rural education in central Oregon during the first half of the twentieth century. A testament to the continued commitment to education of the residents of the town and vicinity, since its completion in 1925 it has been by far the most substantial building in Antelope, occupying the most prominent parcel in town, filling a wide variety of community roles. The school is the third built in Antelope, and was the central focus of education in the surrounding area for 60 years. The Antelope School stands out among other rural schools of its period because of its size and breadth of education offered (including primary through secondary until 1936), designed to meet the state requirements for Standard Schools at all grade levels through that time. Although after 1936 the Antelope School no longer provided instruction for all grade levels, it continued to provide instruction at the elementary and intermediate levels until 1983, when it was closed as a public school, an event that is associated with the Rajneesh movement's establishment of political dominance of the town. From its construction in 1925 to the present, the school has been a focus of community activity, hosting school activities, community events, and locally produced plays. The school has also functioned as the local polling place and the seat of local government, concurrent with and subsequent to its role as a place of formal education.

The Antelope School is also locally significant for its architecture as a unique example of a formal, concrete Classical Revival-style school building in this extremely rural setting where one and two-room, wooden schoolhouses are far more typical.

Oregon's State Advisory Committee on Historic Preservation recommended the building's nomination at their February 2016 meeting. It is one of only 33 properties in Wasco County that are individually listed in the National Register. The National Register, which is maintained by the National Park Service under the authority of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966.

More information about the National Register and recent Oregon lists is online at www.oregonheritage.org (click on "National Register" at left of page).


Attached Media Files: Antelope School National Register nomination , Press Release , Antelope School
ODF implements Regulated-Use Closure on lands protected by Central Oregon District
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/30/16 9:08 AM
Prineville, Ore--Lands protected by ODF's Central Oregon District (COD) will be placed under a Regulated Use Closure beginning Friday July 1, 2016 at 12:01 am. The Regulated Use Closure applies to private, county, and state owned lands protected by COD in Deschutes, Grant, Hood River, Wasco, Wheeler, Crook, Jefferson, Morrow, Harney, Umatilla, Lake, and Gilliam counties. The intent of the Closure is to limit human caused wildfires. Recent high temperatures have dried wildland fuels and increased the danger of large fire growth. Human caused fires in COD are above the ten year average for the District, which concerns fire managers as we enter the heart of fire season with dry fuels, warm temperatures and an increasing possibility of lightning caused fires.

The full Regulated Use Closure Proclamation can be found on the Central Oregon District website: www.ODFcentraloregon.com. The official Closure includes, but is not limited to the following activities:

Smoking is prohibited while traveling, except in vehicles on improved roads.
Open fires are prohibited, including campfires, charcoal fires, cooking fires and warming fires, except in designated areas. A map of designated areas is available on COD's website under Fire Information. Portable cooking stoves using liquefied or bottled fuels are allowed.
Chainsaw use is prohibited, between the hours of 1:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m. Chainsaw use is permitted at all other hours, if the following firefighting equipment is present with each operating saw: one axe, one shovel, and one operational 8 ounce or larger fire extinguisher. In addition, a fire watch is required at least one hour following the use of each saw.
Use of motor vehicles, including motorcycles and all-terrain vehicles, is prohibited, except on improved roads and except for vehicle use by a landowner and employees of the landowner upon their own land while conducting activities associated with their livelihood.
Possession of the following firefighting equipment is required while traveling in a motorized vehicle, except on federal and state highways, county roads and driveways: one shovel and one gallon of water or one operational 2?1/2 pound or larger fire extinguisher, except all-terrain vehicles and motorcycles which must be equipped with an approved spark arrestor in good working condition.
Mowing of dried grass with power driven equipment is prohibited, between the hours of 10:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m., except for the commercial culture and harvest of agricultural crops.
Use of fireworks and blasting is prohibited.

Open fires are allowed by permit only, please contact your local ODF office for information. Exploding targets, tracer ammunition and sky lanterns are prohibited during fire season.

For information on restrictions on public lands contact your local US Forest Service ranger district office or Bureau of Land Management district office.
Marine Board Approves Rules and Initiates Rulemaking
Oregon Marine Board - 06/30/16 7:30 AM
The Oregon State Marine Board met for their quarterly Board meeting on June 28, in The Dalles. The Board approved several grants and rule changes and approved initiating rulemaking on three new items.

The Board amended, adopted or repealed the following rules:

Chapter 250, Division 011, Steering and Sailing Rules. The rule was amended to be consistent with federal navigation regulations for the responsibilities between vessels, right of way, and procedures for safe passage on specified rivers. A temporary rule was in effect; May 2, 2016.
Issuance and Duplication Fees, OAR 250-010-0057 and Refunds, OAR 250-010-0058. The Marine Board repealed OAR 250-010-0057 as registration and titling fees are identified in Oregon Revised Statute. OAR 250-010-0058 was amended to identify the price point where customers will automatically receive a refund if there's overpayment of $10 or more. Any overpayment under $10 will be issued if the customer requests a refund. A temporary rule suspended OAR 250-010-0057; April 13, 2016.
Boat Operations in Jefferson County, OAR 250-020-0161. A new rule was adopted to allow a boat to anchor for 30 consecutive days in one location and then it must be moved to a new location at least half a mile away and must not return to the previously used location for 30 days. For purposes of this rule, "location" is defined as an area within a 300 foot radius. A boat must also not be left unattended for more than seven consecutive days. This rule does not impact private landowners or boats in a marina.
Boat Operations in Wallowa County, OAR 250-020-0340. Motorboats are prohibited on Kinney Lake.

The Board also approved initiating rulemaking for the following items:

Rulemaking for Ocean Charter Vessels, Chapter 250, Division 015. Draft language would expand purchasing options for Ocean Charters to a biennial ($100) or annual ($50) license and to change rule language to improve readability.
Agency Representation by Officer or Employee, OAR 250-001-0035. Allow agency staff to represent the Attorney General at contested case hearings related to the Outfitter/Guide program when the agency proposes to revoke, suspend or deny an outfitter/guide license. The rule will define the limitations of "agency representation" and will not enable staff to present "legal arguments." A temporary rule is in effect; May 12, 2016.
Boat Operations on the Willamette River in Clackamas County, OAR 250-020-0032. In April 2016, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) adopted a rule that authorized members of the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde to harvest hatchery salmon and hatchery steelhead at the Willamette Falls for ceremonial purposes from the shore or from a single platform erected by the Tribe. Although fishing from a boat is not authorized under ODFW rule, the Tribe will have to use a boat to construct and access its fishing platform. The Board approved initiating rulemaking to allow boat access for the platform construction and its subsequent use for ceremonial harvest by the Tribe in the area of the Willamette Falls that is currently closed to boating. A temporary rule is in effect; June 7, 2016.

The Board also approved several Round Two boating facility grant requests totaling $282,025 in state boater funds and postponed several agenda items, including a Chetco River petition to restrict motorboats, which will be considered during the October meeting.

To review the staff report and agenda, visit http://www.oregon.gov/OSMB/info/Pages/Board-and-Public-Meetings.aspx.
###
FBI On-Call PIO
FBI - Oregon - 06/30/16 6:00 AM
PIO Beth Anne Steele will be out of the office until Monday, July 11th. During this time, media should use the on-call pager for immediate needs.
Wed. 06/29/16
Oregon Civil Air Patrol Concludes Linn County Missing Hiker Search
Oregon Civil Air Patrol - 06/29/16 6:28 PM
At the direction of the U.S. Air Force Rescue and Recovery Center and the Linn County Sheriff, the Oregon Civil Air Patrol has concluded its mission to assist Linn County Sheriff's Office in searching for a 75 year old missing male hiker in the Marion Lake area..

The search for the missing hiker was requested by Linn County Sheriff Bruce Riley who asked for the CAP to join the search in the wilderness area of northeast Linn County. There are no roads directly to Marion Lake. The search included numerous agencies from throughout Oregon who spent five days searching for the hiker who was first reported missing by concerned family on Friday, June 24th when he failed to return from a day hike.

Oregon CAP, which was performing a training day last Saturday when the request was received by the AFRCC, diverted three aircraft from training tasks to join the search. Two aircraft flew search patterns while the third aircraft performed a "high bird" function, flying at a higher elevation and relaying radio communications between the search aircraft and the CAP base at Aurora State Airport.
A notable addition to the search effort participants was CAP's 6 state Pacific Region Commander, Colonel Brian Bishop. A resident of Portland, Col. Bishop, a pilot in the CAP, flew a search mission on Monday with a mission scanner and mission observer crew. " I have a backpacking in the search area" commented Bishop. " and have experienced the rugged nature of that terrain on the ground. That experience gave me an understanding and insight of the difficulties of an air search which I used while flying that mission" he said.
"It just goes to show how seriously we take SAR in Oregon" mentioned Undersheriff Jim Yon, search mission coordinator with the Linn County Sheriff on Col. Bishops participation in the search mission. " We do what we need to do to complete the mission" he said.

Civil Air Patrol was founded on Dec. 1, 1941, by a group of aviation enthusiasts and private pilots who wanted to donate their time and aircraft to protect the nation's coastlines during World War II and to perform other critical civil defense missions.

CAP, the longtime all-volunteer U.S. Air Force auxiliary, is the newest member of the Air Force's Total Force, which consists of regular Air Force, Air National Guard and the Air Force Reserve, along with Air Force retired military and civilian employees. CAP, in its Total Force role, operates a fleet of 550 aircraft and performs about 90 percent of continental U.S. inland search and rescue missions as tasked by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center and is credited by the AFRCC with saving an average of 78 lives annually.

Civil Air Patrol's 56,000 members nationwide also perform homeland security, disaster relief and drug interdiction missions at the request of federal, state and local agencies. Its members additionally play a leading role in aerospace education and serve as mentors to more than 24,000 young people currently participating in the CAP cadet program. Performing missions for America for the past 75 years, CAP received the Congressional Gold Medal in 2014 in honor of the heroic efforts of its World War II veterans. CAP also participates in Wreaths Across America, an initiative to remember, honor and teach about the sacrifices of U.S. military veterans. Visit www.capvolunteernow.com for more information.
BPA celebrates 25th anniversary of Spokane Tribal Hatchery (Photo)
Bonneville Power Administration - 06/29/16 4:44 PM
Milton Ray, a 16-month-old tribal member, watches fish at the Spokane Tribal Hatchery, which raises rainbow trout and kokanee salmon for release into Lake Roosevelt, Banks Lake and reservation inland lakes.
Milton Ray, a 16-month-old tribal member, watches fish at the Spokane Tribal Hatchery, which raises rainbow trout and kokanee salmon for release into Lake Roosevelt, Banks Lake and reservation inland lakes.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-06/1236/95717/thumb_Spokane-Tribal-Hatchery-Event-Child-Looking-at-Fish-June-29-2016.jpg
New agreement promises ratepayer support of Spokane Tribal Hatchery for another 20 years

Ford, Wash. - Today, the Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Bonneville Power Administration signed a new agreement that promises BPA ratepayer support of the Spokane Tribal Hatchery for another 20 years. The agreement also includes funding for hatchery modernization and improvements.

