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Bend/Central-Eastern Oregon News Releases for Mon. Aug. 19 - 8:44 pm
Mon. 08/19/19
Portland Woman Indicted for Tax Fraud Scheme Targeting Somali Refugee Community
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 08/19/19 3:37 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon, announced today that a local woman has been indicted for a tax fraud scheme targeting Somali refugees in the Portland Metropolitan Area.

Rukia Mohamed, 35, a resident of Portland, has been charged with thirteen counts of making false statements by willfully aiding and assisting individual taxpayers to submit false or fraudulent tax returns claiming tax credits for which the taxpayers were ineligible. Mohamed is also charged with three counts of filing false tax returns for her own taxes.

The indictment alleges that from 2014-2017, Mohamed claimed more than $1 million in false tax credits on behalf of ineligible taxpayers.

“We encourage members of the public to carefully evaluate those from whom they take tax or other financial advice from,” said U.S. Attorney Williams. “We are aware of fraudulent tax preparers targeting refugee communities in the Portland area and are working closely with the IRS to investigate these crimes and bring those responsible to justice.”

Mohamed was released pending a three-day jury trial before U.S. District Court Judge Michael H. Simon.

This case was investigated by IRS-Criminal Investigation and is being prosecuted by Michelle Kerin, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

An indictment is only an accusation of a crime, and a defendant is presumed innocent unless and until proven guilty.

If you or someone you know have information about tax preparers you believe are engaged in fraudulent activity, please complete IRS Form #3949-A, print it and mail it to: IRS-Criminal Investigation, 1220 SW Third Avenue, G044 M/S 0326, Portland, Oregon 97204.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

State to Honor 169 Fallen Firefighters - September 19, 2019 at 1 PM in Salem / DPSST (Photo)
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 08/19/19 2:58 PM
Oregon Fallen Firefighter Memorial
Oregon Fallen Firefighter Memorial
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-08/1187/126954/thumb_Fallen_Fire_Memorial_B.jpg

The Oregon Fire Service Honor Guard and the Oregon Department of Public Safety Standards and Training (DPSST) extend an invitation to attend the State's 14th annual Oregon Fallen Fire Fighters Memorial on Thursday, September 19, 2019 at 1 p.m. The ceremony will be held at the State’s Fallen Firefighter Memorial which is located on the campus of the Oregon Public Safety Academy at 4190 Aumsville Highway SE in Salem. Please note the event is held outside rain or shine.

We are honored to have Kim Lightley of the United States Forest Service as our keynote speaker on the 25th anniversary of the deadly Storm King Mountain fire in Colorado that claimed the lives of many of her co-workers from the Prineville Interagency Hotshots. 

About Kim Lightley – She is a Critical Incident Response Specialist with the United States Forest Service (USFS) assigned to the Washington Office of Fire and Aviation Management.  She was recognized in 2017 by the USFS through its Unsung Hero Award Program for her commitment to give back to the people who sacrifice so much fighting structure and wildland fires, and, even more so, to the survivors of those who never come home. Lightley survived the 1994 South Canyon Fire; nine of her crewmembers from the Prineville Interagency Hotshots and five others were overrun and killed.  Recognizing that her own experiences had impacted her life and recovery from this traumatic experience, Lightley has placed her daily emphasis on helping others within the wildfire community to prepare for—and recover from—tragic events.  She travels nationwide teaching Stress First Aid for Wildland Firefighters and You Will Not Stand Alone, assists in interventions for wildland fire critical incidents and promotes awareness of suicide prevention. Lightley is an active participant and organizer for the annual National Fallen Firefighters Memorial, and participates annually in the South Canyon Fire staff ride and Prineville Memorial Hotshot Run.  In addition to all of this, she can frequently be found on incident locations supporting agency and family survivors when a firefighter dies in the line of duty, and continues to provide vital support to survivors long after the event.

The ceremony will include the reading of the roll call of fallen firefighters, taps, placement of wreaths, and a bell salute.

DPSST Director Eriks Gabliks said "The Oregon Fallen Fire Fighters Memorial stands as a daily reminder of the sacrifices made by 169 men and women who died in the line of duty protecting our communities, airports and natural resources around our great state.  The memorial also allows us to honor a pledge made to the families of the fallen - we will never forget!  We are thankful that no names are being added to the Oregon memorial during this year’s ceremony which signifies that Oregon did not suffer a firefighter line of duty death in 2018.  Sadly we know that is not the case on a national level as the names of 120 career and volunteer firefighters who died in the line of duty in 2018 and previous years will be honored at the National Fallen Firefighters Memorial at the National Fire Academy on October 5 and 6, 2019 in Emmitsburg, Maryland."

If you have any questions regarding the Memorial, please contact Julie Olsen, Fire Program Manager, at 503-378-2297 or by email at julie.olsen-fink@state.or.us

For More Information on Oregon and National Firefighter Memorials:

Oregon Fallen Firefighter Memorial  https://www.oregon.gov/DPSST/FC/pages/fallenfirefightermemorial.aspx

National Fallen Firefighter Foundation – National memorial https://www.firehero.org/events/memorial-weekend/about/2019-roll-of-honor/

Those honored on the State memorial include:

Fire Fighter Name

Agency

Date

James  Reed

Protection Engine Co #4 - Portland

1881

George P. Wrenn

Corvallis Fire Department

1882

Fred  Wagner

Portland Fire and Rescue

1890

Tom  O'Keefe

Portland Fire and Rescue

1891

John G. Hewston

Portland Fire and Rescue

1892

Tom  Grenfell

Portland Fire and Rescue

1896

Warren  Bodge

Medford Fire Dept.

1910

David  Campbell

Portland Fire and Rescue

1911

William  Higdon

Portland Fire and Rescue

1912

Emil  Gustafson

Portland Fire and Rescue

1916

Francis H. McCormick

Portland Fire and Rescue

1919

Karl  Gunster

Portland Fire and Rescue

1921

Oscar H. Lehman

Portland Fire and Rescue

1921

James S. Baldwin

Portland Fire and Rescue

1922

Oscar B. Gabriel

Portland Fire and Rescue

1922

Amos R. Willits

Medford Fire Dept.

1923

Fred H. Rittenour

Portland Fire and Rescue

1923

Adolph W. Wefel

Portland Fire and Rescue

1923

William E. Wilbur

Portland Fire and Rescue

1926

Rex  Reed

Eugene Fire and EMS

1928

Harry  Josephson

Portland Fire and Rescue

1928

William John McCreery

Portland Fire and Rescue

1928

Charles A. Ryan

Portland Fire and Rescue

1928

Walter  McBride

Portland Fire and Rescue

1929

Richard D. Laisner

Portland Fire and Rescue

1930

Henry Krimbel

Portland Fire and Rescue

1932

Clement Kemmer

Portland Fire and Rescue

1933

Gustave Adolph Stephan

Portland Fire and Rescue

1933

Frank L. Kearney

Portland Fire and Rescue

1934

Harry B. Morrow

Portland Fire and Rescue

1934

Walter Godfrey Duncan

Sandy Fire Dist. #72

1934

H.U.  Gardner

Portland Fire and Rescue

1935

William D. Heath

Portland Fire and Rescue

1935

Floyd G. McMullen

Salem Fire Department

1935

Melvin Claude Richardson

Oregon National Guard

1935

Frank E. Platt

Portland Fire and Rescue

1937

Harry R. Howard

Portland Fire and Rescue

1939

Ernest W. Bills

Portland Fire and Rescue

1940

Peter P. Kumpf

Portland Fire and Rescue

1940

Carl G. Markstrom

Portland Fire and Rescue

1940

John  Dawes

Mill City RFPD

1941

Elmo St. Clair Bradford

Portland Fire and Rescue

1945

Malvin L. Brown

555th Parachute Battalion - US Army

1945

Joseph Frederick Allerton

Portland Fire and Rescue

1945

William  Inglesby

Portland Fire and Rescue

1946

Gregory A. Warner

Portland Fire and Rescue

1946

Marion  Stark

Portland Fire and Rescue

1947

Alfred E. Berg

Portland Fire and Rescue

1948

Daniel G. Shaw

Portland Fire and Rescue

1949

Clayre Lavon Miller

Tillamook Fire District

1949

Jerry  Bain

Douglas Forest Protective Association

1951

R.E. “Bob” Olivier

Taft-Nelscott-DeLake Fire Department

1954

Harold J. Dean

Cottage Grove Fire Department

1956

W.F.  McCall

Cottage Grove Fire Department

1956

John A. McKy

Cottage Grove Fire Department

1956

Warren  Nott

Milwaukie Fire Department

1956

Al  Troge

Multnomah County Fire District #10

1956

George  Mead

Oregon City Fire Department

1956

Donovan  Hodgson

Springfield DFLS

1957

Victor D. Brown

Portland Fire and Rescue

1957

Glenn H. Ferrington

Multnomah County Fire District #14

1958

Roy W. McFarland

Roseburg Fire Dept.

1959

L.L.  Longton

Cottage Grove Fire Department

1960

John T. Metcalf

Portland Fire and Rescue

1960

Wayne  Osterby

Astoria Fire Department

1961

John J. Richards

Douglas Forest Protective Association

1961

Earl  Edwards

La Grande Fire Dept.

1962

Eldon L. Everton

Grants Pass Fire Department

1964

Leland N. Christensen

Eugene Fire and EMS

1966

Harold  Stinson

Eugene Fire and EMS

1966

Virgil L. Spencer

Portland Fire and Rescue

1966

Dale  Fleming

Multnomah County Fire District #1

1968

Sam P. Baseel

St. Helens Rural Fire Dist.

1969

Leland Roger Marshall

Coquille Volunteer Fire Department

1969

Richard  Christensen

Washington County Fire District #2

1969

C.T.  Arnold

Cottage Grove Fire Department

1970

Ben K. Coburn

Thurston-Walterville RFPD

1970

Henry  Martin

Oregon Department of Forestry

1970

Luis  Rodriguez

Oregon Department of Forestry

1970

Jack  Stephens

Portland Fire and Rescue

1971

Richard  Waldorf

Molalla Fire Protection District

1972

Fayet Arthur Scoggin

Redmond Fire and Rescue

1974

Carl E. Kerr

Scio Fire Protection District

1975

Sanford Causey

Coquille Fire Department

1976

S.L.  Finley

USFS Siskiyou National Forest

1976

Lee Kenneth Register

Multnomah Co. RFPD #14

1977

Dale Laverne Smith

Multnomah Co. RFPD #14

1977

John L. Devaney

Portland Fire and Rescue

1977

Roy  Bratten

Redmond Fire and Rescue

1978

Horst  Rech

Springfield DFLS

1978

Russ  Williamson

Washington County Fire District #1

1978

Richard  Underhill

Douglas Forest Protective Association

1979

Ronald  Huddleston

Oregon Department of Forestry

1980

Paul F. Yost

Lyons RFPD

1981

Clyde E. Golden

Mill City RFPD

1982

Michael K. Maine

North Bay RFPD, N. Bend

1982

Robert W. Thompson

Veneta RFPD

1982

David C. Stephens

Bureau of Land Management, Sweet Home

1984

Elwin I. King

Fair Oaks RFPD, Sutherlin

1984

Barbara A. Booth

Oregon Department of Forestry, Cottage Grove

1984

Richard H. Bowers

Oregon Department of Forestry, Cottage Grove

1984

Mary L. Francis

Crow Valley RFPD, Veneta

1985

Michael Allen Lehman

USDA Forest Service

1986

Mark  Giles

Douglas Forest Protective Association

1987

James  Moore

Douglas Forest Protective Association

1987

Russell  Brine

Elkton RFPD

1987

Wendell L. Beck

Crooked River Ranch Fire Dist.

1988

Joseph J. Stroda

Halsey-Shedd RFPD

1988

Louis A. Mohr

Pine Grove RFPD, Hood River

1988

David Alfred Schas

USDA Forest Service, Redmond

1988

William D. Mills

Oak Lodge RFPD #51

1989

William  McAdams

Aurora RFPD

1990

Julius C. Starr

USDA Forest Service, Redmond

1990

Clark N. Gilkison

Fair Oaks RFPD

1991

James Shannon Campbell

Oregon Department of Forestry

1992

Brian L. Hill

Oregon Department of Forestry

1993

Sydney B. Maplesden

Oregon Department of Forestry

1994

Kathi Julie Beck

USDA Forest Service, Ochoco NF

1994

Tamera Jean Bickett

USDA Forest Service, Ochoco NF

1994

Scott A. Blecha

USDA Forest Service, Ochoco NF

1994

Levi J. Brinkley

USDA Forest Service, Ochoco NF

1994

Douglas Michael Dunbar

USDA Forest Service, Ochoco NF

1994

Terri Ann Hagen

USDA Forest Service, Ochoco NF

1994

Bonnie Jean Holtby

USDA Forest Service, Ochoco NF

1994

Robert Alan Johnson

USDA Forest Service, Ochoco NF

1994

Jon Roy Kelso

USDA Forest Service, Ochoco NF

1994

Phillip  Sherburn

Aumsville Fire Department

1995

Henry Walter Howe

Brownsville RFPD

1995

Robert  Chisholm

Gearhart Volunteer Fire Dept.

1997

George P. Converse

USDA Forest Service

1998

Tony B. Chapin

Willamina Fire Department

1998

Santi  Arovitx

Columbia Helicopters

2001

Richard  Hernandez

Columbia Helicopters

2001

Kip  Krigbaum

Columbia Helicopters

2001

John Robert Hazlett

Odell Fire District

2001

Randall E. Carpenter

Coos Bay Fire and Rescue

2002

Jeffrey E. Common

Coos Bay Fire and Rescue

2002

Chuck  Hanners

Coos Bay Fire and Rescue

2002

Bartholomew Blake Bailey

Grayback Forestry, Inc.

2002

Daniel Eric Rama

Grayback Forestry, Inc.

2002

Retha Mae Shirley

Grayback Forestry, Inc.

2002

Alan W. Wyatt

USDA Forest Service, Rio Grande NF

2002

Paul E. Gibson

First Strike Environmental, Roseburg

2003

David Kelly Hammer

First Strike Environmental, Roseburg

2003

Jeffrey D. Hengel

First Strike Environmental, Roseburg

2003

Jesse D. James

First Strike Environmental, Roseburg

2003

Leland Price, Jr.

First Strike Environmental, Roseburg

2003

Richard Burt Moore, II

First Strike Environmental, Roseburg

2003

Mark Robert Ransdell

First Strike Environmental, Roseburg

2003

Ricardo M. Ruiz

First Strike Environmental, Roseburg

2003

Larry A. Brown

Kingsley Field FD, Klamath Falls

2003

D. Craig Mackey

Oregon Department of Forestry, Western Lane

2003

Thomas Howard Kistler

Polk County Fire Dist. #1

2003

Randall  Harmon

Superior Helicopter, Grants Pass

2003

Richard W. Black

Weyerhauser, Eugene Helicopter Ops.

2003

Lawrence J. Hoffman

Oregon Department of Forestry

2004

Shawn  Blazer

Grayback Forestry, Inc.

2008

Scott  Charlson

Grayback Forestry, Inc.

2008

Edrik  Gomez

Grayback Forestry, Inc.

2008

Matthew  Hammer

Grayback Forestry, Inc.

2008

Caleb Renno

Grayback Forestry, Inc.

2008

Bryan  Rich

Grayback Forestry, Inc.

2008

David  Steele

Grayback Forestry, Inc.

2008

Roark  Schwanenberg

Carson Helicopters, Inc.

2008

Robert A. Hales

Scappoose Rural Fire District

2008

Jesse Trader

County Fire and Security

2013

Oscar Montano-Garcia

Pacific Coast Contractors, Inc.

2013

John Hammack

R&K Water Service

2013

Mark James Burns

Medford Fire and Rescue

2016

 

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The Oregon Law Enforcement Memorial Fund raised funds to build the state fallen officer memorial more than 20 years ago and helps support the annual ceremonies that honor Oregon’s fallen law enforcement officers in May of each year, and fallen firefighters in September of each year.  For more information on the Oregon Law Enforcement Memorial Fund, and the statewide license plate that is available to honor fallen law enforcement officers and firefighters, please visit http://www.oregon.gov/DPSST/MF/pages/policememtrustfund.aspx

 

 




Attached Media Files: Oregon Fallen Firefighter Memorial , Oregon Fallen Firefighter Memorial , Oregon Fallen Firefighter Memorial

Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Task Force meets August 27
Oregon Health Authority - 08/19/19 2:58 PM

August 19, 2019

Contact: Lisa Bui, 971-673-3397, ootg.info@dhsoha.state.or.us (meeting information or accommodation)

What: A public meeting of the Oregon Opioid Taper Guidelines Task Force.