BPA began funding the Spokane Tribe of Indians hatchery in 1990, in part, for the environmental impacts of Grand Coulee Dam on the Columbia River. Completed in 1939, Grand Coulee flooded the Spokane Tribe's ancestral homelands and blocked salmon from migrating to the tribe's traditional fishing sites. The operation of Grand Coulee has also negatively affected resident fish populations, such as trout.

The Spokane Tribe of Indians has taken a leadership role in bringing fish back to the river, developing a restoration and enhancement program for Lake Roosevelt that includes a fish hatchery for rainbow trout and kokanee salmon.

"Historically, the Spokane Tribe was known as a river and fishing people, culturally defined, in part, by the bounty of salmon that returned annually to tribal fishery grounds," says Tim Peone, Spokane Tribal member and hatchery manager. "The hatchery program is meant to be more than just a fish production facility; it provides a remembrance and pathway for tribal members to reconnect with the river and its fisheries."

Today, the Spokane Tribe manages the hatchery in coordination with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Sherman Creek Hatchery and the Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Net Pen Rearing Project.

"We realize the hatchery doesn't bring back what was lost 80 years ago, but BPA is committed to protecting and improving conditions for the area's resident fish populations," says Lorri Bodi, BPA's vice president of Environment, Fish and Wildlife. "We want to help preserve and fortify tribal culture and the indigenous knowledge that enriches our entire region."

Annually, the hatchery produces approximately 100,000 kokanee salmon and 750,000 rainbow trout for release into Lake Roosevelt. Additionally, the hatchery also produces 6,000 rainbow trout yearlings for annual release into inland lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation. The tribal hatchery, which consists of 44 indoor/outdoor raceways, employs five full-time and four seasonal employees.

Artifacts, photos and reading panes chronicling historical fisheries, tribal subsistence and the cultural significance of the river are on display at the Spokane Tribal Hatchery -- open Monday through Friday, 8 a.m.to 3 p.m.


Attached Media Files: Milton Ray, a 16-month-old tribal member, watches fish at the Spokane Tribal Hatchery, which raises rainbow trout and kokanee salmon for release into Lake Roosevelt, Banks Lake and reservation inland lakes. , Carol Evans, chair of the Spokane Tribal Council, and BPA Administrator Elliot Mainzer commemorate the signing of a new 20-year funding agreement for the Spokane Tribal Hatchery in Ford, Wash.
Monthly Housing Stability Council Meeting
Oregon Housing and Community Services - 06/29/16 3:42 PM
July 8, 2016 | 9:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m.
Oregon Housing and Community Services
725 Summer St NE, Salem OR 97301 | Room 124 A&B
Call-In: 1-877-273-4202 | Participant Code: 4978330

AGENDA:
9:00 Meeting Called to Order
9:05 Public Comment
9:15 Draft Meeting Minutes
9:20 Multifamily Bond Approvals
10:00 Agency Request Budget
11:00 Health and Housing Study
11:30 OHA Overview
12:00 LIFT Progress Update
12:15 Report of the Interim Director
12:30 Report of the Chair
12:45 Meeting Adjourned
Legislative briefing on public health modernization set July 6 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 06/29/16 3:29 PM
June 29, 2016

What: The Oregon Health Authority will hold a legislative briefing hosted by Representative Mitch Greenlick and Senator Laurie Monnes Anderson to present information about Oregon's public health modernization initiative.

Agenda: Provide an introduction to public health modernization; review findings from the statewide public health modernization assessment; and provide an overview of the public health modernization implementation plan.

When: Wednesday, July 6, 9:30-11 a.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1A, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. The meeting also will be live-streamed through the public health modernization website at http://www.healthoregon.org/modernization.


# # #
Task Force on School Nursing meets July 8 in Portland
Oregon Health Authority - 06/29/16 3:25 PM
June 29, 2016

What: The monthly public meeting of the Task Force on School Nursing

Agenda: Continue analyzing ideas to fund school nursing in Oregon and begin brainstorming recommendations to include in task force report.

When: Friday, July 8, 12:30-3:30 p.m. The meeting is open to the public.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1A, 800 NE Oregon, Portland

The Task Force on School Nursing is a governor-appointed task force legislatively mandated by SB 698 (2015). The task force is charged with:
-- Examining health care funding sources to support school health services.
-- Recommending sustainable funding sources for school health services.
-- Recommending standards of school nursing practices.
-- Recommending ways to create a coordinated school health services model that directs an appropriate level of funding to school nursing and school-based health centers.



# # #
Metolius Loops Bikeway Designation Removed Due to Existing Plan Conflict (Photo)
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 06/29/16 1:00 PM
US Forest Service logo
US Forest Service logo
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-06/1303/95677/thumb_USFS_Logo.png
Joint News Release // Oregon Parks and Recreation Department + US Forest Service // June 29, 2016

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contacts:
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept., Alex Phillips, 503-986-0631 (desk), 503-480-9092 (cell)
Deschutes National Forest, Jean Nelson-Dean, 541-383-5561


Metolius Loops Bikeway Designation Removed Due to Existing Plan Conflict

Lebanon OR -- The Oregon State Parks and Recreation Commission voted to remove the Metolius Loops Scenic Bikeway designation at their June 29 public meeting in Lebanon. The change resolves a conflict with the pre-existing federal Wild and Scenic River Management Plan that preserves the natural qualities of Camp Sherman area by limiting promotions, among other things.

The State Scenic Bikeway designation is a promotional designation. Even without the label "Scenic Bikeway," all public roads in the area are available and open for bicycling.

The Metolius Loops State Scenic Bikeway was designated in 2011, and like all bikeways, was promoted nationally and internationally online and in print by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, its program partner Travel Oregon, and local bicycle and tourism proponents. This promotional mission unintentionally conflicted with the Metolius Wild and Scenic River Management Plan which was signed in 1997 by the Forest Service, following environmental analysis and public comment. The Metolius plan calls for protecting the area's primitive, historic character and preserving Outstandingly Remarkable Values by not permitting entities to promote the area, reducing congestion, managing signage to perpetuate historic character, and other standards. A goal is to limit conflict and crowding in the Metolius Basin to maintain a quality visitor recreation experience.

After discovering the problem two years ago, Camp Sherman residents, bikeway proponents, and staff with the U.S. Forest Service and OPRD tried unsuccessfully to resolve the inherent conflict between the two designations.

Because bikeways have to complement existing plans, the Metolius Loops route probably wouldn't earn designation if proposed today.

Since the Metolius bikeway was never signed, nothing will change on the ground at Camp Sherman with the removal of the Scenic Bikeway designation. Cycling will still be legal on those public roads, though the route will no longer be promoted in print and online by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department and Travel Oregon.

###


Attached Media Files: US Forest Service logo , Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept logo
Public Version of Real-Time Assessment and Planning Tool for Oregon Goes Live (Photo)
Oregon Office of Emergency Management - 06/29/16 9:30 AM
Detailed area of active wildfires can be seen using RAPTOR.
Detailed area of active wildfires can be seen using RAPTOR.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-06/3986/95702/thumb_20160623_PublicRAPTORdetail_-_wildfire.jpg
Salem, Ore. -- June 29, 2016 -- The Real Time Assessment and Planning Tool for Oregon (RAPTOR) is now available for the public to view incident data about wildfires, areas impacted by flooding, live weather radar, contact information for county emergency managers and more.
"This application enables users to view and interact with critical maps, aerial imagery, hazards, weather and event related data via the internet anywhere anytime," says Daniel Stoelb, Geographic Information Systems program coordinator for the Oregon Office of Emergency Management. "These maps offer information about what is happening geographically within our area."

RAPTOR is a web mapping application that allows users to spatially display interrelated and aggregated information from various systems in a geospatial platform. Specific elements of information include weather watches and warnings, local storm reports, live weather radar, road closures/delays, and active incidents. The public can access the application at http://arcg.is/1XVxzQ2.

RAPTOR supports Oregon's emergency operations plan by sharing information before, during, and after an incident such as a flood or wildfire. It allows OEM to develop, implement and share information with local and state partners, and enhances Oregon's overall disaster readiness.

For more information about RAPTOR, contact Daniel Stoelb, GIS program coordinator at the Oregon Office of Emergency Management, at daniel.stoelb@state.or.us.


Attached Media Files: Detailed area of active wildfires can be seen using RAPTOR. , Weather patterns are visibile across Oregon on RAPTOR. , 2016-06/3986/95702/OEM_logo.jpg
Tue. 06/28/16
Julie Green's "My New Blue Friends" to be exhibited in the Governor's Office July 7-Sept. 7 (Photo)
Oregon Arts Commission - 06/28/16 3:03 PM
My New Blue Friends and Wallpaper by Julie Green
My New Blue Friends and Wallpaper by Julie Green
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-06/1418/95698/thumb_MyNewBlueFriendsandWallpaperGreen.jpg
June 28, 2016, Salem, OR -- Corvallis artist Julie Green will exhibit "My New Blue Friends" in the Governor's Office, in the Capitol Building in Salem, July 7 through Sept. 7.

"My New Blue Friends" consists of air-brushed egg tempura paintings depicting abstractions of everyday foods. Inspired by blue-flow ceramics, a technique in which the blue glaze was deliberately blurred, the series presents softly abstracted repetitive shapes in fluctuating tones of blue: a contemporary take on a traditional decorative art form. Green is best-known for her ongoing 16-year project "The Last Supper," which depicts meal requests of U.S. death-row inmates painted in cobalt blue mineral paint on second-hand plates.

"My New Blue Friends" is an oblique response to "The Last Supper," extending Green's exploration of food while providing a lighter and less literal interpretation of the subject.
Born in Japan, Green has exhibited widely in the United States and internationally, and has been a recipient of honors and awards including the Joan Mitchell Foundation Painters and Sculptors Grant, an ArtPrize Juror's Choice Award and a 2016 Oregon Arts Commission Fellowship. She has been featured in The New York Times, a Whole Foods mini-documentary, National Public Radio, Ceramics Monthly and Gastronomica, and her egg tempera is included in the seventh edition of "A World of Art," published by Prentice Hall. Green is a Professor of Art at Oregon State University and is represented by Upfor in Portland.

The Art in the Governor's Office Program honors selected artists in Oregon with exhibitions in the reception area of the Governor's Office in the State Capitol. Artists are nominated by a statewide committee of arts professionals who consider artists representing the breadth and diversity of artistic practice across Oregon, and are then selected by the Arts Commission with the participation of the Governor's Office. Only professional, living Oregon artists are considered and an exhibit in the Governor's office is considered a "once in a lifetime" honor. Artists whose work has previously been shown in the Governor's office include Henk Pander, Michele Russo, Manuel Izquierdo, James Lavadour, Margot Thompson, Gordon Gilkey and Yuji Hiratsuka.



The Oregon Arts Commission provides leadership, funding and arts programs through its grants, special initiatives and services. Nine commissioners, appointed by the Governor, determine arts needs and establish policies for public support of the arts. The Arts Commission became part of Business Oregon (formerly Oregon Economic and Community Development Department) in 1993, in recognition of the expanding role the arts play in the broader social, economic and educational arenas of Oregon communities. In 2003, the Oregon legislature moved the operations of the Oregon Cultural Trust to the Arts Commission, streamlining operations and making use of the Commission's expertise in grantmaking, arts and cultural information and community cultural development.

The Arts Commission is supported with general funds appropriated by the Oregon legislature and with federal funds from the National Endowment for the Arts as well as funds from the Oregon Cultural Trust. More information about the Oregon Arts Commission is available online at: www.oregonartscommission.org

- 30 -


Attached Media Files: My New Blue Friends and Wallpaper by Julie Green
Northeast Oregon scratching off wins
Oregon Lottery - 06/28/16 3:01 PM
June 28, 2016 - Salem, Ore. -- Northeast Oregon is known for its lush fertile farmland, awe-inspiring canyons, mighty rivers and two big Oregon Lottery Scratch-it jackpot wins within a week.

Last week, Larry Storment, a retired railroad engineer, learned he won a $50,000 jackpot playing the Oregon Lottery's 2nd Chance Drawing, where players register their non-winning scratch-its for a chance at the top prize. Storment, from Hermiston, said he was going to use his winnings to fix his house.

Monday, Walt Hinz, of Stanfield -- just over five miles from Hermiston -- won $100,000 on the Oregon Lottery's newest Scratch-it, Wheel of Fortune.

"I had won money on another scratch-it so I was playing with my winnings," Hinz said when he claimed his prize. "I love playing at Main Street Market. They are so nice there and are great with the Lottery games."

Hinz, who is retired from the city of Stanfield, said he plans use his winnings to fix up his house and celebrate his 18th wedding anniversary with his wife Nancy. He purchased the ticket from Stanfield's Main Street Market in Stanfield.

In the past week, Scratch-it winners from Umatilla County have taken home $150,000 and for the year players have claimed from the Salem and Wilsonville Lottery offices more than $437,000 playing Scratch-its.

Hinz won one of two $100,000 prizes available on the $10 Wheel of Fortune Scratch-it. So Oregon Lottery players still have a chance to win up to $100,000 playing the new Wheel of Fortune Scratch-it.

"Wheel of Fortune is the latest entry into the Lottery's 'family of games' Scratch-it offerings," said Interim Traditional Product Manager Tina Erickson. "The Wheel of Fortune Scratch-it has been popular throughout the lottery industry and we are excited to offer it in Oregon. The game features four different tickets at different prices, with different top prizes. The $1 Wheel of Fortune game has a $5,000 top prize, the $2 game has a $10,000, the $5 ticket carries a $50,000 top prize, and the $10 ticket has a top prize of $100,000."

Lottery officials recommend that players always sign the back of the Oregon Lottery tickets to ensure their claim on the prize. In the event of winning a jackpot, winners should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 should contact the Lottery office to schedule an appointment to claim their prize.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned nearly $10 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org


###
Play Ball! The Original Rules of Baseball on Exhibit at the Oregon Historical Society July 1 -- October 9 (Photo)
Oregon Historical Society - 06/28/16 1:52 PM
2016-06/2861/95690/IMG_9665.JPG
2016-06/2861/95690/IMG_9665.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-06/2861/95690/thumb_IMG_9665.JPG
Portland, OR -- June 28, 2016 -- Documents that the Official Historian of Major League Baseball declared "the Magna Carta of America's national pastime" will be on exhibit at the Oregon Historical Society in Portland (1200 SW Park Avenue) beginning this Friday, July 1, through October 9, 2016. The exhibit will be the first public display of these nineteenth century papers, which only recently came to light at an auction in California.

The hand-written documents were drafted by Daniel "Doc" Adams and presented at an unprecedented special meeting of all New York area baseball clubs in 1857. The documents, entitled "Laws of Base Ball," conclusively set the game's rules, among which included establishing ninety-foot base paths, assigning nine players to a side, and fixing the duration of the game at nine innings. A full transcription of the documents is available upon request; please email rachel.randles@ohs.org for a copy.

MEDIA PREVIEW
Media are invited to an exclusive preview of the exhibit with OHS Executive Director Kerry Tymchuk on Thursday, June 30 at 11am. Please email rachel.randles@ohs.org if you plan to attend.

Baseball fans will also want to mark their calendars for Tuesday, August 2, as OHS will host John Thorn, Official Historian of Major League Baseball, for a lecture on the history of America's favorite game. The lecture begins at 7pm at the First Congregational Church (1126 SW Park Avenue). Tickets are $25 and are available online at johnthorn.brownpapertickets.com.

John Thorn is the author of Baseball in the Garden of Eden: The Secret History of the Early Game and co-author of The Hidden Game of Baseball, which established alternative statistics later recognized and adopted as official by Major League Baseball. A sought-after consultant for exhibits and documentaries on America's game, Thorn also talks baseball with fans on his MLB blog, Our Game.

The Oregon Historical Society's museum is open seven days a week, Monday -- Saturday from 10am -- 5pm and Sunday from 12pm -- 5pm. The museum and exhibit will also be open on Independence Day, Monday, July 4, from 10am -- 5pm. Admission is $11, and discounts are available for students, seniors, and youth. Admission is free for OHS members and Multnomah County residents thanks to the recent renewal of the Oregon Historical Society levy.


About the Oregon Historical Society

For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state's collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon's history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon's cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.


Attached Media Files: 2016-06/2861/95690/IMG_9665.JPG , 2016-06/2861/95690/IMG_9664.JPG , 2016-06/2861/95690/EDEN_JOHN35C.jpg , 2016-06/2861/95690/Baseball_in_the_Garden_of_Eden.jpg
A Portland air quality study reminds us of the importance of trees (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/28/16 11:42 AM
Pedestrians enjoying the benefits of a healthy urban canopy in Salem
Pedestrians enjoying the benefits of a healthy urban canopy in Salem
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-06/1072/95683/thumb_UFSalem.JPG
With all of the recent headlines in the news about air pollutants, schools with drinking water concerns and other stories about environmental contaminants, it's nice to hear some good news for a change.

A surprising study at Portland State University has revealed that trees soak up more urban pollutants than previously known.

"It's easy to overlook the important contaminant-cleansing roles that trees play in our cities," says Oregon Department of Forestry's Community Assistance Forester Kristin Ramstad. "This study reminds us of all the work a city's trees do behind-the-scenes," she adds.

The PSU researchers -- Meenakshi Rao, Linda A. George, Todd N. Rosenstiel, Vivek Shandas and Alexis Dinno -- have been examining mobile sources of air pollution (primarily cars and trucks) and measuring nitrogen dioxide (NO2) at 144 sites in Portland.

"One of the discoveries in terms of trees is that the amount of pollutants - like nitrogen dioxide - trees remove is even greater than expected," says Shandas. For those living in or near cities like Salem, Portland and Eugene (all three cities are Tree Cities - a title designated by the Arbor Day Foundation), it's important to consider the benefits trees provide.

Exactly how is it that trees make a city more livable? Clean air, clean water, shade, wildlife habitat and enhanced property values are only a few contributions trees make to communities. Another finding of the new study? Air quality can vary from neighborhood-to-neighborhood.

Planning strategically to improve air quality
"Community leaders and others involved with managing urban forests often take measures that help improve air quality," says Ramstad. "These actions include planting long-lived trees that can reduce long-term pollutant accumulation, planting trees to shade parked cars, planting trees in polluted or heavily populated areas and maintaining large, healthy trees, which can have the greatest per-tree pollution-reducing effects."

Tree benefits - like air quality and the human health connection - are topics frequently explored by urban forestry professionals and researchers. A 2013 U.S. Forest Service and Davey Institute study on urban trees found that trees reduce fine particulate air pollution, saving an average of eight lives every year in New York City. That study was discussed at a Board of Forestry meeting held two years ago to discuss urban forestry topics.

In the PSU study - titled "Assessing the Relationship Among Urban Trees, Nitrogen Dioxide and Respiratory Health" - researchers are finding that reductions in nitrogen dioxide associated with trees is large enough to make a discernible contribution to improved human respiratory health. And, according to the U.S. Forest Service, keeping a city's trees healthy helps its population stay healthy: one hundred trees remove 53 tons of carbon dioxide per year.

Enhancing canopy in Salem
Patricia Farrell, a City of Salem natural resource specialist, has much to say on the topic. Farrell authored the city's "Community Forestry Strategic Plan" in 2009.

"The City of Salem has been working several years with Friends of Trees to expand Salem's urban canopy," says Farrell, who adds "improving air quality is one of several key goals." Salem has also been keen about making a difference in under-served neighborhoods. "This is the fourth year Salem has been working towards enhancing canopy in lower income parts of the city which abut the I-5 corridor," adds Farrell.

In Portland, researchers estimate that nitrogen dioxide reduction associated with trees could result in significantly fewer incidences of respiratory problems, accounting for approximately $7 million in health benefits annually. The Portland State study shows a need to monitor air pollutants on a local scale to help the public assess health impacts.