When: Tuesday, August 27, 1-4 p.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1A, 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland.

Agenda: Welcome, task force purpose and outcomes, agenda review, introductions, background on formation of the task force, principles for guidelines, key components for inclusion in the guidelines, next steps and summary.

For more information, please visit the Opioid Prescribing Guidelines Task Force website at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/PREVENTIONWELLNESS/SUBSTANCEUSE/OPIOIDS/Pages/task-force.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Lisa Bui at 971-673-3397, 711 TTY, ootg.info@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2Hfha9f

 


Lane County Man Pleads Guilty to Shooting At Endangered Gray Wolf
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 08/19/19 2:24 PM

MEDFORD, Ore.—Colton Tony Dick, 22, of Oakridge, Oregon, pleaded guilty today to a single count of unlawfully taking an endangered species.

According to court documents, on October 5, 2016, using a rifle and scope, Dick shot at an endangered gray wolf without legal justification as the animal was walking away from him in the Fremont-Winema National Forest. Dick was unable to locate the wolf.

Although Dick did not admit to killing a gray wolf, an investigation began on October 6, 2016 when an adult female GPS-collared gray wolf known as “OR 28” was found dead in the Fremont-Winema National Forest near Summer Lake, Oregon. On November 9, 2016, the US Fish and Wildlife Service Forensic Lab determined OR 28 died as a result of injuries sustained from a single gunshot wound.

Gray wolves (Canis lupus), located in Western Oregon, are listed as endangered under the Endangered Species Act.

Unlawfully taking an endangered species carries a maximum sentence of one year in prison, a $100,000 fine and one year of supervised release.

Under a deferred sentencing agreement with the government, Dick has agreed to submit to one-year of supervised release, pay restitution of $2,500 to the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, not hunt any wildlife for a period of one year and perform 100 hours of community service.

If Dick complies with these conditions, he will be allowed to withdraw his guilty plea and the government will move to dismiss his charge.

This case was investigated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Office of Law Enforcement and the Oregon State Police. It was prosecuted by Adam E. Delph, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

If you or someone you know has information about a wildlife crime, please contact the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Office of Law Enforcement by emailing fws_tips@fws.gov or calling 1-844-397-8477.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Joint Media Release for Focused Traffic Enforcement Detail
Bend Police Dept. - 08/19/19 1:51 PM

The Bend Police Department and the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office Community Action Target Team (CATT) will be working together on the afternoon of August 22, 2019, to conduct a focused traffic enforcement detail on Highway 97 north of Bend.  The traffic detail will be focused on the area of Highway 97, between Deschutes Junction (milepost 130) and Cooley Road (milepost 134).  The purpose of the traffic detail will be to promote safe and attentive driving, with the officers and deputies specifically focusing on several violations including speeding, following too closely, cell phone use, seat belt violations, and careless driving. 

Preliminary crash data through 2017 from the Oregon Department of Transportation shows that in this particular area, drivers are driving too fast and following too closely.  These two factors were established as being the primary cause of crashes in this area.

It is our hope this cooperative effort between the Bend Police Department and the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office will help drivers understand the importance of following posted speed signs, while encouraging them to be attentive and safe behind the wheel.

 

Submitted by: Lt. Juli McConkey


Redmond Police Now Accepting Applications For 2019 Citizen Academy (Photo)
Redmond Police Dept. - 08/19/19 1:32 PM
Citizen Academy Banner
Citizen Academy Banner
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-08/6157/126947/thumb_Citizen_Academy_Banner.jpg

Redmond, Oregon – The Redmond Police Department is proud to announce the 2019 Citizen Police Academy, beginning Thursday, Sept. 19th, 2019. The academy is an 8-week program designed to give residents an overview of the criminal justice system, how their police department functions and the procedures involved in working to make Redmond a safer community.

 

The Citizen Academy offers citizens insights into how police officers perform their duties and the different ways the department serves the community,” states Redmond Police Chief Dave Tarbet.

 

The Citizen Police Academy provides community members with a historical look at the tradition, progress, and future of the Redmond Police Department. Classes are instructed by highly trained department members and will include discussions on Use of Force, Emergency Vehicle Operations, Criminal Investigation, School Resource Officers, Traffic Enforcement, a tour of Deschutes County 911 and the Deschutes County Adult Jail, and other areas of the police department. Academy attendees will also have the opportunity to ride-along with officers on-duty.

 

Those interested in attending the 2019 Redmond Police Department Citizen Police Academy are encouraged to apply at the Redmond Police Department office or online at https://www.ci.redmond.or.us/government/departments/police/citizens-academy. Completed applications can be dropped off at the Redmond Police Department building, located on 777 SW Deschutes Ave. Class size is limited to 15 applicants. The closing date for applications is August 30.

 

For more information, please contact academy coordinator, Lieutenant Curtis Chambers, at curtis.chambers@ci.redmond.or.us.

 




Attached Media Files: Citizen Academy Banner

U.S. Attorney Statement on Law Enforcement Response to Portland Demonstration
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 08/19/19 12:38 PM

PORTLAND, Ore.—Billy J. Williams, U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon, provided the below statement on the law enforcement response to the August 17, 2019 demonstration in Downtown Portland.

“As a prosecutor, I’ve had the honor of being involved in law enforcement in Oregon for nearly 30 years. Much of this time has been working with agencies in the Portland Metropolitan Area, and, as a federal prosecutor for the last 19 years, partners throughout the state.

This past Saturday, I had the privilege of watching more than 700 local, state and federal law enforcement, fire and medical professionals work tirelessly to protect the City of Portland. These dedicated, unselfish, and non-political public servants worked together to gather the resources needed to protect our community and, in the process, change the narrative of public safety in this city.

Law enforcement does not and cannot take sides in politically-charged public discourse. This weekend’s response effort was consistent with what I’ve observed throughout my career: public servants working together to ensure public safety and help others, irrespective of politics.

In an era where it’s become all too common for politicians and pundits to question the intentions of law enforcement, I hope this weekend’s police response will serve as a definitive counterpoint.

Please join me in thanking the men and women in uniform who gave up their time with family and friends to protect our community and allow people to exercise their rights here in Portland.

To our law enforcement partners throughout Oregon—the U.S. Attorney’s Office and the U.S. Department of Justice appreciate you and have your back.”

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Attached Media Files: 2019-08/6325/126943/USA_STATEMENT-8-17_Demonstration-Final.pdf

West Coast Utility Commissions Discuss Changing Wildfire Risk and Mitigation Efforts
Oregon Public Utility Commission - 08/19/19 12:28 PM

PORTLAND, Ore. – Public utility commissioners from British Columbia, California, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington convened at the Oregon Convention Center for a public dialogue on Friday, August 16, focused on wildfire risk and mitigation. The all-day event featured experts who shared their perspectives and evolving approaches to address rapidly changing wildfire risk, driven by climate change and other factors.

Public utility commissions are responsible for ensuring safe and reliable access to utility services. By convening this joint conversation, the Commissions are exploring ways to address the expanding risk of wildfire.

“Working together will better equip us to handle the increased frequency and severity of wildfires in our region and the impacts on electric utilities, their customers, and the communities they serve,” said Letha Tawney, Commissioner for the Oregon Public Utility Commission. “This was a collaborative event amongst four western states and British Columbia to draw from the expertise and lessons learned in our regions.”

“I am pleased to be a part of this important dialogue focussing on addressing the increasing risk of wildfire which has the potential to impact many, including utility companies and ratepayers throughout British Columbia, and the entire west coast,” said Chair Dave M. Morton, British Columbia Utilities Commission. “Today’s dialogue was an opportunity to learn more about what regulators, utilities, and experts are doing, or could be doing, to best address the threat of wildfires.”

Expert panelists engaged in dialogue with the Commissioner roundtable on the realities of wildfires and wide-ranging solutions to mitigate risk. Specifically, the panel discussions focused on the following:

  • Tracking the Changing Risk: How climate change is impacting potential wildfire areas and the current risk mapping practices.
  • Making Risk-Based Changes to the System: How utilities prioritize risk mitigation efforts, and the issues that arise or barriers that develop for utilities in that 'prioritization.'
  • Managing the Financial Risks: The financial tools available to utilities to mitigate ratepayer risk and keep the cost of capital affordable, and whether these tools are robust enough for the scale of possible losses.
  • Expanding Public Safety Coordination: The factors that should be considered to ensure Public Safety Power Shutoffs or other fire driven outages do not increase public safety risk now that transportation, communications, and other essential services are more reliant on electricity.

“This event continues important collaboration among western states on pressing issues facing the utility sector, including adaptation to the impacts of climate change and dealing with wildfire risks. California will share lessons learned as we implement new tools to mitigate public safety risks and cost impacts to ratepayers,” said Commissioner Clifford Rechtschaffen of the California Public Utilities Commission.

One of the wildfire mitigation measures that can impact communities is proactive de-energization, or Public Safety Power Shut-offs, in the event of extreme wildfire risk. As utilities develop plans to mitigate wildfire, Commissions will need to understand and analyze these proposals from the utilities they regulate.

Commissioner Hayley Williamson of Nevada expressed how grateful she is for the opportunity to meet and speak with experts across the West regarding wildfires. “I especially appreciate the discussion on de-energization and what factors should be considered to ensure de-energizing lines does not increase public safety risks during a wildfire threat or event,” added Commissioner Williamson.

Panelists emphasized that climate change is impacting the intensity of wildfire seasons in their respective regions. The research and tools available to understand and plan for that changing risk to help ensure customer safety were highlighted in today’s discussion. The sharing of these best management practices and lessons are helpful in preparing the states and British Columbia as the wildfire risk continues to evolve.

“Climate change is resulting in increased risk of wildfires in the west,” said Washington UTC Chairman David Danner. “Utility regulators in the region need to understand fully the potential impacts of wildfires on utility service, costs, and community safety. Today’s conversation was an important opportunity to discuss how our utilities can best predict, prepare for, and respond to wildfires in our states, and we look forward to future discussions.”

The commissioners expressed a desire to continue this dialogue to help ensure safe, reliable and affordable electricity service at a time when wildfire risks continue to evolve, requiring constant evolution of best practices.

If unable to watch the event live, you can view the recorded panel discussions online by Monday, August 19, 2019. You can learn more about Tracking the Changing Risk, Making Risk-Based Changes to the Systems, Managing the Financial Risks, and Expanding Public Safety Coordination.

This press release was redistributed today due to technical difficulties Friday. I apologize in advance for any duplication.


OHA gathers subcommittees to address socially focused priorities of State Health Improvement Plan
Oregon Health Authority - 08/19/19 11:13 AM

August 19, 2019

Members will develop, track strategies aimed at ending health disparities

PORTLAND, Ore. — The Oregon Health Authority has gathered teams of community partners to begin tackling State Health Improvement Plan (SHIP) priorities focused on social factors that affect health, such as childhood trauma, food security, and access to health care and employment.

The PartnerSHIP, a steering committee developing the 2020-2024 SHIP, has formed subcommittees with representatives from state agencies, nonprofits, tribal health, local public health departments, health care, academia, businesses, and people with lived experience.

The subcommittees’ goal is to identify and track strategies aimed at achieving the five SHIP priorities that include:

  • Institutional bias, or systematic distribution of resources, power and opportunity in society to the exclusion of people of color, people with disabilities, people with low income and people who identify as LGBTQ+.
  • Adversity, trauma and toxic stress, which can include abuse and neglect, living in poverty, incarceration, family separation, and exposure to racism and discrimination.
  • Economic drivers of health such as housing, living wage, food insecurity and transportation, since poverty is a strong predictor of poor health.
  • Access to equitable preventive health care, which can be limited by health care provider shortages, transportation barriers, health care costs, or language or other cultural barriers.
  • Behavioral health including poor mental health and substance use, which can lead to lower quality of life, unemployment and increased suicide rates.

"Convening these subcommittees is a significant step toward systematically addressing the 2020-2024 SHIP priorities," said Oregon Public Health Director Lillian Shirley. "This provides an exciting opportunity to work with partners to develop strategies for reducing inequities that can have lifelong health effects."

Subcommittee rosters can be viewed by clicking on the 2020-2024 SHIP Priority Area links on the OHA State Health Improvement Plan webpage at https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/ABOUT/Pages/ship-process.aspx.

The subcommittees will align existing assets and strengths and identity new strategies needed to end health disparities, the disproportionate burden of preventable illness, injury, disability, or mortality experienced by marginalized groups in each priority area. The strategies will be developed using a health equity framework, which aims to eliminate disparities by addressing social, economic and environmental conditions that affect health, and will include policy changes, improvements in daily living conditions, and individual-level interventions.

Strategies will be created with particular attention to the needs of priority populations including people of color, people with disabilities, people who are low-income, people who identify as LGBTQ+, older adults and children. Subcommittees will also identify measures that will be used to monitor progress over the next five years of plan implementation.

The 2020-2024 SHIP is a product of the state’s effort to build a modern public health system. The plan’s focus on social factors affecting health was informed by community partners. Next spring, communities will be asked to weigh in on the proposed strategies to ensure they are culturally relevant to priority populations.

Subcommittees will meet monthly starting in August. All meetings are open to the public. Meeting details for each subcommittee, and additional information about the SHIP, can be found at healthoregon.org/2020ship. For questions or comments, contact at isty.j.hudson@state.or.us">christy.j.hudson@state.or.us.

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DOI to Treat More Than 1.2M Acres this Wildfire Season, Resources Mobilized across the Nation
Bureau of Land Management Ore. & Wash. - 08/19/19 9:34 AM

Agency personnel and critical assets are poised to respond to wildfires across the country

Washington - With peak wildfire activity predicted in the coming months, the Department of the Interior (DOI) has been working tirelessly to implement preventative measures to limit the size and scope of wildfires, treat current wildfires already underway, and protect wildfire-prone areas to best safeguard people and their communities. 

“As stewards of one-fifth of the country’s public lands, primarily in the West, we know that our ability to be prepared for wildfires and reduce their severity is paramount to protecting communities and saving lives,” said U.S. Secretary of the Interior David Bernhardt. “In collaboration with local, state, and other federal partners, we are using everything in our arsenal to prepare for wildfires this year, treating more than one million acres.”

As a part of the DOI, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), the National Park Service (NPS), and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) contribute to a total workforce of 4,500 firefighting personnel, 500 tribal firefighters, 151 smokejumpers, 18 interagency hotshot crews and 4 Tribal hotshot crews. These firefighters will have over 600 pieces of specialized equipment available for use, including engines, water tenders, dozers, and other equipment. Aviation assets also play a critical role in efforts to manage wildfires as the DOI will have access to 23 single engine air tankers, 6 water scoopers, 41 Type 1, 2 and 3 helicopters, and a number of other aviation resources.

The Trump Administration has prioritized active management of the nation’s public lands as provided in the President’s Executive Order 13855 and Secretary’s Order 3372, which establish a meaningful and coordinated framework for ensuring the protection of people, communities, and natural resources. Implementation of both Orders is a priority for reducing the risks of deadly and destructive wildfires.

This year, the BLM began analyzing a significant, 11,000-mile stretch of strategic fuel breaks to combat wildfires in the Great Basin, which includes portions of Idaho, Oregon, Washington, California, Nevada, and Utah. This large-scale, collaborative project could serve as a means to better control wildfires within a 223 million acre area. The environmental impact of the proposal is still being evaluated.

As DOI continues to evaluate innovative ways to best limit the destruction of wildfires in the future, it is nearing completion of more than 2,500 wildfire risk-reduction projects on more than 1.2 million acres of DOI and tribally-administered lands in some of the most fire-prone areas of the country. Some of the state totals to be completed and specific projects already completed this fiscal year include:

Alaska: More than 43,000 acres of land will be treated. Already this year, Kenai National Wildlife Refuge, in cooperation with two Alaska Native Corporations and the Kenai Peninsula Borough, has implemented 90 acres of fuels management activities through mechanical treatments and prescribed fire treatments. This treatment is a component of a multi-year fuels break project, initiated in 2016, planned and implemented to protect the community of Sterling, AK. The Sterling fuels break was utilized as a contingency fire line, protecting Sterling from the threat from the 2019 Swan Lake Fire, which has now burned 102,521 acres and is currently 80% contained.

Arizona: Nearly 85,000 acres of land will be treated. Fuels treatment projects are ongoing with 21,287 acres treated so far this year, including 6,706 acres in the southwest border area. By the end of the fiscal year, more than 27,544 total acres of fuels are targeted for treatment by prescribed fire, chemical application or mechanical methods.

California: More than 30,000 acres of land will be treated with some projects including: A 93 acre fuels treatment project in the Sandy Gulch unit of the South Fork Mokelumne Project, near the community of Glenco in Calaveras County. In addition to the work completed by the Mother Lode Field Office, the Calaveras Healthy Impact Products Solutions, which is a local non-profit partner, has completed an adjacent 35-acre fuel break on BLM-managed public lands. This 35 acres represents the north portion of a fuel break that was identified as a priority by CAL FIRE after the 2015 Butte Fire. The southern portion of the fuel break is scheduled to be completed this fall, and will connect to ongoing fuels work in the southern part of the South Fork Mokelumne Project. The BLM California Bishop Field Office made improvements to existing fuelbreaks adjacent to residential areas. Wildland fire crews cut and removed downed trees and limbs on BLM-managed lands, reducing the available fuel load. The project was undertaken in partnership with residents of the community of Wilkerson, Inyo National Forest, and the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection.

Colorado: More than 27,000 acres of land will be treated. The BLM completed a 286-acre prescribed fire near Bayfield, Colorado, called the Rabbit Mountain Project Prescribed Fire. It was completed to restore and maintain a healthy ecosystem and reduce the risk of wildfire to private lands and improvements in the area. The prescribed fire will reinvigorate grasses, forbs, and shrubs and improve deer and elk habitat.

Florida: More than 183,000 acres of land will be treated. Already this year, Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge has completed 8,747 acres of prescribed fire and 1,839 acres of mechanical fuel reduction treatments, with partners including the Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, the National Park Service, the Florida Forest Service, and Brevard County. These fuel reduction projects protect residents, tourists, federal employees, public land, and military and private space industry. Minimizing operational disruption and mitigating risks and hazards, the projects reduce the intensity and duration of wildfires, smoke, and road closures.

Montana: Nearly 85,000 acres of land will be treated. The FWS and the BLM worked with the state of Montana and the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s U.S. Forest Service to reduce fire risk by removing trees and clearing brush. The project near the Red Rock Lakes National Wildlife Refuge reduces the risk of catastrophic fires from spreading to local communities. All timber was harvested and supported local economies.

Minnesota: More than 42,000 acres of land will be treated, primarily from the Red Lake Helitack crew from the Red Lake Reservation in northern Minnesota. They completed a 41,000 acre project to reduce wildfire risk and improve forest conditions. The aviation crew flew for eight hours in coordination with ground support using prescribed burns to remove the grassy understory and replenish the forest.

Nevada: More than 85,000 acres of land will be treated. One project already completed includes: The BLM Nevada Battle Mountain District has recently completed over 2,115 acres of treatments along roadsides including thinning, masticating, herbicide application, mowing, drill seeding, and broadcast seeding to create fuel breaks to limit the wildfire growth potential of roadside ignitions. In 2018, this fuel break allowed the district to successfully suppress a fire, keeping it from becoming a larger, more destructive disaster.

Utah: More than 134,000 acres of land will be treated overall. At BLM Utah, fuels treatment projects are ongoing with approximately 75,000 acres treated so far this year. By the end of the fiscal year, more than 117,000 total acres of fuels are targeted for treatment by prescribed fire or mechanical methods. Fuel treatment accomplishments are continually increasing on an annual basis, with acres targeted for 2019 being the highest planned accomplishment ever. Also, BLM is seeking comments on an environmental assessment (EA) analyzing a proposal to treat vegetation and fuels as part of a wildfire mitigation project near Castle Valley, Utah. The proposal covers approximately 1,400 acres of fuel breaks within a larger 7,500-acre planning and analysis area.

Virginia: More than 11,000 acres of land will be treated. One project already completed includes: The NPS completed a prescribed burn in Manassas National Battlefield Park. The prescribed burn helps to reduce the risk of wildfires and improves the habitat for wildlife.

As wildfire activity likely increases, DOI, in collaboration with local, state, and federal partners, is moving wildfire suppression resources to the most susceptible areas around the country. At the center of this coordination is the National Interagency Fire Center (NIFC), which coordinates eight different agencies and organizations’ emergency management responses. The NIFC produces a monthly “National Significant Wildland Fire Potential Outlook,” which provides wildland fire potential forecasts for the country. The most recent outlook forecasts potential for above normal fire activity in western Oregon and Washington, parts of California and Nevada, and the interior of Alaska.

“Most of the western states experienced a wet spring, which allowed vegetation to grow thickly and quickly,” said Fire Weather Program Manager with NIFC’s Predictive Services group Bryan Henry. “The wet, cool spring delayed fire season, though now, we are seeing hot and dry weather throughout most of the western states, which is rapidly drying the abundant vegetation and creating fuel for wildfires.” 

Due to a cool, wet spring season, wildfire activity has been below normal this year with 27,191 wildfires burning 3,325,456 acres. This is much lower than previous years as around 39,700 wildfires burned over 4.1 million acres at this point in the season last year and 5.8 million acres in 2017. 

Last year was one of the most tragic years on record with more than 58,000 wildfires burning over 8.8 million acres. Additionally, nearly 26,000 structures were destroyed, more than double the previous annual record.

The DOI is currently managing wildfire incidents in Alaska, Arizona, Montana, Nevada, Utah, and Washington, and has deployed personnel, aircraft, and equipment throughout the country to work with interagency firefighting partners.


Sat. 08/17/19
Injured Climber Rescued at Smith Rock State Park (Photo)
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/17/19 9:11 AM
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Released by: Sergeant Nathan Garibay, Emergency Services Manager

Rescued: Luke Wilson, 29 years old, Bishop, CA

On 08-16-19 at approximately 2:49 PM, the Deschutes County Sheriff's Office responded to a call at the Smith Rock State Park for an injured climber. The climber was reported to have fallen in the Dihedrals climbing area inside the park.  One Deputy and ten Deschutes County Sheriff's Office Search and Rescue volunteers responded to the park along with Redmond Fire and Rescue and State Parks Staff.   

The climber, identified as Luke Wilson had fallen from the rock face.  He was eventually caught by his climbing protection, but swung hard into the wall impacting with enough force to cause significant injuries to one of his legs.  Wilson was wearing protective equipment and climbing with other climbers who were able to assist him until responders arrived.  Wilson was treated on scene by Redmond Fire and Rescue Paramedics and transported out on the trails by wheeled litter.  He was subsequently transported by ambulance to St. Charles Medical Center in Bend. 

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is a full service agency that oversees the adult jail, provides patrol, criminal investigations, civil process and search and rescue operations. Special units include SWAT, Marine Patrol, ATV Patrol, Forest Patrol, along with four K9 teams. Founded in 1916 and today lead by your duly elected Sheriff L. Shane Nelson, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office serves the nearly 190,000 residents in Deschutes County. The agency has 230 authorized and funded personnel, which includes 187 sworn employees who provide services to the 3,055 square miles of Deschutes County.




Attached Media Files: 2019-08/5227/126904/SR_rescue_081619.3.JPG , 2019-08/5227/126904/SR_rescue_081619.2.jpg , 2019-08/5227/126904/SR_rescue_081619.1.jpg

Fri. 08/16/19
Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Communities of Color Workgroup meets August 22
Oregon Health Authority - 08/16/19 4:23 PM

August 16, 2019

What: A public meeting of the Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative Communities of Color Workgroup.

Agenda: Review and discuss community survey results and distribution process; discuss and group strategies and activities to further goals; discuss and decide on decision making process.

When: August 22, 9:30-11:30 a.m.

Where: Portland State Office Building, Room 1E, 800 NE Oregon Street, Portland.

Details: The Tri-County Regional Behavioral Health Collaborative brings together multiple sectors across the Portland metro area to collectively address and prevent behavioral health challenges. Its focus is on peer-delivered services and substance use disorder activities that can make an impact in 12 to 24 months.

For more information, see the RBHC website at https://www.oregon.gov/OHA/HSD/BHP/Pages/Regional-Collaboratives.aspx.

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Summer Boslaugh at 503-753-9688, 711 TTY or email .h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us">summer.h.boslaugh@dhsoha.state.or.us at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/308Mgad


First meetings for 2020-2024 State Health Improvement Plan subcommittees set in August, September
Oregon Health Authority - 08/16/19 11:33 AM

August 16, 2019

What: The first meeting of the 2020-2024 State Health Improvement Plan (SHIP) subcommittees, tasked with identifying strategies and measures, and developing work plans for implementing the SHIP. Each of the subcommittees is focused on one of the five SHIP priority areas:

Agenda: Become oriented with members of the identified SHIP subcommittee; set the stage for the subcommittee work; develop a shared understanding of priority and communities of concern; and define the goal of the subcommittee work.

Where: All meetings are held on the ninth floor of the Portland State Office Building, 800 NE Oregon St., Portland. Meetings also are available remotely. Visit the subcommittee meeting page for remote meeting attendance options.

Join the meetings via conference call:

Dial: 877?848?7030

Access code: 2030826#

When:

  • Behavioral Health Subcommittee: Wednesday, Aug. 21, 2-4 p.m., Room 900.
  • Access to Equitable Preventive Health Care Subcommittee: Monday, Aug. 26, 1-3 p.m., Room 918.
  • Adversity, Trauma and Toxic Stress Subcommittee: Tuesday, Sept. 3, 2-4 p.m., Room 900.
  • Institutional Bias Subcommittee: Wednesday, Sept. 18, 10 a.m. to noon, Room 915.
  • Economic Drivers of Health Subcommittee: Friday, Sept. 27, 1-2 p.m., Room 900.

All meetings are open to the public. A public comment period will be held during the last 10 minutes of each meeting; comments are limited to three minutes.

Background: Oregon’s SHIP identifies interventions and strategies to address health-related priorities in the state. The plan serves as a basis for taking collective action with cross-sector partners to improve heath of people in Oregon. The SHIP is based off findings of the State Health Assessment.

Program contact: Christy Hudson, 971-678-4347, isty.j.hudson@state.or.us">christy.j.hudson@state.or.us

# # #

Everyone has a right to know about and use Oregon Health Authority (OHA) programs and services. OHA provides free help. Some examples of the free help OHA can provide are:

  • Sign language and spoken language interpreters
  • Written materials in other languages
  • Braille
  • Large print
  • Audio and other formats

If you need help or have questions, please contact Catherine Moyer at 971-673-1132, ine.moyer@dhsoha.state.or.us">catherine.moyer@dhsoha.state.or.us, at least 48 hours before the meeting.

http://bit.ly/2H8qw6U

 


PacificSource Foundation for Health Improvement Commits $230k to Six Regional Nonprofits
PacificSource Health Plans - 08/16/19 11:21 AM

(Springfield, Ore.) August 16, 2019 The PacificSource Foundation for Health Improvement recently committed $230,000 in grant funding to support six nonprofit organizations based in Oregon, Montana, and Idaho.

“Working in partnership to improve community health is a shared mission of both PacificSource and of our foundation,” said Marian Blankenship, executive director of PacificSource’s Foundation for Health Improvement. “We know that we can do so much more when we partner toward building vibrant and healthy communities. We are pleased to announce this latest round of funding to these deserving nonprofits.”

The funding will span from one to two years for the following nonprofits:

Oregon:

  • NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) Lane County – Two-year grant to support the expansion of their Peer-led Mental Health Support Programming, allowing them to better meet the needs of their clients in rural areas.

 

  • Parenting Now! – Two-year grant in support of their Make Parenting a Pleasure (MPAP) Program, which aims to strengthen families, reduce the risk of child abuse and neglect, and promote the long-term health of children.

 

  • Returning Veterans Project – Two-year grant to support the expansion of their volunteer healthcare provider network, which will allow them to provide free physical and mental healthcare services to more post-9/11 veterans each year.

 

Montana:

  • Mountain Home Montana – Two-year grant to help support and educate young mothers and parents who have a history of trauma, focused on harm-reduction and the prevention of adverse childhood experiences.

 

  • Share Our Strength, Inc. – Two-year grant to support the No Kid Hungry Montana Initiative, which aims to end childhood hunger by providing food access and nutrition.

 

Idaho:

  • Women’s & Children’s Alliance – One-year grant in support of critical counseling services for survivors of domestic and/or sexual violence.

 

About PacificSource Foundation for Health Improvement 

Founded in 1992, the PacificSource Foundation for Health Improvement is an expression of our commitment to our communities. Its mission is to improve community health through the touchstones of better health, better care, and lower healthcare costs. The Foundation’s grants and partnerships focus on improving access to healthcare for vulnerable populations and promoting health excellence via innovative care and community health and wellness programs. For more information, visit http://bit.ly/2yK92qF

 

About PacificSource Health Plans 

PacificSource Health Plans is an independent, regional, not-for-profit community health plan serving the Northwest. Founded in 1933, PacificSource is based in Springfield with local offices throughout Oregon, Washington, Idaho, and Montana. The PacificSource family of companies employs 1,000 people, serves more than 300,000 individuals, and has 3,900 employer clients throughout the Northwest. For more information visit PacificSource.com.

 

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UPDATE - Pedestrian dies in crash on Hwy 97 - Jefferson County
Oregon State Police - 08/16/19 8:04 AM

The pedestrian is being identified as Sarabjit Singh (66) of Kent, WA

On Wednesday, March 14, 2019 at approximately 9:20 P.M. Oregon State Police and emergency personnel responded to  a vehicle crash on Hwy 97 near milepost 108.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a CMV stopped on the northbound shoulder and the operator exited the vehicle and attempted to cross Hwy 97.  A southbound Chevrolet, operated by Megan Kelly (28) of Bend, OR, struck the pedestrian.

The pedestrian sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased at the scene. Name will be released when next of kin has been notified.

Kelly was transported to St. Charles in Bend.

OSP was assisted by Jefferson County Sheriff's Office, Emergency Medical Services, and ODOT


UPDATE - Passenger dies in single vehicle crash on Hwy 30 - Columbia County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 08/16/19 7:40 AM
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On Thursday, August 8, 2019 a silver Cadillac Escalade SUV was involved in a fatal traffic crash on Hwy 30 near milepost 39 east of Rainier, Oregon.

The silver Cadillac Escalade SUV was traveling from Astoria and was eastbound on Hwy 30

OSP is asking for the public's assistance - if you witnessed the crash or saw the silver Cadillac Escalade SUV driving between 11:45 A.M. and the crash time of approximately 2:15 P.M. please contact the Oregon State Police Northern Command Center at OSP (677) and reference Trooper Chris Cowen.

On Thursday, August 8, 2019, at approximately 2:15 P.M. Oregon State Police and emergency personnel responded to the report of a single vehicle crash on Hwy 30 near milepost 39.  

Preliminary investigation revealed a silver Cadillac Escalade, operated by Michael Scarlett (65) of Oakland, CA, was traveling eastbound when it left the roadway, went up the embankment and rotated/rolled multiple times before coming to rest on its passenger side.  Scarlett received minor injuries.

There were four passengers in the Cadillac:

Barry Robinson Jr. (61) from Oregon City sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.

Zyrone Powell (23) from Oregon City was transported with serious injures. 

Coleman Ewell (28) from Pleasantville, NJ minor injuries.

Clayton Ewell (25) from Philadelphia, PA minor injuries. 

Hwy 30 was completely closed with a detour in place for approximately 2 hours and then opened to one lane of travel for an additional hour.

OSP was assisted by Columbia River Fire and Rescue, Columbia City Police Department, and ODOT.




Attached Media Files: 2019-08/1002/126688/20190808_154309_resized.jpg

Single Vehicle Fatal Crash on Hwy 99W - Yamhill County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 08/16/19 7:20 AM
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On Thursday, August 15, 2019 at approximately 8:45 P.M. Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a single vehicle crash on Hwy 99W near milepost 34.