"We now have a very detailed inventory and picture of Portland's tree canopy, which can help us understand the services they provide," says Shandas. Researchers hope that eventually key trees species will be intentionally planted to maximize local nitrogen dioxide removal while taking in other factors including ozone and allergen production.

The non-profit Friends of Trees also takes a keen interest and leadership role in better understanding and sharing the positive health impacts of well-canopied neighborhoods. "We feel that the benefits to human well-being provided by urban trees is really turning out to be one the most compelling reasons for people to want to plant trees in their yards or along their streets," says Kris Hikari, regional program manager with Friends of Trees.

Researcher Shandas recommends examining tree cover and local demographics to prioritize locations where new trees can contribute the most to public health outcomes. A new "trees and health" app (found online at http://map.treesandhealth.org/) works on phones or laptops and is available to help urban forestry proponents in this endeavor.

These newest findings are yet another confirmation of the importance of green infrastructure -- trees, open space, vegetation and other natural assets -- in providing environmental, economic and social benefits vital to healthy living in today's urban environment.


Attached Media Files: Pedestrians enjoying the benefits of a healthy urban canopy in Salem
Mega Millions jackpot quietly grows to $390 million
Oregon Lottery - 06/28/16 11:06 AM
The Mega Millions jackpot for tonight's drawing has quietly been building to its current $390 million level. And if there is no Mega Millions jackpot winner tonight, the jackpot for Friday's drawing will grow to an estimated $415 million.

"The current Mega Millions jackpot is tied for fourth among all-time Mega Millions jackpots," said Lottery spokesman Chuck Baumann. "The largest Mega Millions jackpot, $656 million, was won in 2012."

While Oregon Lottery officials are still waiting for the state's first Mega Millions jackpot winner, Oregon Mega Millions players have won more than $8.8 million in prizes since Mega Millions was first offered in Oregon in March 2010. Mega Millions is currently played in 46 jurisdictions including Oregon.

The Oregon Lottery reminds players to always sign the back of their Lottery tickets, regardless of the game. In the event of winning a jackpot, they should consult with a trusted financial planner or similar professional to develop a plan for their winnings. Prize winners of more than $50,000 should contact the Lottery office to schedule an appointment to claim their prize.

Since the Oregon Lottery began selling tickets on April 25, 1985, it has earned nearly $10 billion for economic development, public education, state parks and watershed enhancements. For more information on the Oregon Lottery visit www.oregonlottery.org

###
PPAO and BRO Condemn Franklin Graham Rally in Salem
Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon - 06/28/16 9:56 AM
Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon and Basic Rights Oregon issued the following joint statement in response to Franklin Graham's Decision America rally today in Salem:

"As progressive organizations, we condemn Franklin Graham's efforts to bring his hateful campaign to Oregon, particularly after this month's tragic massacre in Orlando.

"Franklin Graham has a long history of attacking the humanity of LGBTQ Americans - claiming that Satan is behind pro-equality advocacy, accusing LGBTQ people of 'recruiting' children and supporting Russia's draconian laws against 'gay propaganda.' His supporters include Oregon Life United, a group of extremists who are working to amend the Oregon Constitution to restrict low-income Oregonians from accessing safe, legal abortion.

"Oregonians overwhelmingly reject the politics of division that Franklin Graham and Oregon Life United represent. We stand in solidarity against the toxic rhetoric that breeds acts of terrorism and hatred based on who people love or who they are. Enough is enough."
Oregon Farm Bureau, RS Energy announce new solar system member benefit
Oregon Farm Bureau - 06/28/16 9:19 AM
Oregon Farm Bureau is proud to announce a new member benefit partnership with RS Energy, an installer of high-quality commercial solar panel systems. RS Energy has designed five optimal solar panel systems specifically for farmers and ranchers, and will offer them at significant savings for Farm Bureau members.

"Farm Bureau is very excited about this new savings program with RS Energy," said Dennis Myhrum, vice president of organization for Oregon Farm Bureau. "We're seeing more Oregon farmers and ranchers expanding into solar energy as a way to reduce always-rising power costs."

Through the new partnership, Farm Bureau members can save between $14,515 and $165,144 when they install a RS Energy solar system on their farm or ranch.

"This is a fantastic opportunity for the agriculture community, which has seen electrical costs skyrocket almost 10 percent in the last two years," said Billy Sorenson, partner with RS Energy.

Using solar energy can save as much as $2,000,000 from a farm or ranch's power bills during the life of the system, said Sorenson.

Solar systems can be installed on the roof or on the ground; ground systems take up less than a quarter of an acre. RS Energy also offers four different financing options.

RS Energy's systems qualify for the 30 percent federal investment tax credit for solar. Portland General Electric or Pacific Power customers who install a system are also eligible for an Energy Trust of Oregon cash incentive up to $400,000.

Based on the success of the program, RS Energy will make donations to Farm Bureau's education and outreach programs.

To determine if a solar system is right for your farm or ranch, email RS Energy's Billy Sorenson at billy@rs-s2s.com. RS Energy will meet with interested Farm Bureau members to offer site-specific walk-throughs.

###

Note to Editors: "Farm Bureau" is a registered trademark; please capitalize in all cases.

About Oregon Farm Bureau: The state's largest general farm organization, Oregon Farm Bureau (OFB) is a grassroots, nonpartisan, nonprofit organization representing the interests of the state's farmers and ranchers in the public and policymaking arenas. First established in Oregon in 1919, Farm Bureau is organized in all 36 counties and has 7,000 member families that are professionally engaged in agriculture.

About RS Energy: RS Energy is the leading agricultural commercial solar installer in Oregon. Founded in 2009, RS Energy has installed over 550 projects. RS Energy makes switching to solar easy by being the customer's only point of contact from start to finish. RS Energy is located in Tualatin, Oregon.
Client and Staff Safety Task Force will meet June 29 in Salem --new location -- agenda available
Oregon Department of Human Services - 06/28/16 8:05 AM
The Client and Staff Safety Task Force will meet Wednesday, June 29, 2016 from 1 to 3:30 p.m. at the Oregon State Capitol, Room 350, 900 Court Street NE, in Salem. This meeting is open to the public.

The conference call number for those who are unable to attend in person is: 1-877-873-8017; enter participant code 772325# when prompted.

The task force is directed to make recommendations on staff safety, resident care, and the operation of Stabilization and Crisis Units. The task force will meet approximately six times and provide a report to the Legislature by September 15, 2016.

The task force will consider and make recommendations for:
Ensuring the dignity and self-determination of each resident in a Stabilization and Crisis Unit
Improving the safety of staff employed by a Stabilization and Crisis Unit
Improving the training and support for staff
Staffing levels
Reducing incidents of aggressive and assaultive behavior by residents
Reducing the need for staff to work overtime
Improving access to appropriate mental health supports and intervention methods
Ensuring the timely transition of residents in Stabilization and Crisis Units when ready to be placed with a residential service provider in the community, including recommendations for building capacity in community-based care settings.

All meetings of this task force will conform to Oregon public meetings laws. Request for an accommodation for a person with disabilities should be made to Angie Allbee and should be made at least 24 hours in advance of the meeting. For more information, contact Angie Allbee, DHS Legislative Coordinator, at 503-689-5034.


Attached Media Files: Task Force Agenda
Mon. 06/27/16
Names Released; Officer Involved Shooting Investigation Continuing In Keizer
Oregon State Police - 06/27/16 5:40 PM
The investigation into Sunday night's officer involved shooting in Keizer is continuing. A Keizer Police Officer used deadly force during an armed robbery investigation which resulted in the suspect being taken to Salem Health for life threatening injuries.

The involved officer has been identified as Keizer Police Officer Esteban Perez, age 26. Officer Perez has approximately five years of law enforcement service. He was uninjured in the incident.

The robbery suspect who was injured in the encounter has been identified as Andy L GIBSON, age 50, of Canby. He is still being treated at Salem Health for life threatening injuries.

There had been speculation this suspect was associated with two other robberies that occurred in Keizer early Sunday morning, but it has been confirmed this is not the case and the incidents are not related.

No further information to be released at this time.

End Release


Previous release by Keizer Police Department:

A Keizer Police officer was involved in an on-duty shooting on the evening of June 26, 2016 in Keizer.

On Sunday, June 26, 2016 at 8:18 p.m. officers from the Keizer Police Department responded to the 7-Eleven convenience store located at 5550 River Road North after receiving a report that an armed robbery had just occurred at this business.

One Keizer Police officer arrived on scene and confronted the suspect. During the confrontation the officer discharged his firearm striking the suspect. The suspect was transported to Salem Health (formerly known as the Salem Hospital) for treatment of his injuries. The extent of his injuries is unknown at this time. The involved officer was not injured.

This investigation will be conducted by members of the Oregon State Police and the Marion County District Attorney's Office, who are currently on scene. This is standard procedure for the Keizer Police Department to request the Oregon State Police conduct an independent investigation into an incident of this nature.

The name of the involved officer and the suspect are not being released at this time as additional time is needed to make notification to the families of those who were involved.

The involved officer has been placed on paid administrative leave pending the completion of the investigation. This is standard procedure and consistent with Senate Bill 111 investigation protocols.

Because this is an ongoing investigation, no further information will be released at this time.

Anyone with information regarding this investigation is asked to contact the Oregon State Police at 503-731-3030.
Further media releases will be through the Oregon State Police or the Marion County District Attorney's Office.
BLM Initiates Wild Horse Research in Oregon
Bureau of Land Management Oregon & Washington - 06/27/16 2:35 PM
Agency Works with Veterinarians to Study Safe, Humane Methods to Spay Mares, Control Unchecked Herd Growth

Portland, Ore. -- The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Burns (Oregon) District today released its decision to initiate research, in cooperation with Oregon State University, to develop and evaluate safe and humane methods to spay wild horse mares as a method for managing the growth of wild horse herds on public lands. The decision comes on the heels of the BLM's latest annual population estimate that shows approximately 67,000 wild horses and burros roaming public lands in 10 Western states. This most recent estimate is 15 percent -- equivalent to 9,000 additional animals -- more than what was estimated in 2015. The population of wild horses and burros on public lands is now more than double what the agency has determined is healthy for the animals and the rangeland resources on which they and many other species depend. The BLM's goal is to manage healthy horses on healthy rangelands.

Managing the population of wild horse herds is essential to maintain the health of the animals and of public lands. With virtually no natural predators, herds can grow 15-20 percent per year, doubling in just four years if left unchecked. Overpopulation on the range can damage fragile rangeland resources and compromise animal health. In addition to the on-range population, the BLM is responsible for the care of 46,000 unadopted wild horses and burros in its off-range pastures and corral facilities. It costs nearly $50,000 to care for one unadopted horse in a corral over its lifetime. The BLM is tasked with overseeing the protection, management and control of wild horses and burros by the Wild Free Roaming Horse and Burro Act of 1971 (Public Law 92-195).

The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) found in a June 2013 report there are no highly effective, easily delivered, and affordable fertility-control methods available across the BLM's West-wide Herd Management Areas. As a result of these findings, the BLM aims to develop a variety of new population management tools to reduce the number of animals that must be removed from the range as well as the number of animals that must be cared for in off-range facilities. As part of this effort, the decision announced today will initiate three of 21 research studies and projects with universities and the U.S. Geological Survey to develop new management tools and improve wild horse and burro management. Detailed information about each project has been posted on the agency's website (http://on.doi.gov/1WDtWjt).

The three research studies announced today are focused on investigating the safety and effectiveness of three methods of mare fertility control. The BLM has awarded a research grant to Oregon State University to conduct the studies, and the procedures will follow an animal care protocol approved by the university. Licensed and experienced veterinarians will conduct the procedures and provide post-procedure care. The research will start this summer at Oregon's Wild Horse Off-Range Corral in Hines, OR.

The BLM considered the Proposed Action to conduct the studies and the No Action alternatives in Environmental Assessment DOI-BLM-OR-B000-2015-0055. The BLM has selected the Proposed Action. Copies of the Environmental Assessment, Finding of No Significant Impact, and Decision Record are found on BLM's planning documents website: https://eplanning.blm.gov/epl-front-office/. To search for a document, you can use the map to locate Burns District or click on the "Text Search" tab and search by state, document type, year (2015), and program. For further information on the Spay Research project, please contact the BLM's Burns District Office at (541) 573-4400.

Additional steps BLM is taking to address wild horse population issues include transitioning horses from off-range corrals to more cost-effective pastures; working to increase adoptions with new programs and partnerships; and requesting two new pieces of legislative authority in the Department's Fiscal Year 2017 budget request--one to allow for the immediate transfer of wild horses to other agencies that have a need for work animals and one that would create a congressionally-chartered foundation that could help fund and support adoption efforts.


The BLM manages more than 245 million acres of public land, the most of any Federal agency. This land, known as the National System of Public Lands, is primarily located in 12 Western states, including Alaska. The BLM also administers 700 million acres of sub-surface mineral estate throughout the nation. The BLM's mission is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of America's public lands for the use and enjoyment of present and future generations. In Fiscal Year 2015, the BLM generated $4.1 billion in receipts from activities occurring on public lands.

-BLM-


Attached Media Files: Press Release
Pacific Power adds more features to its convenient mobile app
Pacific Power - 06/27/16 11:23 AM
Media inquiries: Media Hotline 800-570-5838

Pacific Power adds more features to its convenient mobile app

PORTLAND, Ore. (June 27, 2016) --Pacific Power is updating its popular mobile app with new features to make it easier for customers to manage their accounts from anywhere. In addition to paying bills and reporting power outages through the app, customers can now:
View the full billing statement (for the last six months)
Enroll in the Equal Pay option to pay the same amount each month
Choose paperless billing to save time and reduce waste
Learn about ways to save energy and money
"Our customers have loved the app and now there's more to love because additional information and services are available, anywhere at any time," said Barb Coughlin, Pacific Power vice-president of customer service.
These enhancements were developed based on customer feedback. Nearly 70,000 customers are using the free app to make payments and stay informed during power outages.
The original version of the app was launched in May 2015 and allows customers to do the following:
Pay bills quickly with a debit card, credit card or through a checking or savings account
Report a power outage or check the status of an existing outage for homes or businesses
Switch between multiple electric accounts to pay bills and get outage details for each account
Review an account summary
Stay up-to-date with alerts for billing, payments and outages
Stay connected with direct-dial access to customer service and social media links
Customers can log in to the app with an existing Pacific Power web user ID and password or create an account through the app to access secure services on the go. The app can also be downloaded in the App Store or Google Play.
###
About Pacific Power
Pacific Power provides safe and reliable electric service to more than 740,000 customers in Oregon, Washington and California. The company works to meet customers' growing electricity needs while protecting and enhancing the environment. Pacific Power is part of PacifiCorp, one of the lowest-cost electricity providers in the United States, with almost 1.8 million customers in six western states. For more information, visit pacificpower.net.
Supreme Court Protects Abortion Access
Planned Parenthood Advocates of Oregon - 06/27/16 11:18 AM
Today in a landmark ruling, the Supreme Court of the United States protected access to safe, legal abortion by declaring unconstitutional 2 Texas restrictions that shut down clinics and put safe abortion out of reach.

If the Court had allowed the 2013 restrictions to go into full effect, the 5.4 million women of reproductive age in Texas would have been left with only 9 health centers that provide safe, legal abortion in the entire state - down from approximately 40 health centers before passage of this dangerous law. As the Court recognized, "neither of these provisions offers medical benefits sufficient to justify the burdens upon access that each imposes."

In response, Planned Parenthood has vowed to redouble its efforts to fight restrictions on safe, legal abortion across the country. Since 2011, state lawmakers have passed more than 316 restrictions on safe, legal abortion, and have introduced 442 in the first 6 months of 2016 alone, according to the Guttmacher Institute. Last year in Oregon, right-wing conservatives introduced 5 bills to restrict women's health - including one that could have shut down nearly every abortion provider in Oregon.

Statement from Cecile Richards, president of Planned Parenthood Federation of America:

"This landmark ruling is an enormous victory for women. We are thrilled the Court recognized that these laws do not enhance patient safety - rather, they punish women by blocking access to safe abortion. Yet far too many women still face insurmountable barriers, which is why we are taking this fight state by state. It's time to pass state laws to protect a woman's constitutional right to abortion, and repeal ones that block it. A person's right to make their own decisions about abortion shouldn't depend on who they are or where they live."

Statement from Stacy M. Cross, President & CEO of Planned Parenthood of Columbia Willamette and Lisa Gardner, President & CEO of Planned Parenthood of Southwestern Oregon:

"Today is a great day. The Supreme Court made it clear that the U.S. Constitution prohibits politicians from passing laws to block access to safe, legal abortion. No woman or doctor should be punished for receiving or providing essential medical care. We will continue to fight restrictions on safe, legal abortion on behalf of our patients in Oregon. Oregon voters have consistently shown widespread support for reproductive freedom, and we will push for expanded access to all reproductive health care, including abortion. We will not be punished, and we will not go back."

Blocking access to reproductive health care has real and disastrous consequences for all people. This often has a disproportionate harmful impact on communities of color, who already face systemic barriers in accessing quality health care - as National Latina Institute for Reproductive Health, In Our Own Voice and other Reproductive Justice organizations have demonstrated. Expanding access to birth control, prenatal care and abortion improves women's health and long-term financial stability for themselves and their families.

A PerryUndem poll commissioned by Vox found that the majority of Americans oppose restrictions meant to shutter health centers or make it more difficult for women to access abortion, and that 70 percent of Americans don't want to see the Supreme Court overturn Roe vs. Wade.
Local Red Cross Sends Disaster Responders to California Wildfires, West Virginia Floods and Texas Floods
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 06/27/16 10:49 AM
Thirteen Red Cross Cascades Region (Oregon and Southwest Washington) disaster responders have deployed to disaster-affected areas to assist thousands of people.

To schedule a phone interview with a disaster responder, please contact Monique Dugaw, 503-877-7121 or monique.dugaw@redcross.org.

PORTLAND, Ore., June 27, 2016 -- The American Red Cross Cascades Region is responding to three massive disasters throughout the United States, helping people who have lost everything in the raging wildfires in California, the devastating floods in West Virginia and the catastrophic floods in Texas.

Responders from Portland, Salem, Nehalem, Beaverton, Williams, Turner, Keizer, Bend and Eugene, Oregon are on the ground in West Virginia, California and Texas. They are assisting affected communities by managing shelters, providing emergency financial assistance, health and mental health services, transportation services, and coordinating with local government entities to help deliver assistance.

"Whenever, wherever help is needed, Red Cross volunteers step up and assist people who are suffering across the country," said Amy Shlossman, CEO of the Red Cross Cascades Region. "One of our volunteers deployed to West Virginia directly from another a relief operation in Texas and another canceled his birthday plans to respond to the California wildfires. We have remarkable people doing remarkable things to help others in their greatest time of need."

WEST VIRGINIA: Thousands of people are without power and gas service. As many as 60 roads are closed to flooding and flood damage. There are 20 Red Cross and community shelters open across the affected counties where hundreds of people are taking refuge from the flooding. Red Cross workers are providing meals, relief supplies and other assistance to those affected as well as meals for first responders. Red Cross disaster mental health workers are helping people cope. Health workers are helping to replace needed items like prescription medications and eyeglasses. The Red Cross is monitoring the situation and working with state and local officials and partners to help ensure people get the help they need. Find Red Cross flood safety information here.

CALIFORNIA: The Erskine Fire in Kern County started last week and firefighters are working around the clock to contain the blaze, which has already destroyed 150 homes, burned 35,000 acres and forced almost 3,000 people to evacuate. Red Cross workers have shelters open, are providing food and relief supplies, and health and mental health services. People in the path of the fire can find vital safety information here.

TEXAS: Since the beginning of the year, numerous storms have ravaged the state, displacing thousands of families and devastating homes and businesses. Some parts of Texas have received two feet of rain. Emergency officials estimate that some 6,000 homes may be affected.


OTHER RED CROSS RESOURCES:
SAFE AND WELL: Register on the Red Cross Safe and Well website so loved ones can see if you are safe and well. Those who can't access a computer can call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767) and a Red Cross operator can help them register. They can also update their Facebook and Twitter status through the Safe and Well website or visit www.redcross.org/safeandwell on their smart phone and click on the "List Yourself as Safe and Well" or "Search for friends and family" link.

EMERGENCY APP: Download the free Red Cross Emergency App to receive emergency alerts and information about what to do in case of flooding, wildfires and other disasters, as well as locations of shelters. The App also includes emergency first aid information and a Family Safe feature which allows people to instantly see if loved ones are okay. The free Emergency App is available in app stores by searching for the American Red Cross or going to redcross.org/apps.