Preliminary investigation indicates that a 2005 Nissan Murano, operated by Hector Orozco Jr.(29) of Dayton,  was northbound at a high rate of speed when it left the roadway and struck several parked cars. 

Orozco sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased. 

Northbound Hwy 99W was closed for 5 hours following the crash. 

OSP was assisted by Yamhill County Sheriff's Office, McMinnville Police Department, McMinnville Fire Department, and ODOT




Attached Media Files: 2019-08/1002/126876/99w_mp34_fatal.jpg

Motorcyclist dies in crash on Hwy 199 - Josephine County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 08/16/19 7:08 AM
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On Thursday, August 15, 2019 at approximately 4:34 P.M. Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a two vehicle crash on Hwy 199 near milepost 38.

Preliminary investigation revealed that a Harley Davidson motorcycle, operated by Keith Willis (58) of Cave Junction, was traveling south on Hwy 199 when it crossed into the northbound lane and collided with a silver Audi operated by Jose Ortiz Adata (25). 

Willis sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased. 

Ortiz Adata was transported to the hospital with non life threatening injuries.

OSP was assisted by EMS and ODOT.




Attached Media Files: 2019-08/1002/126875/IMG_1680.JPG

Man Dies in Paragliding Accident
Deschutes Co. Sheriff's Office - 08/16/19 2:10 AM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Date: August 15th, 2019

Released by: Sergeant Kent Vander Kamp

Bend, OR – Man Dies in Paragliding Accident

On August 15th, 2019, at approximately 6:49PM, Deschutes County 911 received a call reporting a paragliding accident on the northwest side of Pine Mountain in the Millican area of Deschutes County. The 911 caller reported that a paraglider fell approximately 200 after separating from a paraglider wing in mid-air.

Deschutes County Sheriff’s Deputies, United States Forest Service Law Enforcement, Bend Fire Department Paramedics, AirLink Air Ambulance and Deschutes County Sheriff’s Search and Rescue volunteers were all dispatched to the scene.

When emergency personnel arrived, they found citizen by-standers and fellow paragliders attempting to resuscitate the injured paraglider on the mountain slope about 250 meters from the peak.

The injured paraglider was later identified as 50 year old, Matthew Hans-Joachim Richter, of Bend, Oregon. Mr. Richter was pronounced deceased on scene by emergency medical personnel.

Mr. Richter was described as an experienced paraglider with many years of flying experience. The paraglider wing or canopy, flown by Mr. Richter, was a lightweight motor-less, free-flying, foot launched aircraft with no rigid frame or structure.

According to witness accounts, Mr. Ritcher was only airborne for 10-15 seconds before separating from the wing and falling to the ground. The cause of the accident is still under investigation with the assistance of the Federal Aviation Administration and the NTSB.

CONTACT FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:   Sgt. William Bailey, Public Information Officer, 541-388-6655 or SheriffPIO@deschutes.org  

The Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office is a full service agency that oversees the adult jail, provides patrol, criminal investigations, civil process and search and rescue operations. Special units include SWAT, Marine Patrol, ATV Patrol, Forest Patrol, along with four K9 teams. Founded in 1916 and today lead by your duly elected Sheriff L. Shane Nelson, the Deschutes County Sheriff’s Office serves the nearly 190,000 residents in Deschutes County. The agency has 230 authorized and funded personnel, which includes 187 sworn employees who provide services to the 3,055 square miles of Deschutes County.

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Thu. 08/15/19
Digital Marketing Tips a Topic at Rural Business and Innovation Summit 2019 (Photo)
Klamath Co. Chamber of Commerce - 08/15/19 3:01 PM
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At this year’s Rural Business and Innovation Summit, Jen McFarland, CEO of Women Conquer Business, will deliver practical digital marketing tips for rural businesses. She will cover email, social media, email marketing, website, and funnels.  The Rural Business and Innovation Summit will be held September 12th at Klamath Community College in Klamath Falls and is the premiere conference for rural business owners, entrepreneurs, and community leaders.

“Rural businesses have limited time, money, and resources and it can be confusing to determine the best use of marketing time and money,” says Heather Tramp, the Chamber’s Executive Director, “Ms. McFarland will help our guests understand the practical and essential steps to building a robust marketing foundation.” Jen McFarland is the CEO of Women Conquer Business consulting and podcast. She ditched her comfy C-suite tech project management job in pursuit of freedom. Her goal is to help business leaders vet ideas, take ownership of their projects, and incorporate digital marketing from day one.

In addition to this session, the Rural Business and Innovation Summit will feature a wide variety of topics including entrepreneurship, workforce, and more. The Summit is hosted annually by the Klamath County Chamber of Commerce.  Registration is available online at www.ruralbizsummit.com or by calling 541-884-5193.




Attached Media Files: 2019-08/1602/126862/Jen_McFarland.jpg

Foot Pursuit Leads to an Arrest of a Wanted Man on Multiple Thefts
Bend Police Dept. - 08/15/19 3:00 PM

Date and time: Thursday, August 15, 2019 at 11:15 am

Type of Incident: Multiple thefts and an arrest warrant

Location of Incident: SE Yew Avenue and Bend-LaPine Bus Yard

 

Arrested: Taylor Steven Connelly, 24 year old Bend resident

 

Officers with the Bend Police Department tried to contact Taylor Connelly at a house on Southeast Yew Avenue about multiple thefts he was involved in as well as an arrest warrant for a Parole Violation.  The officers had information he was in possession of a firearm and he made a prior threat that he would point firearms at officers to avoid being arrested.

Once the officers made contact with Taylor Connelly, he ran from the officers across SE 3rd Street and towards the Bend-LaPine Bus Yard.  The officers deployed a flash bang at the ground in an attempted to stop him, however he continued running away from the officers and into a fenced area, not intended for the public, at the Bus Yard. Taylor Connelly was taken into custody with the assistance of K 9 Ronny.  He suffered non-life threatening injuries from being bit by K 9 Ronny.  He was taken into custody and is being treated for his injury.  Taylor Connelly will be lodged at the Deschutes County Adult Jail upon release from the hospital.

Taylor Connelly is charged with:

 

Interfering with a peace officer

Criminal Trespass II

Possession of Methamphetamine

Possession of Heroin

Possession of Steroids

Six counts of Identity Theft

4 counts of Possession of a Forged Instrument

4 counts of Unauthorized Entry into a Motor Vehicle

4 counts of Theft in the Second Degree

Resisting Arrest

Escape in the Second Degree

Warrant for Parole Violation

 

Submitted by: Lt. Juli McConkey


The FBI and Benton Co. Sheriff's Office Arrest Corvallis Man on Child Porn Charge
FBI - Oregon - 08/15/19 12:22 PM

On Tuesday, August 13, 2019, FBI agents arrested Thang Minh Van, 22, of Corvallis, in connection with an investigation begun by the Benton County Sheriff’s Office earlier this year.

On July 3, 2019, the Benton County Sheriff’s Office executed a search warrant at Van’s home in the 3900 block of NW Walnut Place in Corvallis.  The search warrant was related to the alleged illegal distribution of child sexual abuse material over the internet. At that time, deputies seized numerous computers and electronic devices.

Following a joint investigation by the Benton County Sheriff's Office and the FBI, agents obtained a federal criminal complaint charging Van with distribution and possession of child pornography. The arrest on Tuesday was without incident. Following Van’s initial appearance before a federal magistrate in Eugene, the judge released Van on pre-trial supervision. His next scheduled court appearance is on October 9th.

The FBI and the Benton County Sheriff’s Office encourage the public to report any suspected child sexual abuse material online to the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children (NCMEC) at http://CyberTipline.org.  NCMEC continuously reviews CyberTipline reports to ensure that reports of children who may be in imminent danger get first priority. After NCMEC’s review is completed, all information in a CyberTipline report is made available to law enforcement.

The Corvallis Police Department and the Linn County Sheriff’s Office assisted with the investigation with help from the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children.

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Redmond Police Make Arrest At Sam Johnson Park (UPDATE)
Redmond Police Dept. - 08/15/19 10:49 AM

UPDATE - The previous version of the below release indicated the wrong date.  The correct date of the incident described occurred on Wednesday, August 14, 2019, at 3:55 PM.  The Redmond Police Department regrets the error.

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Redmond, OR – On Wednesday, August 14, 2019, at approximately 3:55 PM, two Redmond Police officers contacted a male at the Sam Johnson Park pavilion.  One of the officers recognized the adult male as an alleged suspect involved in the selling of controlled substances at Sam Johnson Park.  Additionally, the officer noticed the male had an unleashed dog in the park.  Redmond park rules require all dogs to be on a leash when in a city park.

 

Officers contacted the male informing him he needed to speak with him about the dog.  The male allegedly stated he was not going to talk with the officer.  The officer warned the person he needed to, or else he would be arrested.

 

During the contact, the decision to arrest the male for Interfering with a Peace Officer was made, and the male was ordered to turn around and put his hands behind his back.  The male resisted the officer’s efforts of arrest and was placed on the ground.

 

While on the ground the suspect continued to physically resist arrest.  A Taser was deployed during the attempt to place the male in custody.  After the initial use of the Taser on the male, he further resisted by attempting to grab the Taser and take it away from one of the officers.  The second officer, recognizing the suspect was attempting to take control of the Taser and putting the officer’s safety at risk, struck the suspect in the head with a closed fist twice effectively ending the male’s attempt to take control of the Taser.  Ultimately, the male was secured in custody after additional officers arrived.

 

The male arrested is Mr. Darian Belles, a 25-year-old Redmond area resident.  He was arrested on – three counts of Interfering with a Peace Officer, three counts of Resisting Arrest, Disorderly Conduct in the Second Degree, Attempted Assault on a Public Safety Officer, Attempted Unlawful Use of a Stun Gun in the Second Degree, and Criminal Mischief in the Third Degree.

 

The officers primarily involved are identified as Officer Bryan Holman and Officer Chris Wooten.  Neither officer was injured, and both have returned to work.  Both officers involved had body cameras on and recorded the incident.

 

It is never lawful to resist arrest.  Officers have a lawful authority to enforce the laws and ordinances of Oregon and the City of Redmond.  Officers will always use all of their training, experience, and tools available to them to take a resisting subject into custody. 

 

All use of force incidents are reviewed by Redmond Police command staff to ensure the response used was lawful and within policy.  The review of this incident has just begun. 

 

All information will be sent to the District Attorney’s Office for review and a charging decision.  Video of this incident will not be released by the Redmond Police Department at this time.

 

The Redmond Police Department holds itself to the highest standards of law enforcement. We value the trust our community members place in us to keep our community safe.

 

 

Your Redmond Police Department serves you by responding to nearly 24,000 calls for service a year, with a professional staff of 47 sworn officers and 12 support staff. 

 


Best-selling author visits prison quilting program to share a message of hope and change
Oregon Dept. of Corrections - 08/15/19 10:40 AM

Marie Bostwick, a New York Times and USA Today best-selling author, will visit Coffee Creek Correctional Facility (CCCF) in Wilsonville to discuss her most recent novel “Hope on the Inside” with the incarcerated women. The book is rooted in the good work occurring at Oregon’s women’s prison. Since 2002, Coffee Creek Quilters’ (CCQ) dedicated volunteer instructors have provided a positive, hands-on program that gives the students an opportunity to learn and practice many life-enhancing skills.

As Ms. Bostwick puts in her note to the reader, “It began seven years ago, when I saw an exhibit of quilts made by inmates. Though the skill displayed by those incarcerated quilters varied from novice to expert, the quilts they produced were so honest, raw, and emotionally evocative that they truly rose to the level of art.”

Through quilting, the program gives students the opportunity to explore personal creativity and give back to the community. CCQ's goal is to nurture students' self-confidence and self-esteem to enhance their success after release from prison.

Each student in the program makes a total of three quilts during weekly two-hour classes. The first two quilts are donated to a variety of charities that serve seniors in nursing homes, hospitalized children, terminally ill adults, and foster children. Approximately 150 quilts are donated to these charities annually. Students may keep the third quilt or give it to a loved one. The opportunity to give back to the community and to loved ones is extremely important to the students.

In the fall of 2017, the writer visited the facility and saw firsthand the program in action. The book looks at the impacts of prison on the lives of incarcerated women, as well as an inspiring story about a woman searching for purpose and a career much later in life than she ever expected. The book is dedicated to the Coffee Creek Quilters.

On August 16, 2019, Bostwick will return to Coffee Creek to talk with the adults in custody about her book and her inspiration to write it based in a correctional facility. She will meet with CCCF book club members and participants of the quilting program.


Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems Names Becky Hultberg as Next CEO (Photo)
Oregon Assn. of Hosp. and Health Systems (OAHHS) - 08/15/19 9:09 AM
2019-08/1635/126837/New_CEO_Photo.jpg
2019-08/1635/126837/New_CEO_Photo.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-08/1635/126837/thumb_New_CEO_Photo.jpg

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

 

Contact: Michael Cox

OAHHS VP of Public Affairs & Communications

mcox@oahhs.org, 916-799-6784

 

Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems Names Becky Hultberg as Next CEO

Hultberg will succeed Andy Davidson, who will leave his position after 14 years at the helm

 

Lake Oswego, Ore. – August 15, 2019 -- The Oregon Association of Hospitals and Health Systems (OAHHS) announced today that Becky Hultberg will become the organization’s new President and Chief Executive Officer when she assumes the position in December.

 

Hultberg currently serves as the President and CEO of the Alaska State Hospital and Nursing Home Association (ASHNHA), a position she’s held since 2014. Prior to her current role, Hultberg served as Commissioner of the State of Alaska’s Department of Administration. Other past roles include serving as Regional Director of Communications and Marketing for Providence Health & Services Alaska and as Press Secretary in the Office of the Governor. She has served on the Alaska Retirement Management Board, the Alaska Health Care Commission and several non-profit boards of directors. She currently serves on the American Hospital Association Board of Trustees.

 

“OAHHS has earned a national reputation as a forward-looking advocate for advancing the state of health care in Oregon,” said Carol Bradley, Senior Vice President and Chief Nursing Officer at Legacy Health, and OAHHS Board Chair. “As a nationally recognized leader in health care, Becky is the right choice to help OAHHS navigate the critical issues facing hospitals and health systems and accelerate the progress being made to advance care and services within our communities.”

 

“The rapidly changing health care environment requires thinking differently and embracing the opportunity to drive progress,” said Hultberg. “My unrelenting focus will be on delivering results for our members and the communities they serve.”

 

Working closely with the 15-member Board of Trustees, Hultberg will be responsible for setting the organization’s strategic direction and managing a staff of 26 across OAHHS and its affiliate organizations, Apprise Health Insights, the Oregon Association of Hospitals Research and Education Foundation, and the Oregon Hospitals Political Action Committee.

 

Hultberg will succeed Andy Davidson, who last December announced he would be leaving his position at the end of 2019, after 14 years at the helm.


“Andy Davidson has provided vision, leadership and advocacy for the hospital industry as OAHHS CEO for 14 years,” said Bradley. “Because of Andy, OAHHS is now recognized as one of the leading state hospital associations in the nation in terms of effectiveness and member engagement.”

 

The OAHHS Board of Trustees decided to conduct a nation-wide search for Davidson’s replacement and formed the 13-member Leadership Transition Committee chaired by Joe Sluka, President and CEO of St. Charles Health System and Board Chair-elect of OAHHS.

 

“OAHHS is a strong, unified organization, uniquely positioned to improve health care in Oregon during a time of radical industry transformation,” said Sluka, who will take over as OAHHS Board Chair in January 2020. “As a thoughtful leader, innovator, strategist and consensus builder, Becky is ideally suited to lead OAHHS into the future.”

 

Hultberg holds a bachelor’s degree in history from Abilene Christian University and an MBA with an emphasis in health policy, economics and administration from Ball State University. She and her husband Jeff have three children. Hultberg will be relocating to Oregon later this year, with her family to follow at the end of the school year.

A photo of Hultberg is attached.

 

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About OAHHS: Founded in 1934, OAHHS is a statewide, nonprofit trade association that works closely with local and national government leaders, business and citizen coalitions, and other professional health care organizations to enhance and promote community health and to continue improving Oregon’s innovative health care delivery system.