HOW TO HELP: These are large relief responses and the Red Cross needs the public's support now. Those who would like to help people affected by disasters like flooding, wildfires and countless other crises can make a donation to Red Cross Disaster Relief. People can donate by visiting redcross.org, calling 1-800-RED CROSS or texting the word REDCROSS to 90999 to make a $10 donation. These donations enable the Red Cross to prepare for, respond to and help people recover from disasters big and small.


Attached Media Files: 2016-06/1190/95649/News_Release_-_Local_Red_Cross_Responds_to_West_Virginia_Floods_California_Wildfires_Texas_Floods.pdf
Governor Kate Brown Declares July 25-29 as Oregon Private College Week
Oregon Alliance of Independent Colleges & Universities - 06/27/16 5:34 AM
PORTLAND, Ore. -- Governor Kate Brown has declared July 25-29, 2016 to be Oregon Private College Week. The proclamation cites the indispensable contributions of the state's private, nonprofit sector of higher education to Oregon's communities and to the state's 40-40-20 education attainment goal.

Twelve private, nonprofit colleges and universities across the state are opening their doors to prospective students and their families during Oregon Private College Week. Students who register in advance and visit at least four institutions during the week will receive application fee waivers. Students may use these fee waivers to apply to any Alliance member college or university.

Together, Alliance colleges and universities enroll 19% of Oregon's undergraduate students, award 23% of Oregon's undergraduate degrees and confer 25% of the bachelor's degrees awarded to minority students in the state, including high-need fields such as STEM (20%), health professions (35%), business (24%), economics and political science (22%), mathematics and statistics (34%), and public administration and social service (22%).

Together, the private nonprofit sector offers degrees in more than 240 fields of study, such as engineering and computer science.

The majority of students (60%) enrolled in Alliance member institutions graduates within four years, saving students time and money. Also cited in Governor Brown's proclamation is the economic contribution that Oregon's private, nonprofit colleges and universities make to the state's economy.

During Oregon Private College Week, prospective students and their families are invited to come ask questions, learn about academic programs and financial aid, meet experts in admission, and tour the campus. College officials will also address common myths about private higher education:

- Thirty-two percent of Alliance undergraduates qualify for federal Pell Grants based on income.
- The Alliance member institutions are cost effective. The average indebtedness of Alliance graduates is lower than the national average for private colleges and universities and similar to that of public institution graduates.
- Ninety-two percent of first time, first year students receive financial aid, with an average grant and scholarship award of over $19,000.

According to research conducted by Eduventures, 71 percent of prospective students identify the campus visit as the most trusted source of information about a college. There's certainly no better way for students to experience the "feel" of a campus and to discover their "best fit" for college.

Sessions will begin at 9 a.m. and 2 p.m., Monday through Friday. For more information about Oregon Private College Week, to view a list of participating colleges, or to register, please visit www.oregonprivatecolleges.com.

About The Alliance
The Alliance represents 18 of Oregon's regionally accredited, nonprofit private higher education institutions. Together, Alliance colleges and universities enroll more than 37,000 students and deliver approximately 30% of all baccalaureate degrees and higher awarded in Oregon. The Alliance intersects the needs of business and industry, private nonprofit colleges and universities, and the public good to create real solutions that build a more educated and skilled workforce for Oregon. For more information, visit www.oaicu.org.


Attached Media Files: 2016-06/4829/95603/Oregon_Private_College_Week_2016.pdf
Sun. 06/26/16
Fire near Crane Prairie Resort (Photo)
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/26/16 5:51 PM
Crane Prairie Fire
Crane Prairie Fire
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-06/5227/95634/thumb_Crane_Prairie_Fire.jpg
Sgt. Vance Lawrence

There is currently a fire west of the Crane Prairie Resort across the reservoir from the resort. This fire is estimated at about two acres. There are ground crews on scene that have been transported across the reservoir by boat from the resort side and are making progress. Fire trucks have gained some access, there is a helicopter using a bucket, dipping water from Crane Prairie Reservoir and dropping it on to the fire.

Deschutes County Sheriff's Office staff on scene say the firefighters are making progress and the fire does not appear to be growing any more at this time. There may be some road closures in the immediate area, there is no information on which roads may be affected at this time.

The initial report is that late last night or early this morning a boat may have capsized in the area and the occupant(s) started a warming fire that got out of control. We will work to confirm this information.


UPDATE

Fire crews have successfully established a fire line around the burn. US Forest Service Law Enforcement contacted the person(s) responsible to document this incident and take appropriate action.

Fire crews will remain on scene throughout the night to mop up and ensure no flare ups occur.

Any questions regarding action taken by the US Forest Service should referred to the USFS Law Enforcement.


Attached Media Files: Crane Prairie Fire
Three Motorcyclists Die On Oregon's Highways Over The Weekend
Oregon State Police - 06/26/16 2:30 PM
JUNE 24 -- LANE COUNTY

On June 24, 2016 at about 5:15PM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a motorcycle versus a pickup on Highway 36 near milepost 7 (near Mapleton).

Preliminary investigation revealed a 2004 Harley Davidson motorcycle was traveling eastbound when it failed to negotiate a corner, crossed the centerline, and struck a 1999 Ford Ranger head-on.

The motorcyclist, Michael R LUCIER, age 56, of Swisshome, Oregon, was pronounced deceased at the scene. The driver of the Ford, Rodney D PRUETT, age 23, of Florence was not injured.

There were intermittent lane closures on Highway 36 while the investigation was conducted. OSP was assisted by the Oregon Department of Transportation and Florence Police.


JUNE 25 -- JOSPEHINE COUNTY

On June 25, 2016 at about 8PM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a single vehicle crash on Highway 46 at milepost 7 (Caves Highway near Cave Junction).

The 911 caller, who was a passing motorist, reporting seeing a motorcycle partially down the embankment. The caller also reported the rider was not breathing. Emergency crews arrived on scene and pronounced the motorcyclist deceased.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a 2001 Triumph motorcycle was eastbound on Highway 46 at milepost 7 when it left the roadway on a corner. The motorcycle struck a tree and the rider, Patrick Michael DALEY, age 57, of Cave Junction, was thrown down the embankment.

Roadway evidence indicates excessive speed was a factor. Highway 46 was closed for approximately 1 hour during the investigation. OSP was assisted by the Illinois Valley Fire Department.


JUNE 26 -- LINN COUNTY

On June 26, 2016 at about 6:45AM, OSP Troopers and emergency personnel responded to the report of a truck versus motorcycle collision on Interstate 5 at the 235 interchange (just north of Albany). Information received is the truck driver failed to remain at the scene and left the area.

Preliminary information indicates a 1995 Kenworth truck tractor towing a chip trailer had been traveling southbound on Old Salem Road. The truck began to make a left turn onto the Interstate 5 southbound onramp, but turned in front of a northbound 1995 Kawasaki motorcycle.

The motorcyclist crashed as a result of the truck turning into its path. The rider, Kevin R ARGO, age 39, of Lebanon was pronounced deceased at the scene by emergency personnel.

The operator of the truck, Ruben L DEFOOR, age 79, of Albany, was later located and is cooperating with the investigation.

The onramp was closed for several hours as the investigation was conducted. OSP was assisted by Albany Fire, Linn County Sheriff's Office and the Oregon Department of Transportation. This is an ongoing investigation. More information will be released when available.
Jewel Road Fire Burns 31 Acres in Central Oregon
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 06/26/16 11:21 AM
The Jewel Road Fire was reported Saturday at 4:30 p.m. burning in grass and brush on Oregon Department of Forestry-protected lands west of Dufer in central Oregon. Fire-fighting resources from ODF's Central Oregon District and several cooperators stopped the fire's spread at 31 acres.

A single-engine air tanker on contract with the Washington Department of Natural Resources flew from Dallesport, Wash., and dropped one load of retardant and three loads of water onto the fire. ODF responded with four engines and a bulldozer, and four additional engines were supplied by the U.S. Forest Service and a rural structural protection district.

The fire burned on rolling hills through grass and brush beneath an overstory of pine and oak trees, and was contained by 11:00 p.m. The engine crews were released from the fire by midnight.

Today, four engines and a five-person crew are patrolling the Jewel Road Fire and extinguishing remaining hot spots.

The cause of the Jewel Road Fire is under investigation.

No other fires 10 acres in size or larger were reported yesterday on ODF-protected lands.

Statewide Fire Statistics for 2016 on ODF-Protected Lands as of June 26:
Lightning has caused 33 fires that burned 2,126 acres.
There have been 167 human-caused fires that burned 186 acres
Total: 200 fires that burned 2,312 acres

10-Year Average for fires on ODF-Protected Lands as of June 26:
Lightning caused 30 fires that burned 37 acres
Humans caused 164 fires that burned 1,332 acres
Total: 194 fires that burned 1,369 acres
https://www.facebook.com/AARPOregon (Photo)
AARP Oregon - 06/26/16 10:31 AM
Elaine Friesen-Strang
Elaine Friesen-Strang
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-06/5564/95630/thumb_p1969529191-o902904532-5.jpg
CLACKAMAS - The state's largest membership organization has a new leader. Elaine Friesen-Strang, 62, has accepted the volunteer position as AARP Oregon's state president, said Jerry Cohen, state director. She will lead the volunteer Executive Council for at least the next two years as well as collaborate with AARP staff and volunteers to achieve positive social change on behalf of people 50+ in Oregon.
AARP Oregon has more than a half million members ages 50+ and approximate 1,500 individuals who volunteer with AARP Oregon, The Driver Safety Program and AARP Tax Aid. "Our volunteers are the real power behind AARP," Cohen said. "They bring significant knowledge, skills and passion to the work to show that age is an asset and life is full of real possibilities at any age."

Friesen-Strang brings a wealth of experience and community service to the position. In addition to her volunteerism with AARP, she is active with the Elders in Action Commission and the Governor's Commission on Senior Services. She's been a key advocate in Multnomah County to create safer streets for pedestrians, bicyclists and cars working hard to pass the recent Portland gas tax.

Friesen-Strang said in accepting the position, "Regardless of who we are, we all share the same needs: financial security, health services, care giving supports, personal fulfillment, and communities that help us thrive. I'm honored to serve with other Oregon volunteers and the AARP staff to help make these goals a reality," she said. "In the words of Ethel Percy Andrus, 'We learn the inner secret of happiness when we learn to direct our inner drives, our interest, and our attention to something besides ourselves.'"