 




Attached Media Files: 2019-08/1635/126837/FINAL_New_CEO_Release_08_2019.docx , 2019-08/1635/126837/New_CEO_Photo.jpg

OnPoint Community Credit Union Announces New Savings Account for Youth (Photo)
OnPoint Community Credit Union - 08/15/19 8:00 AM
Two of OnPoint Community Credit Union's youngest members open OnPoint Savers Accounts at the credit union's branch in Lake Oswego, Oregon.
Two of OnPoint Community Credit Union's youngest members open OnPoint Savers Accounts at the credit union's branch in Lake Oswego, Oregon.
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-08/963/126831/thumb_Savers.jpg

PORTLAND, Ore., August 15, 2019— OnPoint Community Credit Union has launched a new OnPoint Savers Account specifically designed for youth ages 17 and younger. This new product is part of the credit union’s ongoing commitment to improve financial wellness for its members and the community.

The OnPoint Savers Account earns a 5.00% APY for the first $500, which is a higher interest rate than traditional savings accounts. When parents or guardians set up a new membership for their child with a minimum deposit of $25, OnPoint will deposit an additional $55.

The Savers Account is built specifically for kids and it’s not just about the high yield savings and bonus; OnPoint also plans to share tips and tricks with this younger membership designed to help them adopt positive savings habits.

“Financial education is an important part of who we are and we look forward to helping young people adopt healthy money management habits early on in their lives,” said OnPoint President and CEO Rob Stuart. “We invite kids to join their parents at any OnPoint branch to open their new Savers Account and we’ll give them a piggy bank, show them how to use the coin machine and answer any questions they might have about saving.”

According to the Federal Reserve, one in four Americans have not started saving for retirement. It’s never been more important than now to start teaching our kids about short- and long-term saving habits and financial goal setting. In addition to the Savers Account, OnPoint offers online resources for kids and parents on our updated website and new financial education platform.

OnPoint looks forward to being in contact with these young members throughout their banking partnership. When they reach 18, OnPoint will convert their Savers Accounts to a traditional savings accounts, along with providing special offers for products and services.

Opening a Savers Account is easy. Kids and their parent or guardian can stop by any OnPoint branch to get started. To learn more about the OnPoint Savers Account, please visit: https://www.onpointcu.com/onpoint-savers/.

DISCLOSURES

OnPoint Savers Account rate of 5.00% APY is subject to change. Stated APY is for balances up to $500; balances of $500.01 and higher earn posted Regular Savings Account rate. Account must be established for member age 17 or younger by parent or guardian with a minimum $25 deposit. Parent or legal guardian must be on the membership and present to open the OnPoint Savers Account. When primary member attains the age of 18, accounts will be converted to Regular Savings Account, earning that account’s published rate at that time. Fiduciary memberships, including UTTMA and Minor Settlement Accounts are not eligible for OnPoint Savers. One OnPoint Savers Account per member/TIN. One $55 bonus per tax ID for new members only. Cannot be combined with Refer a Friend bonus or other promotional offers. The full account balance APY is calculated by combining the 5.00% APY earnings on the first $500 with the standard APY on the remaining balance above $500.

Federally insured by NCUA.

ABOUT ONPOINT COMMUNITY CREDIT UNION

OnPoint Community Credit Union is the largest credit union in Oregon, serving more than 378,000 members and with assets of $5.8 billion. Founded in 1932, OnPoint Community Credit Union’s membership is available to anyone who lives or works in one of 13 Oregon counties (Benton, Clackamas, Columbia, Crook, Deschutes, Jefferson, Lane, Linn, Marion, Multnomah, Polk, Washington and Yamhill) and two Washington counties (Skamania and Clark) and their immediate family members. More information is available at: 503-228-7077 or 800-527-3932.

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Attached Media Files: Two of OnPoint Community Credit Union's youngest members open OnPoint Savers Accounts at the credit union's branch in Lake Oswego, Oregon.

Live juvenile whale washes ashore near Waldport
Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept. - 08/15/19 7:56 AM

Oregon Parks and Recreation Department

News Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

August 15, 2019

 

Juvenile whale washes ashore near Waldport

Waldport, Ore., Thursday, August 15, 2019 – A 20’ juvenile humpback whale washed shore north of the Alsea River near Waldport on Wednesday, August 14. A team organized by the Oregon State University-based Oregon Marine Mammal Stranding Network (OMMSN) responded to the report early  Wednesday morning and coordinated an all-day effort to relieve the animal’s stress while waiting high tide. After two high tides—one mid-day Wednesday and one shortly after midnight Thursday—the whale remains stranded. A team of contractors representing the federal National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration arrived early Thursday morning to help with an assessment of the whale.

Depending on the animal’s health, options include waiting for additional high tides, assisting its safe return to the ocean in some way, or euthanasia. The evaluation process will take several hours.

Students, volunteers , and staff with the OMMSN, Oregon Coast Aquarium, OSU Marine Mammal Institute, and OSU Hatfield Marine Science Center spent Wednesday providing comfort care by digging out around the beached whale while keeping it wet. Oregon State Park beach rangers provided support. During the Wednesday high tide, the whale managed to swim free briefly before stranding itself again. Members of the team stayed on site most of the night.

The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department reminds all residents and visitors the ocean shore is a wild environment, and presents an invaluable opportunity to enjoy wildlife and natural cycles. Wildlife should be given a wide berth and shown respect at all times, however. Any stranded marine mammal should be reported immediately to 541-270-6830. Marine mammals, including carcasses, are protected by federal law and must be left untouched and given 150’ of space in all directions.

The OMMSN began in the 1980s and is involved in collection and analysis of data and biological samples. Data collected from such events are entered into a national database that is used to establish baseline information on marine mammal communities and their health. The Stranding Network is a volunteer organization, with one paid staff member for the entire state of Oregon (the Network Coordinator). Stranding network members are from universities, state and federal agencies, and the general public, and they donate their time. The network does not receive state funds. Information on volunteering or donating to support the network is online at https://mmi.oregonstate.edu/ways-help.

# # #

Photos, video, and audio of the stranding are online and freely available for noncommercial use at https://tinyurl.com/waldportwhale


Wed. 08/14/19
Department of Human Services statement on changes to "public charge" rule
Oregon Department of Human Services - 08/14/19 5:09 PM

Salem, Ore. -- On Monday, the Trump administration announced a new rule that makes it harder for immigrants who rely on certain government benefit programs to obtain lawful permanent residency if they are found to be a “public charge,” which means they have received public benefits or may receive them in the future.

The new public charge rule is scheduled to take effect October 15, 2019, and will expand the list of benefits that the federal government could consider when making decisions about lawful permanent residency. While some Department of Human Services (DHS)-administered benefits are already affected by the current rule, the new rule would impact additional benefits, such as Supplemental Nutritional Assistance Program (SNAP) that serves more than 600,000 Oregonians, and some forms of Medicaid-funded services.

The Department of Human Services has identified that the greatest potential impact to program participation is the fear that the proposed public charge could affect immigration status for individuals or their families. This fear may lead to fewer families accessing benefits, even when some family members are citizens and have a legal right to our programs. 

“When people - especially children and vulnerable adults - go hungry, lack medical care, and become homeless the impacts are far reaching and expensive. They are preventable and generate cost avoidance that can be refocused on other priorities that move our country forward,” Department of Human Services Director Fariborz Pakseresht wrote to the federal government about the proposed rule last December.

DHS encourages anyone who has questions about the federal public charge rule to:

 

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Ashland Resident Found Deceased in her Vehicle at Otter Rock
Oregon State Police - 08/14/19 4:09 PM

On August 14, 2019 at approximately 12:00 PM, Oregon State Police (OSP) was notified of a Toyota Prius parked at the Otter Rock/Devils Punch Bowl State Park.  Parks reported, it appeared, the Prius had a deceased person in the vehicle.

The preliminary investigation revealed the Prius had been parked, at the park, for approximately the last week. The registered owner was identified as Leslie R. Lightfall, age 68, from Ashland. Once OSP entered the vehicle, the deceased female was identified as Lightfall. It appeared Lightfall had been sleeping in her vehicle and died from natural causes.

OSP was assisted by Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, Depoe Bay Fire and Rescue, Ashland Police Department, Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office, Napa California Police Department, and the Lincoln County District Attorney’s Office.

No photos are available

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Two vehicle fatal crash on Hwy 20 - Harney County (Photo)
Oregon State Police - 08/14/19 3:22 PM
2019-08/1002/126821/20190814_060204_resized.jpg
2019-08/1002/126821/20190814_060204_resized.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-08/1002/126821/thumb_20190814_060204_resized.jpg

On Wednesday, August 14, 2019, at approximately 4:35 A.M. Oregon State Police Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a motor vehicle crash on Hwy 20 near milepost 88.5 approximately 40 miles west of Burns, OR.

Preliminary investigation revealed a Ford F350 pickup had been traveling westbound towing a 40' gooseneck trailer loaded with two GMC pickups.  The Ford F350 became disabled and came to a stop partially blocking the westbound lane.  A Kenworth CMV, operated by Lloyd Theen (69) of Winlock, WA, was also traveling westbound and struck the  trailer forcing the vehicle combination off the roadway and onto the shoulder. 

The operator of the Ford F350, identified as Nicholas Fagen (77) of Bend, OR, was outside of the vehicle working under the hood when his vehicle was struck. Fagen sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced deceased.  

A passenger in the Ford F350, identified as Danny Reinhart (61)  of Bend, OR, sustained minor injuries and was treated at the scene.

Theen was not injured in the crash.  

Approximately 100-125 gallons of diesel fuel spilled onto the roadway and into the ditch of the westbound lane.  An environmental contractor (SMAF) responded to the scene for cleanup.

The westbound lane was closed for several hours to complete the investigation and the Haz-Mat cleanup.  ODOT provided traffic control during the event.

Oregon State Police was assisted by the Hines Fire Department, Harney County EMS, and ODOT.




Attached Media Files: 2019-08/1002/126821/20190814_060204_resized.jpg , 2019-08/1002/126821/Hwy_20-1.jpg , 2019-08/1002/126821/Hwy_20_.jpg

Oregon Department of Forestry uses specialty aircraft to detect fires after thunderstorms (Photo)
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/14/19 12:21 PM
2019-08/1072/126819/ODF_John_Day_Strike_Team.jpeg
2019-08/1072/126819/ODF_John_Day_Strike_Team.jpeg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-08/1072/126819/thumb_ODF_John_Day_Strike_Team.jpeg

SALEM, Ore. – With over 14,000 lightning strikes recorded as thunderstorms swept across Oregon between August 4 and 12, firefighters suppressed 88 lightning fires on lands protected by the Oregon Department of Forestry. As lightning fires often start in remote areas, ODF used specialty aircraft to aid in early detection efforts.  

After successful efforts in Oregon’s severe 2015 fire season, ODF again contracted with Colorado’s Division of Fire Prevention and Control to bring one of their Multi-Mission Aircraft (MMA) to Oregon to assist with finding difficult to detect fires. This specialty aircraft flew across much of eastern Oregon on Sunday and Monday. Early detection is critical to ODF’s mission keeping fires at the smallest possible size, which reduces the financial impact to landowners and Oregonians and limits impact to natural resources such as air, soil, and water quality, wildlife habitat, and aesthetic and recreation values.

Four fires were detected during Sunday’s flight in ODF’s Central Oregon District.  These fires were single-tree fires or small spots with little to no visible smoke.  Due to the remote location and heavy vegetation cover, it is highly likely these fires would have increased in intensity as temperatures warmed.  “Looking at the location and fuel types where those fires were detected, it’s not a good feeling to imagine what they could have been,” said Mike Shaw, Eastern Oregon Area Director. 

Equipped with cameras and software specially adapted for use in wildfire applications, the MMA system uses a sensor ball with an infrared camera and two color cameras (wide and narrow) to detect heat sources from several miles away.  While infrared technology is used to detect heat sources, the MMA is best utilized during the day where the color cameras can be used to collect information regarding terrain, fuels, and fire behavior.  This data, combined with information on fire locations and perimeters, is transmitted directly to resources on the ground. The MMA operates at approximately 20,000 feet—well above tactical aircraft fighting wildfires—so there is no impact to firefighting operations.

This specialty aircraft will be flying across southwest Oregon in the coming days. ODF’s Southwest Oregon District has already been using some of its assigned aircraft to look for fires resulting from the more than 1,600 lighting strikes that hit the area last week. In addition to detection, aircraft have greatly assisted crews on recent fires in the district by dropping retardant on steep, remote terrain and giving firefighters a broad, aerial view of what they’re fighting.

The MMA was contracted using severity funding from a Special Purpose Appropriation from the Oregon Legislature.  Severity funding supports fire suppression activities that are outside the normal ODF districts’ budgeting and activities. 

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Attached Media Files: 2019-08/1072/126819/ODF_John_Day_Strike_Team.jpeg , 2019-08/1072/126819/Multi_Mission_Aircraft_flight_ODF.jpg

PGE announces more than $140,000 in grants to local groups protecting Oregon's environment (Photo)
PGE - 08/14/19 11:43 AM
Youth participating in Trout Unlimited's Youth Conservation and Fly Fishing Camp
Youth participating in Trout Unlimited's Youth Conservation and Fly Fishing Camp
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-08/101/126813/thumb_Trout_Unlimited_photo.jpg

Portland, Ore. — Portland General Electric Company (NYSE: POR) recently presented $144,000 in environmental stewardship grants to 22 organizations located within the company’s operations area in Oregon. These grants are part of PGE’s overall philanthropic commitment to the community and focus on delivering quantifiable outcomes that contribute to enhancing and protecting natural habitats throughout the state.

“We’re fortunate to have so many committed organizations working collaboratively to preserve and protect our natural areas and educate youth on what it means to be great environmental stewards,” said Kregg Arntson, PGE’s director of Corporate Social Responsibility. “Supporting environmental stewardship programs that improve air and water quality, and enhance natural habitats is an important part of our overall commitment to a clean energy future for Oregon and beyond.”

For more than a century, PGE has invested in programs that reflect our customers’ values, employees’ interests and the needs of the communities we serve. PGE’s environmental stewardship grants support projects that are focused on habitat restoration, fish protection, improving water quality and so much more.

“Thanks to the long-time support of PGE, we are able to teach the next generation about healthy watersheds and how to care for them,” said Terry Turner, vice chair of the Oregon Council, Trout Unlimited’s Clackamas River Chapter.

This year’s grant recipients included:

View a complete list of the 2019 environmental stewardship grants.

 

About Portland General Electric Company
Portland General Electric (NYSE: POR) is a fully integrated energy company based in Portland, Oregon, serving approximately 888,000 customers in 51 cities. For more than 130 years, PGE has been delivering safe, affordable and reliable energy to Oregonians. Together with its customers, PGE has the No. 1 voluntary renewable energy program in the U.S. With approximately 3,000 employees across the state, PGE is committed to helping its customers and the communities it serves build a clean energy future. For more information, visit PortlandGeneral.com/CleanVision.




Attached Media Files: Youth participating in Trout Unlimited's Youth Conservation and Fly Fishing Camp

Grant-funded community groups and insurance agents get set to help Oregonians enroll in health coverage
Oregon Dept. of Consumer & Business Services - 08/14/19 10:48 AM

(Salem) – For people not getting health insurance benefits at work, sorting through choices and subsidy programs can be tough. A network of certified community groups and licensed insurance agents can help Oregonians tackle this task, and their assistance is free for the consumer. The Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace awards grants to community groups and insurance agents to support their services. 

For the 2019-20 period, the Marketplace has granted more than $800,000 in funding to nine community groups and 33 insurance agencies. The awardees will use the grants to publicize the upcoming health insurance open enrollment period, and to help Oregonians enroll in coverage through HealthCare.gov and other programs. 

For most people who buy their own health insurance, open enrollment is the only time of year to sign up for a health plan or switch plans. Open enrollment for 2020 coverage will run from Nov. 1 through Dec. 15.

“If you don't deal with premiums, financial assistance, deductibles, and co-pays every day, you might not want to sift through all that information alone, under a deadline,” said Chiqui Flowers, administrator of the Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace. “An agent or partner in your community can help you understand the options and enroll in coverage.”

Grantees were judged on multiple criteria, including their demonstrated ties to community networks, ability to reach underserved populations, and capacity to serve consumers whether they are eligible for HealthCare.gov plans or other programs, such as the Oregon Health Plan or Medicare. 

The nonprofit groups – called community partners – receiving a total of $474,522 in grants are:
•    APANO Communities United Fund, Portland
•    Benton County Health Services, Corvallis
•    Cascade AIDS Project, Portland
•    Interface Network, Salem
•    IRCO, Portland
•    Latino Community Association, Bend
•    Northeast Oregon Network (NENO), La Grande
•    Project Access NOW, Portland
•    Rinehart Clinic, Wheeler

Insurance agents – called partner agents – receiving a total of $332,000 in grants are:
•    Aaron Burns Insurance, Eugene
•    Abel Insurance, Newport, Florence, Coos Bay and Gold Beach
•    Bancorp Insurance, La Pine
•    Boone Insurance Associates, Eugene
•    Cascade Insurance Center, Bend
•    Chehalem Insurance, Newberg
•    Country Insurance, Sisters
•    FG Insurance, Portland, Forest Grove
•    Gordon Wood Insurance, Roseburg
•    Grace Insurance, Portland
•    Hagan Hamilton, McMinnville, Newberg, Junction City, Sheridan
•    HE Cross Company, Portland
•    Health Insurance Place, Grants Pass
•    Health Plans in Oregon, Portland, Beaverton
•    Healthwise Insurance, Portland, Beaverton
•    Healthy, Wealthy & Wise, Tualatin, Tigard
•    High Desert Insurance, Bend
•    Hillock Insurance Agency, Enterprise
•    Hudson Insurance, Tillamook
•    iCover Oregon, Albany
•    Insurance Lounge, Medford, Grants Pass, Portland
•    Insurance Marketplace, Medford
•    Klamath Financial Group, Klamath Falls 
•    Linda Dugan Insurance, Astoria
•    Matthew Woodbridge, Salem and Woodburn
•    Pacific View Financial, Salem
•    Pfaff-Karren Insurance, Independence, Monmouth 
•    Premier NW Insurance, Oregon City, Salem, Sandy
•    RJS & Associates, Philomath, Corvallis
•    Strategic Planning and Insurance, Hood River, The Dalles
•    Tomlin Benefit Planning, Eugene
•    Valley Insurance, LaGrande
•    WHA Insurance Agency, Wilsonville 

To make an appointment with a partner or agent, go to OregonHealthCare.gov/gethelp or call 855-268-3767.

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The Oregon Health Insurance Marketplace is the state-level partner to HealthCare.gov and a division of the Department of Consumer and Business Services (DCBS). For more information, go to OregonHealthCare.gov.


Quality Measurement Council meets Aug. 15
Oregon Department of Human Services - 08/14/19 10:47 AM

(Wilsonville, Ore.) – The Quality Measurement Council will hold a meeting from 9 a.m. to noon on Thursday, Aug. 15, 2019, in Training Rooms 1 and 2 at the Oregon Child Development Coalition, 9140 S.W. Pioneer Court, Wilsonville, Oregon, 97070.

The Quality Measurement Council was formed with the passage of House Bill 3359 in 2017. The council meeting is open to the public.

Agenda items include will include a discussion on collecting and reporting metrics.

Sign language interpreters and live captioning will be provided. Those who are unable to attend in person, may join by calling toll-free phone number, 1-888-363-4735, and using Conference ID #3439085. 

The meeting location is accessible to people with disabilities. For questions about accessibility or to request an accommodation, please contact Rebecca Mapes at 1-541-735-0058 or Rebecca.Mapes@state.or.us  Requests should be made at least 48 hours before the meeting.

For questions about this meeting, please contact: Rebecca Mapes at 1-541-735-0058 or Rebecca.Mapes@state.or.us

About the Quality Measurement Council

The council was established to create and maintain a system through which community-based, long-term care facilities report reliable and meaningful data that will make possible a system for measuring a facility’s performance compared with other long-term care providers in the state.

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Oregon Disabilities Commission Executive Committee to meet Aug. 20
Oregon Department of Human Services - 08/14/19 10:37 AM

(Salem, Ore.)  ?? The Oregon Disabilities Commission (ODC) Executive Committee will meet from 1:30 to 3 p.m. on Tuesday, Aug. 20, 2019, at the Barbara Roberts Human Services Building, 500 Summer St NE, Room 473, Salem, Oregon, 97301.

The meeting is open to the public.

The agenda includes regular ODC Executive Committee business, review and approval of the meeting agenda and prior meeting minutes, public comment, announcements, ODC executive business and other topics as well as future meeting agenda ideas.

Those who can’t attend in person may call into the meeting using this conference line and access code: 503-934-1400, 2205340#.

The meeting location is accessible to people with disabilities. For questions about accessibility or to request an accommodation, please contact Lori Watt at Lori.C.Watt@state.or.us  Requests should be made at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting.

For questions about the meeting, please contact: Ryan Kibby, program analyst at RYAN.E.KIBBY@state.or.us or Joseph Lowe, program analyst at Joseph.Lowe@state.or.us.

 About the Oregon Disabilities Commission:

The Oregon Disabilities Commission is charged by state statute to advise the Department of Human Services, the Governor, the Legislative Assembly and appropriate state agency administrators on issues related to achieving the full economic, social, legal and political equity of individuals with disabilities. ODC also acts as a coordinating link between and among public and private organizations services individuals with disabilities.

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West Coast Wildfire Dialogue
Oregon Public Utility Commission - 08/14/19 10:26 AM

MEDIA ADVISORY

TOPIC:                       West Coast Utility Commissions – Wildfire Dialogue

WHEN:                       Friday, August 16, 2019, 9 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

WHERE:                     Oregon Convention Center, 777 NE Martin Luther King Blvd., Portland, OR 97232

COST:                        Free; open to the public and media

PARTICIPATION OPTIONS:

West Coast Utility Commissions - Wildfire Dialogue

Public utility commissioners from British Columbia, California, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington will convene at an all-day, public dialogue regarding wildfire risk. The event will feature participants and experts, who will share their perspectives and evolving approaches to address rapidly changing wildfire risk aggravated by climate change and other factors. This dialogue will focus on impacts to energy utilities, customers, and communities, as well as lessons learned by western states to help manage and mitigate wildfire risk.

Panel Topics for Dialogue:

  • Tracking the Changing Risk
  • Making Risk-Based Changes to the System
  • Managing the Financial Risks
  • Expanding Public Safety Coordination

This event is open to the press and public, however it is not a decision-making meeting for the participating Commissions and no formal action will be taken.

Media representatives are encouraged to attend in person, view the event live online or listen by phone to help educate the public of the regional efforts on the increasingly prominent topic of wildfire risk and mitigation. Please register online, whether attending in person, by phone or viewing live online. Details including the call-in number and web link will be emailed in advance of the event.

For more information or to register, visit:  https://www.cpuc.ca.gov/WestCoastWildfireDialogue/.

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Odell Lake Recreational use health advisory lifted August 14
Oregon Health Authority - 08/14/19 9:55 AM

August 14, 2019

Media Contact: Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Odell Lake Recreational use health advisory lifted August 14

The Oregon Health Authority (OHA) has lifted the recreational use health advisory issued for Odell Lake in Klamath County.

Water monitoring has confirmed that the level of cyanotoxins (harmful algae toxins) in Odell Lake are below recreational guideline values for human exposure. However, officials advise recreational visitors to be alert to signs of cyanobacterial (harmful algae) blooms, because blooms can develop and disappear on any lake through the season. Only a fraction of Oregon’s lakes and streams are monitored for cyanobacterial blooms.

People and especially small children and pets should avoid recreating in areas where the water is foamy, scummy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish red in color, if a thick mat of blue-green algae is visible in the water, or bright green cells are suspended in the water. If you see these signs avoid activities that cause you to swallow water or inhale droplets, such as swimming or high-speed water activities.

It’s possible cyanotoxins can still exist in clear water. Sometimes, cyanobacteria can move into another area, making water that once looked foamy, scummy or discolored now look clear. However, when a bloom dies elsewhere in the water body, it can release toxins that may reach into the clear water. There also are species of cyanobacteria that anchor themselves at the bottom of a water body, live in the sediment, or can grow on aquatic plants and release toxins into clear water near the surface.

For health information or to report an illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) at 971-673-0482.


Fire--Ward Update 2018-08-14 0800
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/14/19 8:15 AM

Fire Summary:

Warmer and drier conditions continue to play a role in the Ward fire. Predicted flare up activity during the day kept firefighters busy on Tuesday. Crews achieved good successes on some sections, reinforcing control lines. As a result, several engines and crews will be reassigned today from more secure parts of the line to some of the more challenging areas. In the eastern section, there are still many islands of green, unburned areas inside the fire perimeter, which take longer to secure.

Today, crews will concentrate on meticulously checking for and extinguishing hot spots, flagging areas of concern, and meeting mop up standards, which vary from a minimum of 200 feet from the hard black (areas where there is no fuel) to 300 feet in incompletely burned and areas of higher fuel concentrations. With a front coming through Thursday morning, this work is critically important. “The biggest variable on fire behavior is weather,” says Chris Cline, Incident Commander. “The fuels and the slope stay constant.” Cline also noted the importance of continued vigilance on the fireline; “The job that we are doing today affects what happens on the fire tomorrow.”

The level of containment (currently at 47%) is a good measure of the Incident Commander’s assessment of the fire’s potential. Simply put, containment level is the percentage of the perimeter that has been determined controlled. In this case, there may be no smoke or flames in the other 53% of the perimeter, but firefighters cannot yet rule out the possibility that a light wind might ignite some of the unburned fuels near the line and result in spot fires.

If conditions stay as predicted, it is likely that steady progress towards full containment will continue through the week.


Fire--Ward Update 2018-08-14 0800
Oregon Dept. of Forestry - 08/14/19 8:15 AM

Fire Summary:

Warmer and drier conditions continue to play a role in the Ward fire. Predicted flare up activity during the day kept firefighters busy on Tuesday. Crews achieved good successes on some sections, reinforcing control lines. As a result, several engines and crews will be reassigned today from more secure parts of the line to some of the more challenging areas. In the eastern section, there are still many islands of green, unburned areas inside the fire perimeter, which take longer to secure.

Today, crews will concentrate on meticulously checking for and extinguishing hot spots, flagging areas of concern, and meeting mop up standards, which vary from a minimum of 200 feet from the hard black (areas where there is no fuel) to 300 feet in incompletely burned and areas of higher fuel concentrations. With a front coming through Thursday morning, this work is critically important. “The biggest variable on fire behavior is weather,” says Chris Cline, Incident Commander. “The fuels and the slope stay constant.” Cline also noted the importance of continued vigilance on the fireline; “The job that we are doing today affects what happens on the fire tomorrow.”

The level of containment (currently at 47%) is a good measure of the Incident Commander’s assessment of the fire’s potential. Simply put, containment level is the percentage of the perimeter that has been determined controlled. In this case, there may be no smoke or flames in the other 53% of the perimeter, but firefighters cannot yet rule out the possibility that a light wind might ignite some of the unburned fuels near the line and result in spot fires.

If conditions stay as predicted, it is likely that steady progress towards full containment will continue through the week.


DPSST Police Policy Committee Meeting Scheduled - **Amended** (Agenda item #11 added)
Ore. Dept. of Public Safety Standards and Training - 08/14/19 8:13 AM

For Immediate Release                                        

August 15, 2019

Contact:         Mona Riesterer
                      (503) 378-2431

Notice of Regular Meeting

The Police Policy Committee will hold a regular meeting at August 15, 2019 @ 10:00 a.m.  The meeting will be held in the Victor G. Atiyeh Boardroom. The meeting location is accessible to persons with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the deaf or hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made before the meeting by calling the contact listed above. 

 The meeting will be available through video live stream on Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/DPSSTOregon/

Agenda Items:

1.   Introductions

2.   Approve Meeting Minutes of May 16, 2019

3.   Proposed Rule Changes for OAR 259-008-0010: Establishing Pre-Employment Psychological Screening Standards for Compliance with SB 423

Jennifer Howald

4.   Administrative Closures – Police/Regulatory Specialist

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

5.   Darling, Wesley DPSST # 59704: Application for Training & Subsequent Certification – Eugene Police Department

Presented by Kristen Hibberds   

6.   Martin, Logan DPSST # 60009; Application for Training & Subsequent Certification – Josephine County Sheriff’s Office

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

7.   Schmierbach, Ryan DPSST # 41342; Basic, Intermediate & Advanced Police Certifications – Oregon City Police Department (OCPD)

Presented by Kristin Hibberds

8.   Lewis, Gregg DPSST # 22515; Basic Police Certification – Portland Police Bureau (PPB)

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

9.   Altabef, Daniel DPSST # 45330; Basic Police Certification – Stayton Police Department (SPD)

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

10.  Lackey, Issac DPSST # 39648; Basic, Intermediate & Advanced Police Certifications – Portland Police Bureau (PPB)

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

11.  Jones, Steven DPSST #23649; Basic Police Certification – Portland Police Bureau

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

12.  Nightingale, William DPSST #46319; Re-evaluate Ineligibility Period of Recommendation Basic, Intermediate & Advanced Police Certifications & Basic Telecommunications & Emergency Medical Dispatcher Certifications – Woodburn Police Department

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

13.  Womack, Ronald DPSST #38511 – Reconsideration Basic, Intermediate and Advanced Police Certifications: Tigard Police Department

Presented by Kristen Hibberds

14.  Department Update

15.  Next Police Policy Committee Meeting – November 21, 2019 at 10:00 a.m.

 

Administrative Announcement

This is a public meeting, subject to the public meeting law and it will be recorded. Deliberation of issues will only be conducted by Police Policy Committee members unless permitted by the Chair. Individuals who engage in disruptive behavior that impedes official business will be asked to stop being disruptive or leave the meeting. Additional measures may be taken to have disruptive individuals removed if their continued presence poses a safety risk to the other persons in the room or makes it impossible to continue the meeting.


Tue. 08/13/19
Impact of federal 'public charge' rule change on access to health care in Oregon
Oregon Health Authority - 08/13/19 4:15 PM

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

August 13, 2019

Media contacts: Robb Cowie, 503-421-7684, obb.cowie@state.or.us">robb.cowie@state.or.us; Delia Hernández, 503-422-7179, nandez@state.or.us">delia.hernandez@state.or.us

Impact of federal 'public charge' rule change on access to health care in Oregon

SALEM, Ore. — On Monday the Trump administration announced a new rule that could make it harder for some immigrants who rely on certain government benefit programs to obtain lawful permanent residency if they are found to be a "public charge." The new public charge rule expands the list of benefits that the federal government would consider to determine whether an individual is considered a public charge. Benefits that would be considered not only include cash-assistance programs (including Supplemental Security Income and Temporary Assistance for Needy Families) and Medicaid-funded long-term care, but also nutrition assistance, housing assistance, and many other types of Medicaid for adults. However, the rule does exempt some categories of Medicaid eligibility and participation in other health programs. The Oregon Health Authority is the state agency responsible for protecting the health of all 4 million people living in Oregon. As part of our role, we want to inform state residents about the impact of the rule on programs that provide health coverage and health-related benefits in Oregon. Under the new rule:

  • Immigrant adults who receive some forms of Medicaid coverage would have their enrollment considered (among other factors) by the federal government to determine whether they are (or might become) a public charge. If an immigrant is deemed a public charge, he or she could be denied lawful permanent residency.
  • The public charge rule does not apply to some federal and state programs such as:
    • Medicaid for children under 21 and pregnant women (including 60 days postpartum).
    • Emergency Medicaid (CAWEM).
    • The Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP).
    • Women, Infants and Children (WIC) supplemental nutrition program.
    • Medicaid-covered special education services funded by the Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA).
    • Commercial health insurance premium subsidies offered through Oregon’s Health Insurance Marketplace.
    • School-based health services.
    • Oregon’s Cover All Kids Program.
    • Most services offered by Oregon’s Reproductive Health Program.