About AARP
AARP is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization, with a membership of nearly 38 million that helps people turn their goals and dreams into 'Real Possibilities' by changing the way America defines aging. With staffed offices in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands, AARP works to strengthen communities and promote the issues that matter most to families such as healthcare security, financial security and personal fulfillment. AARP also advocates for individuals in the marketplace by selecting products and services of high quality and value to carry the AARP name. As a trusted source for news and information, AARP produces the world's largest circulation magazine, AARP The Magazine and AARP Bulletin. AARP does not endorse candidates for public office or make contributions to political campaigns or candidates. To learn more, visit www.aarp.org/or or follow us on twitter @aarpor.


Attached Media Files: Elaine Friesen-Strang
Sat. 06/25/16
Civil Air Patrol joins Linn County Sheriff for search for missing man (Photo)
Oregon Civil Air Patrol - 06/25/16 2:57 PM
Lt Col Wayne Shultz and Lt Jonathan Ritchie are preflighting the aircraft and preparing to take off from Aurora State Airport to join a search in Linn County for a missing hiker. (Photo by Cathe Frederic)
Lt Col Wayne Shultz and Lt Jonathan Ritchie are preflighting the aircraft and preparing to take off from Aurora State Airport to join a search in Linn County for a missing hiker. (Photo by Cathe Frederic)
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-06/1184/95620/thumb_Lt_Col_Wayne_Shultz_and.jpg
The U.S. Air Force Rescue and Recovery Center has dispatched the Oregon Civil Air Patrol to assist Linn County Sheriff's Office in searching for a missing man.

The search is for a missing hiker aged 75 in the Marion Lake area. Sheriff Bruce Riley has asked for the CAP to join the search in the wilderness area of northeast Linn County. There are no roads directly to Marion Lake.

CAP was performing a training day today, so it has diverted three aircraft from training tasks to join the search. Two will fly search patterns while the third aircraft will perform a "high bird" function, flying at a higher elevation and relaying radio communications between the search aircraft and the CAP base at Aurora State Airport.

"We are happy to divert our aircrews and aircraft to support Sheriff Riley," said Lt Col Ira Rosenberg, who is the Incident Commander. "Performing this search will help us keep our skills sharp even better than our practice missions would have. We are able to respond very rapidly since we had aircraft fueled and ready, and our personnel had already gathered."

More than 57 people are involved in the CAP emergency services drill today. Five Cessna 182s and one Cessna 172 are active today. Activities are controlled from Aurora, but pilots with their aircrews took off from Hillsboro, Portland, Eugene and Bend. CAP and its Emergency Services teams practice frequently to maintain readiness and skill levels. They train vigorously to Federal Emergency Management Agency standards.

Civil Air Patrol was founded on Dec. 1, 1941, by a group of aviation enthusiasts and private pilots who wanted to donate their time and aircraft to protect the nation's coastlines during World War II and to perform other critical civil defense missions.

CAP, the longtime all-volunteer U.S. Air Force auxiliary, is the newest member of the Air Force's Total Force, which consists of regular Air Force, Air National Guard and the Air Force Reserve, along with Air Force retired military and civilian employees. CAP, in its Total Force role, operates a fleet of 550 aircraft and performs about 90 percent of continental U.S. inland search and rescue missions as tasked by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center and is credited by the AFRCC with saving an average of 78 lives annually.

Civil Air Patrol's 56,000 members nationwide also perform homeland security, disaster relief and drug interdiction missions at the request of federal, state and local agencies. Its members additionally play a leading role in aerospace education and serve as mentors to more than 24,000 young people currently participating in the CAP cadet program. Performing missions for America for the past 75 years, CAP received the Congressional Gold Medal in 2014 in honor of the heroic efforts of its World War II veterans. CAP also participates in Wreaths Across America, an initiative to remember, honor and teach about the sacrifices of U.S. military veterans. Visit www.capvolunteernow.com for more information.

#


Attached Media Files: Lt Col Wayne Shultz and Lt Jonathan Ritchie are preflighting the aircraft and preparing to take off from Aurora State Airport to join a search in Linn County for a missing hiker. (Photo by Cathe Frederic)
Fri. 06/24/16
Be A Trooper: OSP Accepting Online Applications (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 06/24/16 8:56 PM
2016-06/1002/95607/DSC_0233.JPG
2016-06/1002/95607/DSC_0233.JPG
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-06/1002/95607/thumb_DSC_0233.JPG
Have you ever considered the Oregon State Police as a career? If so, the Oregon State Police offers numerous duty assignments across our beautiful state and will be accepting Entry Level and Lateral recruit trooper applications beginning today and will close at midnight on Sunday, August 7, 2016.

Careers with the Oregon State Police not only offer many geographical transfer opportunities throughout the state, but also offer a wide variety of assignments within our Patrol, Fish and Wildlife and Criminal Divisions.

Adding to the attractive scenery and numerous assignment options are numerous opportunities for promotional advancement, excellent wages, incentives based on education and experiences, and an excellent benefit package.

Start the process now by going to the Oregon State Police recruiting website at osptrooper.com. The website will help interested applicants learn about the process, understand qualifications, and get a head start on the required entry level testing.

Two entry level testing sessions will be held on Saturday, August 20, and Monday, August 22, at the Department of Oregon Public Safety Academy located at 4190 Aumsville Highway SE in Salem. The Oregon State Police testing sessions typically take the majority of the day, and kick off around 7:30 a.m.

The Oregon State Police urges applicants to prepare for the application and testing sessions beforehand.

The complete application for employment is comprised of an e-recruit profile, a supplemental questionnaire and required attachments.

The Oregon State Police is an equal opportunity employer and strongly encourages women and minorities to apply. If you are interested in a challenging career that will provide you with a lifetime of memories, then consider applying with the Oregon State Police. Information about our agency, the different opportunities that are available, how our hiring process works, and updates to our hiring process can be found at www.osptrooper.com.

For additional information applicants should call the OSP Recruiting and Training Section at (503) 378 4931.


Attached Media Files: 2016-06/1002/95607/DSC_0233.JPG , 2016-06/1002/95607/hat.jpg
Oregon Home Care Commission plans to meet July 7 in Salem
Oregon Department of Human Services - 06/24/16 3:09 PM
The Oregon Home Care Commission plans to meet Thursday, July 7 at 10 a.m. at 676 Church Street NE in Salem. The meeting is open to the public.

Agenda items include: Public testimony; updates on the Governor's Commission on Senior Services, Oregon Disabilities Commission, Oregon Association of Area Agencies on Aging and Disabilities, Aging and People with Disabilities, Office of Developmental Disabilities Services, Community Advisory Councils, Coordinated Care Organizations; Oregon Health Authority Office of Equity and Inclusion toolkit presentation; and staff reports.

The Commission will hold an Executive Session starting at 1:30 p.m. to discuss labor negotiations. In accordance with Oregon law, this session is closed to the public.

The Oregon Home Care Commission welcomes visitors to its meetings. People who need any type of accommodation due to a disability should contact Joanna Gould at 503-378-4984 at least 48 hours before the meeting.
# # #


Attached Media Files: Home Care Commission Full Agenda
OSP And Partners Focusing On Waterway Safety This Weekend (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 06/24/16 2:27 PM
2016-06/1002/95595/7653.jpg
2016-06/1002/95595/7653.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-06/1002/95595/thumb_7653.jpg
As the hot weather arrives again this weekend, Oregon State Police urges those who utilize state wildlife areas, parks, beaches and other locations along waterways to not make critical mistakes that affect them and others on Oregon roads and waterways. In particular, OSP wants to remind those who recreate on the Sauvie Island Wildlife Area (SIWA) beaches near Portland, Oregon to enjoy their time with friends and family and to keep it enjoyable by making safe and sober boating and driving a priority.

OSP and local law enforcement partners will participate in a national enforcement effort this weekend, 'Operation Dry Water,' to discourage impaired boating and prevent alcohol-related incidents on Oregon waterways. Operation Dry Water is a national weekend of boating under the influence awareness, education and enforcement launched by the National Association of State Boating Law Administrators (NASBLA) in 2009 in partnership with the U.S. Coast Guard. In conjunction with this effort, additional OSP and local law enforcement will focus the same effort to discourage impaired driving.

Important safety tips for warm weather recreating:

Designated Driver (DD) - If you haven't worked out who will drive if you're going to drink; now's the time!
Sun, wind, noise, vibration and motion --"stressors" common to the boating environment-- intensify the effects of alcohol, drugs, and some medications.
Make it an Overnighter - couches or hotel rooms make great landing pads and are far more comfortable than a jail bed.
Reach out for help - if you've been drinking or using marijuana you shouldn't be boating / driving. Call a cab, phone a friend or send for backup on Twitter - it may mean the difference in someone else's life.
If you do see an impaired driver behind the wheel or operating a boat call and report it: 911

Here are links to operation dry water. First one is for media:
http://www.operationdrywater.org/awareness


Attached Media Files: 2016-06/1002/95595/7653.jpg
Inmate walk away from Deer Ridge Correctional Institution work crew BACK IN CUSTODY(Photo) (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 06/24/16 1:58 PM
Richard Phillip Clark
Richard Phillip Clark
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-06/1070/95549/thumb_Clark.jpg
UPDATEINMATE CLARK WAS APPREHENDED BY LAW ENFORCEMENT AT APPROXIMATELY 1:00 P.M. HE IS IN CUSTODY AT MULTNOMAH COUNTY JAIL.




An inmate walked away today from a Deer Ridge Correctional Institution (DRCI) work crew near Sisters. Oregon State Police are investigating.

DRCI staff discovered inmate Richard Clark missing at approximately 1:45 p.m., Thursday, June 23. Clark is a 29-year-old Caucasian male, 6 feet tall, 205 pounds, with blond hair and blue eyes. He is most likely wearing blue jeans with the word "inmate" and the DOC logo stenciled on the knee in orange or red shorts, and a blue t-shirt with the word "inmate" and the DOC logo stenciled in orange on the front and back.

Clark entered DOC custody on March 31, 2016, on two counts of attempted robbery in the second degree out of Washington County. His earliest release date is June 11, 2019.

Anyone with information regarding Clark's whereabouts is asked to call Oregon State Police at
1-800-452-7888.

DRCI is a multi-custody facility located four miles east of Madras in central Oregon. This men's prison contains 644 minimum-security beds and 1,223 medium-security beds. The minimum facility began receiving inmates in September 2007. The medium facility has not received inmates due to cost saving measures. DRCI provides a range of correctional programs and services including, education, drug and alcohol treatment, mental health treatment, cognitive programs, and inmate work crews.


###


Attached Media Files: Richard Phillip Clark
Health advisory issued for Howard Bay located in Upper Klamath Lake (Photo)
Oregon Health Authority - 06/24/16 12:48 PM
Howard Bay, Upper Klamath Lake. Imagery ©2016 DigitalGlobe, Landsat, State of Oregon, Map data ©2016 Google
Howard Bay, Upper Klamath Lake. Imagery ©2016 DigitalGlobe, Landsat, State of Oregon, Map data ©2016 Google
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-06/3687/95581/thumb_howardbay.png
June 24, 2016

High toxin levels found in lake area in Klamath County

A health advisory was issued today for Howard Bay (also known locally as Howards Bay or Howard's Bay), located in the southwest corner of Upper Klamath Lake, northwest of Klamath Falls in Klamath County.

Water monitoring has confirmed the presence of toxic blue-green algae in the bay. Toxin concentrations can be harmful to humans and animals, though toxin testing in other areas of the lake have been low.

People should avoid swallowing water while swimming or inhaling water droplets as a result of high-speed water activities, such as water skiing or power boating, in areas where blooms are identified. Although toxins are not absorbed through the skin, people who have skin sensitivities may experience a puffy, red rash at the affected area.

Drinking water directly from Howard Bay at this time is especially dangerous. Oregon public health officials advise campers and other recreational visitors that toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating water with camping-style filters.

People who draw in-home water directly from the affected area are advised to use an alternative water source because private treatment systems are not proven effective for removing algae toxins. However public drinking water systems can reduce algae toxins through proper filtration and disinfection. If people connected to public water systems have questions about treatment and testing, they should contact their water supplier. If community members have questions about water available at nearby campgrounds, they should contact campground management.

Oregon health officials recommend that those who choose to eat fish from waters where algae blooms are present remove all fat, skin and organs before cooking, as toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water. Public health officials also advise people to not eat freshwater clams or mussels from Howard Bay and that Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife regulations not allow the harvest of these shellfish from freshwater sources. Crayfish muscle can be eaten, but internal organs and liquid fat should be discarded.

Exposure to toxins can produce a variety of symptoms including numbness, tingling and dizziness that can lead to difficulty breathing or heart problems, and require immediate medical attention. Symptoms of skin irritation, weakness, diarrhea, nausea, cramps and fainting should also receive medical attention if they persist or worsen. Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. People who bring their pets to Upper Klamath Lake for recreation activities should take special precautions to keep them from drinking from or swimming in Howard Bay.

The advisory will be lifted when the concern no longer exists.

With proper precautions to avoid water contact, people are encouraged to visit Howard Bay and enjoy activities such as fishing, camping, hiking, biking, picnicking, and bird watching. Boating is safe as long as speeds do not create excessive water spray, which could lead to inhalation risk.

For health information or to report an illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) at 971-673-0400.

OHA maintains an updated list of all health advisories on its website. To learn if an advisory has been issued or lifted for a specific water body, visit the Harmful Algae Blooms website at http://www.healthoregon.org/hab and select "algae bloom advisories," or call the Oregon Public Health Division toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767.

# # #

Attached image: Howard Bay, Upper Klamath Lake
Imagery (C)2016 DigitalGlobe, Landsat, State of Oregon, Map data (C)2016 Google


Attached Media Files: Howard Bay, Upper Klamath Lake. Imagery ©2016 DigitalGlobe, Landsat, State of Oregon, Map data ©2016 Google
Media Advisory - 25-year anniversary and rededication of the Spokane Tribal Hatchery
Bonneville Power Administration - 06/24/16 12:36 PM
Ford, Wash. - On June 29, 2016, the Spokane Tribe of Indians and the Bonneville Power Administration will celebrate the 25-year anniversary and rededication of the Spokane Tribal Hatchery.

WHAT: Signing ceremony, celebration and hatchery rededication.

WHO: Spokane Tribe of Indian elders, leaders and BPA executives.

WHEN: Wednesday, June 29, 2016, 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.

WHERE: 5629 Hatchery Rd., Ford, Wash.

Contacts: Monica Peone, 509-458-6587, rawhide@spokanetribe.com
David Wilson, 503-572-1209, dbwilson@bpa.gov

Background:

In 1990, BPA began funding the hatchery's design, construction and operation to mitigate in part for the environmental impacts of Grand Coulee Dam. Completed in 1939, Grand Coulee flooded the Spokane Tribe's ancestral homelands and blocked salmon from migrating to the tribe's traditional fishing sites. The operation of Grand Coulee has also negatively affected resident fish populations, such as trout.

The Spokane Tribe of Indians has taken a leadership role in bringing fish back to the river, developing a restoration and enhancement program for Lake Roosevelt that includes a fish hatchery for rainbow trout and kokanee salmon.

"Historically, the Spokane Tribe was known as a river and fishing people, culturally defined, in part, by the bounty of salmon that returned annually to tribal fishery grounds," says Tim Peone, Spokane Tribal member and hatchery manager. "The hatchery program is meant to be more than just a fish production facility, it provides a remembrance and pathway for tribal members to reconnect with the river and its fisheries."

The rededication and signing ceremony will improve and modernize the hatchery facilities and guarantees BPA ratepayer funding for another 25 years.

Today, the Spokane Tribe manages the hatchery in coordination with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Sherman Creek Hatchery and the Lake Roosevelt Rainbow Trout Net Pen Rearing Project.

"We realize the hatchery doesn't bring back what was lost 80 years ago, but BPA is committed to protecting and improving conditions for the area's resident fish populations," says Lorri Bodi, BPA's vice president of Environment, Fish and Wildlife. "We want to help preserve and fortify tribal culture and the indigenous knowledge that enriches our entire region."

Annually, the hatchery produces approximately 100,000 kokanee salmon and 750,000 rainbow trout for release into Lake Roosevelt. Additionally, the hatchery also produces 6,000 rainbow trout yearlings for annual release into inland lakes on the Spokane Indian Reservation. The tribal hatchery consists of 44 indoor/outdoor raceways and employs five full-time and four seasonal employees.

Artifacts, photos and reading panes chronicling historical fisheries, tribal subsistence and the cultural significance of the river are on display at the Spokane Tribal Hatchery -- open Monday through Friday, 8 a.m.to 3 p.m.
Oregon Civil Air Patrol To Hold State Wide Exercise (Photo)
Oregon Civil Air Patrol - 06/24/16 11:39 AM
Oregon Civil Air Patrol utlizes it's fleet of specially equipped Cessna C182 search aircraft for numerous missions in support of the state of Oregon
Oregon Civil Air Patrol utlizes it's fleet of specially equipped Cessna C182 search aircraft for numerous missions in support of the state of Oregon
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2016-06/1184/95576/thumb_cessna_182_cap_4.jpg
The Oregon wing of the Civil Air Patrol will be conducting a major state wide training exercise this coming weekend, June 25 and 26, with numerous senarios to train for, and test, the Oregon CAP's capability and preparedness to respond to various types of historically supported emergency incidents

With incident command centers located in both Medford and Aurora, the CAP will conduct responses to natural disasters,such as those posed during the Cascadia Rising state wide exercise earlier this month that CAP also participated in, air search and rescue, and related operations that could be requested by state, local and federal authorities. Up to 8 aircraft and up to 100 members from around the state will comprise ground, mission base and air crew personnel to conduct various emergency responses. These operations could be communications support to local authorities, search operations to locate missing persons or aircraft, high resolution digital photo reconnaisance, emergency medical support flights and transporting of critical supplies, equipment and personnel among other possible tasks as directed by USAF evaluators.

In addition to adult aircrew and ground staff, the CAP will utilize its teenaged cadet members in various ground support operations such as communications, mission base operations, ground search and rescue operations and aircraft flightline activities under the guidance of an experienced adult member."Our cadet members are an important force multiplier during our missions" said Lt. Col. Thomas Traver, Oregon Wing CAP public affairs officer "They perform essential tasks that have a tremendous impact on the success of our multitude of operational missions" he added.

Civil Air Patrol, the longtime all-volunteer U.S. Air Force auxiliary, is the newest member of the Air Force's Total Force, which consists of regular Air Force, Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve, along with Air Force retired military and civilian employees. CAP, in its Total Force role, operates a fleet of 550 aircraft and performs about 90 percent of continental U.S. inland search and rescue missions as tasked by the Air Force Rescue Coordination Center and is credited by the AFRCC with saving an average of 78 lives annually. Civil Air Patrol's 56,000 members nationwide also perform homeland security, disaster relief and drug interdiction missions at the request of federal, state and local agencies. Its members additionally play a leading role in aerospace education and serve as mentors to more than 24,000 young people currently participating in the CAP cadet program. Performing missions for America for the past 75 years, CAP received the Congressional Gold Medal in 2014 in honor of the heroic efforts of its World War II veterans. CAP also participates in Wreaths Across America, an initiative to remember, honor and teach about the sacrifices of U.S. military veterans. Visit www.capvolunteernow.com for more information.

MEDIA NOTE:
Members of the media are encouraged to visit the CAP mission bases at the Medford Airport and
Aurora State Airport (North end) during the exercise.


Attached Media Files: Oregon Civil Air Patrol utlizes it's fleet of specially equipped Cessna C182 search aircraft for numerous missions in support of the state of Oregon
Thu. 06/23/16
Man Injured During Mountain Bike Crash
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 06/23/16 10:34 PM
Released by: Deputy Cliff Cox, Assistant SAR Coordinator

Occurred: June 23, 2016 / 6:45 PM

Location: Trail System near Tumalo Falls

Rescued: Jeff Hess, 50 yrs
Bend resident

NARRATIVE:

On June 23, 2016 at approximately 6:54 PM, Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Special Services Deputies were dispatched to the area of Tumalo Falls for a Mountain Bike Crash.

It was learned that Jeff Hess was riding with two other riders. Hess lost control and crashed approximately one half mile from the parking lot. Hess was wearing a helmet and his fellow riders were able call 9-1-1 and provide accurate location information.

One Deputy and 16 SAR Volunteers responded to the scene. Rescuers had to hike to the patient and reached him shortly after 8 PM. Rescuers packaged Hess into a wheeled litter and transported him to the parking lot where he was turned over to Bend Fire Department paramedics.

The Deschutes County Sheriff's Office would like to remind our citizens of the importance of having proper gear including navigation and means of communication when recreating in the backcountry.