In the comments the Oregon Health Authority submitted to the federal government on the proposed rule in December 2018, the agency wrote:

We know that health coverage contributes to healthier pregnancies, births, and childhood outcomes. When people have health coverage, they are better able to work, go to school and contribute in other ways to their local economy. Employers benefit from a healthier workforce, insurance costs are lower, and there is less absenteeism. When people have health coverage there are reduced emergency department visits and hospitalizations as well as reduced uncompensated care. Ultimately fewer people turn to social services and draw on the safety net. When people have health coverage, they are healthier, on average, than people who lack health coverage, and communities are healthier too …

Health care is not a cash assistance benefit. Good health is the foundation for thriving, economically independent people, families and communities. This proposal punishes immigrants for taking responsibility for their health, the health of their loved ones and their neighbors by seeking health care. It fails to acknowledge that in a growing majority of states (like Oregon), which have expanded Medicaid, a high percentage of Medicaid members work, earn income and support themselves without public assistance. It stigmatizes Medicaid and CHIP as public assistance programs, instead of promoting them of as a vital cornerstone of a strong health care system.

As a result, this proposal is in direct conflict with our agency’s mission which is to help people and communities achieve optimum physical, mental and social well-being and improve access to quality, affordable health care.

The new rule will be posted in the Federal Register on August 14 and is scheduled to take effect October 15, 2019. The rule is not retroactive.

The Oregon Health Authority encourages anyone who has questions about how the federal public charge rule may affect them or members of their family to seek counsel from a qualified immigration attorney. A list of attorneys can be found at the Oregon Immigration Resource: https://oregonimmigrationresource.org/.

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http://bit.ly/2N0i5y8


Recreational use advisory for Upper Klamath Lake updated August 13
Oregon Health Authority - 08/13/19 2:54 PM

August 13, 2019

Recreational use advisory for Upper Klamath Lake updated August 13

PORTLAND, Ore.— The Oregon Health Authority updated a recreational use health advisory today for Upper Klamath Lake due to the presence of a cyanobacterial (harmful algae) bloom and cyanotoxins (harmful algae toxins) above recreational guideline values for human exposure. The lake is in Klamath County.

The advisory, originally issued July 19, applied to the Eagle Ridge County Park area of Upper Klamath Lake. OHA updates an advisory when new sampling data is received. Sampling data received Aug. 8 showed toxin levels above recreational guideline values in the Howard’s Bay area of Upper Klamath Lake. Satellite imagery shows the entire lake affected by a cyanobacterial bloom. Out of caution, OHA is updating the advisory to apply to the entire lake and will continue to evaluate new information as it becomes available.

People should avoid swimming and high-speed water activities, such as water skiing or power boating, in areas of the lake where blooms are identified. Although toxins are not absorbed through the skin, people who have skin sensitivities may experience a puffy red rash.

People are encouraged to visit Upper Klamath Lake and enjoy activities such as fishing, camping, hiking, biking, picnicking, and bird watching. Boating is safe as long as speeds do not create excessive water spray, which could lead to inhalation risk.

Drinking water

Drinking water directly from areas of the lake affected by a bloom is especially dangerous. Toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating water with camping-style filters. Contact campground management or the local health department with questions about water available at nearby campgrounds or day use areas.

People who are not on a well or a public water system and draw in-home water directly from an affected area are advised to use an alternative water source because not all private treatment systems are proven effective in removing cyanotoxins.

Fishing

Fish caught from areas where cyanobacterial blooms are present should have fat, skin and organs removed before cooking or freezing, as toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water.

Symptoms

Exposure to cyanotoxins can be serious and result in a range of symptoms, from those similar to food poisoning such as stomach cramping, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting, to more serious symptoms like numbness, tingling, dizziness and shortness of breath that may require medical attention. Children and pets are at increased risk for exposure because of their size and level of activity. People who bring their pets to a lake with areas affected by a bloom for recreation activities should take special precautions to keep them from drinking from or swimming in these areas.

For health information or to report an illness, contact the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) at 971-673-0482.

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http://bit.ly/2OVCNSl


Prineville Man Sentenced to Federal Prison for Conspiracy to Transfer and Unlawful Possession of a Machine Gun
U.S. Attorney's Office - District of Oregon - 08/13/19 1:57 PM

EUGENE, Ore.—Michael James Friesen, 33, of Prineville, Oregon, was sentenced today to 18 months in federal prison and three years’ supervised release for conspiracy to transfer and unlawful possession of a machine gun.

According to court documents, between May and June 2018, Friesen agreed to broker the sale of a Guide Lamp, Model M3A1, .45 ACP caliber machine gun for co-defendant John Widener Jordan, 38, also of Prineville. Between May 30 and June 5, Friesen discussed the sale price of the firearm with an undercover agent from the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) posing as a potential purchaser. Friesen confirmed for the agent that he had seen the firearm function as a machine gun.

On June 6, Friesen met the undercover agent in a motel room in Prineville. Shortly thereafter, Jordan brought the firearm to the motel room and completed the transaction in exchange for $3,000 in cash. Jordan in turn paid Friesen for arranging the sale.        

On April 24, 2019, Friesen pleaded guilty to one count each of conspiracy to transfer and unlawful possession of a machine gun.

 Jordan is awaiting a jury trial scheduled to begin on October 16, 2019.

This case was investigated by the ATF and is being prosecuted by Nathan J. Lichvarcik, Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon.

The case was brought as part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN). PSN is the centerpiece of the Department of Justice’s violent crime reduction efforts. PSN is an evidence-based program proven to be effective at reducing violent crime. Through PSN, a broad spectrum of stakeholders work together to identify the most pressing violent crime problems in the community and develop comprehensive solutions to address them. As part of this strategy, PSN focuses enforcement efforts on the most violent offenders and partners with locally based prevention and reentry programs for lasting reductions in crime.

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Attached Media Files: PDF Release

Reminder: Seasonal health advisory in effect for Lake Billy Chinook
Oregon Health Authority - 08/13/19 1:31 PM

August 13, 2019

Media Contact: Jonathan Modie, 971-678-7572, phd.communications@dhsoha.state.or.us

Reminder: Seasonal health advisory in effect for Lake Billy Chinook

Precautionary recreational use advisory issued June 11; OHA not aware of algal blooms in lake

PORTLAND, Ore. — The Oregon Health Authority is reminding the public that a precautionary recreational use health advisory for the 2019 cyanobacterial (harmful algal) bloom season remains in effect for Lake Billy Chinook due to cyanobacterial blooms that routinely develop in the lake.

Oregon Health Authority is not aware of any cyanobacterial blooms in the lake at this time. However, blooms can develop throughout the season and in areas that are not visually monitored by Jefferson County, Oregon State Parks or the U.S. Forest Service.

Lake Billy Chinook is located about 12 miles west of Madras, in Jefferson County. The advisory will remain in effect through Nov. 1, 2019.

Tests done at Lake Billy Chinook since 2015 show that blooms in the lake consistently produce cyanotoxins over OHA’s recreational use health guideline values for people and pets. In the past, OHA would issue and lift advisories on the lake as data were made available. Testing is costly, making it difficult for local water body managers to regularly test the lake during times when blooms occur. This makes it challenging to determine when cyanotoxins are being produced, and if an advisory is needed.

As a result, OHA and local partners determined that a 2019 seasonal advisory for the lake is appropriate. At this time, the OHA Public Health Division is reminding the public of the steps to take to reduce exposure to cyanobacterial blooms and the cyanotoxins that may be present throughout the season. OHA staff will evaluate the effectiveness of this advisory at the end of the 2019 season.

Activities to avoid in areas affected by cyanobacterial blooms

In areas of the lake where cyanobacterial blooms have been identified or where you believe water is affected by a bloom, avoid swimming, water-skiing, wake-boarding, tubing, and other high-speed water activities. Watch children and pets to be sure they are not swallowing water or coming in contact with cyanobacterial blooms washed up on the shore or dried on rocks. Do not use lake water for drinking as camping-style filters and boiling do not remove the toxins.

Enjoy non-water-related activities at Lake Billy Chinook

In affected areas of the lake when there is a bloom, non-water-related activities such as camping, hiking, biking, picnicking and bird-watching can be enjoyed with very little possibility of exposure to cyanotoxins. Certain water-related activities can be safe. These include canoeing, fishing and boating, if boating speeds are kept low to avoid kicking up spray that could be inhaled.

What to look for

Cyanobacterial blooms are not unique to lakes in Oregon. Oregon health officials advise recreational visitors to any water body to always be alert to signs of cyanobacterial blooms because only a fraction of the many lakes and waterways in Oregon are tested by state, federal and local agencies.

Certain water body conditions can help people identify when a bloom may be present. People and their pets should avoid areas where the water is foamy, scummy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish red in color, a thick mat is present, or when bright green cells can be seen suspended in the water column, making the water a brighter shade of green. In areas where blooms are found, people should avoid swallowing water while swimming or inhaling water droplets made during high-speed water activities, such as water-skiing or power-boating. A good rule of thumb when encountering something in the water that doesn’t look familiar: “When in doubt, stay out.”

Symptoms

Exposure to cyanotoxins can be serious and result in a range of symptoms, from those similar to food poisoning such as stomach cramping, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting to more serious symptoms like numbness, tingling, dizziness and shortness of breath that may require medical attention. Although toxins are not absorbed through the skin, people who have skin sensitivities may experience a puffy, red rash at the affected area. Children are most vulnerable to exposure and illness due to their size and level of activity. If you or someone in your family develops any of these symptoms after your visit to an Oregon lake or waterway, contact OHA at 971-673-0440 for health information or to report the illness.

Pets are at risk, too

Over the past several years OHA has received many reports of dog illnesses and even deaths due to exposure to bloom-affected waters in Oregon. Dogs are more likely to have higher exposure to cyanotoxins than humans because they lick cyanobacteria off rocks and off their fur, eat the scum, or drink affected water. Symptoms of exposure range from lethargy, no appetite and vomiting to drooling, twitching, inability to stand or walk, convulsions and paralysis. Symptoms develop within the first hour or two after exposure and can be deadly. If a pet develops any symptoms, it should be seen by a veterinarian as soon as possible. OHA also takes pet illness reports; call 971-673-0440 for more information.

Other concerns

Drinking water directly from areas of Lake Billy Chinook affected by a cyanobacterial bloom is especially dangerous when toxins are present. Toxins cannot be removed by boiling, filtering or treating water with camping-style filters. Drinking water at campgrounds and day use areas should not be affected, but if you have any questions or concerns, contact campground management or the local health department.

People who are not on a well or a public water system and draw in-home water directly from an affected area are advised to use an alternative water source because not all private treatment systems are proven effective in removing cyanotoxins.

Fish caught from areas where cyanobacterial blooms are present should have fat, skin and organs removed before cooking or freezing, as toxins are more likely to collect in these tissues. Fillets should also be rinsed with clean water.

OHA maintains an updated list of all health advisories on its website that is also available by phone. OHA will update information for Lake Billy Chinook when new data are available. To learn what water bodies are being sampled for the season and whether an advisory has been issued or lifted, visit the Cyanobacteria Blooms website: http://www.healthoregon.org/hab and select “current cyanobacteria advisories,” or call the Oregon Public Health Division toll-free information line at 1-877-290-6767.

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Media Advistoy
Oregon Lottery - 08/13/19 1:03 PM

Salem, Ore; Aug. 13:

Advance 24-draw quick-pick Powerball tickets printed between Friday, Aug. 10 and Monday, Aug. 12 listed incorrect dates for the Oct. 26, 29 and Nov. 2 draws. While the dates on the tickets are off by one day, the tickets are valid for the actual draws.

A coding mistake in the Powerball ticketing system caused the draw dates to print one day off on approximately 30 tickets. A player brought the issue to Lottery’s attention on Monday Aug. 12, and Lottery’s gaming vendor worked immediately on a fix. Tickets are printing correctly today.

Players who purchased Powerball tickets that included the Oct. 26, 29 and Nov. 2 draws have two options: hold on to the ticket and present it for validation if winning numbers are drawn for any of the draws listed; or contact Lottery at 503-540-1000, or lottery.webcenter@state.or.us, to arrange a new ticket with the same numbers.  


Land Board appoints Vicki Walker as permanent DSL director
Oregon Dept. of State Lands - 08/13/19 12:14 PM

NEWS RELEASE – for immediate release

Media Contact:

Ken Armstrong, Communications Manager, 503-881-2623, ken.armstrong@state.or.us

Aug. 13, 2019

State Land Board appoints Vicki Walker as permanent director of Department of State Lands

SALEM, Ore. – The State Land Board today voted to make Vicki Walker the permanent director of the Oregon Department of State Lands. Today’s action appointed Walker to a four-year term, retroactively effective from March 1, 2018.

In March 2018, the Land Board appointed Walker as interim director of the agency for a term of 18 months, a term that expires this month.

“Vicki’s leadership of the Department of State of Lands is a key part of Oregon’s commitment to responsible stewardship of state lands and to our schools,” said Governor Kate Brown. “I look forward to her continued service and DSL’s continued work on behalf of our most valuable natural resources.”

Walker’s career includes serving as Oregon State Director for U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Development (2009 to 2017). While at USDA, Walker oversaw the investment of $4.8 billion into more than 24,000 projects helping rural Oregonians.

Before her work at USDA, Walker served for 10 years in the Oregon Legislature in both the House and the Senate (1999 to 2009), where she was a leader on the Joint Ways and Means Committee, overseeing budgets for natural resource and public safety agencies. Among other committee assignments, she also served as chair of the Senate Education Committee.

Walker was chair and later administrator of the Oregon Board of Parole and Post-Prison Supervision in 2009, and for 25 years she operated her own court reporting firm. She received a B.S. from the University of Oregon.

“I am so proud to lead this agency, which is responsible for one of the most important trusts in Oregon government – the Common School Fund,” said Walker.” The professionalism and dedication of this agency’s employees is humbling and motivating to me. I look forward to continuing the good work we do.”

About the State Land Board and the Department of State Lands: The State Land Board consists of Governor Kate Brown, Secretary of State Bev Clarno and State Treasurer Tobias Read. The Department of State Lands administers diverse natural and fiscal resources. Many of the resources generate revenue for the Common School Fund, such as state-owned rangelands and timberlands, waterway leases, estates for which no will or heirs exist, and unclaimed property. Twice a year, the agency distributes fund investment earnings to support K-12 public schools. The agency also administers Oregon’s Removal-Fill Law, which requires people removing or filling certain amounts of material in waters of the state to obtain a permit.

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www.oregon.gov/dsl


Shepherd's House Ministries Accredited by National Financial Accountability Organization (Photo)
Shepherd's House Ministries - 08/13/19 11:20 AM
2019-08/3949/126776/SHM.jpg
2019-08/3949/126776/SHM.jpg
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-08/3949/126776/thumb_SHM.jpg

Shepherd's House Ministries Accredited by National Financial Accountability Organization

BEND, OR – The ECFA (Evangelical Council for Financial Accountability) announced today the accreditation of Shepherd's House Ministries of Bend, OR.

 

ECFA accreditation is based on the ECFA Seven Standards of Responsible Stewardship™, including financial accountability, transparency, soundboard governance, and ethical fundraising.

                             

Shepherd's House Ministries joins a growing number of Christ-centered churches and ministries across America, supported by over 27 million donors that have earned the right to display the ECFA seal.  When an organization is accredited by ECFA, it demonstrates its willingness to follow the model of biblical accountability.

 

“We are pleased to accredit a ministry committed to seeing hearts healed and lives changed from the inside out,” said Dan Busby, president of ECFA.

Founded in 2007, Shepherd's House Ministries (www.shepherdshouseministries.org) strives to feed the hungry and to shelter the homeless, but their deeper aim is to walk alongside the hurting and the needy to effectively address the life-controlling issues that perpetuate the long-term cycles of pain and homelessness.

To learn more about Shepherd's House Ministries and their stewardship opportunities, visit ServantMatch®, ECFA’s program that matches God’s servants with the stewardship options of ECFA members based on ministry sectors and categories.  It is ECFA’s newest online feature that allows you to quickly and easily find giving opportunities.

ECFA, founded in 1979, provides accreditation to leading Christian nonprofit organizations that faithfully demonstrate compliance with the ECFA Standards pertaining to financial accountability, fundraising, and board governance.  For more information about ECFA, including information about accreditation and a listing of ECFA-accredited members, visit www.ECFA.org or call 1-800-323-9473.

 

FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT:

 Dan Busby, President

 1-800-323-9473

 Dan@ECFA.org

 

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Attached Media Files: 2019-08/3949/126776/SHM.jpg

Oregon Historical Quarterly Summer 2018 Special Issue "Oregon's Manila Galleon" Wins 2019 AASLH Award of Excellence (Photo)
Oregon Historical Society - 08/13/19 10:53 AM
Cover of the Summer 2018 issue of the Oregon Historical Quarterly
Cover of the Summer 2018 issue of the Oregon Historical Quarterly
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-08/2861/126773/thumb_Summer_2018.jpg

Publication will be honored at awards gala August 29 in Philadelphia

Portland, OR – The Oregon Historical Society (OHS) is proud to announce that the Oregon Historical Quarterly is the recipient of an American Association for State and Local History (AASLH) Award of Excellence for the publication’s Summer 2018 special issue, “Oregon’s Manila Galleon.”

The AASLH Leadership in History Awards, now in its 74th year, is the most prestigious recognition for achievement in the preservation and interpretation of state and local history. This year, AASLH is proud to confer fifty national awards honoring people, projects, exhibits, and publications. The winners represent the best in the field and provide leadership for the future of state and local history. OHS staff will accept the award on behalf of the Quarterly’s editorial advisory committee at a special banquet during the 2019 AASLH Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, on Friday, August 30.

For more than three centuries, Nehalem-Tillamook people have told stories of shipwreck survivors who washed ashore on or near the Nehalem Spit, established relationships with locals, and, eventually, violated social norms and either departed or were killed. Cargo wreckage accompanied the survivors, including distinctive blocks of beeswax. Until June of 2018, however, the history of Oregon’s “Beeswax Wreck” — now recognized as likely producing the first direct contact between Indigenous people of the region and people of Europe, Asia, and, potentially, Africa — was characterized by mystery. “Oregon’s Manila Galleon,” answers the questions of which ship wrecked, where it was going to and from, who was aboard, and what cargo it carried. The authors reached their conclusions through innovative, collaborative scholarship that brings together Native oral tradition, archival collections on three continents, and archaeological investigations — almost all published for the first time in OHQ.

The AASLH awards program began in 1945 to establish and encourage standards of excellence in the collection, preservation, and interpretation of state and local history throughout the United States. The AASLH Leadership in History Awards not only honor significant achievement in the field of state and local history, but also bring public recognition of the opportunities for small and large organizations, institutions, and programs to make contributions in this arena.

For more information about the Leadership in History Awards, visit www.aaslh.org.

 


About the Oregon Historical Society

For more than a century, the Oregon Historical Society has served as the state’s collective memory, preserving a vast collection of artifacts, photographs, maps, manuscript materials, books, films, and oral histories. Our research library, museum, digital platforms & website (www.ohs.org), educational programming, and historical journal make Oregon’s history open and accessible to all. We exist because history is powerful, and because a history as deep and rich as Oregon’s cannot be contained within a single story or point of view.

About the American Association for State and Local History

The American Association for State and Local History is a not-for-profit professional organization of individuals and institutions working to preserve and promote history. From its headquarters in Nashville, Tennessee, AASLH provides leadership, service, and support for its members who preserve and interpret state and local history in order to make the past more meaningful to all people. AASLH publishes books, technical publications, a quarterly magazine, and maintains numerous affinity communities and committees serving a broad range of constituents across the historical community. The association also sponsors an annual meeting, regional and national training in-person workshops, and online training.

 




Attached Media Files: Cover of the Summer 2018 issue of the Oregon Historical Quarterly

Employment in Oregon: July 2019
Oregon Employment Department - 08/13/19 10:00 AM

Oregon’s Unemployment Rate Matches Record Low of 4.0 Percent in July 

Oregon’s unemployment rate was 4.0 percent in July, the same as the revised June rate of 4.0 percent. This was Oregon’s lowest unemployment rate in the current series dating back to 1976. It tied the 4.0 percent unemployment rate reached in the state in May, June, and July 2018. The U.S. unemployment rate was 3.7 percent in both June and July 2019.

In July, Oregon’s total nonfarm payroll employment added 2,400 jobs, following an over-the-month loss of 1,000 jobs, as revised, in June. Monthly gains for July were strongest in professional and business services (+1,300 jobs); health care and social assistance (+1,100); and construction (+800). Two industries cut more than 1,000 jobs in July: leisure and hospitality (??'1,100 jobs) and government (??'1,300).

Newly revised payroll employment figures show that there was minimal growth of only 2,000 jobs between December 2018 and March 2019, which was much weaker growth in the first quarter of 2019 than was originally estimated. Oregon’s total nonfarm employment for March is now pegged at 1,931,900 jobs.

Looking at longer-term trends, the new numbers show Oregon’s economy growing moderately for quite some time. Since July 2018, total nonfarm payroll employment was up 29,600 jobs, or 1.6 percent. In fact, Oregon’s over-the-year job growth has averaged 1.6 percent during the past 16 months.

The most rapid gains since July 2018 were in transportation, warehousing, and utilities (+4,500 jobs, or 7.0%) and construction (+4,500 jobs, or 4.3%). Construction’s growth rate, although still rapid, has slowed from the 8.2 percent annual growth it averaged in 2015 through 2018. Several industries contributed to Oregon’s expansion since last July, including health care and social assistance (+8,200 jobs, or 3.2%); manufacturing (+5,000 jobs, or 2.6%); and professional and business services (+5,500 jobs, or 2.2%). However, six major industries were nearly flat or down over the past 12 months, led by retail trade (-2,800 jobs, or -1.3%) and information (-1,500 jobs, or ??'4.4%).

 

Next Press Releases

The Oregon Employment Department plans to release the July county and metropolitan area unemployment rates on Tuesday, August 20th, and the next statewide unemployment rate and employment survey data for August on Tuesday, September 17th.

Notes:

All numbers in the above narrative are seasonally adjusted.

The Oregon Employment Department and the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) work cooperatively to develop and publish monthly Oregon payroll employment and labor force data. The estimates of monthly job gains and losses are based on a survey of businesses. The estimates of unemployment are based on a survey of households and other sources.

The Oregon Employment Department publishes payroll employment estimates that are revised quarterly by using employment counts from employer unemployment insurance tax records. All department publications use this Official Oregon Series data unless noted otherwise. This month’s release incorporates the January, February and March 2019 tax records data. The department continues to make the original nonfarm payroll employment series available; these data are produced by the BLS.

The PDF version of the news release, including tables and graphs, can be found at www.QualityInfo.org/press-release. To obtain the data in other formats such as in Excel, visit www.QualityInfo.org, then within the top banner, select Economic Data, then choose LAUS or CES. To request the press release as a Word document, contact the person shown at the top of this press release.

For help finding jobs and training resources, visit one of the state's WorkSource Oregon centers or go to: www.WorkSourceOregon.org.

Equal Opportunity program — auxiliary aids and services available upon request to individuals with disabilities. Contact: (503) 947-1794. For people who are deaf or hard of hearing, call 711 Telecommunications Relay Services.




Attached Media Files: 2019-08/930/126768/employment_in_Oregon_--_July_2019_--_press_release.pdf

Oregon FBI Tech Tuesday: Building a Digital Defense Against Weight Loss Scams (Photo)
FBI - Oregon - 08/13/19 10:00 AM
TT - Weight Loss Scams - GRAPHIC - August 13, 2019
TT - Weight Loss Scams - GRAPHIC - August 13, 2019
http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news/2019-07/3585/126449/thumb_TT_-_Weight_Loss_Scams_-_GRAPHIC_-_August_13_2019.jpg

Welcome to the Oregon FBI’s Tech Tuesday segment. This week: building a digital defense against weight loss scams.

We are in the heat of the summer, and you really want to head to the pool or the beach. Problem is that you just aren’t happy with how you look in that swimsuit that looked cute in the store months ago. You’ve thought about diet and exercise, but those can be hard to get started and harder to maintain. Maybe you see a late night ad on TV or – better yet – get an email or see a social media post from a friend with information on a great new option. It worked for some random online friend, it can work for you, right?

Here’s the problem: scammers will often hack into email accounts and social media accounts, sending messages to that person’s friends and followers. The message will include a fake testimonial about how this new miracle weight-loss option worked for her. The message will often also include a fake celebrity endorsement to make it seem more legitimate. You click on the link – which can load malware onto your device – and then you freely give up your credit card info. You want to lose weight, but, in the end, the only thing you end up losing is your money.

Our friends at the Federal Trade Commission have a few tips to help you avoid this scam:

  • Avoid clicking on links or opening attachments, even if they appear to come from someone you know.
  • Be wary of weight loss claims that do not include exercise and a change in diet. Anyone saying that they lost more than a pound a week, without changing anything, is probably not telling the truth.
  • Learn how to spot fake news sites. They often include fake celebrity endorsements, supposed satisfied customer endorsements, and dramatic weight loss claims.
  • Before buying a product, do your homework. Research the name of the product with words such as “scam”, “complaints”, and “reviews.”

Bottom line - while those weight-loss ads may be appealing, avoid any pill, cream, or drink that promises weight loss with zero effort.

As always, if you have been a victim of an online scam, report it to the FBI’s Internet Crime Complain Center at www.ic3.gov or call your local FBI office.

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Attached Media Files: TT - Weight Loss Scams - AUDIO - August 13, 2019 , TT - Weight Loss Scams - GRAPHIC - August 13, 2019

PacifiCorp acquires full ownership of Foote Creek I wind project to pave the way for repowering
Pacific Power - 08/13/19 9:56 AM

PacifiCorp acquires full ownership of Foote Creek I wind project to pave the way for repowering

 

Transaction adds more renewable energy to PacifiCorp’s portfolio and leads to an upgrade of one of the West’s first wind facilities with dramatically advanced modern turbines.

 

CHEYENNE, Wyo. (Aug. 13, 2019) — PacifiCorp has acquired sole ownership of the Foote Creek I wind generation facility, a 41.4-megawatt renewable energy project in Carbon County, Wyoming, and is proceeding to repower the project with new turbine technology that will increase energy output of the entire facility by 60 percent. The repowered facility will produce enough energy to meet the needs of 19,500 typical homes in PacifiCorp’s service territory. It is anticipated that the project will generate an additional $14 million in tax revenue for rural Wyoming communities over the next 30 years.

 

Foote Creek I was the company's first wind facility and the first utility-scale wind project in Wyoming, a jointly owned demonstration project commissioned in 1999 with PacifiCorp and the Eugene Water & Electric Board (EWEB) as co-owners and supported with a power purchase agreement with the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville). The success of the facility and ongoing technological advancements led PacifiCorp to invest billions of dollars in low-cost wind energy, create associated tax revenue benefits and new wind energy jobs in rural communities in Wyoming, Washington, and Oregon. PacifiCorp is today the largest regulated utility owner of wind assets in the West. 

 

“Twenty-one years ago, PacifiCorp and its partners’ development of Foote Creek I helped pave the way for utility-scale wind energy as an industry-defining demonstration project,” said Stefan Bird, president and CEO of Pacific Power. “Today, this new investment in the project builds on our vision to even better harness wind energy and power the grid with increased efficiency, delivering even more low-cost, renewable energy to our customers.”

 

PacifiCorp will begin the process of repowering the Foote Creek I facility by removing the 68 existing 600-kilowatt wind turbine generators originally installed between 1998 and 1999 and replacing them with 13 new modern turbines with a  much higher output capability that will be supported by new foundations, along with new energy collector circuits, switchgear and controls. The result is significantly fewer wind turbines needed to produce an equivalent peak output, while dramatically increasing the energy production from the facility.

 

Repowering in 2020 will requalify the facility for federal production tax credits, which will be passed on as savings to PacifiCorp customers. It will also reduce ongoing operating costs associated with the older turbine equipment. The repowering project will extend the useful life of the facility by more than two decades, creating substantial ongoing benefits for customers when instead the facility would otherwise have been retired from service. The wind turbines only occupy about one percent of the land they are housed upon, thereby allowing the property to continue supporting traditional land uses such as grazing livestock.

 

“Acquiring full ownership and repowering Foote Creek I provides a unique opportunity to upgrade the company’s oldest wind plant, located in one of the most favorable wind energy sites in Wyoming, applying the latest technology so that it can continue to serve our customers well into the future,” said Gary Hoogeveen, president and CEO of Rocky Mountain Power.

 

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About PacifiCorp: A leader in renewable energy development, PacifiCorp provides affordable, reliable power to more than 1.9 million customers in six Western states. A Berkshire Hathaway Energy company, PacifiCorp operates as Rocky Mountain Power in Utah, Wyoming, and Idaho and as Pacific Power in Washington, Oregon, and California. Learn more at www.pacificorp.com.

 


Consumer Cellular Celebrates 3.5 Millionth Customer by Gifting $350,000 to The American Red Cross
American Red Cross - Cascades Region - 08/13/19 6:00 AM

Top-rated wireless carrier continues long tradition of honoring company milestones through charitable giving

PORTLAND, Ore. (Aug. 13, 2019) - Consumer Cellular, the wireless provider ranked “#1 in Customer Service among Non-Contract Wireless Providers, 7 Times in a Row” by J.D. Power,  is celebrating its 3.5 millionth customer by donating $350,000 to the American Red Cross through the Disaster Responder Program.

“Each and every milestone we achieve provides the perfect opportunity to celebrate,” said John Marick, CEO of Consumer Cellular. “We are extremely grateful for our 3.5 million customers and our 2400 employees who serve them every day. This donation will support the American Red Cross and help fund and provide resources when natural disasters hit. We are honored to make this donation on behalf of our customers and employees who helped us achieve this amazing milestone.”

While natural disasters like hurricanes, floods, tornadoes and wildfires strike each year, the Red Cross responds to more than 62,000 disasters across the country. Generous contributions from Disaster Responder members, like Consumer Cellular, enable the Red Cross to provide disaster services to people in need of assistance at no cost and regardless of income.

“In the face of disasters, the generosity of Disaster Responder members like Consumer Cellular ensure the Red Cross can provide comfort and care to people in their darkest hours,” said Don Herring, chief development officer at the American Red Cross. “We are extremely grateful for these proactive contributions because it enables us to respond immediately and compassionately when help and hope are needed most.”

Consumer Cellular has a long-standing tradition of celebrating its company milestones with the community, its employees and customers. In 2018, to celebrate their 3 millionth customer, the company gifted $3 million, split between their employees and three charities, including Meals on Wheels, Providence Cancer Institute and Shriners Hospital for Children. In 2017, in recognition of their 2.5 millionth customer, Consumer Cellular donated 2.5 million meals to Feeding America. In 2015, the company donated $2 million dollars to the Knight Cancer Challenge in recognition of its 2 millionth customer. In commemoration of its 1.5 millionth customer, Consumer Cellular asked its employees to select three national charities who each received $150,000. Those charities included the American Cancer Society, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital and Wounded Warrior Project.

About the American Red Cross
The American Red Cross shelters, feeds and provides emotional support to victims of disasters; supplies about 40 percent of the nation's blood; teaches skills that save lives; provides international humanitarian aid; and supports military members and their families. The Red Cross is a not-for-profit organization that depends on volunteers and the generosity of the American public to perform its mission. For more information, please visit redcross.org or cruzrojaamericana.org, or visit us on Twitter at @RedCross.

About Consumer Cellular

Consumer Cellular is a top-rated wireless carrier that provides no-contract cellphones and service plans primarily to those 50+. The company has been an approved AARP Provider for over 10 years and offers AARP members special discounts on service. Founded over 23 years ago on the belief that everyone should have affordable access to the safety and convenience of cellular service, Consumer Cellular is privately held with 2,400 employees. The Portland, Ore.-based company utilizes the nation's largest voice and data networks, which covers more than 300 million people – or 99 percent of the U.S. population. Consumer Cellular's wireless phones and plans are sold nationwide at leading retailers such as Target, as well as direct to consumers at ConsumerCellular.com or (888) 345-5509. The company has been ranked on the Inc. 5000 list for 10 years in a row. Consumer Cellular received the highest score in the non-contract value segment of the J.D. Power 2016 (V2) – 2019 (V2) Wireless Non-Contract Customer Care Performance Studies of customers’ satisfaction with wireless customer care experience. Visit jdpower.com/awards. For cellphone tutorials, features, applications and company news, connect with Consumer Cellular on Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Google+.

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